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Questions tagged [nouns]

This tag is for questions about nouns. Nouns are words that refer to an entity, quality, state, action, or concept. Add this tag to single-word-requests if you are looking for a noun. Add the tag word-usage if you are asking about the usage of the noun.

-2
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0answers
18 views

What noun goes with “I”? [on hold]

Where is the noun of I pronoun? For example for he ( the name of a boy or a man). For she ( the name of a girl or woman). he is a boy Ahmad is a boy Mahmood is a boy she is a girl. Nilofar is a ...
0
votes
0answers
37 views

Why not “alkaline metal” rather than “alkali metal”? cf. “alkaline earth metal”

The word "alkaline" is described as the adjectival form of the noun "alkali". For example, Group 2 in the Periodic Table is named "alkaline earth metal". But then why is Group 1 named "alkali metal" ...
0
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0answers
13 views

Correct way to address [on hold]

In spoken English what is the correct way to address an Aunty or uncle, it is Aunty Lilly or Lilly Aunty.
0
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0answers
31 views

Uncle Scrooge's Money Bin [closed]

I'm deveoping an app focused on saving money that is good for wellness. This app is in 3D and at the center of the scene we can find the faithful reproduction (or almost, for copyright reasons) of the ...
0
votes
0answers
10 views

Is is more appropriate to use a singular or plural form of a noun in a list title? [duplicate]

I want to display a list of mice. Each row represents one mouse. Now, for the title of this display, would it be more appropriate to say "Mouse List" or "Mice List". In other words, when describing ...
0
votes
3answers
101 views

A word for something that is impossible to be sure of? [closed]

A noun for something that you cannot prove; something you can never be sure of actually happening/being real?
0
votes
3answers
29 views

Never listens to me

What do you call it when others never listen to what I am saying or discredit my experiences and talk over me?
0
votes
1answer
13 views

Culture aspects vs Cultural aspects

Hello I wanted to say that I read this book because it has cultural aspects Then, I got confused when to use “culture aspects” and “cultural aspects” Thanks in advance
3
votes
2answers
71 views

What is it called when a word no longer literally describes something? [duplicate]

An example of this would be the word "Film". Film is no longer the medium that we use to record movies but we still refer to movies as films. What is it called when an older term is used to refer to ...
0
votes
2answers
21 views

The link to a subtitled version or the link for a subtitles version?

I was writting a post on Facebook and I didn't know how to write this properly: -This is the link to a subtitled version or -This is the link for a subtitled version A few months ago a modern ...
0
votes
5answers
69 views

What's the idiomatic word for something that keeps you sane/grounded?

There's a word for something, that when remembered--or a person that when spoken to--brings you back to reality and the knowledge that you're not insane. I keep wanting to say "touchstone", but I don'...
0
votes
0answers
9 views

Is it spelled “bodyparts”, “body parts”, or “body-parts”? [duplicate]

It seems to have different spellings in different places. Which is correct? Are there multiple correct ways to spell this?
0
votes
0answers
14 views

Do I use the plural or singular form of a noun when saying “zero or one”? [duplicate]

E.g. Do I say "I have zero or one child" or "I have zero or one children"?
10
votes
7answers
2k views

Noun for things that annoy you?

Okay, it’s on my the tip of my tongue. I was watching interviews where they ask people what is their strongest point etc. If they’re asking about their weakness, the noun is ‘What is your Achilles ...
0
votes
1answer
18 views

Is “…taken to be scholarly authority” missing a preposition or an article?

The sentence is from Harold Bloom's book Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human. This chronology, necessarily tentative, partly follows what is generally taken to be scholarly authority. I find ...
8
votes
3answers
1k views

“Mango” or “mango tree”?

I sometimes become confused when it comes to looking up the definitions of plants or fruits' names. Let's take the example of “Mango” which denotes both, fruit and a tree in its definitions from ...
2
votes
1answer
46 views

Is there a name for a word which is a noun and also an unrelated verb?

