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Questions tagged [terminology]

Terminology is a system of terms belonging or peculiar to a science, art, or specialized subject, nomenclature.

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What is “first modify” in the following piece from a license text?

"You may redistribute the source code of this program subject to the condition that you do not first modify it in any way"
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What is the proper term for etching or digging of wall to hide conduit of cables

I am creating a scope of work and I can't seem to find the right term to say... (including context) Contractor should provide in wall conduit. If no in wall conduit is available, contractor should ...
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Is there any standard terminology to describe how advanced a topic is?

Background: I have been searching for succinct language for referring to how "advanced" a topic or skill might be. I've found things like Integrative Complexity and the Model of Hierarchical ...
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When and where did “clam” come to mean a missed note in a musical performance?

Someone just asked me in chat what a missed note in music is called. Without hesitation, I replied, "A clam." It's what I've always heard in academic and professional settings since forever. Only now,...
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“sit back down again” — Tautology or no?

I'm curious about whether the phrase "sit back down again" (along with anything similar, like "stand back up again") would be considered a tautology or if another term would be a better fit here. To ...
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2answers
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Term for direct antonyms?

The word "antonyms" covers any pair of words where the meaning is opposite -- quiet and loud, cautious and foolhardy, simple and complex -- but each word in these pairs could have other partners ...
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In horse breeding, what is the female equivalent of putting a horse out “to stud”?

The BBC today has a story about a champion racehorse who has just retired She will now be retired to stud https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/horse-racing/47918578 This doesn't really scan for me. It ...
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List of “criminal epithets” [closed]

I am looking for a list of (generally derogatory, but not always) names used to describe criminals by their offense. Some examples: "murderer" "rapist" "pirate" "killer" "traitor" "thief" "spy" "...
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is there a term for verbs that are followed, or can be followed, by an infinitive?

I was wondering if there is a technical term for verb like 'want', 'appear' or 'decide' which can be followed by an infinitive verb, as in 'I want to eat', 'It appears to be a cloud', 'I decided to ...
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What is the name of this spectacles?

It has some microscope attached to it: What is the name of this spectacles?
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Features of Textual Language [closed]

I've been trying to study the features of text for a while. For example, If I said "John had gone to the market" and then i said, "John bought milk from the market". Then these sentences are ...
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What is the rhetorical device that modifies a famous phrase, similar to antithesis?

According to Wikipedia: An antithesis must always contain two ideas within one statement A similar effect (parallelism emphasizing opposition of ideas) can be created in which the first element is ...
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Confusion in meaning of word “classic”? [closed]

I have searched the meaning of "classic" in Cambridge dictionary, but I am not satisfied about its meaning as adjective What is difference between terms classic and old? As we often use terms like ...
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Is there a familial term for apples and pears?

The term Citrus Fruit covers oranges, lemons, and grapefruits; all of which are very similar in skin & flesh. Is there a similar term to cover apples and pears (outside of Cockney rhyming slang)? ...
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what is the verb for water going past a rock?

I'm looking for a verb to describe the "Y" thing the water makes when it hits a rock, for example in the river. Here is a professional piece of art I made (view from the top): Is it simply called "...
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Alternative to “launch customer” or “beta customer”? [closed]

I'm looking for a phrase that refers to the initial customers of a new product or service - the ones who bear the risk and benefit of trying something new. "Launch customer" is used in the aircraft ...
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1answer
42 views

Is there a name for all numbers different than zero?

The names for the number 0 include "zero", "cipher", "null", "naught", "nought", "love", "duck", "nil", "nada", "zilch", "zip", "o", "aught", and "ought". There are various subtleties of usage amongst ...
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Experimental or experiment?

There is already a Q&A regarding experiment setup and experimental setup, where the setup, a bunch of instruments, is used to measure properties of something else and the instruments themselves ...
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Are juice and coffee considered 'consumer goods'?

I am writing a report in which I have to forecast sales of juice and coffee. I want the title to be something along the lines 'Forecasting sales of consumer goods...', however, I do not think it ...
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2answers
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the queen fed her enemies to her dragons

In matters of government, we often say that a ruler did something when he/she actually ordered a bunch of other people to do something. For example, we might say, "The queen fed her enemies to her ...
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1answer
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Are initialisms that sound like existing words in English still called initialisms? Or are they called something else?

An initialism has come into common parlance as a word on its own. An initialism is a word made from the first letters of each word in a phrase. Unlike acronyms, initialisms cannot be spoken as ...
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3answers
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Word that means every outcome is worse?

What word means that every outcome is worse than where you started, For example, You must make a choice but the choices are a worse situation than your current one.
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Is there a term yet for “visual onomatopoeia”? [duplicate]

Onomatopoeia is the formation of a word from a sound associated with what is named (e.g. cuckoo, sizzle). A new word (US teenagers are first on this) is uwu (said "oowoo"). The meaning is, to have ...
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How to verbalize the correct statement of a measure in mixed units

I want help phrasing the instructions in a math question. The issue is the correct way to express mixed units. For example, if an answer is “25 inches,” I don’t want to accept “25 inches” or “1 foot ...
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Is there an animal equivalent to “archaeophyte”?

