Questions tagged [proper-nouns]

A proper noun or proper name is a noun representing a unique entity as opposed to a common noun, which represents a class of entities or non-unique instances of that class. Proper nouns are usually, but not invariably, capitalized in English.

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Should "time" be capitalized? [closed]

I would like to request some clarification on the capitalization of the word time. Is it possible in certain contexts to use it not as a common noun, but as a proper noun? For example, what if you are ...
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Why are the names of the four seasons not proper nouns, but the names of the weekdays and months are?

My original question was: Why is summer not capitalized like Monday and June. After some research, my question became the one in the title. From a shallow google search, I've read that months and ...
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Use of pos­ses­sive apos­tro­phe with the sec­ond word of a com­pound proper noun like “Aus­tralian States”

I have a rel­a­tively sim­ple ques­tion, but I am just a lit­tle con­fused and po­ten­tially mis­in­formed. My un­der­stand­ing is that when plu­ral­is­ing a pos­ses­sive noun, you add an apos­tro­phe ...
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Is there a name for separating two items with comma when listing them?

I noticed that journalists often write titles in which they connect two proper nouns (but not only those) with a comma, instead of using "and". Two examples: Poll shows gap between Le Pen, ...
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Why is the A in "Article" capitalized in legal articles when referring to itself? [closed]

I looked at ten different law articles; when refering to itself, the letter A in Article is capitalized. For example, in the abstract it would say something like: This Article proposes modifying the ...
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What is the etymology of the name of the River Cherwell in England? [closed]

The River Cherwell is the second largest tributary of the Thames after the River Kennet. What is the etymology of its name? I could not find any etymology after checking several websites.
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Is it a "Spanish-language movie" or a "Spanish language movie"?

As I understand it (please correct me if I'm wrong): "Spanish" is a proper noun and therefore must be capitalized; "Spanish-language" in this case is a compound adjective and those ...
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I find it awkward to say I live in the China but not I live in the Philippines or I live in The USA. What is the rule for this? [duplicate]

It is awkward to say "I live in the China", but not "I live in the Philippines" or "I live in The USA". The determiner 'the' of the sentences all precede a proper noun ...
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Should proper nouns be used as singulars or plurals? [duplicate]

My question is about whether proper nouns (used as the subject of a sentence) should be considered as singular or plural. The proper nouns "The United States" and "The Duck Variations&...
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Does capitalisation change when a word moves from proper noun to adjective?

For the sake of this question I'll use the word Linux as an example, but I really want to ask about the principle generally. The word Linux started as the name of an operating system kernel written by ...
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Capitalise or not foreign demonyms when original language uses lower case and English has no equivalent?

In English we capitalise demonyms. Someone from Paris is a Parisian. When we insert words from other languages we indicate the non-English nature of the word with quotation marks or italics. "He ...
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Why isn't the word "white" capitalized when referring to the race? [duplicate]

I was surprised to find that there's a growing convention of capitalizing the word "black" when referring to the race, i.e.: A Black person. I thought this was wrong, because I thought it ...
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Capitalisation when talking about a proper noun [closed]

So when I write a sentence like for example: The word europe originated from ... should the word be capitalised or not? It seems logical not to capitalise because in this sense it's not talking ...
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Referring to a specific instance of a common noun [closed]

Let's say I am planning an as of yet unnamed wall at the back of my garden, which I will build using gabion baskets. If I temporarily refer to the wall according to its construction, should I write it ...
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Are there English toponyms that are pluralia tantum? [closed]

There are toponyms that are pluralia tantum in a few languages. What come off top of my mind are Mediterranean cities in classical languages, such as Athenae and Pompeii. A modern example I can come ...
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Should I Capitalize the Word "mom" in This Specific Context [duplicate]

In the book Grammar Girl's Quick and Dirty Tips for Better Writing is says the word "mom" is a proper noun in the following context and should be capitalized: "How's Mom these days"...
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Is "Black" correct, incorrect, or could it be used as either "Black" or "black"? [duplicate]

I was reading an article that I was assigned by my professor, and I came across the following: “We’re the ones getting killed,” Los Angeles Clippers coach Doc Rivers, who is Black, said in an ...
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Why is it 'the Corona virus' not 'Corona Virus'?