There are many true homonym pairs where one of the words is a noun and the other is an verb. Example: Bear as a noun: The bear is a furry carnivorous mammal, different species of which can be ...
2
votes
2answers
49 views

A noun for the act of misinterpreting a word

When someone says a word that is superficially similar to, but means something different from, what they really mean, we call it a malapropism. I'm looking for the counterpart to this—a word for the ...
0
votes
1answer
34 views

Chemical elements spelled out are not capitalised but what about Natural Gas?

A quick google shows that natural gas is generally capitalised whereas the rule for chemical elements seems to be that they are not. I am writing a text that includes Natural Gas (I cannot replace ...
3
votes
3answers
80 views

Glasses - countable or uncountable noun?

Is word glasses countable or uncountable? Are these sentences correct? These glasses (referring to one pair of glasses) are my favourite! I have quite a few glasses in my drawer, however, my favourite ...
10
votes
6answers
2k views

Is there a word to describe someone who wakes up in predawn?

I'm trying to translate a poem from Persian. In the poem there is a noun that describes the person who has woken up before the dawn, way before others! It's used in a metaphorical way to describe the ...
-1
votes
0answers
29 views

What's a word to use for people that you know but aren't super close to but also are not too distant

What's a word to use for people that you know but aren't super close to but also are not too distant, like a group of friends but they aren't really friendly nor mean (unless there's a survival ...
-1
votes
2answers
35 views

Term for Entrance fee

I am about to "invent" an extension to the iCalendar MIME type. A calendar event may be one, where you need to pay money to get in. Since there is no such thing already defined in any RFC, I will go ...
-1
votes
0answers
31 views

Lettuce -plural [duplicate]

Which is correct for the singular plural noun as it relates to lettuce? The lettuce’s leaves are fine. The lettuces’s leaves are fine.
0
votes
1answer
41 views

Interdiction vs Interception?

What's the difference between interception and interdiction? Their definition seems the same to me?
-1
votes
0answers
17 views

Are there any rules for using nouns as pre-head modifiers of other nouns?

For example, I find "Tesla videos" correct, but not "robots news". What is the rule behind it? Thank you!
1
vote
1answer
26 views

Using “proximity” to imply “next to each other”

I am currently writing the introduction to my thesis and I want to say that two genes are next to each other. I would like to use the word "proximity" without saying "close proximity" but am unsure ...
6
votes
2answers
804 views

what do you call a place where someone thought of an idea?

I'm working on a project about structures and their historical value. I don't need this information, however, I would like to know and/or have it exposed to people that have wondered the same question....
0
votes
2answers
61 views

What do we call the combination of a number and a unit

As a Software Engineer I give my best to find descriptive names for specific concepts. That is a very important task to reduce software complexity. Naming concepts can be really hard and today I’d ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

People have computers vs people have a computer

I am curious about plural and singular noun usage. Let's assume there were no one who had two computers. (i.e. one computer each.) Which one is more natural: "people have computers," or "people have ...
-1
votes
0answers
11 views

How do I write a sentence in which parentheticals compensating for singular vs plural are inconsistent? [duplicate]

I am writing a sentence using a singular noun. I want to use a parenthetical to include the possibility of a plural noun. For example, the noun is "question" and I want to write "question(s)". The ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views

How to define common word for health places?

I have these words : Public hospitals - Pharmacy store - Doctors clinic - Gym club training & gym supplements store - Makeup artist room & store. Is there a common word for : store-clinic-...
7
votes
5answers
1k views

Closest English term for Spanish “merienda”

The Spanish word merienda is often included in lists of untranslatable words. It originally meant the meal you had around noon between breakfast and dinner, as that meal used to be small compared with ...
2
votes
3answers
52 views

Is 'public' a mass noun?

