Questions tagged [terminology]

Terminology is a system of terms belonging or peculiar to a science, art, or specialized subject, nomenclature.

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What is the meaning of elliptical in this context? [closed]

...and it is this possibility, which is clearly provided for in language, that has encouraged a rival idea (8), namely that needing is always by its nature needing for a purpose - any purpose at all ...
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Single-word contractions

How could I describe the following two categories of single-word contractions in the least words possible? A) those that cannot be pronounced the way they are written, and therefore are used only in ...
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"Transfeminine" vs. "trans feminine" (gender identity term)

I am writing an article and need to select between "transfeminine" and "trans feminine", in reference to a gender identity descriptor. Both terminology choices are seen in ...
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28 views

The difference between focalisation and free indirect speech? [closed]

Im struggling to figure out the difference for my essay. I think I have a handle on focalisation but I don't really understand how it free indirect speech differs? Am I just being an idiot here? Thank ...
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Correct and technical terminology for the process of converting a traditional procedure to a more modern and systematic one

The title is pretty self-explanitory, what would be the correct and technical term to use for the process of "converting an old and traditional procedure of doing something (usually related to ...
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23 views

Can you wind the wind? Can you tear a tear? Can you lead to lead? What are these examples called? [duplicate]

These words are spelled the same. These words sound different. These words have different meanings. This question can be answered and is about learning English. We really speak American in the United ...
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45 views

What's the meaning of genre conventions? [closed]

Could you please tell me the meaning of "genre conventions" in the following sentence? As this brief overview has shown, from the level of terms, to phraseology, register, genre ...
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What did I mention? Water or frozen water? [closed]

I said, “Water froze.” Then, what did I mention? Water Frozen water Water & frozen water Thank you.
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5answers
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What can I call 2nd and 3rd place finishes in a competition?

There are many awards I received from the sport I did. I thought to compress everything and write as 'Inter university and All island winner' but I have placed only 2nd and 3rd places. What is the ...
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What's the group of words that should exist but don't even though other words suggest that they do? [duplicate]

(Please redirect me to https://linguistics.stackexchange.com/ if that's a better forum for this question) There are certain pairs of words where the opposite word is suggested but sometimes doesn't ...
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3answers
73 views

An umbrella term for property crimes without the use of violence

Is there an umbrella term (ideally, a single word) for crimes of illegally taking possession of someone else's property “quietly”, not involving the use of violence, threats, or endangerment? So it ...
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1answer
55 views

Name for expert sizing by a tailor

I remember reading years ago about a skill of some traditional tailors, possibly by special training or from experience. The skill was in judging by eye, to an unnatural accuracy, all the size ...
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Is "scrolling" inherently a 2D thing, or does it also apply to 3D?

In the 1990s video game magazines I'm currently re-reading, they constantly make references to "smooth scrolling" and whatnot for polygon-based 3D games for PlayStation and Saturn in their ...
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Case and choice

I need to choose most intuitive, generic and neutral terms, so I am wondering if "case" and "choice" are best ones? By "case" I mean something (good or bad) what may ...
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1answer
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Committed team vs dedicated team [closed]

I want to express that I am managing a team that is responsible for API integrations. How is the best and tightest way to say it? Managing a committed on API integrations team Managing a team, ...
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1answer
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What is the noun of "to credit something to somebody"?

I'm working with digital securities. You can think about company shares. If an investor buys those shares, it is a process with several steps. At the end, the issuer gives the shares to the investor: ...
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Suitable substitute for "edge" in business terminology

I am doing a translation on global integration among entrepreneurs. There is one sentence that makes me very confused is "talk about the outside of the topic before going straight to the main ...
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1answer
46 views

Ledger vs Registry

A quick background and analogy. In developing some software we are naming various components. One component is effectively a log of completed and pending transactions. The nature of these transactions ...
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1answer
121 views

What do you call this device that floats in the water at ports?

I've seen lots of these, at ports, floating on the water: I don't have a clue about what they are called.
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1answer
49 views

Is there a word for when you use an abstract noun in a concrete sense? [closed]

In The Crucible, Reverend Hale says that his books are "weighted with authority". Here authority is used as if it's a concrete noun so I was wondering if there is a technical term for when ...
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First Use of the Word 'Skimmer' to Mean a Low-Flying Hovercraft in Science Fiction? [closed]

Does anyone know when the word 'skimmer' first got used to mean 'a low-flying, in-atmosphere hovercraft' in science fiction?
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4answers
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What is a 'nonexaggerated' word for egotistical?

Webster defines egotistical : characterized by egotism : having, showing, or arising from an exaggerated sense of self-importance. And other dictionaries add conceit and self-centered. Webster ...
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-logy: Word for "the study of humour"

I'm searching for the correct word for: "The branch of knowledge and research concerned with funniness / what people find funny / what makes people laugh" Generally such words are suffixed ...
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1answer
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What does "to wait out a full school year" mean?

The setting is in modern day U.S. The character, a teenager, and his mother move places a lot. Then they decided "to wait out a full school year" in a his mom's friend's house in Portland. I'...
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Synonym of personification that contains either the prefix andro- or morph-

There is a specific word which contains either of the aforementioned prefixes. I read it some time ago and recall a definition somewhat similar to "giving human characteristics to something that ...
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3answers
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What is the name for the term that describes small changes in normality? [closed]

Small changes can be very difficult for humans to recognise, so we get used to the new normal and do not realise that the many small changes have collectively created a huge change. To take one ...
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Is the term "animate object" still used?

