Questions tagged [syntactic-analysis]

Parsing or syntactic analysis is the process of analysing a string of symbols, conforming to the rules of a formal grammar.

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Should I use "who" or "whom" in "The main problem of Argentina comes from whom has taken office."? [duplicate]

Should I use who or whom in this sentence? The main problem of Argentina comes from whom has taken office. My logic I know that whom is an object pronoun, that whom has taken the office is the ...
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Which one's correct? [closed]

Which one is correct? What are you doing here? or What you are doing here? Similarly, Till when you are at home? or Till when are you at home?
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Use of 'Get' in a particular type of sentences

I just want to know whether the sentences below are grammatically correct or not – His / that attitude gets me irked. Is the use of word 'get' acceptable in such cases? His / that attitude irks me. ...
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Syllabify geology

How do we syllabify the word "geology? Ge ol o gy or ge o lo gy. If A is right then why is B wrong? If B so then why A? Also 2. laboratory.
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Is it okay to say "Captains Carter and Marvel"?

An artist wrote "Captains Carter and Marvel" to refer to both Captain Carter and Captain Marvel together. Is it okay to use the title only once and make it plural when there are multiple ...
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As if as though

I am having a problem identifing which gramatical function as if (as though, like) has As far as I know After linking verbs, we have noun/ noun phrase/ noun clause and adjective/ adjective phrase ...
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Describing multiple choices with two options in a particular order in one statement

Say I have three options (or choices if prefer) , A,B and C but one must decide on either A or later having the option of B and C (you cannot choose B or C straight away, only decide that you don't ...
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Omitting a pronoun from a cleft sentence

I believe this is a cleft sentence: It was 10:18 ᴀᴍ when it happened. However, I cannot explain why the pronoun when can’t be removed when you rewrite that sentence into this one: When it (=the ...
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In the pattern "I am also <adjective>," does "also" modify the verb "am" or the adjective?

My family and I saw the following phrase: The also relevant part is . . . We all agreed that it was kind of an awkward sounding construction. But we disagreed on whether it was grammatically correct....
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How to explain this sentence structure

He later admitted having seen the dish on the menu... Would I break down the form of this as follows: admitted (verb, past participle of admit) + having (verb to have + -ing) + seen (verb past ...
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Can ‘attribute A to B’ be used as ‘attribute to B A?’ [migrated]

The article I read uses ‘attribute A to B’, but it uses attribute A to B as attribute to B A. is this correct? Also, here’s the article. Delay is a necessary component of procrastination. This means ...
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Is “whose” a true relative pronoun? (and request for the full list of relative pronouns)

The internet is indeed a tangled web, and since anyone can write anything, there is a lot of conflicting information about what is and isn’t a relative pronoun. We all agree that who, whom, that, and ...
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Do the Phrases "Entitled to" and "Eligible for" Mean the Same Thing? [closed]

It comes up in the Supreme Court Couse Bacerra vs. Empire Health Foundation. Here is some example context: "Person x is ENTITLED TO medical assistance" and "Person x is ELIGIBLE FOR ...
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The word "new" may be an Adverb or an Adjective

I am trying to understand this sentence where the word 'new' can both be an adverb and also an adjective. Can someone please help me explain the ambiguous structure and the meaning conveyed in the ...
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Can "coincide" be use transitively?

The New York Times today has an unusual use of "coincide": NYT Looking at common-cold coronaviruses, some researchers have predicted that SARS-CoV-2 will become a seasonal winter infection ...
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As powerful as black holes are

Recently, I've come across some "as+adj+as" patterns that don't fit into the famous "as+adj+as" pattern. Like, he is as old as me. The new patters are as follow: As powerful as ...
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Is this ordering of words wrong "make transparent [object]"? [closed]

I was scrolling around and found the post Long sentence between "make" and adjective. The OP is concerned that in the following sentence the bolded part is too long as an object (I think), ...
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Is this list syntax correct?

I saw the following sentence earlier: We’ll help you win across every channel, every format and on your terms. I interpret that as one of the following: We’ll help you win; [across every channel], [...
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Usage of "even when" in a sentence [duplicate]

Does the meaning of this sentence change if “even when” is placed in the beginning? Removing the word “even” gives the sentence clear meaning, does adding it change the meaning?? Larceny occurs even ...
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How to interpret 'when' in this sentence?

I have a question about how to interpret 'when' in the bold-lettered sentence. Below is the context and the sentence (from Beginners by Raymond Carver). “It gets worse,” Terri said. “He shot himself ...
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Which is correct: 'a fear of never doing something' or 'a fear never to do something'?

In a story my students are currently reading, a mother who is an alcoholic and has a daughter with speech disorder does not ask the social services for help because she fears she might very well never ...
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Natural Sentence and Unnatural Sentence [closed]

I think that since Tom is a student, he cannot buy expensive meat. I don't think that Tom can buy expensive meat since he is a student. Since Tom is a student, I don't think that he can buy ...
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2 answers
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"There are fish of every hue." For different kinds of fish, should fish be in plural form here?

In the Caribbean waters, there are fish of every hue. Since one is talking about different kinds of fish, should fish be in marked plural form (fishes) here?
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"Looking forward to watching me play" vs "watching me playing" [duplicate]

We were reading a piece of text and my English teacher told us that the sentence: "For sure, my fans are looking forward to watching me play today." is wrong, and that it should instead be ...
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(Rather than) as a conjunction

It is said that, as a conjunction, the two constructions on each side of (rather than) must be parallel. So can this phrase join two sentences like this? (I know there are better ways of doing it) I ...
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Is this a complex sentence with a relative clause?