Does anyone know which kind of noun 'public' is? Is it a common noun or a collective noun?
1
vote
1answer
76 views

Difference between 'etiquette' and 'protocol' and 'decorum'? [closed]

can someone tell me the difference between 'etiquette' and 'protocol and decorum''? On Oxford Dictionary they appear as synonyms to each other. There were definitive explanations of how they differ ...
1
vote
0answers
31 views

What is the word for the section for the last most content in a printed document [closed]

in a printed document, there is a section is aligned to the bottom of the content and is present only on the last page e.g. for quotations, this section may be the "Terms and conditions" It is not a ...
1
vote
1answer
26 views

How to description 3 nouns in a sentence?

I want to describe ' Please enter the input value of temperature with numerical in the form.' But input, value and temperature also are nouns, how can I joint it together? Thanks
3
votes
1answer
72 views

So there is no solid rule to form PLURAL COMPOUND NOUNS right? Why say “gumball machine” but “securities dealer”?

In the dictionary, a security (FINANCE, STOCK MARKET): a financial investment such as a bond or share that is traded on a financial market a securities agreement/audit/dealer a ...
1
vote
0answers
46 views

What is the plural of “mediocre”? [closed]

I've looked it up and all I found that its "mediocres", but never hearing it makes me confused. I wanna use it in a similar sentence: "all the books I've read are mediocres". Is that correct? What ...
0
votes
2answers
36 views

What does `exchange' mean in this sentence? [closed]

I am trying to understand an English passage about beauty and the Trinity: We can define beauty as “that which, when seen, pleases.” But there is something going on at a deeper level—--an exchange—-...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

Is “a man after my own heart” for Jesee or David?

In the following sentence: I have found David son of Jesse, a man after my own heart; he will do everything I want him to do. Is "a man after my own heart" for Jesse, or for David? From the ...
3
votes
1answer
80 views

Where is the stress of the noun “Portuguese”?

Studying suffixes I've learned that "-ESE" is a strong suffix, therefore it holds the main stress when it's added to a word (e.g. China -> Chinese; Japan -> Japanese; journal -> journalese; etc.). ...
2
votes
1answer
47 views

Is there currently a shift from -nce word endings to -ncy word endings?

This is something I think I've noticed, but maybe I've just been noticing odd word choices and putting it down to a shift in language use. Has anyone noticed a shift from people using verb-derived ...
0
votes
1answer
46 views

Proper noun capitalisation: “The Union” or “the Union”? [duplicate]

When capitalising a proper noun that has a “the” prefix, should the “the” be capitalised? Eg: “This puts the Union at risk” or: “This puts The Union at risk”
1
vote
4answers
126 views

Is there a word that denotes the process by which a new leader is selected?

I'm looking for a word that describes the process by which a leader is chosen. I would use "election", but that word contains too much information about the details of the process. I need something ...
1
vote
0answers
43 views

A possible Spanish origin for “lunch”

I have recently discovered the words of José María Pemán from 1941 regarding the origin of the English word lunch. My translation (sorry): Wellington's Englishmen arrive in Spain, they fall in love ...
6
votes
2answers
1k views

English terms for a female wolf and a female owl?

In the English language, what are the right terms for a female wolf and a female owl; perhaps "she wolf" and "owl hen"? Are there distinct or separate words in English used for feminine? I checked ...
4
votes
1answer
76 views

Can a house have a 'roof' but no 'ceiling' in its upper floor?

A user in the Spanish Language site asked a question about how to distinguish 'ceiling' from 'roof' in Spanish, and gave us the following example: The top floor of my house does not have a ceiling ...
23
votes
4answers
4k views

What is the plural of the noun “go” (as in “have a go”)? [closed]

If I were to try to achieve something you could say I "had a go". If I tried it multiple times, how would I write that down? I had many goes or I had many go's or I had many gos
3
votes
2answers
100 views

Why does English have the word “broomstick”?

Oxford Living Dictionaries' dictionary of North American English defines broomstick as : 1 The long handle of a broom. 1.1 A brush with twigs at one end and a long handle, on which, in children'...