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Questions tagged [proper-nouns]

A proper noun or proper name is a capitalized noun representing a unique entity as opposed to a common noun, which represents a class of entities or nonunique instances of that class.

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2answers
27 views

Type of noun from the sentence [closed]

"Seeing the baby the mother rose in her." Is the word 'mother' in the above sentence a: (a) Common Noun (b) Abstract Noun (c) Proper Noun (d) Collective Noun
7
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2answers
162 views

Is there a linguistic term for using a common noun as a proper noun?

In some situations, a common noun in a specific scenario is treated as a proper noun because it refers to a specific entity that satisfies the common noun. Is there a special term for this ...
43
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3answers
4k views

Why is quixotic not Quixotic (a proper adjective)?

Adjectives derived from proper nouns are known as proper adjectives, and are capitalized: A piece of writing could be Shakespearean, not shakespearean. A person may be Canadian, not canadian. Even ...
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1answer
108 views

Do you capitalize yakuza?

When referring to the infamous Japanese criminal organization, which sentence would be correct? The yakuza member picked up his glasses, scooped some of the jewelry and loose change into his ...
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2answers
123 views

Word order in noun phrases

Which word order should I choose in noun phrases with a proper noun component and a common noun component? the Elvis Presley singer v. the singer Elvis Presley the Star Wars movie v. the movie ...
2
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1answer
61 views

Why it is “the Grinch” but not just Grinch as it's his personal name

We don't use the definite article with personal names, however here....why is it so? Yeah, I know sometimes we can use "the". When it's a person everybody knows about or smth like that. But why it'...
6
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6answers
945 views

Etymology of proper nouns

I had an argument with a friend regarding etymology of the word "Oz" in "The wizard of Oz". I believe that it doesn't have any etymology, and that generally most proper nouns don't have any origin. He ...
2
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0answers
55 views

Use of an indefinite article associated with a particular person's name [duplicate]

Indefinite (and definite) articles are sometimes associated with a person's name. This answer by Jon Hanna is the best summary of the uses I have found. Also, another question addresses the issue ...
1
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1answer
229 views

“Born in” vs “born at” with proper nouns: is this a definite vs indefinite prepositional object situation?

Please help me explain to my friend why, while there's no doubt that he was born at St James Hospital, it is incorrect for him to say he was born in St James Hospital -- despite the fact that he ...
0
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2answers
62 views

Parts of speech in sentence “Amber is a real person” [closed]

Specifically I am wondering about the word "person" in the sentence, because at first thought I believed it was a common noun but it is qualifying a proper noun, so I am confused if it is a noun or a ...
1
vote
1answer
68 views

Proper way to refer to someone that previously held an official title, but is no longer in said title

I’m trying to figure out the best way to refer to someone in a resume. I once received an award from former Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld when he was still the Secretary of Defense. I use this ...
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2answers
47 views

Which of “which Beatles song” or “which The Beatles song”?

While my inclination is to go with: Which The Beatles song did the BBC ban on May 20th, 1967 for its overt references to drug use? it sounds cumbersome compared to: Which Beatles song did ...
2
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1answer
175 views

Is “Underground” a proper noun or a common noun?

The definition on the Oxford Dictionary is a little bit confusing for me. The dictionary doesn't call it a proper noun, but the first letter is capitalised in the example. Since I know the ...
2
votes
1answer
47 views

Conjugation when not substituting pronouns for proper nouns

Pronouns take the place of proper nouns when context allows. However, it seems proper nouns are only ever conjugated in the third person, singular or plural. Is this a rule? For example, if I'm ...
2
votes
4answers
202 views

eSwatini as the start of a sentence

Swaziland has recently changed its name to eSwatini. The unique capitalization structure, similar to iPhone or eBay, is unique for the name of a country. While brand names have an established set of ...
0
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1answer
53 views

Why do we “drive to the United Nations” but “drive to United Airlines”?

I understand why we "drive to Microsoft" but must "drive to the United Nations". But why do we "drive to United Airlines" rather than "drive to the United Airlines"?
1
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3answers
141 views

Is a pluralized proper noun (Russias) the grammatical plural of that proper noun (Russia)?

