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Questions tagged [nouns]

This tag is for questions about nouns. Nouns are words that refer to an entity, quality, state, action, or concept. Add this tag to single-word-requests if you are looking for a noun. Add the tag word-usage if you are asking about the usage of the noun.

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Usage of singular noun as a concept for generalization

I have recently come across two sentences that feature the usage of singular nouns to generalise the statement as they follow. "The presence of the gene predisposes a person to heart disease&...
JJH's user avatar
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0 answers
22 views

Can I use the noun "luge steering" to refer to the act of steering a luge? [migrated]

For a research paper about the luge sport, I initially wrote: "According to our model of luge steering [...]". A colleague remarked that this sounds strange. According to him, nobody would ...
Enuff's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
65 views

Is "The Shining" a title with a gerund, or a regular -ing noun? [duplicate]

Does using "the" or "a" in front of a gerund alter it somehow? "A painting," for example, is not a gerund, and if a book were titled "The Painting" it would not ...
Sarah's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
81 views

Is Swirling a noun?

I have got a title composition from AI "Swirlings of simple Things". Also in the Leo online dictionary is Swirling listed as a noun (https://dict.leo.org/englisch-deutsch/swirling). But I ...
amte's user avatar
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11 votes
4 answers
2k views

Sink vs Basin distinction

In australian-english, a sink is a fixture for washing dishes (kitchen sink), clothes (laundry sink, or for big ones, laundry tub), or buckets (cleaner's sink) while a basin is for washing hands (hand ...
Dale M's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
48 views

Using "content" vs. "contents" when referring to multiple written works

I am aware of the previous discussions on "content" vs. "contents". According to the top answer there, it looks like they can be used interchangeably when referring to a written ...
Superbee's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
34 views

Using the terms gesture, gestural and gesturality

I am trying to understand the difference between, and I'm not sure how to describe it, something like: agree, agreeable and agreeability; approach, approachable and approachability etc...I'm ...
Ch Mait's user avatar
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5 votes
3 answers
1k views

Why is "second" an adverb in "came a close second"?

Consider the following example sentence excerpted from Oxford Learner's Dictionaries: One of the smaller parties came a close second (= nearly won). Much to my surprise, the example sentence is ...
xmllmx's user avatar
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0 votes
4 answers
138 views

A descriptive noun (slang term?) for “cordial while also inept and disagreeable”

Context: a business manager who supports their team but refuses to enable them through innovations. I am looking for a noun that describes a particular type of person (male, female, or trans) by ...
Steve Clark's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
22 views

Another word for shaking [duplicate]

I can't find a noun that go with this sentence: He tried not to shake, but he was already shaking like a ???.
Lawrence Liu's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
31 views

Usage of “Effects” [duplicate]

I came across this sentence: “This new patch commit can be cherry-picked directly to the main branch to fix the bug before it effects more users.” I find the usage of “effects” here to be weird. Is ...
Uri Greenberg's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
63 views

Greatest extent possible vs Greatest possible extent [adjective position]

I know the following sentences basically mean the same thing: We need to reduce pollution to the greatest extent possible. We need to reduce pollution to the greatest possible extent. so my ...
mateleco's user avatar
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0 answers
47 views

Noun of noun agreement

I had a question regarding MLK's speech "I have a dream", and the following quote more especially: I have a dream that my four little children will not be judged by the colour of their skin ...
user503173's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
44 views

Capitalization and Use of Acronyms? [duplicate]

When examining algorithms like the Decision Tree Classifier, should it be capitalized as "Decision Tree Classifier (DTC)" or written in lowercase as "decision tree classifier (DTC)"...
Aunraa's user avatar
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0 answers
29 views

Shortening multi-word proper nouns to one word, kept capitalized [duplicate]

I was reading the Wikipedia article for Joe Arridy and near the bottom it mentions an organization called "Friends of Joe Arridy", and then instead of restating the entire proper noun, it's ...
gator's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
60 views

Comma Rules - It sounds weird in my head without the Comma, but can't tell what's wrong about not having one either

I was marked wrong for this - Do we or do we not use commas to separate two nouns that come like this: From the couch, Alice continued, "I will speak to..." I thought From the couch would ...
Helen's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
79 views

What is a religious object used in pilgrimage called? [duplicate]

Character in the story has an object that he is supposed to take to a holy place. The object is central to his pilgrimage. Is there a term in English for such an object. Just to clarify, it is not a ...
EMS's user avatar
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-1 votes
1 answer
29 views

Is the word "bridge" used to indicate measurement of something in this sentence?

