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Questions tagged [spanish]

For questions about English words and phrases of Spanish origin. For questions purely about Spanish, visit our sister site Spanish Language Stack Exchange.

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Idiomatic expressions for making sarcastic comparisons with other person: translations for ‘otra que’ or ‘ser un poroto’ [closed]

Consider this situation. I'm playing a football game and one of my teammates eludes all the opponents and scores all on his own. If he is a regular player, I would say with irony one of these two ...
tac's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
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How are called the fouls made with the sole? Translation of ‘planchazo’

Need help for an English equivalent of this action, I didn't find anything: planchazo (also plancha) Adelantamiento frontal de la suela del pie, que constituye una infracción en varios deportes. ??? ...
tac's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
76 views

Idiomatic words for saying ‘yes and no’ at the same time (or best translation for ‘ní’) [duplicate]

Imagine this: You have to answer a yes/no question but it is so complex that you can't even just say ‘yes’ or ‘no’. You do know the answer (or an answer), but you know that the question is open and it'...
tac's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
101 views

On whether the subjunctive mood in present is correctly understood here and whether is correct to test it in analogy with Spanish subjunctive mood

I need to apply the subjunctive mood in present time in some translations from Spanish. I should do this, and although I know the common thing to do is to avoid it, this is a literary translation and ...
algo's user avatar
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8 votes
3 answers
805 views

How would you name the different types of periods? ~ Translating ‘punto seguido’, ‘punto y aparte’ and ‘punto final’

In Spanish, we have different names for the different types of periods: If the period is inside a paragraph, it's called punto seguido. If the period ends a paragraph, it's called punto y aparte. If ...
tac's user avatar
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0 answers
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Is “actual” both a false friend and a cognate from Spanish to English?

English definition of “actual”: existing in fact; typically as contrasted with what was intended, expected, or believed. Spanish definition of “actual”: current, present, contemporary These are ...
Felix's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
47 views

Idiomatic word or expression for a lazy and unmoral person who gets paid without working - Translation of Spanish ‘ñoqui’ [duplicate]

I'm not talking about the Italian dish. In Argentina, there's a well known expression for someone who doesn't go to work and only assists the last month's day to get paid: It's called a ñoqui. The ...
tac's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
135 views

Idiomatic expressions for falsity pt. 3: the guesser falsity - Translation of Spanish: ‘mandar fruta’

Introduction According to correspondence theory, if you say or think something that does not correspond to reality then you have said something that is false. While this is an obvious concept learned ...
tac's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
160 views

Idiomatic expressions for falsity pt. 2: the sophist falsity - Translation of Spanish: ‘versear’ or ‘chamuyar’

Introduction According to correspondence theory, if you say or think something that does not correspond to reality then you have said something that is false. While this is an obvious concept learned ...
tac's user avatar
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10 votes
15 answers
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Idiomatic word/expression for someone ‘who has no feeling for the game’ - Translation of Spanish ‘pechofrío’

I'm having trouble translating the expression pechofrío (pecho frío, ‘cold chest’) from Spanish—specially Argentinian Spanish, I don't know if it's used in other countries. It means: s. masc. Persona ...
tac's user avatar
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6 votes
10 answers
3k views

Idiom for Spanish ‘no escupas para arriba’ (i.e., ‘be careful with the harm you do, it could come back at you’)

In Spanish, there's the expression ¡no escupas para arriba! (literally ‘don't spit upwards!’), which is used for example in counter-reprimanding or counter-criticizing purposes—although there are many ...
tac's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
135 views

English equivalent of the Argentinian idiom "not a single puppet was left with its head on"

I'm looking for an English idiom related to this one, pretty odd, heard in Argentina: "Not a single puppet is left with its head on.", or maybe "To chop off every puppet's head." (...
Seba fff's user avatar
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2 votes
0 answers
70 views

Explaining how to translate spanish "Ya" (already vs just vs ...) [closed]

I asked my coworker to fix something in a program. When he fixed it, he replied with, "I already fixed it." -- this wasn't intentionally misleading, but was an incorrect translation of &...
Kimball Robinson's user avatar
14 votes
19 answers
3k views

Idiom for frustrating someone else's plans by taking what the other person wanted in the first place

There's an idiom in Argentina translated roughly as "to sleep someone" (dormir a alguien), which is used when someone frustrates the plans of someone else by taking what the other person ...
Seba fff's user avatar
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-1 votes
1 answer
615 views

Are the origins of ¡ay, güey! and 'oy vey' related at all? [closed]

Though both of these terms come from other languages, they are both said in English, depending on where one is. One (ay wey as a more English form) can mean holy crap!, and the other can mean ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
50 views

lo + adjective/adverb + que + clause in Spanish VS the adjective (superlative) + (that) + clause in English

Recently I learned a Spanish grammar "lo+adjective/adverb+que+clause" to translate"how ..." (indicative) of English. But I found the structure unusual because "lo+adjective&...
Atle's user avatar
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22 votes
10 answers
5k views

Would there be a way to make the joke "Ella es mi amiga vieja, disculpe, mi vieja amiga" work in English?

