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Is "between the pair" grammatically correct?

"Between" implies at least two things, as in "between the tree and the garden." In accounting, the term "firm pair" means a pair of firms. The phrase "between the ...
Eggy's user avatar
  • 111
0 votes
0 answers
12 views

"first century millennium" perhaps just a typo?

Just the other day I was reading a PDF entitled Early_Sino_Vietnamese_Lexical_Data_and_... and was confused by Phan (2013) has hypothesized what he calls Annamese Chinese, essentially a variety of MC ...
Dan Jacobson's user avatar
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0 answers
18 views

Is the phrase "Are you five years old" a thing? [closed]

Let's say you are an adult. And you did something childish or stupid. And your partner is puzzled and annoyed. And then says " What? Are you five years old"
birdpoolcleaner's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
11 views

Correct position of "always"

Which of the following two sentences is grammatically correct? The train always arrives late. The train arrives always late. Using the logic from answers to a similar question for the word "...
nwolijin's user avatar
  • 101
0 votes
2 answers
19 views

Is there a word or expression that describes a person who demands that something needs to be a certain way yet they wont help to get it that way?

For example: If someone demanded to another person that they will only communicate with them using a specific phone app and is fully aware that this person is unable or has forgotten the group ...
Jason's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
1 answer
21 views

Possessive of time / belonging to the ages: time’s or times’

Given that in the following phrase, "times" is equivalent to all time periods, or ages, from the beginning of time through the end of time, where would the apostrophe be placed: "time’s ...
Psaul's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
0 answers
14 views

Can 'as opposed to' be used preceding a verb? [closed]

Would one say 'hopefully it helps as opposed to leads you astray'? Or would it be 'hopefully it helps as opposed to leading you astray'? Summarily, can 'as opposed to' be used right before a verb? If ...
OJ K Greezy's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
28 views

What is the concept of an accepted default not having a formal name?

Is there a name for the concept of something not having a formal name because it's the default? I work in software. There is a traditional software architecture that was so normalized, it never had a ...
Deane's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
84 views

In this example do the square brackets mean Mexican was the original word and not addict? "the addict [read Mexican]"

... The suppression of traffic in a drug which makes the addict [read Mexican] frequently a dangerous or homicidal maniac. In this example, do the square brackets mean Mexican was the original word ...
patrick anderson's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
25 views

In saying "how things ought to be how they ought to be..." is the use of "ought to be" redundant? [closed]

Below is a quote from Herbert Simon (italics his, not mine)- "...the designer, is concerned with how things ought to be how they ought to be in order to attain goals, and to function." How ...
Shashank's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
44 views

To Find a Word Beginning with B: Adjective, in the Shape of a Grape [closed]

Probably spelled like biutyrial (only a reference), not included in dictionaries. But I remembered I have seen an article on merriam-webster.com about different shapes and funny insults. There are ...
findaword's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
57 views

"To put the copestone on something", meaning, literary synonyms

The expression "to put the copestone on something" is found in Wuthering Heights", a novel written by Emily Brontë. On opening the little door, two hairy monsters flew at my throat, ...
LPH's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
93 views

Meaning of the verb "hate"

Further to a preceding post about the classification of catenative verbs, CamGEL states that the verb "hate" has two different meanings depending on whether its clausal complement can have a ...
ishtar's user avatar
  • 410
0 votes
0 answers
25 views

What does "on" means in this context? [closed]

Some currencies are more valueble than others because Imagine that you are buying something from a company in China, and you live in America. In essence you are paying for the effort of a Chinese ...
Gia's user avatar
  • 1
4 votes
3 answers
706 views

"run-down" versus "rundown"

In The Complete Poems of Anna Akhmatova by Judith Hemschemeyer, we read: In this everyday gray dress, On rundown heels... I thought that "rundown" was a substantive and "run-down"...
Bruno's user avatar
  • 143
-1 votes
0 answers
20 views

Is "be to do" a shortened form of "be going to do"? [migrated]

You are to do your homework without watching any TV. The students are not to travel by subway without a friend. Can't we also write these sentences like this: You are going to do your homework ...
KoskeyNat's user avatar
0 votes
4 answers
101 views

Word or idiom to describe clothes colours that don't match

In Arabic, when somebody is wearing clothes that ridiculously don't match colour-wise, and therefore the person looks goofy, we describe their mismatched clothing as "zaraq waraq" - That ...
E.Groeg's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
45 views