I was reading a scientific article about historical archaeology and then suddenly I came across this part in the article; "Understanding the development of mass marketing and mass consumption as ...
PROCESIONES CELESTES's user avatar
-1 votes
2 answers
103 views

What is an over the shoulder fanny pack called?

A fanny pack (a.k.a. a "bumbag") is a small pouch, usually sealed by a zipper, with an attached belt, meant to be worn around one's waist, an example of which appears below. A fanny pack ...
ohwilleke's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
27 views

What adjective indicating number is understood when no adjective is used? [duplicate]

Take the following statement, when used within a conversation on Global Warming: Polar bears are dying in the North. There is no adjective to describe the number of polar bears. According to normal ...
izzatso's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
44 views

"Being in advantage", as used in the video gaming world of fighting games

In fighting games such as Street Fighter, it is common to say that you're "in advantage" to say that you're "in an advantageous state" as opposed to your opponent. Is it ...
Stefan Schouten's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
63 views

Is there premodification in this noun phrase "too many victims"

I have to analyze the noun phrase "too many victims" but I somehow can't figure out whether "too many" is a determiner or premodification. Given the fact too is an adverb and many ...
Alex's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
60 views

What s, if any, the type of noun modifier for the receiver of a verb

I'm looking to find what it is called when a noun is modified by a prefix/suffix to mean that it is someone who receives x. And also, if there are examples of it in languages that are simple. The best ...
Durakken's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
79 views

How often "-to-be" is added to nouns? is it ok to modify nouns this way?

I would like to use some noun and express plans about it in the future. Think, getting something. I see "my bride-to-be" as a good example. It's better than using "wannabe." Can I ...
RandomJGuest's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
96 views

In what cases is best to use "to" or "for" after the words "stimulus" and "impetus"?

In what cases is best to use "to" or "for" after the words "stimulus" and "impetus"? Is there any difference in the use of the prepositions with each of the ...
Rodolfo Oviedo's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
73 views

Can you actually "want a need"? [closed]

I know it's a mouthful, but can you, actually? I ran across this line in my recent reading: For example, in Little Caesar, Rico has power and every material need he could ever want but he has no ...
desmo's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
58 views

A word or phrase for a task which can't be neatly defined by a process

I'm looking for a word or phrase for a task which can't be neatly defined by a process. By process I mean a series of steps to be followed exactly. Writing a good stack exchange request would be an ...
MichaelJK's user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
285 views

What is a more inclusive version of "pedestrian"?

A pedestrian [noun] is a "person going on foot" (Merriam Webster). Is there a more inclusive term that also includes people in wheelchairs and other mobility devices, but excluding people in ...
DLu's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
116 views

The word for smoke left on walls or when an oil burns and the residue coats things. There's a word I can not place; it's like residual, but a noun

Specifically when secondhand or thirdhand smoke creates a sticky or dingy layer on the walls and flat surfaces, usually it's due to the nicotine tar that's in the air. It leaves a layer on lampshades ...
ash listermann's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
99 views

Indolence vs Laziness - Is there any difference in usage?

They appear to have practically identical definitions. Is there any reason to use "indolence" over its more common counterpart or is "indolence" obsolete?
Tom888's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
70 views

What is a single word that describes a person who has a small amount of authority and exercises it heavy handedly with great self importance? [duplicate]

For example, a supermarket cashier who strictly regulates customers’ compliance with their rules for proper check-out protocol, such as use of the order divider bar.
user495163's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
26 views

What's the difference between a gerund acting as a noun, and an infinitive acting as a noun, as well? [duplicate]

I asked this question at the end of class, and the teacher told me: "They do not have the same meaning. A gerund represents any instance of an action, while an infinitive represents the concept ...
Stim Roe's user avatar
0 votes
6 answers
146 views

A word for a tendency to overreact

I'm analyzing a story in which there is a character who has unnecessarily extreme reactions to any situation that she's in — for example, she falls in love with a man (who she can't even speak to ...
chickazee4's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
79 views

Is there a noun for the emotion of feeling numbed by a sudden, massive change in one's life? [duplicate]

I have a character whose daily work relies immensely on her agility and mobility, and whose favourite passtime is running around and climbing the local terrain. I'll be writing a story arc very soon ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
41 views