Is the term "animate object" still acceptable to use, for example for a grasshopper? I remember objects being broken down into either animate objects or inanimate objects back when I was in ...
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What would be the "medical" term for hitting your head against a brick wall?

My Grandfather was a GP from Aberdeen and often took pleasure in explaining how he dealt with time-wasters. The individual would come into the surgery seeking a Doctors note excusing them from work on ...
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1answer
55 views

Name for the argument of the mathematical absolute-value function

Some arguments of common mathematical functions have names, like addend, minuend, subtrahend, dividend, divisor, numerator, denominator, and radicand. A colleague recently asked me: does the argument ...
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1answer
37 views

What is the technique to make something normal appear abnormal?

I was wondering about the name of the literary/poetic technique where, through examination of tiny details, ordinary actions become abnormal and strange. For example describing eating as 'the ...
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3answers
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What is the name for a hardware equivalent of a Widget?

In graphical UI development, we have buttons, knobs, and sliders and the hypernym would be widgets. In computer hardware, we have buttons, knobs, and sliders and the hypernym would be ... for some ...
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34 views

What is the meaning of 'national' as in eg 'Australian national'? [closed]

From here: https://academia.stackexchange.com/questions/115930/career-prospects-for-a-math-phd-student-in-pure-math I am an Australian national and want to live in Australia long term. what exactly ...
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92 views

Polygons: why are three and four different from other "sidegons"

A few past Questions almost get to my query but even this about "name-gons" doesn't quite do it. Please don't even trouble to read on unless you're interested in what might seem totally ...
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One word for all kinds of reading materials

What's the word or phrase for all kinds of reading materials like books, magazines, journals, newspapers etc?
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1answer
58 views

Is higher-numbered tier always better than lower one?

I live in South Korea, and as a rather-enthusiastic learner of English, there is a question that has bothered me for a long time. People here use the word "tier" in different way than other ...
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Is there an equiv­a­lent of “nych­the­meron” that specif­i­cally starts at mid­night?

That is, is there a word for the 24-hour pe­riod start­ing at mid­night? I know that tech­ni­cally a day means ei­ther 24 hours or the pe­riod of time be­tween sun­rise and sun­set, and that day and ...
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In the field of bookbinding, where does the term "Davey Board" come from?

There is a generic material called "Binder's Board". Which is the board that the covers of hardcover books are made from. In the industry, it is also called "Davey Board". I ...
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Name for the previous definition to which a definite article refers

Pronouns refer to antecedents. What do definite articles refer to? Are these also antecedents? For example: Mary owned a fennec fox named Archibald, who was a gift from Mary's father. The fox was ...
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2answers
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Is there a name for the deliberate use of incorrect grammar?

Is there a name for the deliberate use of incorrect grammar? I'm thinking of the phrase "As sure as eggs is eggs", which I heard used by a well-educated speaker recently. Of course, they ...
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3answers
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What kind of error is using Women instead of Woman

An online argument. Guy says "You are looking for a women". Girl replies "talking all that sh*t with bad Grammar". Guy replies "Spelling is not a part of Grammar". ...
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1answer
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Word for attributing multiple diseases to the same cause? [closed]

What is the medical term for attributing multiple diseases to the same cause? I assume it is Greek, so it would pan-etiology or pan-onosis or something like that.
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Antonym of "Crying Wolf too much"

Not sure if "The Boy who cried wolf" is idiom/phrase/something-else, so that is another question in itself as if the antonym is the correct operator for this context (and that could be ...
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1answer
41 views

Adjective for something using plug-ins

I'm looking for an adjective (preferably) that describes a software component as being capable of using plug-ins, or better yet, as only performing its function if it has been loaded with plugins. So, ...
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1answer
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Name of this grammatical construction [duplicate]

for quite some time now, I've been wondering whether there is a proper name for the following grammatical construction expressing obligation: Is/are to be + [participle] For example, ''This paper is ...
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3answers
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What's a word to describe a self-referential text?

In Yeats' poem "When You Are Old" he writes a line that goes "And nodding by the fire, take down this book". The term "this book" here is clearly referencing this very ...
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1answer
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What's the technique for altering clichés? [duplicate]

Is there a specific word for when you take well known sayings and you switch some of the words like if I changed "he had a heart of stone" to "he had a heart of wood". I know ...
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1answer
59 views

Is there a name for words that are both transitive verbs and adjectives (ex: "hurt")

I'm wondering if there is a name for the words that are both transitive verbs and adjectives. As in the example of the poetic phrase: "hurt people hurt people" meaning: "people who ...
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0answers
111 views

"Comprehend" vs "Interpret" vs "Understand"

What is the difference between "Comprehend", "Interpret", and "Understand"? Here are the definitions that I referred to, from Cambridge Dictionary- Comprehend- to ...
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A word for drain plugs in boats?

In row boats, and similar boats, there is a drain plug, which is taken out when it is ashore, to empty for water. In Norwegian the term used is 'nygle', and in Icelandic 'nöldur'. In contemporary ...
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3answers
170 views

An adjective to describe eyes like these?

Some people have eyes that look rather different than most people's, with their whole upper eyelids (*) being very visible. Is there a term or an adjective for eyes like these? (*) By "eyelid&...

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