Questions tagged [spanish]

English words and phrases of Spanish origin.

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3
votes
5answers
63 views

Verb “abound” to ask someone to develop a subject

When you're having a conversation, maybe you'd like your counterpart to speak more about what she/he is talking about. Of course, you could simply say: "could you develop your point?", or something ...
1
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3answers
54 views

Looking for a well-known refrain or proverb indicating that some big trouble has just started

I am translating into English a famous refrain from Spanish, Ahí fue Troya. That means something like Then a big trouble started. I am looking for some correspondingly recognizable refrain I can ...
4
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1answer
140 views

Is “adios” an English word now?

I recently heard an American being interviewed use the word "adios" casually in a sentence. The particular sense of the word seemed to be a sort of permanent "good bye." Since the speaker was (as far ...
6
votes
1answer
151 views

Since when is “Ese” used in American “Spanglish”?

My question is about "Ese" when used to designate a person. How long has this usage been part of common speech in the US? 80s? 90s? Earlier? Later? I am thinking of 'Ese' as it used by Latino film ...
3
votes
3answers
256 views

Origin of the negative connotation of “boy”

Recently I stumbled on a discussion where the word "chico" in Spanish is translated to "boy". To my knowledge, using "chico" to refer to someone younger is considered normal. But in English, calling ...
7
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5answers
1k views

Closest English term for Spanish “merienda”

The Spanish word merienda is often included in lists of untranslatable words. It originally meant the meal you had around noon between breakfast and dinner, as that meal used to be small compared with ...
4
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3answers
1k views

In which states (USA) can someone “live easily without speaking any English”? [closed]

Russian polyglot Dmitry Petrov said in this video: ...испанский язык наступает английскому языку на пятки. Мы знаем, что в США есть несколько штатов, где можно свободно жить, зная испанский. ...
23
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9answers
3k views

English equivalent of *refrán*, which is less formal than a proverb

Spanish makes a subtle distinction between proverbio [proverb] and refrán [?]. This distinction was described well here. I'll attempt to translate informally from that answer. Although the two ...
1
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0answers
208 views

Sloppy English?

I just read a post by a non-native English teacher whose title reads like this: "Never is late: Nunca es tarde para aprender". Unfortunately, it frequently happens that a Spanish teacher makes ...
8
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3answers
829 views

In agriculture, what do you call a section within an orchard?

I'm a software developer and I like to have my code in english. I'm currently developing a software for fruit exporters and packing plants. There are growers, orchards and orchards sections. In ...
55
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7answers
6k views

What happened to the “ch” in moschito?

Mosquito > Moschito > Mosquito /məˈskito/ — [mɒˈskiːtəʊ], [məˈskiːtəʊ], [mɒˈskitoʊ], [məˈskitoʊ] The name of this insect is spelled with the letters ‹qu› in several languages, including Catalan ...
7
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1answer
5k views

What's the difference between Example and Sample? [closed]

What's the difference between Example and Sample? In Spanish it's the same word, but in English it is 2 different words. What is the difference?
2
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1answer
454 views

Equivalent of the Spanish phrase “morir de éxito”

In Spanish we have the phrase 'Morir de éxito'. Literally, it translates into 'Die from success' and we use it to refer to some cases in life where a success in something becomes too much of a hassle ...
16
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2answers
2k views

“newfangled”, “fandangle” and “fandango”

I see a little silhouetto of a man Scaramouche, Scaramouche, will you do the Fandango? Anyone who's over 30 years should recognize the lyrics of Queen's epic song Bohemian Rhapsody A fandango is ...
3
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2answers
386 views

What rules govern uniform mispronounciation of romance languages? [closed]

As someone who isn’t a native speaker of English, I’m often fascinated by how those who are seem to change the pronunciation of words originally from French, Italian, Spanish, and so on in a seemingly ...
1
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2answers
628 views

How people commonly pronounce gender neutral -@ or -x [closed]

More and more I see, especially in activist communities, Spanish-derived words ending in x or @ in order to neuter the gendering inherent in the original language. For example: latinx (or latin@) as ...
3
votes
1answer
150 views

Use of the definite article by Hemingway in “For Whom the Bell Tolls”, in a way that doesn't seem to mimic Spanish grammar

