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Questions tagged [syntactic-analysis]

Parsing or syntactic analysis is the process of analysing a string of symbols, conforming to the rules of a formal grammar.

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39 views

The difference between “doesn't contain” and “contains no”

Could anyone explain the difference between the following two sentences: The device doesn't contain random inputs. The device contains no random inputs. Are this sentences correct? If correct, ...
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What does 'it' refer to in “come you more nearer than your particular demands will touch it”?

Apologies for the long title; I was led to understand it is better to be as specific as possible in titles, even if it makes them a little long. I'll edit it if people agree otherwise. In Shakespeare'...
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Is this sentence syntactically correct?

" To put these skills to practical use, I participated in Kaggle competitions and attained a best of, a place in the top 17% in the leader-board." I am writing my SOP and was wondering if the second ...
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32 views

Question about a game concerning sentence structures

Would it be possible for a compound sentence to have a noun that is a retained objective complement, and this noun would then be contained in an elliptical clause functioning as a retained objective ...
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1answer
49 views

Why Shakespeare used “come” in the line “A Daniel come to judgement?”

From The Merchant of Venice, 1596: SHYLOCK: A Daniel come to judgment! yea, a Daniel! O wise young judge, how I do honour thee! Is it a perfect tense with the auxiliary verb omitted? And is ...
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40 views

'To solve' versus 'To solving'

Trying to understand what seems to be a very subtle difference in written and spoken English. Recently, I've seen articles that use 'to + gerund' and 'to + infinitive' in the exact same situations, ...
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27 views

Ajax was stricken by madness by the goddess Athena

The Microsoft® Encarta® 2009 reads Ajax was stricken by madness by the goddess Athena. What is its right syntactic analysis? The only one I come up with is [by madness [by the goddess Athena]], ...
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4answers
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'The Kukhtarev's model' or 'Kukhtarev's model' ('John's car' or 'The John's car')?

I think I know the answer to this but I just want to be sure. I have a supervisor who doesn't have a good level of English; sometimes he worries me with his corrections. I was writing: Here, we ...
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What's the grammatical structure of this sentence?

What's the grammatical structure of this sentence? "Conversely, in the majority of countries the proportion of children with low literacy levels increased, the biggest rise being evident in Austria.” ...
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48 views

“in that way” - Which of the following three sentences is more correct to convey the desired meaning?

I'm not asking for a proof reading. And to further clarify, the Context is there to only provide context. I ask you to please ignore any perceived mistakes in the Context (located underneath the ...
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1answer
69 views

Use of … all are?

Is the all in "John, Bob, and Sue all are hungry" redundant? Does it mean anything beyond "John, Bob, and Sue are hungry"?
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26 views

Sentence structure with “fitting”

Wework’s building in Tokyo’s Shibuya district is a cross between an iceberg and a plastic bottle passed through a shredder. Fitting, then, that the office-rental firm’s abortive listing, shelved on ...
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152 views

What is the answer? <--What's the subject?

This might seem like a simple question, but I'm not sure it definitely is. What is the Subject, in its most likely reading, of the question: What is the answer? Is it the noun phrase (NP) ...
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1answer
549 views

Why is this sentence grammatical?

I just encountered this sentence in the novel David Copperfield by Charles Dickens. Why is it grammatical? I am just not sure why there could be no conjunction between the two subjects it and he. ...
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4answers
137 views

Is it OK to use “if” at the end of a sentence? [closed]

Is it OK to use "if" at the end of a sentence? e.g. I saw a professor once saying: They can withdraw the paper you don't go to the conference if.
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30 views

Is this a simple or compound sentence?

The water will gradually evaporate leaving the sugar juice to solidify in the pan The ambiguous part to me is at the phrase: leaving the sugar... Is that a compound sentence of a clause (The water... ...
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27 views

Adverb of place vs prepositions

Keep the book right on the table. Keep the food down on the floor. Are the words right and down working as adverbs or prepositions here? If they're adverbs, what do they modify? If they're ...
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102 views

Omission of “is” in “She thought the study of Latin a waste of time.”