Is "Russias" the plural of "Russia", in the sense that this is how they relate grammatically? The reason that I suspect that they are not plural-singular is the following example. [1] I see the egg. ...
1
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0answers
243 views

Articles with proper names

It's correct to use the definite article before the name of a river, canal, sea and ocean: When my father dies, we will have to wash him, wrap him in rich cloth, cremate him, and then sprinkle ...
1
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2answers
89 views

What would you call people who attend conferences? [closed]

What would you call people who attend conferences? Maybe "Attendee"?
3
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2answers
290 views

Is “Pre-Raphaelite” capitalized? [closed]

Is the art term "Pre-Raphaelite" capitalized or is it spelled "pre-Raphaelite"? What is the general policy for the orthography of "pre-"? For example, The Pre‑Raphaelites emphasized attention to ...
0
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0answers
32 views

Should I Capitalize Savannah Belt?

I want to know if one needs to capitalize "Savannah Belt" in the following sentence: "We are in the Savannah Belt." Is it a proper noun?
1
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1answer
243 views

“Is” versus “are” in regard to a proper noun that sounds singular but is actually plural (“The Song of Albion Trilogy”)

I am writing a book review. I've encountered a problem with my sentence, "The Song of Albion Trilogy are the best books I’ve ever read". Even though I am talking about a trilogy or series, it is not ...
1
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1answer
91 views

Adding the 'the' article for proper noun and abbreviation? [duplicate]

As a part-time English tutorial teacher who isn't specialized in language, I would like to ask about article usage for proper nouns and abbreviations. Do you add 'the' for the following sentences? "I ...
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1answer
1k views

Should the 'a' in 'agile/Agile' be capitalized? [closed]

I was discussing this topic in a chat over on PMSE and figured I'd pose it to the experts. Should the 'a' in the word 'agile/Agile' be capitalized? Specifically, when referring to the concept brought ...
0
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1answer
115 views

Should I pluralize “University” in the phrase “Yale and Harvard Universities”?

I'm wondering if I need to pluralize "University" in the following sentence: "Our expert panelists, including former admissions officers from Yale and Harvard Universities, will discuss..." Should ...
1
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1answer
55 views

Is the phrase “[the] South of France” grammatically sound? [closed]

I remember my English teacher telling me that South of India, for example, is the area to the south of India, which would be Sri Lanka. Was she mistaken in her understanding? Or is the south of ...
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0answers
1k views

Is it appropriate to use 'the' in front of a company name that starts with an adjective?

Some company names begin with adjectives, for instance: Wikimedia Foundation RELEVANT Magazine While most company names are not: Google Microsoft Apple I've noticed that when when people refer to ...
0
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1answer
58 views

How should literary/fictional words, derived from the anglicization of other languages, be pronounced? [closed]

We often see peculiar names being given to titles and fictional characters, such as Wolfenstein (which protagonist does also have a weird name: Blazkowicz). I would spend long times trying to figure ...
0
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1answer
55 views

A strange proper name [closed]

Why the complete name of British philosopher McTaggart, i.e. John McTaggart Ellis McTaggart, has such an strange form? Edit: Considering @Lawrence concerns, I should note that, although strangeness ...
2
votes
1answer
3k views

Should “people of color” be capitalized? [closed]

In Yoga and the Roots of Cultural Appropriation, the term "people of color" is repeatedly capitalized, though the names of other protected classes are not: Meanwhile, in order to uphold the ...
1
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2answers
132 views

What does the noun “Hawaiian” really mean in English? [closed]

Headlines this morning (Saturday 1/13/2018) proclaimed that "Hawaiians woke up to emergency alerts" on mobile phones that a missile strike might be incoming. But no local news source here in Hawaii ...
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0answers
351 views

Using “the” with names of buildings

How can I guess either is necessary or not to prefix the names of buildings with the article the? For example: Rabati Castle is a medieval castle complex in Georgia. It was built in the 9th ...
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1answer
421 views

Can 'pronouns' be considered ad hoc proper nouns?

The term 'pronoun' itself causes plenty of confusion. Its etymology suggests that a pronoun somehow stands for a noun: mid-15c., from pro- and noun; modeled on Middle French pronom, from Latin ...
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1answer
343 views

When a word is both a common and proper noun, how do you use it as a cultural modifier?