Corona is the name of a virus and hence is a proper noun. Please tell me why this exception arises. Also if there are other similar cases when 'the' is used before proper nouns, please let me know. ...
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Can capitalization be considered as a marker of definitness in proper nouns

Proper nouns are always definite (i.e. are names of people or names of places). They are also always capitalized. Does that mean that the capital letter is considered a marker for definiteness? Do we ...
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"I see myself as" with personal names of well-known individuals [closed]

I'm not sure how to use articles when using personal names of well-known characters in this particular case. For example it would be "I see myself as a nice person" or "I see myself as ...
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When referring to a specific person by title only within a specific office, should the title be capitalized?

When referring to a specific person by title only within a specific office, should that title be capitalized, as in: "XYZ University's Board Chairman and Office Manager shall provide the ...
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Should "the" or "el" appear before a Spanish proper noun placed in an English text

I have a textbook that refers to the Spanish royal road that linked Mexico City and Santa Fe as "El Camino Real", though the full name in Spanish is "El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro&...
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Hydrophobic, hydrophobized, or hydrophobicized?

I found three adjectives which can be used in the following context: "velour (HYDROPHOBIC / HYDROPHOBIZED / HYDROPHOBICIZED) with alkenyl maleic anhydride composition". Which one should be ...
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When should we use "the" before the name of a university or institute?

Should I write "at Higher Institute for Applied Sciences and Technology (HIAST)" or "at the Higher Institute for Applied Sciences and Technology (HIAST)", and should I write "HIAST" or "the HIAST" in ...
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Should this name for an organization contain an apostrophe?

We're looking to start a small brewery and have decided to call it "Loons Landing". I'm wondering if perhaps it would be more correct to call it "Loon's Landing". I know that, as a business, we're ...
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Capitalization of "tribe" and its derivatives in the United States

In these examples, when should "Tribe" or "Tribal" be capitalized? "This rulemaking will preempt State, local, and Tribal requirements but does not propose any regulation that has substantial direct ...
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Hyphenating proper noun rules

Is there any special rules for hyphenating proper nouns? I've seen information like "never split a proper noun", but in numerous scientific papers these words are hyphenated.
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Capitalization of "Gothic" as a genre descriptor

In the context of genres such as Gothic literature and Gothic music should "Gothic" be capitalized? Although names of genres are generally not capitalized, these happen to share the name of a historic ...
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What did the word "Ade" mean in the English of a hundred years ago?

Saw this in the news today and think I see the word Ade, but have never seen it before. Is it Ade? Or Ode? Wde? What does it mean? Is it an abbreviation?
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When creating an initialism of a country's full name, should the "o" in "of" be capitalized once initialized?

When creating an initialism of a country's full name, should the "o" in "of" be capitalized once initialized? For example, should Republic of Ireland be "ROI" or "RoI"?
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Capitalization and hyphenation of proper noun declensions [duplicate]

I'm transcribing some speech and I came across One of the accusations that certain non-Orthodox Christians level against the Orthodox is that we worship idols. However, I am not certain on how to ...
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How do I refer to multiple people with the same name

My daughter now has her own bedroom. She doesn't want her sister to come in. She has made a sign. "No Paiges Allowed!" What is the correct apostrophy use on "Paiges" when I want to refer to ...
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2 votes
1 answer
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Possessive function of a business name which is made with a possessive

Garner's fourth edition, page 714, states regarding the name McDonald’s It is quite defensible to write McDonald’s dinner combos (the name functioning as a kind of possessive) On what grounds ...
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What's the first vowel of Boston, MA?