I am not a native English speaker, but I've been studying English for a couple of decades now... And recently I decided to read "For Whom the Bell Tolls". I know that in this book Hemingway writes in ...
-1
votes
1answer
294 views

Word for “Programmer Analyst”? (Spanish: “Analista Programador”)

I really would like to know the correct translation of this IT role into English, because I believe that "Programmer Analyst" or "Analyst Programmer" do not make sense in English and it is a very ...
0
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1answer
71 views

English for “ayudante de cátedra”

I have to translate "ayudante de cátedra" from a Spanish document. This is a university job that a former good student of a course can take. The student's job is to answer questions from the current ...
7
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3answers
418 views

A universal term for “educación básica y media”

I'm writing my curriculum vitae in english, but attended school in Chile. In our education system we have "educación básica y media". Those are the first twelve years of formal education before the ...
0
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3answers
211 views

How do I translate “Actualmente estoy cursando tercer año”? [closed]

I am writing my resume and would like to say that I didn't finished my studies yet. So I would like to say which year is my current (I don't know if this phrase is even right). In Spanish I would say ...
-1
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1answer
488 views

A word for source of energy, enthusiasm, etc [closed]

I need an single awesome word for following features - For these features - the group of person or objects filled with lots of energy source of unstoppable energy the one who start with great effort ...
-2
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1answer
444 views

What's the origin of the word “nachos”? [closed]

Just like it says on the tin! Looking for root words or early usages, ideally "first usage" or an unambiguous etymological origin.
9
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1answer
2k views

The X in Xavier

The NOAD lists the pronunciation of Xavier as (ig)ˈzāvēər. In my own experience the parenthetical pronunciation is very common. I, however, do not know of any other x-initial words that are vowel-...
6
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1answer
6k views

How did Spanish “Sevilla” become English “Seville”?

In Spanish, the name of this city is spelled Sevilla and pronounced /seˈβiʎa/, but in English it is spelled Seville and pronounced /sɛˈvɪl/. Having never heard of Sevilla/Seville until I went to ...
9
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1answer
1k views

Influence of Spanish and usage of Spanish words in US English

A recent report by Instituto Cervantes ["El Español una lengua viva, informe 2015"] lists the US as the 4th country in the world with the highest number of native Spanish speakers (41.343.921), ...
9
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1answer
650 views

Expectaltee: A person who expects something

The word of the day: † expectaltee, n. Obs. rare. A person who expects something. [OED] You might ask how on the earth expectaltee is a word. Well, apparently it is a word but the origin is ...
2
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1answer
311 views

'Nonprobabilistic Sampling' versus 'Nonprobability Sampling'

I'm writing a research paper, and I need to translate it to English. I hired a translator and I'm not sure that the following sentence has the right structure: Interventions: It was performed ...
1
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3answers
762 views

English equivalent to “grandecito” in Spanish?

What is the equivalent to "Grandecito" in English? At first it seems redundant because in English you cannot say, "big-small" or "small-big". I have heard, "its biggie". I also have heard, "biggish", ...
40
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14answers
41k views

Friendly way of saying “I love you”

In Spanish, Te amo (I love you) has more romantic feeling than saying Te quiero. The last one is used as a friendly way of saying I love you, but without romantic purposes. However, if translated to ...
0
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4answers
261 views

Exhortation to “be successful”? [closed]

I just bought a smoothie and the barista wrote the Spanish phrase "Éxitos" on my cup. My Spanish-speaking colleagues tell me this is wishing me success. I'm trying to think of an analogous English ...
6
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5answers
7k views

What would be an English equivalent for the Mexican Spanish word tocayo? [duplicate]

In Mexican Spanish (not sure if other Spanish speaking countries use the word too) we call "tocayo" to those people that share the same name as us (but not necessarily the same last name i.e., Juan ...
0
votes
1answer
377 views

How should I arrange a foreign word and its translation in middle of sentence?

I'm having trouble with this sentence: "I possess what in spanish we call ganas, the desire, to attain a graduate degree." I think it's clear what I'm trying to say, but it sounds wrong. It feels ...
15
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5answers
8k views

What is a saying for someone who does good in the street, but is bad at home?