Is a noun singular or plural when listing two or more of them that are numbered? [duplicate]

I was asked by someone to review a selection of portrait photos and then respond by selecting which one(s) I wanted to have printed. Each photo is labelled "Pose," followed by a letter (i.e.,...
Juan's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
40 views

What seems more accurate "You and your kid discover their true capability" or "You and your kid discover his/her true capability"? [duplicate]

I have been asked to look at some old admission response forms that our school mails back to applying students. This letter consists of their test scores and the programs that is offered to them. Now, ...
Ashutosh's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
31 views

The crowd _____(was/were) dispersed by the police [duplicate]

Here, the people comprising the crowd are dispersing in different directions, right? So, the word 'crowd' is no longer a singular unit. Kindly, someone confirm the answer.
Ananya Priyadarshini's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
296 views

What is a term for someone who always rejects other people’s offers or favors?

Is there any word for someone who doesn't accept others' favors? They have no reason for it, they just say no. Perhaps it's because they would feel insecure. Example: -Why does she always say no when ...
mtl's user avatar
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-1 votes
2 answers
49 views

What is the word that describes willingness of a human or even an animal to provide value to others in general? [closed]

For example, willingness to provide for someone is generosity and willingness to protect someone is bravery, but if we wanted to put both of these (an possibly other values) under an umbrella term, ...
Alireza's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
110 views

Is there a word for a kinetic ability magic user like how '-mancy' magic users have '-mancer'?

I'm looking for a good noun to describe a character who can use Comakinesis, which is hair manipulation, but "Comakinesis-user" isn't good enough. Also, I can't find a word to describe hair ...
ProtoKirby's user avatar
2 votes
5 answers
701 views

What word describes a person that doesn't pay his bills?

In the Spanish language there is a word that is used to describe a person that has been tagged as a deadbeat; it is Largo. Largo in Spanish means Long as in the measurement of the distance between two ...
Richard Castro's user avatar
-3 votes
1 answer
113 views

What word should I use for someone who has been around for a while?

When I say 'Been around for a while' I mean like someone who has been somewhere, or been a member for a while. I'm trying to make a role for the people in my discord server for some of the oldest ...
Rayla's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
94 views

Is there a noun for an estranged adult child? [closed]

I'm looking for a noun that means "estranged adult child". I want to be able to say "I'm a [estranged adult child]" Is there a word for "estranged adult child"?
Merlin -they-them-'s user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
64 views

Are there any words for people who exclude specific things from their diet — that aren't meat?

The words I'm looking for would be used for a multiple choice list in a fill–out form for submitting dietary preferences for a dinner. I would like to refrain from pointing to allergies or dietary ...
walterP's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
301 views

Is there a single word meaning 'a person who loves to represent their city'? [duplicate]

A person who is especially proud to be from a particular city, and puts down others from opposing cities. They rep their city as if it's a sports team. This is especially true in the US. Could you ...
Jennifer S's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
237 views

What are "weed" (the annoying plant) and "weed" (the drug) classified as that makes them treated differently grammar-wise?

"Weed" (the annoying plant you don't want in your garden) and "weed" (the psychoactive drug) are treated differently grammatically. Just some example sentences "There are ...
chausies's user avatar
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1 vote
5 answers
241 views

What’s the word to describe someone who works somewhere, but not always?

I’ve been racking my brain about this for a solid 30 minutes and I keep drawing blanks. I know there’s a specific word for someone who works at an establishment, but doesn’t work a consistent schedule....
Atlas Edwards's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
62 views

A peal of bells - part of speech? [closed]

I’ve been thinking about the phrase ‘a peal of bells’. Both peal and bells are nouns, but are acting somewhat differently. In the example sentence ‘I heard a peal of bells.’, ‘peal of bells’ is the ...
user75434's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
32 views

Is there a word for a person who makes wind instruments? [duplicate]

There's the word luthier for a string instrument maker, but with winds, the only option seem to be more like naming something in modern English, like "reedmaker" which would more apply to ...
jasper's user avatar
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4 votes
5 answers
364 views

Does 'angle' as a noun necessarily receive a definite article?

Here is the sentence in dispute: In humans, the femoral angle shows no correlation with femoral length. The question: why would 'femoral angle' receive a definite article, but not 'femoral length'? ...
BVinNV's user avatar
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