I am writing a piece on Kandi Kids, the name for a specific rave culture. "The Kandi Kid community..." (Proper noun.) "She gave him a piece of kandi." (Common noun.) "They saw two young ...
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5answers
5k views

Should apartheid be capitalised?

In an attempt to prevent an edit war over on Skeptics.SE, I'll defer to here. Which is preferred - or are both correct?: Was South Africa better run during apartheid? or Was South Africa ...
0
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1answer
396 views

“The” before proper nouns in technical writing

Should I use "the" before proper nouns? I would like to skip it, will it be grammatically correct? Example: MicroApp receives the SL Recovery Key, the LF Service Key, and the Auth Key to control ...
1
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1answer
696 views

Is the verb “to rob” somehow related to Robin Hood? [closed]

Does the verb "to rob" come from the famous robber "Robin Hood", was that name created after the verb, or is it simply a fun coincidence?
2
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0answers
614 views

Omission of definite article before common nouns in pairs

I am well aware that the usage of, or the omission of, the definite article "the" has been a frequently asked question, here and elsewhere. I have read up on existing questions on this matter. (But I ...
1
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1answer
183 views

Can we use There is + proper noun?

We know that we can say: There is a play at the theater tonight. But can we say: There is Hamlet at the theater tonight. The last sentence sounds a bit odd, but it's not clear why. Is this ...
1
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1answer
152 views

On the idiomaticity of attributive proper nouns, proper adjectives, and either singular or plural possessives when describing Imperial Possessions [closed]

When talking about something which is owed by an empire or is considered to be a part of that empire, which of the many ways to express this relationship are most commonly used and generally accepted ...
0
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1answer
257 views

What is it called when you refer to someone by using an adjective rather than their name? [duplicate]

For example; the "the brunette said" instead of "Susan said" or "The young man asked" rather than "Jason asked".
0
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0answers
589 views

Should proper nouns be hyphenated if used as compound adjectives?

Which of the following two is correct, if any? I watched a Six Nations rugby match. I watched a Six-Nations rugby match. Is there a general rule for the use of hyphens in compound adjectives when ...
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1answer
745 views

Are the names of historic events treated as proper nouns?

When writing about famous events, how are they capitalised? As a proper name? It is obvious that World War 1 and the Second World War are capitalized. But what about, for example, the Cuban Missile ...
0
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1answer
185 views

“Ubered everywhere” meaning [closed]

On Modern Family episode 1 of season 7, Michael says to Cameron Oh, you walked over here. I just thought you Uber-ed everywhere. I know what Uber is, but I can't understand ubered everywhere ...
5
votes
2answers
989 views

Are capital letters used for terms of endearment like “Honey” and “Sweetheart”?

When writing a sentence (for a book/story) do the endearments Honey, Sweetheart, etc. get capital letters? e.g. "Are you ready, Honey?" or "Are you ready, honey?"
4
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1answer
317 views

Is the object in “Eighty-six forty-five.” a proper noun?

The object in the sentence "Eighty-six forty-five." refers to the 45th president of the US, as in Bush 41 vs. Bush 43. The meaning of the verb eighty-six – eject, bar, reject, discard, cancel (...
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3answers
299 views

Noun Capitalization When Used With Common Nouns

I have come across a few written documents by my peers that have what I would call a proper noun grouped with a common noun. So as an example without any capitalization: Select the edit menu from ...
4
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1answer
169 views

Should “Share your magic with the Universe” capitalize Universe?

Is "the Universe" considered a proper noun and should it be capitalized when used in the phrase "Share your magic with the Universe"? The IAU Style Manual recommends that astronomical objects be ...
3
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2answers
1k views

The Southern US, or the southern US? [duplicate]

To my understanding, specific geographic regions are always capitalized. For example, Southern US is proper because it is a specific region. However, a co-author argues that southern should not be ...
1
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2answers
112 views

Refering to someone whose name has an aristocratic particle

Context: In French, some last names have an aristocratic particle (e.g. Alfred de Musset). The latter is yet ommited when one refers to a person via its last name only. One would for example say: ...