Unanswered Questions

9,102 questions with no upvoted or accepted answers
19 votes
1 answer
2k views

Southern Dialect: Word for a time of day?

I remember reading a story somewhere that a Southerner wrote about one of his life experiences. He mentioned that in the region he lived there was a time of day that cooled off a large amount in less ...
8 votes
1 answer
395 views

The traditional grammar term for 'nominals'

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Page 329) has a section titled 'Nominals': Intermediate between the noun and the NP we recognise a category of nominals: [3] a. the old man b. that book ...
8 votes
1 answer
4k views

Why is "x" used as an abbreviation for some nouns?

This question is related, but is not a duplicate, of Why do some words have "X" as a substitute?. I have noticed that a few nouns can be significantly abbreviated with an "x" at the end. ...
7 votes
2 answers
236 views

Words spelled the same way they are pronounced

Is there a term for words that are spelled the same way they are pronounced? If so, is there a list of them somewhere? For example, I have thought of: "a" spelled A pronounced "A" ...
7 votes
2 answers
234 views

What is the equivalent word to oenology for the study of, knowledge of or expertise in alcoholic drinks and making them?

Apologies in advance, I am no linguist and don't know the proper terminology for things. I am looking for a collective word to describe someone who is interested in alcohol, makes cocktails, brews, ...
7 votes
2 answers
280k views

Is 'I am glad to hear that' very formal or informal phrase?

I said this to one professor when she expressed about her current research work. Later, I realized that that phrase could be very informal.
6 votes
3 answers
143 views

Word for the sensation of reading a word on a page without knowing where it is

I frequently experience the phenomenon of turning a page in a book or flipping a slide in a slideshow, and my eyes catching a single word on the page without me consciously knowing where the word is --...
6 votes
1 answer
103 views

Why are "er”, "ar” and "or" often listed as R-colored vowels but "air”, "ear" and "oor/ure" are not? Are they vowels or vowel+consonant?

NOTE: I speak a rhotic variety of English. I am struggling with how to explain r-coloured vowels/vocalic R to teachers during a presentation on the phonemes of English. Many grapheme-phoneme lists ...
6 votes
0 answers
490 views

Earlier sources or identity of person who coined the term "neutrois"?

A lot of work I've been doing recently has been around the emergence of various gender identities. "Neutrois" recently came to my attention, with more information about it here: Nonbinary ...
6 votes
1 answer
81 views

Is there a "-nym" word for kinship terms?

... or do we just say "kinship terms" or "family relationship terms" or something like that? In English we have for example "aunt" and "uncle" meaning "...
6 votes
1 answer
188 views

Why are the articles "an" and "the" not allowed in this structure? "(The/An) X though Y was..."

(*An) astute businessman though he was, P was capable of extreme recklessness (*The) actual perpetrators though they were, the criminals never admitted their guilt in court Why are the articles not ...
6 votes
1 answer
257 views

Where does compulsory "do support" come from?

We are familiar with the concept of "do support", where the verb do is used as an auxiliary verb. It can be found frequently in Shakespeare and before and it is claimed to derive from the ...
5 votes
1 answer
141 views

When did "sink" start referring to the tap as well?

A current TikTok trend involves someone asking another person to "turn off the sink". In a play with the term "turn off", the second person then goes to the sink and says something ...
5 votes
0 answers
164 views

American vs British English: using 3rd person singular pronoun or person's name?

I grew up in the UK and now have a lot of American friends and colleagues; I tend to notice an almost systematic difference in the way Americans use 3rd person singular pronouns in preference to a ...
5 votes
0 answers
237 views

Is "luggage" becoming a countable noun?

When I learned English, I learned that "luggage" an uncountable noun, meaning the collection of all your bags and suitcases (and/or their contents). From https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/...

15 30 50 per page
1
2 3 4 5
607