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Questions tagged [foreign-phrases]

The tag has no usage guidance, but it has a tag wiki.

10
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4answers
6k views

What is the English pronunciation of “pain au chocolat”?

How do Brits and Americans pronounce pain au chocolat?
-2
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1answer
57 views

Are words from other languages(especially European ones) also appropriated in the English language, like they do in case of Hindi/Sanskrit?

I observe that there are many words in Hindi/Sanskrit, the pronunciation of which, are appropriated by the International(especially US) English speaking crowd, for example:- Yoga Avatar Ramayan ...
25
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27answers
9k views

English equivalent for Polish phrase meaning doing something fast and poor quality [closed]

The meaning of Polish 'doing something on knees' or 'on a knee' is completely different than English: https://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/british/on-your-knees It is rather a metaphor to a ...
0
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3answers
321 views

Why do some people misspell “kernel” with an “a”?

Sometimes when working with servers, one may encounter a problem with the kernel. I have noticed many times when participating in support groups on IRC, that some people type "kernal" instead of "...
4
votes
1answer
345 views

How would you translate this Spanish saying “Sacar un clavo con otro clavo” to English?

Fellow English Speakers, I've been trying to translate this common saying from Spanish to English: Sacar un clavo con otro clavo. However, I cannot find any translation that satisfies my ...
0
votes
1answer
36 views

Italicize foreign words if there are more than two in a sentence and it includes a definition next to it or not?

I know certain foreign words are to be italicized, but in the case where two are used in the same sentence, should they still be italicized or wrapped in quotes? Secondly, if a definition is ...
1
vote
1answer
76 views

Italicising common 'foreign' words [closed]

If a house style outlines that foreign terms should be italicised, how strictly should this be applied to common terms taken from, say, French that everyone is more than familiar with? Italicising ...
0
votes
0answers
54 views

Is there any implied meaning betwwen “n + of all sorts” and “all sorts of + n”?

1: There were all sorts of industry in the uplands of Zurich 2: You shall have gold as well, and jewels of all sorts May I use "industries of all sorts" in the first sentence and "all sorts of ...
2
votes
2answers
160 views

Should a foreign phrase that modifies an English noun go before or after that noun in English?

I’m thinking of the placement of the Latin phrase, ad hominem as it is used in English, not as it is used in Latin. Should it precede or follow its noun? In other words, are both of these two ...
4
votes
2answers
791 views

Literary term for implied meaning

There is a mode in Arabic literary rhetoric (balāgha) for a statement that is true in itself, but the intended message is implied by the phrase "secondarily", but is not directly represented in the ...
1
vote
1answer
4k views

Does the phrase “per se” have to be italicized? [duplicate]

As far as I understand, the phrase "per se" comes from Latin. Yet, it has become to accepted in English and is used so commonly, that I was wondering if the phrase is still considered of foreign ...
-1
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3answers
376 views

Term or phrase for attempting to gaslight a large group

Gaslighting or gas-lighting is a form of psychological abuse in which a victim is manipulated into doubting their own memory, perception, and sanity. -Wikipedia But gaslighting "a victim" implies ...
5
votes
1answer
271 views

Why the abbreviation “maitre d'”?

I have often seen the expression maitre d' in English texts. It obviously comes from the French maître d'hôtel, meaning more or less head waiter. I can understand that the î in maître would be ...
23
votes
7answers
3k views

Should foreign words used in English be inflected for gender, number, and case according to the conventions of their source language?

Is there a general rule for whether, for, example, foreign nouns and adjectives used in English should be inflected for gender, number, and case as they would be if the entire text were written in the ...
2
votes
1answer
98 views

Term for “the class of landlords”

I have heard in several spoken discussions a term (which sounds kind of French and is maybe related to the English verb "rent") for the class of landlords - people who live off renting out properties ...
4
votes
1answer
4k views

Why Cosmonaut, not Astronaut?

An American space traveler is called in English an astronaut. A French space traveler is called in English an astronaut (not l'astronaute). A Japanese space traveler is called in English an ...
3
votes
2answers
3k views

Word or phrase for the beauty in pain, tragedy, damage, etc?

I'm looking for either a single word or a very short (really, as short as possible) phrase that could be defined (literally or metaphorically) as: "beauty that is possessed due to or despite the ...
0
votes
2answers
109 views

“To jog in stride with someone, particularly in silence.”

Looking for a single word, or short phrase, in any language, that approximates to that concept: "to jog in stride with someone, particularly in silence." This - if our collective wisdom can find it - ...
-2
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2answers
567 views

What is a “tony shop”? [closed]

This appears to be an uncommon phrase. Google returns nothing. Perhaps it's a foreign transliteration. Here is the excerpt: The notice posted on Thursday said the embassy had received “information ...
2
votes
2answers
205 views

What is the equivalent of this Arabic expression?

In Arabic, when someone tells you "You look good today," or "Thank you for the flowers, they are beautiful," the polite answer is: It is not the flowers. Your eyes are so beautiful everything appears ...
5
votes
1answer
1k views

Origin of the term “top tucker”

In India, at least in the Southern part, there is a phrase "Top tucker" used to compliment/attribute someone for their exceptional qualities/achievements in a colloquial way. The entry Tucker in OED ...
5
votes
1answer
139 views

What is the stylistic form to use for including foreign text in an English article?