'were' or 'was' in a sentence with two subjects - plural followed by singular [duplicate]

I have a sentence that goes somewhat like this: No further oranges or information <were/was> given. Now, I know that usually we use 'were' in cases like this where there are two subjects in the ...
ntn's user avatar
  • 1
-1 votes
1 answer
50 views

What would be a good humorous alternative to "Let's get a move on"? [closed]

You're stuck in traffic. It's bumper-to-bumper for no apparent reason, and you're annoyed. You want to shout: "Guys, let's get a move on!" But that's trivial and boring. What would be a good ...
Ricky's user avatar
  • 20.4k
2 votes
0 answers
61 views

Is there a word for feeling both intense panic and peace at the same time?

I'm looking for a word which describes the feeling of peace and panic at the same time. I get this feeling a lot when I'm looking up a the stars, or when I'm underwater. I saw somebody call is '...
Victoria's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
32 views

Manager/managee - role word question

What is the story behind the phenomenon where you can indicate a relationship between two people by adding -ee on the end of a word. Eg: mentor/mentee. Employer/employee. It seems to indicate a power ...
Cm78787's user avatar
  • 11
3 votes
0 answers
69 views

"A, and thus B, is true." or "A, and thus B, are true."?

Both of these sound correct to my ear, but I am sure experts can come up with a convincing reason to conclude that one of them is not grammatically correct. ChatGPT reasons that one should use "...
Atom's user avatar
  • 133
1 vote
0 answers
26 views

'Some people' and 'Others' and their relation in context of being majority/minority/equal

When there is a question that is about viewpoints of people for instance, and the answer comes in format like: Some people ... Others ... This generally gives me feeling that the first is minority ...
Jarek's user avatar
  • 111
0 votes
1 answer
45 views

Ambiguity in Singapore’s extradition act? [closed]

I refer to the interpretation part of Singapore’s extradition act: Does the foreign state here mean just “any foreign state” or “any foreign state between which and Singapore an extradition treaty is ...
selectivitism's user avatar
-2 votes
0 answers
34 views

What are the purposes of language and literature in human society? [closed]

Is language a part of literature or literature a part of language? What separates language and literature?. Some professors I know say that language can express or do whateever literature can do.some ...
Jvlnarasimharao's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
28 views

"...a wealth of additional informative information." looks somehow wrong to me - redundant to call information informative or OK? Missing comma?

Under my answer in Space Exploration SE I just added the comment: Note: I'll point folks back up to the comments under the question and to the other answer(s), both of which contain a wealth of ...
uhoh's user avatar
  • 877
0 votes
1 answer
56 views

Why are pronouns in gender-like listings always come in threes?

In a bio you might be asked to list the pronouns you'd like to be addressed with. For example: they/them/theirs or she/her/hers But why does this list has three entries? Wouldn't it be enough to ...
halloleo's user avatar
  • 498
10 votes
3 answers
3k views

Whence comes the expression ‘’starve a cold, feed a fever?”

What is the origin of the expression "starve a cold, feed a fever"? It is is used as basic (perhaps incorrect) medical advice for common illnesses.
Grundkeit's user avatar
  • 119
0 votes
0 answers
24 views

CavalCade -> motorcade [duplicate]

I have read this questio What is the etymology of "-cade" as in motorcade or cavalcade? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Motorcade says The term motorcade was coined by Lyle Abbot (in 1912 or ...
d-b's user avatar
  • 1,303
-1 votes
0 answers
34 views

What does "goes in" mean? [closed]

I can relate to this to some extent. My boyfriend is Korean, and given the recent "Kpop fever" or whatever, we often catch 13-year-old girls taking pictures of him, whispering while pointing ...
user525528's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
24 views

Is the word "smacking" only used when slapping someone on the buttocks? [closed]

I'm reading a book where the narrator says he wants to "smack" someone. I don't understand if he intends to slap the face or the buttocks. Can smacking only be used when someone is slapped ...
Andreia Carmo's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
1k views

Fire (as in shooting) in plural

Is it usual to write about “fires” when one means shooting? I was reading the RUSI report “Preliminary Lessons from Ukraine’s Offensive Operations, 2022–23”, and found that it uses the noun “fire” in ...
Ture Pålsson's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
79 views

Can I omit "it" in informal speech?

