Questions tagged [syntactic-analysis]

Parsing or syntactic analysis is the process of analysing a string of symbols, conforming to the rules of a formal grammar.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0 votes
0 answers
33 views

This sentence puzzles me most

I saw this sentence in the CoGEL(Quirk et al). 15.16 Verbless clause: Wall-to-wall carpets in every room is their dream. Question: Why is this awkward sentence acceptable? It's obvious that it ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
26 views

Do we hyphen ordinal numbers written in letters? [closed]

Knowing that we hyphen compound numbers under 100. Do we do the same for the ones used for ranks? Every website I've looked at teaches how to hyphen cardinal numbers (67, 82, 34,...) but does not say ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
24 views

How should I hyphen decimal numbers written in letters (that contains the word "point" and "and")?

All the wesites I've looked at says to hyphen numbers when you are describing compound numbers between 21 and 99 (except 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80 and 90). A compound number is any number that consists ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
36 views

Help me understand this phrase: growing base yield royalties over a long period

That phrase is the heading of a short section from The Invincible Company by Alex Osterwalder et al. (The book is about managing, updating and optimizing your business model and constantly reinventing ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
25 views

Please help me understand by giving explanations to your answers. I answered wrong but didn't know why [closed]

Anyone who has ever pulled weeds from a garden _____ roots firmly anchor plants to the soil. (A) is well aware of (B) is well aware that (C) well aware (D) well aware that A major concern among ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
7 views

What are the syntactic structures of these three clauses? [migrated]

I'm working on a project in which I take sentences and clauses from utterances and distinguish their syntactic structure (declarative, interrogative, imperative). I've encountered three clauses that ...
user avatar
  • 1
1 vote
0 answers
43 views

What is the predicate part of the sentence in an "X is ___ed" pattern?

Basically, this derives from an NLP problem I am facing in software development. NLP stands for "Natural Language Processing", and it is ML dependent. Since it depends on ML, it is ...
user avatar
  • 111
1 vote
0 answers
20 views

present participle in there be sentences [duplicate]

"There is a man sitting under the tree. " How to explain the "sitting" grammatically?
user avatar
  • 11
2 votes
2 answers
203 views

Is "none" when used alone without antecedent singular or plural (for context, I'm talking about people): "None [are/is] here"?

I know that "none of [...]" can be both singular or plural, but when I use it alone in a sentence, without the "of" and without any other nouns, can it be both singular and plural ...
user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
30 views

What part of a sentence is "regarding X" classified as?

In the process of learning Japanese, I've been doing some grammar analysis on sentence structure (across languages), Eg. subject, object, etc. I've come across something I haven't heard of before: the ...
user avatar
  • 21
0 votes
0 answers
35 views

Is a 'to' needed here between the auxiliary verb and the main verb? [duplicate]

So this post just popped on a meme site. In the comments a discussion arose is the second meaning grammatically correct. If not, what is the closest correct formulation? Perhaps including some of the ...
user avatar
  • 207
4 votes
0 answers
84 views

How can I distinguish between supplements and modifiers as proposed in The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (CGEL)?

In CGEL, the authors use the term 'adjunct' as an umbrella term to cover an element that is either modifier or supplement. On page 1350, the authors explain the properties of supplements to ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
25 views

Should I use "who" or "whom" in "The main problem of Argentina comes from whom has taken office."? [duplicate]

Should I use who or whom in this sentence? The main problem of Argentina comes from whom has taken office. My logic I know that whom is an object pronoun, that whom has taken the office is the ...
user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
1 answer
25 views

Use of 'Get' in a particular type of sentences

I just want to know whether the sentences below are grammatically correct or not – His / that attitude gets me irked. Is the use of word 'get' acceptable in such cases? His / that attitude irks me. ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
34 views

Syllabify geology [closed]

How do we syllabify the word "geology? Ge ol o gy or ge o lo gy. If A is right then why is B wrong? If B so then why A? Also 2. laboratory.
user avatar
  • 11
2 votes
1 answer
58 views

Is it okay to say "Captains Carter and Marvel"? [duplicate]

An artist wrote "Captains Carter and Marvel" to refer to both Captain Carter and Captain Marvel together. Is it okay to use the title only once and make it plural when there are multiple ...
user avatar
  • 29
1 vote
0 answers
40 views

