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Questions tagged [syntactic-analysis]

Parsing or syntactic analysis is the process of analysing a string of symbols, conforming to the rules of a formal grammar.

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Is an adjective justified in the place of the subject in a sentence? [migrated]

I am an ESL Chinese student in China. And I wonder whether it is standard to put an adjective in the place of the subject. Subject is always noun phrases including infinitives, gerunds and noun ...
fafafafa's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
55 views

How to parse and punctuate the saying: "United we stand, divided we fall."

Personally, I think the phrase should be punctuated like this: "United, we stand; divided, we fall." The thing is, I could envision "United we stand" without a comma perhaps ...
Ben Mo Juan's user avatar
-4 votes
2 answers
58 views

This is relating to a number of posts from a few years ago that I have just stumbled upon [closed]

There seems to be some confusion around the word 'food' and its plural form. The word 'food' is one of those nouns that is singular as well as plural, so you don't put an s on the end to make it ...
user519715's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
154 views

I’m confused by how the term “syntactic marker” is used in CGEL

I am confused about the term syntactic marker as used in The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (CGEL), by Huddleston and Pullum. They say that to, for, that, but, and, nor, either, neither etc....
Salim uddin's user avatar
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2 answers
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Is it correct to use "as quickly as he never had....."?

So I was reading something someone had written and I came across: He < does something> as quickly as he never had in < time period> It just seemed a bit odd to me and I didn't encounter ...
Abella's user avatar
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1 answer
101 views

Types of English where "try [bare infinitive]" is common? (e.g. I'll try work on it) [closed]

I've found myself using try with verbs in their bare infinitive (without 'to'). Are there are dialects/types of English where this syntax is common or standard? Examples I'll try work on it. He said ...
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what does a prepositional phrase that follows a that clause modify? [migrated]

Consider the following sentence: As secretary, you are to set a meeting agenda that includes discussions in concert with the boss. What word does the prepositional phrase "in concert with the ...
carolyn's user avatar
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Run or ran correct? [duplicate]

Ewes are pasture ran all year on grass. Or Ewes are pasture run all year on grass. Which is correct American English?
DDH's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
145 views

"This" and "That" situation [closed]

I want to make a album named "This Doesn't Mean Anything" but I don't know if I should use "That" or "This", it's this correct?
emotion's user avatar
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7 votes
2 answers
266 views

A question about syntactic function of the clause

Given: He told me the secret how he had done well in the exam. In this sentence, the ditransitive verb tell here has the following core arguments, with each of these noun phrases performing a ...
Salim uddin's user avatar
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2 answers
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"A modifier in clause structure" — Is it possible to understand by this phrase what head the modifier modifies?

Sometimes I come across the phrase "a modifier in clause structure". Can we draw the unambiguous conclusion from this phrase about what head such a modifier modifies? If we can, then what ...
Loviii's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
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Why does the phrase "as a mapping out of a..." work?

"This deck of cards can be viewed as a mapping out of a spiritual journey, one that parallels the journey of faith and discovery found in Anderson's book." I am specifically wondering about ...
Riley 's user avatar
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4 votes
2 answers
556 views

Parse Pope's "they humbly take upon content"

From Alexander Pope's Essay on Criticism II.305–310: Others for language all their care express, And value books, as women men, for dress: Their praise is still—"the style is excellent": ...
Quuxplusone's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
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In "amount of data, collected ~", which is modified by 'collected~'? amount or data?

The fast-growing, tremendous amount of data, collected and stored in large and numerous data repositories, has far exceeded our human ability for comprehension without powerful tools. (from Data ...
Mcreaper's user avatar
9 votes
5 answers
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"Scarlet with rage, she swept past her employer and stormed up the stairs." — "Scarlet with rage" modifies "she", so adjectives can modify pronouns?

collinsdictionary.com: (1) Scarlet with rage, she swept past her employer and stormed up the stairs. I thought adjectives can modify personal pronouns only in short phrases like "poor me" or ...
Loviii's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
64 views

Greatest extent possible vs Greatest possible extent [adjective position]

I know the following sentences basically mean the same thing: We need to reduce pollution to the greatest extent possible. We need to reduce pollution to the greatest possible extent. so my ...
mateleco's user avatar
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-5 votes
2 answers
91 views

Explain why we use "a" before "interesting bird" but not "an" [closed]