Academic texts often include translations of terms, and these are included in parentheses. Is there a standard to use when including foreign language text (e.g. Arabic, Russian, Chinese, etc.)? Let'...
8
votes
4answers
4k views

Origin of “How are you?”

I'm currently researching different greetings for a linguistics project and I'm having trouble finding information as to the history of the phrase, "How are you," or those of equivalent structures. I ...
0
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1answer
111 views

Does the indefinite article “an” apply to vowel sounds from foreign languages?

When adding an indefinite article to English nouns, you either select a or an depending on the sound of the first letter of the noun that it precedes. In some languages vowel sounds occur that do not ...
2
votes
3answers
159 views

How do I treat foreign words after its English counterpart?

I'm formatting a Bible study that includes Hebrew and Greek Words. The PDFs of so many Bible studies were created long ago, and will be available as downloads on the site I'm REbuilding. I'm ...
15
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2answers
16k views

When citing a French citation in the original, should the guillemets (angle quotes) be changed? What about punctuation order?

I’ve come across a puzzling punctuation problem! I’m working on a document in US English. It includes a citation of a French text in the original French, and this citation includes a citation (all in ...
0
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2answers
592 views

How would an English speaker pronounce “valid” with a circumflex over the A?

My branding department (read my friend from work) has suggested the word "vâlid" with a circumflex over the A as a way to brand my product. He just likes the way a lowercase a looks in typography. ...
1
vote
4answers
852 views

Name of a foreigner from Earth?

Someone from Mars is called a Martian. Someone from America is called an American. Someone from Europe is a European. Someone from Hyrule is a Hyrulean. We are not far from colonizing other planets, ...
2
votes
1answer
603 views

What does one call this kind of Japanese toilet in English?

This was a warning notice placed near a Japanese toilet, containing one of those inimitable Japanese Engrish expressions. But as these toilets start to become popular in western countries, what is ...
16
votes
4answers
7k views

When using the French word “sans” in an English sentence, should I use italics?

In the sentence, below, I am using the French word sans to mean without. Should sans be italicized? Or, should all of "sans human civilization" be italicized? Planet Earth sans human civilization ...
0
votes
1answer
124 views

Singaporean Makan <Hoken???> Centre <<transcript question / listening question

Can anyone who is familiar with Asian cuisine help me with a food word? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WYFe2-hqA2Q "One thing unites all Singaporeans; food. It’s the national obsession. For an ...
4
votes
1answer
765 views

What does “B-grade” mean in the context of Japanese food?

In movies, "B-grade" refers to lower-budget movies: When Hollywood studios were at their height -- and before television was available -- it was common for people to spend an entire evening at ...
0
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1answer
362 views

How should I arrange a foreign word and its translation in middle of sentence?

I'm having trouble with this sentence: "I possess what in spanish we call ganas, the desire, to attain a graduate degree." I think it's clear what I'm trying to say, but it sounds wrong. It feels ...
31
votes
1answer
5k views

Is there a term for a foreign word that looks like an English word but has a completely different meaning?

examples: Gift (German) = poison poisson (French) = fish embarazada (Spanish) = pregnant sauce (Spanish) = willow triviale (Italian) = vulgar parentes (Portuguese) = relatives slim (...
14
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3answers
4k views

What's another phrase for “word for word”? [closed]

It's a sudden random question I have but I distinctly remember there being another phrase, probably of another language, which means exactly the same as "word for word". What is it?
0
votes
1answer
3k views

What is the correct way to properly quote and cite a foreign language resource? [closed]

Should I provide my own translation? If so, where? It is important for this particular quote to appear directly: it is the crux of the argument.
0
votes
1answer
1k views

*Deja vu* all over again [closed]

"Deja vu all over again" is an example of either a semi-literate (when the speaker does not know what deja vu means) or a jocular use (when the speaker tries to be funny). Can you give similar ...
1
vote
2answers
13k views

Italicizing foreign language words in an English Essay

I am writing an essay about German history, and I'm unsure whether German words should be italicized or not. The essay is in English, but I use words like Reichstag (German Parliament Building), ...
11
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4answers
5k views

Etymology of Sleep like a Top

An explanation for the English expression "sleeping like (or as sound as) a top" is here. Apparently case closed. It derives from the Italian expression Ei dorme come un topo with topo being wrongly ...
3
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3answers
2k views

Why are foreign words used in modern vernacular?

Why are seemingly foreign words such as hors d’œuvres, maître d’, garçon, and Gesundheit used in American vernacular?
4
votes
4answers
595 views

Is there a rule concerning nouns with foreign articles?

I'd like to know if there is a rule concerning the usage of "the" preceding nouns already including a foreign article. For instance, should a restaurant called "La trattoria" be referred to simply as "...
2
votes
1answer
264 views

A term for redundancy in loan words?

Unfortunately, I can only think of one example at the moment, but, sometimes a loan or borrowed phrase is redundant because it includes in it both the lending and borrowing languages' words for the ...
3
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3answers
5k views

Is “enroute” an acceptable variant of “en route”?

Is "enroute" (without the space) an acceptable variant of "en route"?