In The Elements of Style, the authors give this example: She thought the study of Latin a waste of time. I cannot understand why the verb is has been omitted. Should not this sentence be as: ...
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What are AWAY and APART modifying here?

I wanted to ask a question about the adverbs away and apart. The villages are miles apart. The exam is only two weeks away. It is three days apart. It is five kilometers away/apart. Away and apart ...
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1answer
88 views

Why can go take a gerund? (eg: go shopping; go fishing, go dancing)

I am trying to figure out why go can take a gerund, which is a verb doing the job of a noun, as an object yet the verb go is always intransitive and therefore cannot take an object. I need to make ...
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1answer
112 views

Who does “ I” refer to or who do “ I” refer to? [closed]

While framing a question, many teachers are doubtful when they are testing their students' comprehension of a given passage. For example, read the following paragraph and answer the following ...
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1answer
65 views

being usages dilemma

I've read in BBC that we use use "being" as a verb-ing. BBC has listed two kinds of usage; what I want to learn about here is the "preposition + verb-ing" usage. It has been said that "being + past ...
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3answers
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How to parse the grammar of a sentence that appears to have two tensed verbs

This question came from a student of mine - he wanted to know how to parse the grammar of this sentence, which appears to be simple but clearly is not: Peter seems to have found his glasses. ...
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3answers
82 views

What is the grammatical topic of this shortening technique?

Extracted from English cloze test: .....these virtual selves exist in the same online spaces that many people use every day. And this is a new and unfamiliar phenomenon that some people might ...
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1answer
57 views

How do you make a phrase possessive? [duplicate]

I just read a post where someone said "That's a friend of mine's house." My first thought was, "mine's" is a double possessive! The friend owns the house, and the one posting the comment owns the ...
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2answers
38 views

What part of speech is 'stumble' in this sentence?

I saw this sentence somewhere: 'This episode sees the heroine stumble upon a body.'. I know 'stumble' is a verb, but which part of the verb is being used here? I don't think I really know how to ...
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65 views

Can “either” be used as an adverb, and if so does it require, allow, or prohibit the use of a comma when so used?

Can either be used as an adverb, and if so, does it always take a comma when it is? And is the following statement correct in congruence with my question? I believe there is some mistake that I don't ...
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2answers
53 views

regarding the correct/incorrect use of the comma [duplicate]

There is a building which is taller than all others known as the Burj Khalifa. Is a comma necessary after "others", which makes the sentence: There is a building which is taller than all others, ...
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1answer
47 views

Thank you sentence structure

Which one is more correct? a) Thank you for your help Norman. -or- b) Thank you Norman for your help.
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49 views

Beginning a sentence with 'Comes'

A colleague asked whether it was possible to begin a sentence with the word 'Comes', noting that there should, surely, be an 'It' first. Of course standard grammar requires it, as far as I can tell, ...
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1answer
48 views

What does 'fungus-growing' mean?

Renowned Swiss entomologist Martin Luscher described the mounds of this fungus-growing species as being as much as 16 feet tall, 16 feet in diameter at their base, and with a cement-like wall of ...
3
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1answer
76 views

What do you call sentence structures with unnecessary pronouns? [duplicate]

Examples: "The father, he was very angry." instead of "The father was very angry" "The cup, it was overflowing." instead of "The cup was overflowing" I have seen it in dramatic texts, especially ...
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33 views

Sentence pattern

She was obedient to her elders. In this sentence, how do you label the phrase "to her elders?" The subject of this sentence is 'She', the verb is 'was'. complement is 'obedient', what is to her elders'...
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1answer
109 views

How the west was won - Is this a noun phrase?