As if as though

I am having a problem identifing which gramatical function as if (as though, like) has As far as I know After linking verbs, we have noun/ noun phrase/ noun clause and adjective/ adjective phrase ...
user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
46 views

Describing multiple choices with two options in a particular order in one statement

Say I have three options (or choices if prefer) , A,B and C but one must decide on either A or later having the option of B and C (you cannot choose B or C straight away, only decide that you don't ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
39 views

Omitting a pronoun from a cleft sentence

I believe this is a cleft sentence: It was 10:18 ᴀᴍ when it happened. However, I cannot explain why the pronoun when can’t be removed when you rewrite that sentence into this one: When it (=the ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
30 views

In the pattern "I am also <adjective>," does "also" modify the verb "am" or the adjective?

My family and I saw the following phrase: The also relevant part is . . . We all agreed that it was kind of an awkward sounding construction. But we disagreed on whether it was grammatically correct....
user avatar
  • 101
1 vote
1 answer
33 views

How to explain this sentence structure

He later admitted having seen the dish on the menu... Would I break down the form of this as follows: admitted (verb, past participle of admit) + having (verb to have + -ing) + seen (verb past ...
user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
38 views

Is “whose” a true relative pronoun? (and request for the full list of relative pronouns)

The internet is indeed a tangled web, and since anyone can write anything, there is a lot of conflicting information about what is and isn’t a relative pronoun. We all agree that who, whom, that, and ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
25 views

Do the Phrases "Entitled to" and "Eligible for" Mean the Same Thing? [closed]

It comes up in the Supreme Court Couse Bacerra vs. Empire Health Foundation. Here is some example context: "Person x is ENTITLED TO medical assistance" and "Person x is ELIGIBLE FOR ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
31 views

The word "new" may be an Adverb or an Adjective

I am trying to understand this sentence where the word 'new' can both be an adverb and also an adjective. Can someone please help me explain the ambiguous structure and the meaning conveyed in the ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
30 views

Can "coincide" be use transitively?

The New York Times today has an unusual use of "coincide": NYT Looking at common-cold coronaviruses, some researchers have predicted that SARS-CoV-2 will become a seasonal winter infection ...
user avatar
  • 23.3k
3 votes
1 answer
45 views

As powerful as black holes are

Recently, I've come across some "as+adj+as" patterns that don't fit into the famous "as+adj+as" pattern. Like, he is as old as me. The new patters are as follow: As powerful as ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
56 views

Is this ordering of words wrong "make transparent [object]"? [closed]

I was scrolling around and found the post Long sentence between "make" and adjective. The OP is concerned that in the following sentence the bolded part is too long as an object (I think), ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
39 views

Is this list syntax correct?

I saw the following sentence earlier: We’ll help you win across every channel, every format and on your terms. I interpret that as one of the following: We’ll help you win; [across every channel], [...
user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
30 views

Usage of "even when" in a sentence [duplicate]

Does the meaning of this sentence change if “even when” is placed in the beginning? Removing the word “even” gives the sentence clear meaning, does adding it change the meaning?? Larceny occurs even ...
user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
1 answer
40 views

How to interpret 'when' in this sentence?

I have a question about how to interpret 'when' in the bold-lettered sentence. Below is the context and the sentence (from Beginners by Raymond Carver). “It gets worse,” Terri said. “He shot himself ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
22 views

Which is correct: 'a fear of never doing something' or 'a fear never to do something'?

In a story my students are currently reading, a mother who is an alcoholic and has a daughter with speech disorder does not ask the social services for help because she fears she might very well never ...
user avatar
  • 3,806
0 votes
2 answers
33 views

Natural Sentence and Unnatural Sentence [closed]

I think that since Tom is a student, he cannot buy expensive meat. I don't think that Tom can buy expensive meat since he is a student. Since Tom is a student, I don't think that he can buy ...
user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
137 views

"There are fish of every hue." For different kinds of fish, should fish be in plural form here?

