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Questions tagged [syntactic-analysis]

Parsing or syntactic analysis is the process of analysing a string of symbols, conforming to the rules of a formal grammar.

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Sentences with “participle clauses” [on hold]

Are these sentences below grammatically correct and understandable? And which version of each example is more appropriate? 1- He is a bookworm, having lived first in Canada and then having moved ...
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2answers
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crashed out in practice for the Australian grand prix

An English dictionary gives the following example sentence: Schumacher crashed out in practice for the Australian grand prix. I'd like to know how to parse "crashed out in practice for the ...
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1answer
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What does “Disturb not X” mean?

I already know what the word disturb means, but I do not understand what disturb not means. I’ve seen titles that start with this, like Disturb Not the Dream and Disturb Not the Sleep, etc. What does ...
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0answers
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What does “self temporarily” mean? [migrated]

This is the whole paragraph I’m having trouble with: His uncle backhanded him so hard across his left cheek that Isaac’s sense of self temporarily broke upon the ground on which his body fell. ...
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0answers
30 views

“Instead of ʏᴏᴜʀ calling” vs “Instead of ʏᴏᴜ calling” [duplicate]

Which is better: Instead of your calling, maybe I should do it. Instead of you calling, maybe I should do it. I feel like the first one is the better choice here because instead of needs a gerund, ...
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1answer
59 views

“I know him ʙᴇɪɴɢ honest” vs “I know him ᴛᴏ ʙᴇ honest”

The intended original sentence before conversion is: I know that he is an honest man. I want to know about these two possible reformulated versions of that sentence that replace the original’s ...
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2answers
66 views

Who is lost in thought in “I had no glimmer of what was in his mind, nor did he enlighten me, but sat lost in thought…”? [closed]

I'd like someone to clear up the sentence that seems ambiguous to me. It's from "The problem of the Thor Bridge" by Conan Doyle. I had no glimmer of what was in his mind, nor did he enlighten me, ...
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0answers
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“have sm accoplished” [migrated]

I'm just wondering why we can say "What do you want to have accomplished in ten years ?" is it right to use "have sm done " in such sentence ? or we use present perfect here... im confused
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1answer
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“such … as” in an attributive clause

Please help me understand the following sentence structure: More than half the roster, including such popular characters as Black Panther, Scarlett Witch, Star Lord, Spider-Man, and Doctor Strange ...
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3answers
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What are the meaning and grammar of “Crying isn't like you”? [closed]

Can I say that something is not like somebody like this: Crying isn’t like you. What is its meaning?
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1answer
38 views

How do you parse the sentence?

The original sentence: In this way, we have learned all that we know of the laws of astronomy, or of the habits of the social insects, let us say. Please let me make it simpler as below: In ...
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1answer
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For the expression “bumf**k, Egypt”, is “bumf**k” an adjective and “Egypt” a noun? [closed]

I'm asking about the structure of the expression. If the answer is YES, then what's the reason for the comma. Besides, which Egypt is meant, "The Arab Republic of Egypt" or that "region of Illinois", ...
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2answers
101 views

In “You did me wrong”, is “wrong” an adverb or some other part of speech instead?

Consider: You did me wrong. In that sentence, is wrong an adverb or some other part of speech? I don’t understand the syntactic construction being used here.
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0answers
32 views

Comparison of equality used as Adjunct - As good/happy as

I came across this sentence in A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini: As happy as she was about this pregnancy, his expectation weighed on her. I was trying to parse this sentence and was ...
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1answer
41 views

I envisage that it does not. Can the sentence exist?

The sentence is my answer to the question of whether robots will replace teachers in the future. I am not a linguist or a native speaker, therefore I cannot tell the truth. Personally, I speculate ...
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1answer
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Why ”were” and not “was” in “and e’en to tell it ᴡᴇʀᴇ no easy task”?