In Spanish there is this saying "Candil de la calle, oscuridad de tu casa". Which is basically said to people who do good outside, e.g. at work or school, but does nothing good at home for his or her ...
0
votes
1answer
786 views

The use of word “apply” for “apply someone to college”

Discussion started here: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/556494 from the translation of "Nosotros la vamos a aplicar." from spanish which literally translates into "we are going to apply her" (la in ...
5
votes
3answers
512 views

“Made a rhyme without effort” in English from Spanish “Hice verso sin esfuerzo”

In Spanish we can say "Hice verso sin esfuerzo", which means something along the lines of "I made a rhyme without effort", whilst rhyming. What would be an English equivalent of this phrase? I've ...
1
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2answers
241 views

English approximations of Spanish pronouns

Excuse me if this question sounds familiar, but I've searched and couldn't find what I desired. In the Spanish second-person, there is usted (formal), tú (familiar), and ustedes (plural for both). ...
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1answer
3k views

How to say: I only speak spanish [closed]

Are these sentences correct? I only speak spanish. I speak spanish alone. I just speak spanish. Are there other ways to say the same thing?
2
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2answers
21k views

How to refer to a 'second' last name or family name?

I know in most english speaking countries, there's no such a thing like a "second" last name. But for example in spanish it's quite common (we are fond of long a complicated names lol), our full names ...
5
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3answers
7k views

Does the English language have an official Academy? [duplicate]

For some languages, there are academies that decide topics such as grammar and spelling of things, for example, for the Spanish language, there are 22 academies in 22 different countries, all making ...
10
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5answers
25k views

Why is quixotic pronounced as it is?

Since "quixotic" was coined with Don Quixote as its basis, why is it pronounced "kwicks-OTT-ick" when it should by rights/origin be pronounced "Key-HO-tick"? It even sounds more onomatopoeiatic the ...
2
votes
4answers
3k views

What English words employ the Spanish suffix '-ista'?

The Spanish suffix '-ista' denotes someone associated with something. This has been adopted into English in one example I can think of, namely a 'fashionista'. One would have expected many more but I ...
5
votes
8answers
37k views

“Crack” as a positive noun?

Some Spanish speakers use the word crack as a positive noun. For example: Lionel Messi es un crack del football! Is it the same in English? Can I say: You're a crack?
10
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10answers
1k views

Equivalent expression to Spanish “cutting by the healthy part”

What would be an equivalent expression to the Spanish "cortar por lo sano", probably something like "cutting by the healthy part", to convey the idea that to solve a problem from spreading, like ...
3
votes
1answer
2k views

Pronunciation of “Nevada” [closed]

People in the state of Nevada insist that it should be pronounced /nəˈvædə/ (with the vowel of TRAP)—this "issue" always comes up during campaigns—while much of the country typically pronounces it /...
4
votes
7answers
26k views

Is there an equivalent of the spanish “que hueva” slang expression in English to denote that you feel lazy about doing something?

In Spanish slang, particularly in the west, the expressions "que hueva" or "me da hueva" are used, respectively, to convey that you are lazy about doing something. The context might be as follows: A: ...
15
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5answers
3k views

Best word for Spanish “integral”

In Spanish there's a word "integral" which, when used as an adjective, means something like "it includes everything". When we say "servicio integral" we mean that the service includes all aspects ...
9
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4answers
6k views

Is the plural form of “Mercedes” a disused word?

In the picture below: 1) are there two Mercedeses? Or, 2) are there two Mercedes? Can we infer from this nGram that the plural noun "Mercedeses" is a disused word, hence the sentence 2) is ...
11
votes
3answers
185k views

Why do British people pronounce “Ibiza” as “Ibitha”?

My brief overseas experience in Great Britain has taught me that British people tend to pronounce Ibiza as Ibitha. My questions are as follows: Why is this the case? How did this develop? What are ...
15
votes
1answer
23k views

Why is the “J” in San Jacinto pronounced like an English “J” instead of an “H” in Texas?

Many Spanish words taken into English have a "J" sounding like "H", but San Jacinto follows a different rule: San Jose La Jolla San Juan Jimenez Why is San Jacinto not pronounced San Hacinto in ...