Questions tagged [nouns]

This tag is for questions about nouns. Nouns are words that refer to an entity, quality, state, action, or concept. Add this tag to single-word-requests if you are looking for a noun. Add the tag word-usage if you are asking about the usage of the noun.

-1
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0answers
21 views

Attributive noun and adjective difference for '-ist' suffixed words

I’d like to understand if there is any difference between attributive nouns and attributive adjectives with regard to ‘-ist’ suffixed words that refer ideologies, belief systems and movements in art ...
1
vote
2answers
69 views

What's a word used for someone who criticizes his country but doesn't let any foreigner criticize his country?

I noticed some people attack foreigners who say anything negative about their country, yet they themselves criticize their same country and are being negative. What's a word that describes them? ...
0
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0answers
31 views

Is there an English word describes a women or girl loves being around? [on hold]

Is there an English word of a women or girl loves being around men, or many men around her and she tries to hold them all?
3
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4answers
95 views

Positive synonym for “skepticism”?

Hello to anyone who sees this! I'm looking for a word similar to "skepticism", but more positive. (Here, I define skepticism as the belief that we can never have certain knowledge.) Sorry if this ...
-1
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1answer
40 views

Which one is correct ?? Weighs or Weights? [on hold]

Which one of these two senteces are grammatically correct ? Each bag weighs 5 kg. or Each bag weights 5 kg.
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0answers
18 views

Verb and noun relation

Is the set of subsidies exactly the same as the set of things that subsidise? Put another way: can there exist something that subsidises that is not a subsidy?
1
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0answers
43 views

Is there an “-onym” for “group names of animals?”

Psuedonyms are false names. Synonyms are similar names Antonyms are opposite names. There are also aptronyms, homonymns, eponyms, demonyms, and retronyms. Is there an "-onym" that applies to ...
0
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0answers
54 views

The use of possessive with genitive case

This has been puzzling me greatly. I see "Governance quality has been decreasing ..." and think it should be "Governance's quality has been decreasing ...". Which one is correct? Could someone ...
0
votes
1answer
37 views

What is the term for moving an adjective from before to after the noun it describes?

I think this is a bit of an anachronism, but sometimes in nursery rhymes or songs you'll hear sentences in which an adjective describing a noun is moved to be after the noun it describes, and I was ...
0
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1answer
37 views

Use of 'advice' [duplicate]

As 'advice' is an uncountable noun, hence should not be used as plural, but I have a sentence here which has word 'advices' and marked as NO ERROR without any proper explanation. They are awaiting ...
0
votes
1answer
32 views

Use of quotation marks after 'it's called X' and similar?

I've been looking at the Oxford Dictionary's page on inverted commas, and see that they use this example: He called this phenomenon "the memory of water." This seems like it would work with or ...
4
votes
2answers
88 views

What do you call that little area just inside the front door of some houses?

Some houses have a little rectangular area just inside the front door. You then walk through that little area to get into the main areas of the house. This little area is well defined with a wall on ...
2
votes
1answer
49 views

Name for our customer's customer?

Trying to address a business domain where we are making software that will be used by our customers to give access to their assets to their customers. What is a good name for these entities? Is ...
1
vote
1answer
26 views

how to justify the “rough and tumble” used in this sentence?

Our clothing is designed to take the greater "rough and tumble" that they expect boys to give it. This is clearly an attributive clause. What baffles me is that the "it" used in the end. If " rough ...
3
votes
4answers
117 views

I found a reference to ‘naysmith’ in a work of science fiction. Is anybody familiar with the term?

I could not find any references to ‘naysmith’ as an actual historical term. Following is an excerpt from the book ‘Horus Rising.” ‘Then it occurs to me, Garviel, that only a weapon which questions ...
1
vote
1answer
55 views

Why are place names in some old books a capital letter followed by dashes, and what is this phenomenon called?

This is something very odd I have noticed in some older books, most recently in "Crime and Punishment" by Dostoyevsky. Place names, when not specifically essential or well-known, are made up of one ...
2
votes
2answers
60 views

Capitalisation in texts where the title is also a concept that is referred to within the text?

I'm going to use Karpman's drama triangle as an example for my question because I can't seem to find any consistency around its capitalisation (although I'll admit I don't own the book). Say you have ...
1
vote
1answer
34 views

Is “Soft Reshape” right in specific case? [closed]

I am a programmer and my native language is not English. And we have interesting question with naming. We have a command for our software that we call "reshape". This name is used widely in math and ...
0
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0answers
32 views

Spacecraft vs space station

A station in outer space is called a space station, made up of two words. A ship in outer is called a spaceship, which is one word. Why is the former two words and the later one word?
1
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2answers
28 views

Food production techniques or technologies?

Please help me with the translation of the phrase in the title. The problem is, in Russian, which is the language I'm translating from, 'technique' and 'technology' is one and the same word. Also, I ...
0
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0answers
29 views

How to use the definite article “The” for more than one object

This is one of those questions that I find silly at first, but have made me really scratch my head the more I ponder over them. In a sentence with multiple nouns, do we use the definite article "The" ...
1
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2answers
30 views

What is a good epithet for someone who follows the rules regardless of good sense

'Vogon' is a good one but not if you don't have the right cultural background. "Robot" and "drone" work. Can anyone think of any more?
0
votes
1answer
17 views

In the sentence: “<noun> count” (“count of <noun>”) should <noun> be plural or singular?

For instance, should I say: 1) "The book count is overwhelming" or 2) "(The?) Books count is overwhelming"? I am specifically interested in the version without "of" (as in brackets in the question).
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1answer
39 views

Is character a countable or an uncountable noun? [closed]

Is character a countable or uncountable noun? How to judge?
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0answers
30 views

What do we call a person who says that he has experienced something about which others are talking but actually he has not experienced it?