I am reading a translation of Dante’s Inferno made by Cary in 1805. Here I cite the translator’s text for the opening of Canto I: In the midway of this our mortal life, I found me in a gloomy ...
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1answer
48 views

Do I need whom in this sentence? [duplicate]

"One of the benefits of this is that it will eliminate gym anxiety if you have any because you are with someone whom you trust."
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1answer
66 views

Complex object grammar and other things [closed]

I've seen a number of different phrases in different books describing the action of closing a door, and I'm not quite sure that I fully understand the grammar behind them. For example: (1) [He] ...
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0answers
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Omitting whose in relative clauses [closed]

I know object defining relative pronouns can be omitted. But I cannot figure out whether whose is object or subject of the sentences.
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0answers
65 views

Escaping [one place] to [another] - sentence structure validity

I want to use the following phrase in this specific structure (if possible): How come social media is considered as a way for people to escape life when they sometimes escape social media to(?) ...
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1answer
33 views

Framing of a sentence

I just want to know whether the below-constructed sentence is correct or not? If not, then what will be the correct form? One more question: which pronoun is apt at the end of the sentence? Either ...
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2answers
261 views

Should I write numbers in words or as numerals when there are multiple next to each other?

I hope this is not off-topic: How do you write things like this: The machine was tested in 5 3-players games, 2 4-players games... Or: five 3-players games, two 4-players games... I want to say e.g....
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0answers
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Feel confused about the use of “seem” or “seems” in these two sentences

I saw the first sentence in a book, and I thought it was a mistake. I googled it and realized that many writers had used it on the websites. But then I googled the second sentence and found many ...
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1answer
65 views

If only had I known it! / If only I had known it!

Could you help me, please? A question for the native speakers (desired) of British English or American English. Which variant is correct and why? Or it's possible to use either of them)? If only ...
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1answer
62 views

How “unless” and “until” affect the structure and meaning of a complex sentence

Here is an ex­cerpt from a book I’m read­ing: Un­less con­sumed in highly skilled rit­ual con­texts, as is prac­ticed in many tra­di­tional so­ci­eties, what drugs in fact do is re­duce our per­...
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5answers
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What is the gram­mat­i­cal term for “‑ed” words like these?

In English we say things like: a cal­i­brated de­vice a dis­trib­uted prod­uct a founded com­pany a de­stroyed house Those ‑ed words there all sig­nify that some verb (here re­spec­tively cal­i­...
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1answer
42 views

“Apposition,” “Metonymy,” & Synecodche [closed]

What's the difference between, apposition, metonymy, and synecdoche? May apposition include metonymy or synecdoche?
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0answers
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Categorizing sentences with lots of “the”

Consider the following sentence: "The higher the price the better the quality." I've certainly heard people say similar sentences before (in terms of sentence structure). How would one categorize a ...
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0answers
29 views

As for you, Frodo, in so far as lies in me

It's from The Lord of the Rings: ‘Then I will declare my doom,’ said Faramir. ‘As for you, Frodo, in so far as lies in me under higher authority, I declare you free in the realm of Gondor to ...
3
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2answers
92 views

Why is “…and others” wrong in this sentence?

Somebody asked me about this sentence: My business is closed on Thanksgiving, Christmas, and others. I know that it should be "...and other holidays", but I'm struggling to explain why. Is this ...
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1answer
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Formal writing, scholarly citation: 'Given in italics' or 'given italics'?

Generally, regarding scholarly citation, I would say As a general rule, any work that is published or produced under its own title is given in italics. However, yesterday I found another version ...
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0answers
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Pretended not to hear or pretended to not hear? [duplicate]

I'm trying to understand whether the two sentences are the same or are they different? 1. She pretended not to hear... 2. She pretended to not hear... Personally, I prefer the second choice but I ...
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2answers
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In this sentence with multiple negations, should I use “is” or “isn't”?