"I saw a interesting bird in the tree." I was taught to always insert "an" before a vowel, however the above statement apparently is explained to be grammatically correct by ...
Ayush's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
46 views

What pronoun should I use, "by we who" or "by us who"? [duplicate]

He will be yelled at by we who hate him. He will be yelled at by us who hate him. After by you use us, but in this case I'm confused. Which one of these sentences is correct?
James's user avatar
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1 answer
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"She was a curious mixture, part grand lady, part wild child." — Is "part grand lady, part wild child" an appositive, supplement and adjunct?

oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com: (1) She was a curious mixture, part grand lady, part wild child. my parse: "Part grand lady" is a noun phrase. "Part wild child" is a noun phrase. &...
Loviii's user avatar
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16 votes
2 answers
2k views

Origin and grammaticality of "I like me ..."

A pattern: I like me a good book. I like me some fried eggs. Most English speakers would not express ideas in this way. However, this vernacular is not uncommon in some parts of the United States. ...
Brett Holman's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
59 views

How would you analyze or explain this philosophical sentence? [closed]

I am reading a book with my friends. We all are not native speakers. We have different opinions on the following sentence about how to read it. I hope you could show us the grammatical structure of it....
Tag Kwon's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
35 views

How to unambiguously write a name with multiple of each component?

Preamble Each PH stands for Placeholder. Context I'm quite normal - I've one first name, one last name, but two middle names: First Second (Middle) Third (Surname) Roke Julian Lockhart Beedell ...
RokeJulianLockhart's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
121 views

Which word should come first in a noun phrase, the ordinal adjective or the numeral? [duplicate]

Should one say 'the first 13 colonies on the planet Pelaton' or 'the 13 first colonies on the planet Pelaton'?
zenith3's user avatar
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1 answer
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Why were US businessmen in the late 19th cent. known >in print< by first & middle initial + last name, such as R.N. Smith?

I am researching an area of interest in the late 19th century in the United States. I have encountered many men's names in print by first initial, middle initial and surname when being referred to in ...
ceilr's user avatar
  • 1
3 votes
1 answer
115 views

How does the word "it" function in: "What is it that makes us uneasy ... ?"

What is it that makes us uneasy about accepting credit for something wonderful we have done? In this sentence, how does the word "it" function? Is it a pronoun or a dummy subject? Or is it ...
jamesyikim's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
88 views

Sentence structure 'The furniture arrives fully assembled.' [duplicate]

I have a questions about sentence structure. The furniture arrives fully assembled. I understand what it means, but what's the function of 'fully assembled'? It doesn't seem to modify the verb, but ...
Lisa Kim's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
44 views

Is "???" a valid version of ellipsis?

I'm marking essays for the IB (International Baccalaureate), and I've run into two student essays from students in the UK (don't know if that makes a difference) where they've identified the use of &...
tylerharms's user avatar
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1 vote
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42 views

Is "say they" correct? [duplicate]

English is not my first language. The text below is a translation of the Quran by Ahmed Ali : And when it is said unto them, "Follow ye what God hath sent down", say they, "Nay! Follow ...
Mike's user avatar
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5 votes
2 answers
394 views

What’s going on with John 7:16, “My teaching is not my own, but his who sent me”?

This seems unusual. Particularly, the odd part is “his who.” Is it correct to use a possessive and a relative pronoun in this way? If so, what similar phrases are also allowed? It seems like this is ...
Matthew Cortese's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
80 views

Why are **differences** in temperatures degrees C or F?

Per what I'm seeing online °F and °C are degrees because they have an arbitrary reference point; however, if you take the difference of two temperatures it's no longer an arbitrary reference. So why ...
user1543042's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
83 views

Is the word “it” needed after a comma in this situation?

Here is an example of my sentence: The physical therapy visit was not dated, did not contain the name or date of service, and therefore could not be validated. Someone is trying to correct me and ...
Annie's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
204 views

'I know what is freedom / freedom is'. <-- Word order in WH-questions

My understanding is that in a wh- subordinate clause, we must use statement word order (subject then verb) rather than question word order (verb then subject): Correct: I know what freedom is. Wrong:...
user182601's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
16 views

What's the rule about using I first in a sentence with multiple noun or pronouns? [duplicate]

A sentence can be written as I and my friends And My friends and I There are several references for both sentences but I want to know the rule for the first one.
Huma's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
160 views

When does a relative pronoun become the subject of a relative clause and when does it not?