Instead of "coming from you, it means a lot" can I say "coming from you, means a lot"?
Lia's user avatar
  • 51
-1 votes
0 answers
23 views

Single noun as a concept instead of an object [closed]

I've been hearing these sentences since I started listening to podcasts, typically from elite intellectuals. Does this grammatical construct have a name, and where does it come from? The grammar is ...
piojo's user avatar
  • 289
0 votes
1 answer
53 views

Is "me's" a word?

I was writing out song lyrics and the guy pronounces "me is" (as in "ignoring me is bad enough") as "me's". Is this a real spelling or just sloppy pronunciation? I do ...
Charlie0828's user avatar
-4 votes
0 answers
78 views

What scientific literary English term describes a person who makes money from the misfortunes of others? [closed]

I forgot the scientific term in English that describes a person who makes money from the misfortunes/problems of other people. «Nineteen Eighty-Four» (1984) mentioned the term "prole", which ...
invzbl3's user avatar
  • 93
0 votes
1 answer
29 views

Which sentence is most correct? [closed]

Which sentence is correct? Coming from you means a lot! Coming from you, it means a lot!
user525114's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
52 views

Is "sort of like" hypercorrectur? [closed]

Dutch has soortgelijke "alike, similar", soortelijk "specific to", and indeed soort van "sort of", German has to my knowledge only technical jargon sortenrein "...
vectory's user avatar
  • 816
0 votes
1 answer
47 views

What is the general term for terms that end in -ian, -ist etc.?

All the terms with a definition starting with 'One who... ', what is the term to describe these terms? Like, Occupation is the general term for a particular line of work; Mechanic, Doctor, Dentist, ...
EMS's user avatar
  • 339
0 votes
0 answers
8 views

What's the correct reply to “nice to meet you”? [migrated]

I’ve learnt all my life replying to “nice to meet you” as “me too” or likewise and so on. But maybe I am learning wrong or whatever, I have seen people replying in American soaps and movies as “you ...
Naveed Ahmed's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
217 views

Is there a word in English specifically for any dream during sleep? [closed]

The word dream have two main dictionary meanings: a series of events or images that happen in your mind when you are sleeping something that you want to happen very much but that is not very likely ...
halt9k's user avatar
  • 121
1 vote
0 answers
22 views

'If I were mayor, I'd make the public transport free.' What is the reported speech of this sentence beginning with 'she said'? [migrated]

I am confused about the answer to this question in the Cambridge English Objective Proficiency Student Book Second Edition. The answer given is She said that if she had been mayor, she would have ...
Kow Kang's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
79 views

In Early Modern English, is it common to use “if thou do something”, or “if he do something”?

In the sentence patterns mentioned above, the predicates are uninflected. But in current English, such subjunctive usage only appears in the copula be (I assume). Eg., "whether it be" is a ...
user524868's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
58 views

meaning of to drive out between trains

I am reading Edith Wharton's famous 'Afterward' (1910). Which is a struggle for me since many of her sentences and words are beyond my understanding. (English is not my native language) Anyway, today'...
user58207's user avatar
  • 1,533
0 votes
0 answers
33 views

Slang words describing the persons in the "Distracted Boyfriend" meme? [closed]

¿Are there slang words describing each of the three persons in the "Distracted Boyfriend" meme:
Geremia's user avatar
  • 722
0 votes
1 answer
37 views

What does "taking" means here?

Seems stagnant? How so? TAKING new parks, 'Gathering Place' is new and one of the best parks, if not the best park, I’ve ever been to. Tulsa has lots of stuff opening downtown and has a pretty good ...
user524761's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
23 views

Frequent vs often, before vs after [migrated]

Suppose the trash gets collected in your neighborhood on Wednesday, and it did, but now it is Friday and you see the trash getting collected again. As a native speaker of English (California) I would ...
davidbak's user avatar
  • 131
0 votes
0 answers
38 views

"smaller to larger" vs "smallest to largest"

Would it be ok to say "from smaller to larger" or do I have to say "from smallest to largest" E.g., I'm using the batteries from smallest/smaller to largest/larger capacity.
FluidMechanics Potential Flows's user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
554 views

Is "farfel" an idiolectical quirk/part of a familect?

My whole life, my family has used "farfel" to refer to anything small, unwanted, usually fabric-based, and out of place (i.e., on the floor; not in the trash). Lint, a few millimeters of ...
Ben A.'s user avatar
  • 195
0 votes
0 answers
6 views

Which one of these sentences is correct? [migrated]

My vocabulary is lower than Americans'. My vocabulary is lower than an American's
Loa's user avatar
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