There is a Spanish joke, Ella es mi amiga vieja, disculpe, mi vieja amiga. The joke basically says, "She is my friend that is old, excuse me, my old friend", making fun of the person's age....
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17 votes
10 answers
7k views

What is an English equivalent of 'Colorín, Colorado, este cuento se ha acabado,' a phrase used at the end of stories?

Colorín, Colorado, este cuento se ha acabado is a Spanish phrase used to indicate that a story has reached its end. The first part is just nonsense, the second part means 'this story is over.' We use ...
Heartspring's user avatar
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1 vote
3 answers
155 views

English slang for "bochar"

I'm looking for some possible slangy words that are equivalent to this Ríoplatense term: bochar No aprobar a alguien tras haber rendido un examen o cursado una asignatura. "lo bocharon en ...
tac's user avatar
  • 474
2 votes
2 answers
316 views

What could be the translation of «Cantinflear»?

"Cantinflear" = Cacophony I have been studying English for almost a year now, and much of it has been making semantic comparisons with Spanish. Similar verb refers to the act of giving a ...
NicWaves's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
809 views

rascal etymology

I use the word rascal (as in troublemaker) to describe my 7-month old daughter. My father in law (from Costa Rica) recently used the Spanish word "rascar" (rascarse) meaning to scratch, ...
Bastiaan Quast's user avatar
9 votes
1 answer
1k views

Is there more difference between European and American English than between European and American Spanish?

As a Spanish (Spain) speaking person I can notice the differences between European and American Spanish. Is there also such a big difference between European and American English? Vocabulary and ...
Erik's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
478 views

Why is "hammock" spelled the way it is?

The word hammock comes from Spanish hamaca. type of hanging bed, 1650s, alteration of hamack, hamaca (1550s), from Spanish hamaca, from Arawakan (Haiti) word apparently meaning "fish nets" (...
Arunabh's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
77 views

Translate "Lengua Bífida" to English [closed]

I am trying to translate "Lengua Bífida" from Spanish to English. The text "Lengua bífida" in Spanish expresses that someone has a tempting form of talking, normally in a bad way. ...
Slifer Dragon's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
99 views

How can I build impersonal sentences like this one from Spanish

I don't know how to build in English impersonal sentences like this one from Spanish: Es feliz quien quiere serlo. I've thought of this one: He's happy who wants to be it. But I don't like it ...
Claudi's user avatar
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4 votes
2 answers
210 views

What does “takes advantage of their head rope runs the risk” mean?

The fol­low­ing line is from the 2015 trans­la­tion from the Span­ish of des­a­pa­re­ci­do Ar­gen­tine writer Ha­rol­do Con­ti’s 1962 novel, South­easter (orig­i­nal Span­ish ti­tle, Sud­este): This ...
Bnw Creatives's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
2k views

How to translate "por la cara" to English?

I'm looking for a suitable English translation of the Spanish expression "por la cara". In Spanish, unless you go very deep into the details, for various context that are very specific, ...
Marina Morales's user avatar
15 votes
15 answers
3k views

A saying similar to "playing whack-a-mole"

My wife is looking for a phrase or saying in English that is similar to... Lo urgente no deja tiempo para lo importante ...which means "Urgent matters do not leave time for what is really ...
Cascabel_StandWithUkraine_'s user avatar
6 votes
2 answers
737 views

What is the English word for "rinconada"

In general a "rinconada" is an incoming angle formed at the intersection of two houses, two streets, or two roads. In geography a "rinconada" is the land between two mountain ...
Andrés Chandía's user avatar
1 vote
4 answers
229 views

"Floh-ree-dah" rather than "Flor-duh"

I am writing an effigy poem homaging Ponce De Leon, "discoverer" of La Florida in 1513 and though it is being written in English (Early modern English), I am very adamant on having "...
Tom O' Bedlam's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
160 views

Should "the" or "el" appear before a Spanish proper noun placed in an English text

I have a textbook that refers to the Spanish royal road that linked Mexico City and Santa Fe as "El Camino Real", though the full name in Spanish is "El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro&...
Village's user avatar
  • 2,091
0 votes
0 answers
32 views

English / Spanish parallels and confusion

In general, I'm pretty confident and familiar about all typical uses of the past perfect tense. However, I noticed a compelling case while studying Spanish years ago. In Spanish, there's the pretérito ...
Alexander's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
98 views

A shorter way of saying "In view of the fact"