In the Caribbean waters, there are fish of every hue. Since one is talking about different kinds of fish, should fish be in marked plural form (fishes) here?
user avatar
  • 209
1 vote
0 answers
22 views

"Looking forward to watching me play" vs "watching me playing" [duplicate]

We were reading a piece of text and my English teacher told us that the sentence: "For sure, my fans are looking forward to watching me play today." is wrong, and that it should instead be ...
user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
63 views

(Rather than) as a conjunction

It is said that, as a conjunction, the two constructions on each side of (rather than) must be parallel. So can this phrase join two sentences like this? (I know there are better ways of doing it) I ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
29 views

Is this a complex sentence with a relative clause?

I have a sentence here: “I don’t understand why you like birds.” Upon analyzing the sentence structure, there is what appears to be a relative clause: “why you like birds” Is this then a complex ...
user avatar
  • 559
1 vote
0 answers
23 views

How to understand the grammar structure of this sentence? especially the "by which that which"part?

"This whole government is carried on with our assistance and they try to keep us in ignorance of our power of cooperation between ourselves by which that which is in our own hands at present can ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
84 views

Confusing reduction transformation

Let's assume sentence below (which is From "The Official Cambridge Guide to IELTS"). Ants simply sense changes in their environment, as for example when the mound's wall has been damaged, ...
user avatar
  • 35
1 vote
0 answers
29 views

What is the word to describe speaking in the negative perspective? [closed]

Instead of saying "It is sunny", someone says "It is not cloudy" or "It is the opposite of cloudy". Is there a word to describe the last 2 sentences to mean speaking in ...
user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
112 views

Using 'all' without a noun or pronoun [closed]

As far as I understand, 'all' should always be followed by a noun or pronoun, so the sentence 'I want to buy all' is incorrect. However, in computer games and mobile apps, I often see phrases like '...
user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
100 views

negating contractions in Jane Austen

The novels of Jane Austen frequently contain constructions of the form auxiliary verb not which today are forbidden. We have Didn't you like it? Did you not like it? but *Did not you like it? Do we ...
user avatar
  • 141
2 votes
3 answers
62 views

"This is not getting washed" What is the function of "getting" in the sentence [closed]

I have seen a few sentences where the structure looks like this subject + to be + verb-ing + verb in past. Is this grammatically correct?
user avatar
  • 21
3 votes
1 answer
104 views

reversing extraposition

Let’s as­sume we have this sen­tence: It was the in­ven­tion of the hand-held cal­cu­la­tor that pro­vided the orig­i­nal tech­nol­ogy for the present gen­er­a­tion of small but pow­er­ful com­put­...
user avatar
  • 35
1 vote
0 answers
42 views

Is this prepositional phrase acting as an adjective?

The example Create a referral to a specialist. The question Is that sentence grammatically correct? I think it is because the prepositional phrase is acting as an adjective (modifying "referral&...
user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
73 views

"All hazards and dangers we barter on chance"

This is from the lyrics of "Arthur McBride" by Paul Brady. ...“But,“ says Arthur, “I wouldn’t be proud of your clothes For you’ve only the lend of them, as I suppose And you dare not change ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
50 views

Using the word "inform" as a synonym for "instruct" - Is this wrong?

I work in a section of my organization that involves writing of technical documents. Our organization recently put out a policy to avoid using the word "instruct" when referring to our ...
user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
136 views

"Given a man walking a dog and a cat,..." [duplicate]

I want to write a sentence that starts similar to Given a man walking a dog and a cat, ... This could be interpreted as "given a man that is walking both a dog and a cat". "given (a ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
13 views

Due to/because of [duplicate]

...does happen due to...; didn't happen due to; Carpal tunnel syndrome 'doesn't occur due to, but because of...extended use', for example. So, do any of those sound right — even if they're all wrong? ...
user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
125 views

English syntax: Object at the beginning of a sentence / Object as sentence opening [duplicate]

Is it correct to build an English sentence as follows, with the object as opener? The red chair we placed at the left end of the table. (instead of the 'standard' syntax: We placed the red chair at ...
user avatar
  • 173
-1 votes
1 answer
48 views

What's wrong with "There is nobody John works with who doesn’t love him"? [closed]

There is nobody John works with who doesn’t love him. (The sentence means to say that everyone with whom John works loves him.) What is the core problem in this sentence? The obvious problems that I'...
user avatar

1
2 3 4 5
65