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Unanswered Questions

7,175 questions with no upvoted or accepted answers
11
votes
1answer
147 views

Origin of 'mellontolatry.'

In the collection of essays, God in the Dock, C. S. Lewis uses the word "mellontolatry," which is defined as "worship of the future." This is the first instance of the word I can find. In other ...
8
votes
1answer
110 views

If -ment suffix is from Old French, then why does it form nouns instead of adverbs?

The suffix -ment forms nouns from verbs, e.g. entertain → entertainment. A similar suffix exists in French (and -mente in other Romance languages) that forms adverbs from adjectives, e.g. sûr → ...
6
votes
0answers
125 views

Did prescriptivists make up pied-piping in relative infinitive constructions?

A quick Internet search suggests that pied-piping in relative clauses was a natural feature of English even though it is loved by prescriptivists; it existed in older stages of the language, and it ...
5
votes
1answer
104 views

What to call something that is used to impart flavour to food, but is not actually ingested?

What is the generic term for something that is used in food preparation, typically to impart flavour, but is removed from the dish before it is served? For instance, a bouquet garni is a specific ...
5
votes
1answer
71 views

Does reduplication always place the front/close vowel before the back/open vowel?

I was looking up "seesaw" on Wiktionary , and I noticed all their examples of ablaut reduplication "such as teeter-totter, zigzag, flip-flop, ping pong, etc." have "ee" or "i" in the first word, ...
5
votes
2answers
290 views

Pronunciation of “reprise” (repreez/reprize)

Is "reprise" pronounced as "repreez" in all contexts, as noun and verb, except for usages in legal context? I'd like to reference a number of dictionaries: Oxford Living Dictionaries only has one ...
5
votes
2answers
302 views
+100

How to tell if something is a core complement or a non-core complement?

CaGEL on page 216 cite the following: "Kim gave the key to Pat" An NP indirectly related to the verb through the preposition is referred as an oblique. The phrase "to Pat" is a non-core ...
5
votes
1answer
1k views

Why is it “in the university” rather than “at the university” in these examples?

The title of an 1848 book is The Organization of Industry, Explained in a Course of Lectures Delivered in the University of Cambridge in Easter Term 1844. The cover page of this 1864 book states that ...
5
votes
2answers
348 views

Is 'who' here a relative word or an interrogative pronoun?

(1) That's a big part of who I am. (2) When that day comes if you don't like who you are, you're done. At first blush, the who's in (1) and (2) seem to be relative words in the fused ...
4
votes
0answers
56 views

Early morning study

Lucubration is the act of intensely studying late into the night (historically, by candlelight). What would a similar word be for studying early in the morning? E.g. I woke up before the sun rose for ...
4
votes
0answers
116 views

You need your eyes testing

My question is about the regional acceptability of sentences such as the following: You need your eyes testing. I need my hair cutting. I want my car washing. The second example is given in the ...
4
votes
0answers
64 views

How tran­si­tiv­ity is de­fined in CGEL

This ques­tion is specif­i­cally for those who are fa­mil­iar with the 2002 edi­tion of The Cam­bridge Gram­mar of the English Lan­guage by Hud­dle­ston and Pul­lum. The book has this pas­sage at ...
4
votes
1answer
58 views

What is the relative frequency of English graphemes and/or phonemes in printed UK English texts/spoken English?

Having reviewed freely accessible research I found references to The Grapheme-Phoneme Problem in Reading and other spelling studies and have sought other frequency tables that describe the relative ...
4
votes
1answer
187 views

“… for all the yolk in your eggs.”

Melville addresses his readers "ye lucky livers, to whom by some rare fatality your Cape Horns are placid as Lake Lemans, flatter not yourselves that good luck is judgment and discretion; for all ...
4
votes
3answers
539 views

On the phrase “You wouldn't think it to [look at him]”

There is an oft-used phrase structure that appears odd to me, but I can't tell if it qualifies as a set phrase, idiom, a mere grammatical fluke, or an archaic grammatical structure. The superstar ...

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