The usage of 'neophyte' and 'archaeophyte' to distinguish from true 'native' has now been widely established in botanical circles. However, animals can also fall into these categories, for instance (...
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In the medical field what terminology do they use in describe cures and treatments

When doctors diagnose a poison what are the treatments cures called to stop the poison? What other names to the cures and treatment are there?
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What was required to accept “troll”?

At what point did the concept of internet troll become incorporated into an English dictionary?
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2answers
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Describing a group of windows?

I'm unsure of the most readily recognizable term among normal people to describe a group of windows in a building. Here's an example of the type of architectural feature I have in mind. In this photo ...
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What's up with this archaic usage of “leads”?

This is my first Stack Exchange post, so please let me know if there'd be a better place to ask this question! I'm reading Bleak House by Charles Dickens right now, and I came upon this bit, ...
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1answer
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Is there a contraction for non-exclusive or?

I find that often, in technical writing, I want to specify that or is non-exclusive: or ≠ xor; or = and/or. (Stylistically, "and or" is terrible and gets tiresome quickly;) As an example of the type ...
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287 views

What do you call a word that can be spelled forward or backward forming two different words

Trying to find the name of the word that describes a word mean spelled backwards or forwards is meaning and having different meanings. For example: reward and drawer.
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2answers
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What is the word that means of or pertaining to bushes?

I recall a long time ago reading a science-fiction book that contained a word to describe a character that I didn't recognise. When I looked it up, I learned it meant 'of or pertaining to bushes.' It ...
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What are the inhabitants of the island Ireland called? [closed]

On the island Great Britain lives the English, the Scots and the Welsh - they are all called British. What are the corresponding words for citizens of countries Eire, Northern Ireland and the island ...
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Is there a term for clause in a sentence that can be removed without invalidating the remainder of the sentence?

Take, for example, the sentence "The dog, which is in the corner of the room, is barking.". Is there a specific term for the part of the sentence "which is in the corner of the room", which can be ...
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How can “telecommuting” mean “to not commute or travel”?

Wikipedia describes that telecommuting … is a work arrangement in which employees do not commute or travel (e.g. by bus or car) … If you do not commute, how can you call it "...
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Expression for an expression meaning what it doesn't mean

What would one call a word, phrase or expression that, by usage or by miscoinage, comes to mean something which, by etymology, it does not, and more importantly, should not mean in the first place? ...
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Term for the brain's automatic [psychological] response to being told to do something; to not want to do that thing anymore

I was wondering if there are any terms that describe a psychological response to this specific type of interaction- something along the lines of: You know what academic work you have to do for a ...
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1answer
33 views

What is the origin of “cut rate”? [closed]

I saw this drug store sign from 1929. Does the term "cut rate" have a pharmaceutical origin or does this just refer to "low cost"? This in a low income area, but I know pharmacies "cut" drugs with ...
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What’s the word for when someone tells you to do something and that same person reprimands you for it? [closed]

I know that there’s a word for it but I cannot remember what it is. I know it can be used in the law e.g. it’s illegal for a police officer to tell a store owner to sell alcohol to a minor and then ...
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Stone slab covering grave

Is there a word for the stone slab that lays horizontally on top of a grave? In the image it would be on the grave on the left.
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Is there a linguistic term for using a common noun as a proper noun?

In some situations, a common noun in a specific scenario is treated as a proper noun because it refers to a specific entity that satisfies the common noun. Is there a special term for this ...
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1answer
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Is there a word for when you grab somebody, spin them around, and throw them?

I've seen a move like this in games like Tekken and Yakuza, typically by characters with unrefined fighting mastery. Below are links showcasing the move in question in both Tekken 7 and Yakuza Kiwami ...
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Umbrella term for treasury bills, notes and bonds

I am using interest rate data for all these treasury securities. Because bills, notes and bonds all are used for a certain maturity interval (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...
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Is there a term to describe this type of word within a word?

I'm looking for a term to describe the following: a word where every other letter is capitalized and the capital letters spell another word. E.g. ToRtUrE = TRUE torture (the word "TRUE" has been ...
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1answer
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Antonym of black and white thinking (or splitting)

Splitting is a type of cognitive distortion where one sees a situation from an all-or-nothing perspective. What could we call the type of thinking that is not based on extremes? Would "balanced ...
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1answer
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It's the size of a brick; What size shirt/shoes do you take?; I have a daughter your age

What is the grammar of the English words "size", "age", etc? According to Quirk (1985:1293) Some noun phrases of measure, denoting size, age, etc, can also be postposed: A man the size of a ...
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English word for the employment relationship of a student of a work & study program?

In Germany we have the Cooperative State University. Doing your bachelor’s degree at this university works as follows: You will first need to find a company that employs you for this type of study ...
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1answer
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term for obvious “stuttering” in print

Is there a name for an obviously erroneous duplication of a word in a print medium? For example (with apologies to Mr. Lincoln)" "Four-score and seven seven years ago..." If someone is relatively ...
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What's is called when you think something is better because it's newer/more recent?

I really feel like there's a word or phrase for this, but I honestly can't think of it. What's it called when you think something is better because it's newer/more recent? As an example, say an ...