Previously, I thought that a relative pronoun becomes the subject of a relative clause when the relative clause modifies the subject of the main clause. In other words, it serves a double purpose. For ...
Dirga's user avatar
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0 votes
3 answers
223 views

The problem with "there"

It is natural, now, to think of there being connected with a sign, also what I should like to call the sense of the sign. It's the first sentence of the paragraph. There wasn't a context about some ...
Sayber73's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
121 views

I would like to understand a sentence in 'The Catcher in the Rye' [closed]

I am having trouble following correctly this part of the book as to its logic it refers to. M'boy, if I felt any better, I'd have to send for the doctor... At first, it says under condition that if ...
PROCESIONES CELESTES's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
89 views

What happens when a sentence and an aside require different sentence structures?

How do you handle when an aside -- a parenthetical or a dashed aside -- doesn't fit with what follows, but since the aside is the "closest" thing, the original thing doesn't fit either. ...
Deane's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
78 views

There is a soldier on the hill whom he sees with binoculars

Give your first, immediate interpretation of... There is a soldier on the hill whom he sees with binoculars. What springs to mind? Are these to be rephrased in the same way? Is the punctuation ...
sanya6's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
66 views

Why is 'a' used between smooth and gloss? [duplicate]

I am reading a book (A Promised Land) and there is a sentence that I don't understand: I still like writing things out in longhand, finding that a computer gives even my roughest drafts too smooth a ...
merrona's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
84 views

Comma before a moved verb

I can't seem to find a definitive answer for this, and my colleague and I are disagreeing on it: Your next obsession, found. Your next obsession found. It was an advertisement, as in something like ...
humble.rebel's user avatar
14 votes
2 answers
4k views

'I think IT unlikely that our team can win'. <--Is IT the object?

We think it unlikely that our inexperienced team can win a single > game this season. Is "it" the direct object? If it is, what is the function of the noun clause "that our ...
cookie234's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
162 views

Is "Put together" a phrasal verb?

She put all the flowers together in one big bunch. Is "put together" a phrasal verb in this sentence? Or is "together" an adverb?
darkhealer's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
94 views

What's the linguistic difference between "exit only" and "only exit"? [closed]

For example, if a lane were to be marked "exit only", this would indicate that the lane is only for exiting. On the other hand, if a lane were to be marked "only exit", this would ...
Caleb Koch's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
100 views

How Relative Pronouns Work [closed]

A relative pronoun is called "both a conjunction and a pronoun". There are other definitions, but the horribly superficial ones like "connects two sentences" are enough. Why doesn'...
Kadir's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
55 views

Is the highlighted phrase an absolute phrase modifying the main clause or simply an non restrictive appositive?

But no one in Brega had a clear idea of what was happening on the battlefield, not even the few fighters fidgeting by a new barricade outside the refinery’s front gate Source-: https://www.newyorker....
rahul sehrawat's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
103 views

Why does this sentence "feel" wrong

I saw this sentence. It "feels" wrong, but I can't put my finger on why. Thanks for being part of the family and to help build a network. I feel that it should be: Thanks for being part ...
theblitz's user avatar
  • 153
0 votes
1 answer
75 views

The impediment generates that in relation to which it is an impediment . <-- analysis?

Can someone help me analyze the grammar of the following sentence? In a paradoxical logic, the impediment generates that in relation to which it is an impediment. I'm very confused by "that in ...
bww z's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
43 views

How to write the tree diagram for the following ambiguous sentence: "The design has large squares and circles."?

What is the tree diagram for the following ambiguous sentence? The design has large squares and circles.
smile for life's user avatar
3 votes
4 answers
343 views

Is "There danced a man in the hall" a grammatical alternative to "A man danced in the hall"? What verbs are possible here? [duplicate]

Does the following sentence sound grammatical to you? There danced a man in the hall With the meaning: A man danced in the hall. And compare it with There died a man in the hall Which one sounds ...
Koray Nedim Özdemir's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
27 views

Square Feet versus Square Foot [duplicate]

The sentence is The project would construct a 2000 square (foot/feet) kitchen.' I put 'The project would construct a 2000 square feet kitchen.' My senior reviewer changed feet to foot. Why? If I ...
Barnaby Briggs's user avatar

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