The Wikipedia article on Boston states that the first vowel in the name of the city is that of "caught," not "cot," citing Longman Pronunciation Dictionary. This seems consistent with my own ...
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Capitalization of "the" beginning a proper noun [duplicate]

When should "the" be capitalized when it begins a proper noun? There are some proper nouns that seem to have their leading "the" included as part of their name/title. For example, The Real ...
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Distinguishing lowercase proper nouns in paragraphs

I'm writing a case study about a client whose name is completely lowercase. How do I differentiate the client's name from the rest of the text, making it clear to the reader that it's a proper noun? ...
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Usage of a definite article with a proper name + defining characteristic [closed]

Suppose in a book there is a character named Alex, and he has a beard. There are no other Alexes mentioned. Which variant is correct? 1. "Hello," said bearded Alex. or 2. "Hello," said the bearded ...
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'The Kukhtarev's model' or 'Kukhtarev's model' ('John's car' or 'The John's car')?

I think I know the answer to this but I just want to be sure. I have a supervisor who doesn't have a good level of English; sometimes he worries me with his corrections. I was writing: Here, we ...
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Is the Earth a proper or common noun? [duplicate]

I guess the website got this wrong. It says that the Earth is a common noun. In my view it should be a proper noun. Please see the screenshot. The earth moves round the sun. • Earth is ...
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17 votes
5 answers
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Does the word “uzi” need to be capitalized?

"Uzi" is not contained in any Scrabble® dictionary that I can find online. I am assuming that the Scrabble® powers that be are treating it as a proper noun. However, after reading the Wikipedia ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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Are all capitalised words proper nouns? [closed]

When a word is capitalised in the middle of a sentence (not the beginning, not in the title, etc), is it necessarily a proper noun? Do we have grammatical rules for capitalising a word, which is not ...
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When a proper noun is converted into a verb, should it be capitalized? [duplicate]

If a proper noun (e.g. Google) is converted into a verb (e.g. Let me (G/g)oogle that for you), should it still be capitalized when used as a verb? I recognize that English has no such concept as a "...
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1 vote
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Indefinite article - are there any exceptions for proper nouns? "an Aristides" vs "Aristides"

I was going through Leviathan of Hobbes today and I think I spotted an error. "and every Citizen bringing his Oystershell into the market place, written with the name of him he desired should be ...
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Capitalisation in texts where the title is also a concept that is referred to within the text?

I'm going to use Karpman's drama triangle as an example for my question because I can't seem to find any consistency around its capitalisation (although I'll admit I don't own the book). Say you have ...
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2 votes
1 answer
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I am trying to find out if there is a convention of correctness for writing Arabic proper nouns starting with 'Al'

The news channel 'Al Jazeera' writes its name like I have i.e with a space between 'Al' and 'Jazeera', in text but in the logo it is 'ALJAZEERA'. One come across variations like 'Alqaeda', 'Al-Qaeda', ...
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2 answers
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Type of noun from the sentence [closed]

"Seeing the baby the mother rose in her." Is the word 'mother' in the above sentence a: (a) Common Noun (b) Abstract Noun (c) Proper Noun (d) Collective Noun
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8 votes
3 answers
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Is there a linguistic term for using a common noun as a proper noun?

In some situations, a common noun in a specific scenario is treated as a proper noun because it refers to a specific entity that satisfies the common noun. Is there a special term for this ...
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44 votes
3 answers
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Why is quixotic not Quixotic (a proper adjective)?

Adjectives derived from proper nouns are known as proper adjectives, and are capitalized: A piece of writing could be Shakespearean, not shakespearean. A person may be Canadian, not canadian. Even ...
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Do you capitalize yakuza?

When referring to the infamous Japanese criminal organization, which sentence would be correct? The yakuza member picked up his glasses, scooped some of the jewelry and loose change into his ...
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1 vote
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Word order in noun phrases

Which word order should I choose in noun phrases with a proper noun component and a common noun component? the Elvis Presley singer v. the singer Elvis Presley the Star Wars movie v. the movie ...
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