My apologies, I’m having issues with a double negative sentence. Bear in mind I don't want to change the sentence structure around, I just want to know if at the end of the sentence, I should put the ...
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1answer
58 views

What part of speech is the word hair in 'hair spray'? [duplicate]

Consider the following sentence as an example. I used some hair spray. What part of speech is hair? Intuitively, I want to say it's an adjective modifying spray since hair spray is two separate words ...
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1answer
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Is “that which” grammatical in the sentence “I have that which I should have told you summers ago”, and if so, how?

This is my first question although I have been reading you for a long time. My question is: can that which be used with the meaning of something? For me, that is a demonstrative pronoun, so you can ...
2
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1answer
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CaGEL equivalent to obligatory adverbial?

When I learnt grammar in school, I was taught that there are optional and obligatory adverbials. Trying to understand grammar in the form presented by Huddleston and Pullum (e.g. the Cambridge Grammar ...
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3answers
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Are these PPs or non-finite clauses – or something else entirely?

I'm wondering about the construction for [NP] to [VP], as illustrated in the following examples: (1) I waited for you to come here (2) He arranged for me to go there (3) For him to do that took ...
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2answers
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What's that you say? [Syntactic role of 'you say']

An opinion article titled "Mattel and Margot Robbie's Barbie movie is not the film 2019 needs" has this passage: Yet I don't think Mattel gives a tinker's cuss whether we're hating on Barbie or ...
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2answers
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“It's ok to somebody” sentence structure

I corrected a student as she had made the sentence "it's ok to Martin". I know that this sentence structure is incorrect, she asked why I had made the correction and I am having difficulty explaining ...
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0answers
32 views

usage and meaning of attribute after a noun [duplicate]

Suppose there is a cat ,a mouse and a table in a room, while the cat is watching the mouse. [Q1] What does "the cat is watching the mouse on the ground" mean? Are both the cat and the mouse on the ...
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0answers
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Extraposition -examples

a. Some guy with red hair was there. b. Some guy was there with red hair. Do both these sentences express the same meaning? I saw it in Wikipedia as examples of extraposition.
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0answers
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Can I say my name by using “this is” structure [duplicate]

Ex: This is John. Is it correct way to say my name?? This doubt has arisen when my friend told that "This is" structure is only used to specify about a thing not a person.
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0answers
62 views

The king wanted him killed VS The king wanted him to be killed [duplicate]

Do the following sentences mean the same thing or are they different? The king wanted him killed. The king wanted him to be killed. Please use examples to explain the differentiations.
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1answer
33 views

“You've said so time and again” [closed]

I have come accross an unusual to me form of sentence from "The curious Savage": "You’ve got me in such a state, I can’t think. I haven’t a brain in my head, anyhow—you’ve said so time and again.". ...
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5answers
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Can I write “You must not sit when your superior is not”?

I’m trying to shorten some of the sentences in my work and this sentence came across: “You must not sit when your superior is standing.” Is it grammatically correct to substitute with: “You must ...
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1answer
170 views

How to use passive voice in a sentence? [duplicate]

And as he ate it, she looked at him steadily. In this sort of grammatical constructions, "she" works as a subject of the sentence with active voice. Now, consider a sentence which I read in The ...
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0answers
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Help identifying clasuses, sentence structure

I'm a first time poster, so please let me know if I am posting in the wrong place! I am trying to break down the sentence structure of this sentence. Specifically, how commas are used in the following ...
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2answers
222 views

Opposite of 'Lion's share'

I am writing one proposal for one of the funding agency and I want to write some sentence which conveys following sentiment Although my contribution to this field will be small and not huge ...
2
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1answer
93 views

For the linguists among us: I like loud singing vs I like singing loudly

Can you explain why using "loud" as either an adjective or an adverb changes the meaning of the sentence. Is it just an English convention, or is there something deeper going on? I like loud singing =...
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2answers
47 views

Does a ver­bal noun turn back into a verb when mod­ified by an ad­verb? [duplicate]

Here singing is a noun: I like singing. But what about here? I like singing loudly. Loudly is still an ad­verb, right? But singing is still be­hav­ing like a noun, right? So which is it, a noun ...