I need a shorter, equivalent form for "In view of the fact". I am a certified Spanish/English translator in Venezuela. Thank you for your assistance.
Elpidio Saldeño's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
316 views

Does the whole always "comprise" the parts of something, and not the other way around? [closed]

The verb "comprise" comes to me naturally to use in certain situations, at odds with a legalistic sense of correctness. It's a word often used in patents, or patent applicaitons, where some invention ...
Justina Colmena's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
372 views

Spanish-derived words in English

I recently found out that "mustang" is a Hispanicism word of Spanish origin: it is adapted from "mostrengo" or "mestreño", which roughly mean "without rooting"; ...
mathbekunkus's user avatar
-2 votes
3 answers
2k views

Difference between "Make a choice" and "Make a desicion"/"Take a decision"

In spanish we normally say "Tomar una decisión". But, which one will be the correct translation? Make a choice Make a decision Take a decision Decision: the act of or need for making up one’s mind. ...
Nic's user avatar
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3 votes
5 answers
152 views

Verb "abound" to ask someone to develop a subject

When you're having a conversation, maybe you'd like your counterpart to speak more about what she/he is talking about. Of course, you could simply say: "could you develop your point?", or something ...
KarloIsaac's user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
96 views

Looking for a well-known refrain or proverb indicating that some big trouble has just started

I am translating into English a famous refrain from Spanish, Ahí fue Troya. That means something like Then a big trouble started. I am looking for some correspondingly recognizable refrain I can ...
MrAn3's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
2k views

Is "adios" an English word now?

I recently heard an American being interviewed use the word "adios" casually in a sentence. The particular sense of the word seemed to be a sort of permanent "good bye." Since the speaker was (as far ...
StayOnTarget's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
495 views

Since when is "Ese" used in American "Spanglish"?

My question is about "Ese" when used to designate a person. How long has this usage been part of common speech in the US? 80s? 90s? Earlier? Later? I am thinking of 'Ese' as it used by Latino film ...
user avatar
3 votes
5 answers
4k views

Origin of the negative connotation of "boy"

Recently I stumbled on a discussion where the word "chico" in Spanish is translated to "boy". To my knowledge, using "chico" to refer to someone younger is considered normal. But in English, calling ...
ChilliDoughnuts's user avatar
8 votes
5 answers
3k views

Closest English term for Spanish "merienda"

The Spanish word merienda is often included in lists of untranslatable words. It originally meant the meal you had around noon between breakfast and dinner, as that meal used to be small compared with ...
Charlie's user avatar
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2 votes
3 answers
2k views

In which states (USA) can someone “live easily without speaking any English”? [closed]

Russian polyglot Dmitry Petrov said in this video: ...испанский язык наступает английскому языку на пятки. Мы знаем, что в США есть несколько штатов, где можно свободно жить, зная испанский. ...
69 420 1970's user avatar
22 votes
9 answers
4k views

English equivalent of *refrán*, which is less formal than a proverb

Spanish makes a subtle distinction between proverbio [proverb] and refrán [?]. This distinction was described well here. I'll attempt to translate informally from that answer. Although the two ...
aparente001's user avatar
  • 21.6k
1 vote
0 answers
350 views

Sloppy English?

I just read a post by a non-native English teacher whose title reads like this: "Never is late: Nunca es tarde para aprender". Unfortunately, it frequently happens that a Spanish teacher makes ...
Sarah Jimris's user avatar
8 votes
3 answers
998 views

In agriculture, what do you call a section within an orchard?

I'm a software developer and I like to have my code in english. I'm currently developing a software for fruit exporters and packing plants. There are growers, orchards and orchards sections. In ...
sports's user avatar
  • 183
62 votes
7 answers
6k views

What happened to the “ch” in moschito?

Mosquito > Moschito > Mosquito /məˈskito/ — [mɒˈskiːtəʊ], [məˈskiːtəʊ], [mɒˈskitoʊ], [məˈskitoʊ] The name of this insect is spelled with the letters ‹qu› in several languages, including Catalan ...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
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13 votes
1 answer
15k views

What's the difference between Example and Sample? [closed]

What's the difference between Example and Sample? In Spanish it's the same word, but in English it is 2 different words. What is the difference?
Luis Valencia's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
2k views

Equivalent of the Spanish phrase "morir de éxito"

In Spanish we have the phrase 'Morir de éxito'. Literally, it translates into 'Die from success' and we use it to refer to some cases in life where a success in something becomes too much of a hassle ...
fedorqui's user avatar
  • 1,255
17 votes
2 answers
2k views

"newfangled", "fandangle" and "fandango"

I see a little silhouetto of a man Scaramouche, Scaramouche, will you do the Fandango? Anyone who's over 30 years should recognize the lyrics of Queen's epic song Bohemian Rhapsody A fandango is ...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
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