It often happens that whenever we are sitting with friends, we are sharing our experiences. For example, if we just had our lunch at a fine dining restaurant and the finger bowls are brought after you ...
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0answers
29 views

Is it supposed to be “responses” here?

The original sentence in The Cornhill Magazine: For the same reason, writers talk interminably about their own books, winkling out hidden meanings, super-imposing new ones, begging response ...
2
votes
3answers
111 views

Term or Title That Embraces the Juxtaposition of Work and Fun

I'm looking for a clever way to describe someone who likes to be positive and have fun but who is also serious about getting work done. The phrase "work hard, play hard" comes to mind, but I'm not ...
-1
votes
2answers
147 views

Should “index” be countable here?

I'm having trouble with the grammar of this sentence: In urban areas, the graduation index of general high school and higher education was greater than 1, while that of compulsory education and ...
1
vote
1answer
51 views

What do you call the part of the basketball hoop that attaches the rim to the backboard?

I call it the neck. Is there a proper term?
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votes
1answer
55 views

Rules of adding “-erlessness” to words? [closed]

I noticed some words that "er-less-ness" can be added to. like "prayerlessness" or "thinkerlessness". Is there a rule that regulate the usage?
0
votes
1answer
74 views

One word for a curious child

What would you call (in a single word) a child that asks a lot of questions, leading you to admire that fact? (In Russian, for example, there is such a word. Is there in English?)
0
votes
1answer
20 views

Correct position of adjective?

I'm confused with these 3 sentences for the adjective 'responsible' The police seem certain they will find the people responsible for the attack. The police seem certain they will find the ...
1
vote
1answer
70 views

How would you call a person who posses a certificate?

I am building for a client online certification application. Person will complete a short training (few slides) and after that the person will get the certificate proving completion of the "course". ...
0
votes
2answers
77 views

Are river fish considered “seafood” [closed]

I am confused whether river fish can be categorised under "seafood".
0
votes
1answer
31 views

What is the word for someone who is willing to do anything for a fee

My character Laila is a sort of allrounder, jack of all trades and will do anything, from being your lawyer or temporary girlfriend to going undercover in the government, assassinating someone or even ...
1
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1answer
59 views

Is there a grammatically need to hyphenate the compound words “dumb f*ck” within a novel?

Would I leave the space, hyphenate it, or combine the two works like its similar, less aggressive counterpart: "dumbass" The quote from my novel is from dialogue "It's been six years, you dumb ...
2
votes
1answer
59 views

Is the Canadian in 'That's the Canadian in you' an adjective or a noun?

That's the Canadian in you. Is this Canadian a noun or an adjective? To clarify the fog, I asked 92 to 96 native speakers residing in the U.S. for the acceptability of the following three sentences. ...
1
vote
1answer
30 views

Question on attributive nouns/noun adjuncts

I am writing a review in English and I need to use the structure ‘eye movement changes’, ‘eye movement abnormalities’ with ‘eye movements’ in the form of a noun adjunct. Even in the title I would need ...
5
votes
1answer
912 views

Is pagan related to propaganda? [closed]

A pagan is someone who holds religious beliefs other than the main world religions. Propaganda is misleading information. Pagans could be ostracized for holding different beliefs and being labelled ...
43
votes
4answers
8k views

What are the spoon bit of a spoon, and fork bit of a fork, called? [closed]

A knife has a handle and a blade. A spoon has a handle and a... Bowl? A fork has a handle and... Spikes? Prongs? I guess this can be extended to more esoteric cutlery such as sporks.
2
votes
0answers
72 views

Can the phrase “once more” be a noun in American English?

Can the phrase "once more" be a noun in American English? I'm wondering if it can, as the two Japanese online dictionaries I'm using for my translation of 今一度 both say that the entry, -which only ...
1
vote
2answers
56 views

Can “contemporary” be used for objects

I don't want to use the word competitors in a business context, can I use the word "contemporaries". For example, Our business stands out from its contemporaries.
4
votes
7answers
303 views

Word for pleasing someone sexually because you care about them even though you don't like it?

Closest words that come to mind are: pleasing or pleasuring, but somehow these don't catch the meaning. Do you guys know any other words? Context: "I often thought about what I felt. If I were to ...
0
votes
3answers
47 views

A word's different meanings in a sentence

The image of God is one thing, and that which is contemplated in the image is another. I'm not sure but it seems the two "image" in the sentence have different meanings from each other. in my opinion ...
0
votes
2answers
123 views

Can one use 'man' like one can use 'woman' as an adjective?

As a consciously feminist act so that women are not reduced to their reproductive capacities, the word 'woman', which is generally accepted and used cheifly as a noun, is used in place of the word '...
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votes
2answers
56 views

Type of noun from the sentence [closed]

"Seeing the baby the mother rose in her." Is the word 'mother' in the above sentence a: (a) Common Noun (b) Abstract Noun (c) Proper Noun (d) Collective Noun
3
votes
2answers
67 views

Evening and night in English

How does the division into evening and day in English? Is there a certain time when evening and night begin?
19
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2answers
2k views

Is there a name of the flying bionic bird?

I have seen this flying robotic bird on youtube few days ago. Unlike other flying machines/robots, it flaps its wing to fly. Doing google, I came to know that they are called bionic bird. But, ...
2
votes
0answers
27 views

Is there a technique used when someone splits a compound noun into two parts?

My student has asked whether the splitting of the compound word keyhole into key hole is a particular literary technique. I didn't know! It's relevant to the text, as it is about disconnection and ...
1
vote
1answer
42 views

Name for a singular noun that is used like a plural? [duplicate]

Is there a word for a noun that is singular but can be used like it is plural? For example... Q: How is your team doing? A: They are doing great. Or Manchester United are at the top of ...