I have a sentence here: “I don’t understand why you like birds.” Upon analyzing the sentence structure, there is what appears to be a relative clause: “why you like birds” Is this then a complex ...
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How to understand the grammar structure of this sentence? especially the "by which that which"part?

"This whole government is carried on with our assistance and they try to keep us in ignorance of our power of cooperation between ourselves by which that which is in our own hands at present can ...
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Confusing reduction transformation

Let's assume sentence below (which is From "The Official Cambridge Guide to IELTS"). Ants simply sense changes in their environment, as for example when the mound's wall has been damaged, ...
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What is the word to describe speaking in the negative perspective? [closed]

Instead of saying "It is sunny", someone says "It is not cloudy" or "It is the opposite of cloudy". Is there a word to describe the last 2 sentences to mean speaking in ...
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1 vote
3 answers
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Using 'all' without a noun or pronoun [closed]

As far as I understand, 'all' should always be followed by a noun or pronoun, so the sentence 'I want to buy all' is incorrect. However, in computer games and mobile apps, I often see phrases like '...
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4 votes
1 answer
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negating contractions in Jane Austen

The novels of Jane Austen frequently contain constructions of the form auxiliary verb not which today are forbidden. We have Didn't you like it? Did you not like it? but *Did not you like it? Do we ...
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"This is not getting washed" What is the function of "getting" in the sentence [closed]

I have seen a few sentences where the structure looks like this subject + to be + verb-ing + verb in past. Is this grammatically correct?
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reversing extraposition

Let’s as­sume we have this sen­tence: It was the in­ven­tion of the hand-held cal­cu­la­tor that pro­vided the orig­i­nal tech­nol­ogy for the present gen­er­a­tion of small but pow­er­ful com­put­...
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Is this prepositional phrase acting as an adjective?

The example Create a referral to a specialist. The question Is that sentence grammatically correct? I think it is because the prepositional phrase is acting as an adjective (modifying "referral&...
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2 votes
3 answers
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"All hazards and dangers we barter on chance"

This is from the lyrics of "Arthur McBride" by Paul Brady. ...“But,“ says Arthur, “I wouldn’t be proud of your clothes For you’ve only the lend of them, as I suppose And you dare not change ...
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Using the word "inform" as a synonym for "instruct" - Is this wrong?

I work in a section of my organization that involves writing of technical documents. Our organization recently put out a policy to avoid using the word "instruct" when referring to our ...
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3 answers
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"Given a man walking a dog and a cat,..." [duplicate]

I want to write a sentence that starts similar to Given a man walking a dog and a cat, ... This could be interpreted as "given a man that is walking both a dog and a cat". "given (a ...
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Due to/because of [duplicate]

...does happen due to...; didn't happen due to; Carpal tunnel syndrome 'doesn't occur due to, but because of...extended use', for example. So, do any of those sound right — even if they're all wrong? ...
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3 votes
1 answer
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English syntax: Object at the beginning of a sentence / Object as sentence opening [duplicate]

Is it correct to build an English sentence as follows, with the object as opener? The red chair we placed at the left end of the table. (instead of the 'standard' syntax: We placed the red chair at ...
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What's wrong with "There is nobody John works with who doesn’t love him"? [closed]

There is nobody John works with who doesn’t love him. (The sentence means to say that everyone with whom John works loves him.) What is the core problem in this sentence? The obvious problems that I'...
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1 vote
4 answers
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Best way to say "human aspect" or "human element" in one word?

My example is as follows: "The piece of art had a sort of merit, normalcy, and _______." Like the quality of being made by a human, rather than the machine. I best describe it as the ...
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What's the correct structure of this sentence [duplicate]

I have a list of programs that are installed. What's the correct way to say this? "The number of programs installed" or "The number of installed programs"? What's the correct ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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The distribution of *by*-phrases in complex nominals

I was recently reading page 39 of Surface Structure [1980] by Robert Fiengo when I stumbled upon the following dataset: (1a) The suggestion of a different tactic by John (1b) *The suggestion of depth ...
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4 votes
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Unsplit phrasal verbs with two particles?

In English, the following phrase would sound unnatural: */? You can change the brightness settings, adjust the volume, and turn on or off subtitles. However, if we split the phrase at the end, it ...
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1 answer
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An analysis of a sentence

I just wonder if anyone could help me understand the differences between the following original excerpt gleaned from the latest The Economist as follows : One aspect of hammam culture proving ...
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Does this sentence imply that the tenant would only need to deliver the property after the expiration of the tenancy agreement?

I found this sentence in a tenancy agreement: I guarantee that the Tenant shall deliver up vacant possession of the Property at the expiration or sooner determination of the said Tenancy Agreement or ...
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1 answer
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What’s the most practical punctuation for this simple sentence? [closed]

I know this seems rudimentary, but it’s tripping me up for some reason. Yuck. Mushrooms are gross. I feel the period creates to much of a pause and strays too far away from the emphasis I want on ...
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What are syntactic structures?

I was hoping you could help me clarify what the term syntactic structure refers to. I came across a question about which syntactic structures play a certain syntactic function (verb, object, etc.) in ...
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What is the constituent type of 'laugh' in 'I saw her laugh'?

Could someone explain to me the constituent type of “laugh” as in “I saw her laugh”? Best with an X-bar graph. I know it's a lot of trouble. You don't have to draw the whole thing, a simplified ...
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Is it correct to say "he is realized" to show a gain of awareness?

The following is the sentence I am writing: "Perhaps, he trembles at the sight of this act not solely for the fear of exposure but because he is realized of the horridness of his actions." ...
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