I'm trying to determine what the following types of phrases (in bold within the sentences below) would be called. I want to say they're noun phrases, but I may be wrong. To me, these resolve to ...
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1answer
17 views

Parallel structure with a negative

Would this sentence follow the rules of parallel structure? In order to improve your country, you should take care of the environment, avoid throwing litter, help society, and don't use plastic. I ...
2
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1answer
84 views

How can “of me doing something” be grammatically correct? What grammar rule is this? [duplicate]

The first book on my list has actually been recommended to me like multiple times over the years of me doing BookTube. I found that sentence in my English book, and the last part where it reads of ...
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4answers
5k views

Why is “dark” an adverb in “dark blue”?

The sky is dark blue. Source: BBC English Catherine: The sky is dark blue. The sky is dark blue. Finn: So, is blue an adjective or adverb? Catherine: It’s an adjective. Blue is ...
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1answer
154 views

resulting from or resulted from?

Which one of these sentences is correct? For an academic paper The third theme resulting from focus group interviews was cultural barriers. The third theme resulted from focus group interviews was ...
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1answer
47 views

What part of speech is “almost” when applied to an adjective? [closed]

If I say that "the box is almost flat" what part of speech is "almost"? I can't say "the box is almost", so it does not appear to be an adjective itself. It seems to be a word that modifies the ...
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2answers
67 views

Subject/Object Confusion in The Silmarillion [duplicate]

In Tolkein's "The Silmarillion", page 216 of the chapter "Of Túrin Turambar", the following is written: "[...] this Wildman was the Mormegil of Nargothrond, whom rumour said was the son of Húrin ...
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1answer
52 views

"The economic and health [crisis | crises] can be tackled together.”

Is this sentence correct with plural crises: The economic and health crises can be tackled together. or should it instead be this one with a singular crisis: The economic and health crisis can be ...
2
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1answer
59 views

Why the comma is used in the sentence by Jane Austen [duplicate]

I cannot understand the usage of comma after "chapel" in this sentence: Its long, damp passages, its narrow cells and ruined chapel, were to be within her daily reach, and she could not entirely ...
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1answer
197 views

I have got a car (Present Simple or Present Perfect?)

I was taught that ‘have got’ means 'possess, own, or hold' and you can also use ‘have’ [Present Simple] I have got a car./I have a car I haven't got a car./I don't have a car Have I got a car?/...
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2answers
47 views

Singular or plural after Subject + modal + base form of the verb

For example: A well thought-out system streamlines operation, improves work process, reduces data redundancy..... If can is added to the sentence, should the following verb be singular or plural?...
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1answer
29 views

Help regarding the subject in a sentence

Could anyone please tell me what would be the subject in the following sentence which I have taken from the National Geographic website: Providing pools of water for frogs when other water is ...
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0answers
30 views

How should I correctly write the term 'get well soon card'?

My instincts tell me that the examples below may be correct; however, I could not find in corroborating sources online. She received many 'Get Well Soon' cards. He opened the mail to find yet ...
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1answer
27 views

Comma needed or not? [closed]

I was reading an article and found the below sentence: I met Ruhail through Facebook last year but I hadn’t saved his number as I didn’t want my parents to know. I believe the author missed commas ...
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51 views

In “behind the house was an old culvert”, is “behind the house” a complement or an adjunct?

In behind the house was an old culvert, is behind the house the subject of was, or is it an adjunct? I had it down as an adjunct but am changing my mind. If it's an adjunct, what rule allows us to ...
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0answers
18 views

Little did I suspect that she would sign a new contract.(inversion) [duplicate]

Why is it inversion? We use DID after the word LITTLE. If I see another example,I'll understand .So-Not until we saw our kids with our own eyes did we believe they were really safe and sound- in that ...
3
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1answer
44 views

Sentences that do not contain the classic subject and predicate structure [duplicate]

I understand the classic definition of a sentence is one that contains a predicate and a subject, but is it okay to have shorter sentences that don't follow this structure for effect? For example, if ...