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Unanswered Questions

5,434 questions with no upvoted or accepted answers
8
votes
0answers
170 views

The “prickmouse” and the “butcher's broom”

I sometime go for walks in the wood near where I live, and in the undergrowth, beneath the oaks and pines, you'll find an evergreen prickly shrub which is called pungitopo in Italian. The word is ...
8
votes
0answers
403 views

Southern Dialect: Word for a time of day?

I remember reading a story somewhere that a Southerner wrote about one of his life experiences. He mentioned that in the region he lived there was a time of day that cooled off a large amount in less ...
8
votes
0answers
331 views

Did prescriptivists make up pied-piping in relative infinitive constructions?

A quick Internet search suggests that pied-piping in relative clauses was a natural feature of English even though it is loved by prescriptivists; it existed in older stages of the language, and it ...
7
votes
3answers
515 views

Is 'who' here a relative word or an interrogative pronoun?

(1) That's a big part of who I am. (2) When that day comes if you don't like who you are, you're done. At first blush, the who's in (1) and (2) seem to be relative words in the fused ...
6
votes
1answer
176 views

How tran­si­tiv­ity is de­fined in CGEL

This ques­tion is specif­i­cally for those who are fa­mil­iar with the 2002 edi­tion of The Cam­bridge Gram­mar of the English Lan­guage by Hud­dle­ston and Pul­lum. The book has this pas­sage at ...
6
votes
4answers
117 views

looking for an English idiom to describe specialist employment

There's a French phrase "Mais il faut recruter à l’extérieur : on ne peut pas faire des pâtissiers avec des maçons" Translates as "However, we have to recruit outside: we cannot make confectionery ...
6
votes
1answer
172 views

Analyzing 'genitive/accusative + V-ing phrase (gerund-participle phrase)' as different constructions

(1) I regretted [his leaving the firm]. (2) I regretted [him leaving the firm]. (3) I regretted [leaving the firm]. (4) He didn’t bother [giving me a copy]. Regarding the above ...
5
votes
1answer
105 views

What is the name of this puzzle commonly found in puzzle books?

I'm looking for the name of puzzle in the picture below, commonly found in puzzle books. In Dutch, it's called a ''filippine''. It has its variations, including anagrams, rebus, trivia questions, ...
5
votes
0answers
178 views

What is the origin of “Panama schedule”?

"Panama schedule" describes an alternating 2-2-3 shift plan with 12-hour shifts over a period of 14 days, common in the military and some industries. What is the origin of this phrase?
4
votes
0answers
54 views

Is 'to smoke' a complement or adjunct in this sentence?

I hope you are all well. He stopped to smoke. Is to smoke a complement of stop or is it an infinitive-of-purpose adjunct?
4
votes
1answer
125 views

Is differing pronunciation of “second” a regional difference? (US English)

According to Wiktionary the word "second" can be pronounced one of two ways in the US: /ˈsɛk.(ə)nd/ and /ˈsɛk.(ə)nt/ I've googled to try to find anything about the difference between these ...
4
votes
1answer
195 views

Origins of the word “understand”?

I'm curious about the word understand and based on brief research its origins seem not very clear, https://www.etymonline.com/word/understand Breaking up the word in two, under-stand, I could make a ...
4
votes
1answer
110 views

What's the meaning & origin of the word “Stretherism?”

I ran across the word "Stretherism" in Camille Paglia's 1991 essay "Junk Bonds and Corporate Raiders: Academe in the Hour of the Wolf:" A final word on the title: I find "Heroes and Their Pals" ...
4
votes
0answers
84 views

Earlier sources or identity of person who coined the term “neutrois”?

A lot of work I've been doing recently has been around the emergence of various gender identities. "Neutrois" recently came to my attention, with more information about it here: https://nonbinary....
4
votes
2answers
134 views

Graded/ungraded adjectives and grading/non-grading adverbs

I saw in the Farlex Grammar Book an explanation of gradable adjectives and graded adverbs. It lists the following words as examples of each category: Gradable adjectives small cold hot difficult sad ...

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