0
votes
1answer
13 views

adverbial phrase inversion

I am teaching English at a high school in South Korea. I am not an American but Korean. Recently, I was teaching adverbial phrase inversion as a grammatical point. My question is which of these ...
3
votes
2answers
29 views

A person who has a hard time throwing away unnecessary things

What would we call a person who has a hard time throwing away unnecessary things, and, as a result, has a home cluttered with stuff? This person is not just untidy. What causes the clutter is their ...
0
votes
1answer
36 views

Is it possible for an adjective to modify another adjective? [on hold]

While I doubt an adjective can modify another one, I'm wondering if it may be possible. Here is the example: "An immaculate black three-piece suit." Most likely, I'd have to use the adverb ...
2
votes
1answer
19 views

In the following sentence , should locally owned have a hyphen?

In the following sentence , should locally owned have a hyphen? A fun, causal way to sample the sights, stories and flavors of a cross-section of locally owned restaurants.
-2
votes
0answers
31 views

What is the only word that contains the letters A&E IOU and Y [on hold]

UnqUEstIOnAblY Unquestionably is the only word in the dictionary That contains the letters A&E IOU and Y
0
votes
0answers
35 views

What does “high to take care” mean? [migrated]

I need to translate an item from a questionnaire: “My parents were too drunk or high to take care of the family.”, but I don't understand the part "... or high to take care ...". How to understand the ...
0
votes
3answers
31 views

Connecting consequences and premises

“Hence”, “therefore”, “ergo”, “so”, “thereupon”, and “thus” are examples of connectors where the premises are written before the conclusion. I am looking for ways to connect a consequence and its ...
0
votes
1answer
30 views

Sardony sarcasm, irony, satire, or what

What is the literary term or convention that best describes the following sentence: "Socrates drank hemlock, therefore you should drink hemlock" The term I seek is similar in form to sardony/...
1
vote
4answers
154 views

Word that means married but also includes pre-marriage relationship?

First, some background. My wife and I dated for 9 years before we got married. We've been married 19 years, so we've been together for a total of 28 years. I am running for my local school board ...
1
vote
2answers
40 views

What does “take dead aim” mean? Does “dead” do anything?

I've heard this term, to take dead aim at something. Does the "dead" in this expression do anything? I remember hearing the expression "I'll do my level best" and was quite sure leaving "level" out ...
-1
votes
0answers
15 views

Past simple, present perfect, present perfect continuous using “in the last hour”

She ate 36 sandwiches in the last hour. She has eaten 36 sandwiches in the last hour. She has been eating 36 sandwiches in the last hour. Is it legal to use present perfect continuous in the example ...
2
votes
1answer
46 views

What do you call a pun that isn't a pun?

I've just learned of the event within the (UK) Labour Party known as the 'Chicken Coup' and it made me wonder: is it still a pun if it's a play on writing, and not the spoken word? According to the ...
-2
votes
0answers
22 views

please correct this sentence [on hold]

is this sentence grammatically correct to ask "How is new place" just wanted to ask about new place of a friend.
2
votes
1answer
20 views

“Done with the task” or “Done with task”?

Which is the correct form: "[are you] Done with the task?" or "[are you] Done with task?" It feels to me that the first form is the correct one, as it implies the specific task that was assigned ...
0
votes
2answers
61 views

Past tense of MOT?

I'm usually quite good at this kind of thing but can't decide on this. When describing when a car has had its MOT test do I write... Recently MOTd Recently MOT'd Recently MOTed ...or something else?...
2
votes
6answers
81 views

Is there a word or term for always saying you're going to do something, but then not doing it? [on hold]

For example, my SO always talks about getting all of these tattoos, but then never does. Or, I talk about how I want to go on all of these world-travelling adventures, but then never do. Looking for ...
5
votes
2answers
921 views

“Which exams is he taking?” or “Which exams are he taking?” [duplicate]

There is a set of exams (e.g. SAT subject tests, AP exams, etc.), and a (male) student is necessarily taking more than one of those exams. My friend knows which ones he's taking, so I'm asking him ...
2
votes
1answer
35 views

“We” when referring to a team of 1

When contacting different departments of companies many will end an email/letter with something like Sincerely, The [Company Name] Support Team. additionally they will refer to themselves as "...
1
vote
1answer
24 views

De Certeau’s shtick is to read the environment as one would a script: that is, like written speech

De Certeau’s shtick is to read the environment as one would a script: that is, like written speech. Is another “read" missing after "would" or is it correct? If it is correct, how can"would"indicates"...
1
vote
0answers
29 views

What is the word that fits both “repair” and “manipulation” categories?

I am tasked with choosing a word that covers both the repairing of a mechanical device and mechanical manipulation; when something is not broken yet could use some tinkering. "Wrenches are tools ...
-1
votes
0answers
15 views

Need help with verb tenses [on hold]

Two people were married to one another. Can I say: They were destined to had been together?
1
vote
1answer
46 views

What is the correct pronunciation of 'cwtch'?

I heard this word for the first time in this news item when a little girl pronounced it rhyming with 'clutch'. After her Dad died a company made a cuddle bear or 'memory bear' out of Dad's clothes for ...
0
votes
0answers
42 views

Which is correct, the use of “it” or “they” with the word “Audience”? [duplicate]

The Question is about the Sentence: With the lighthearted tone of the play, the audience never doubts a happy ending, and it is never caught up in the tension of an uncertain outcome. Is the use of ...
0
votes
0answers
23 views

Repetition of articles, a and an

Once again, I am really cofused about all the three statements given below. Which of these sentences is gramatically correct and why? She is an honest and a hardworking child. She is an honest and ...
4
votes
2answers
175 views

Word meaning vulnerable to the elements

I would like to see what is the closest word I can get that means vulnerable to the elements. One word is preferred, as opposed to a phrase. Here is a basic example: Steel is ____________, but ...
0
votes
0answers
14 views

''It enables the decentralised control of each component independently''

Does it make sense? I've read the sentence over and over, and something doesn't seem quite right. Decentralised seems to conflict with the word independently Can anyone spot a problem or is it just me?...
0
votes
2answers
49 views

A word or phrase for someone who is sure of himself [on hold]

Is there a word or phrase for someone who is sure of himself, someone who acts like everything they say is a fact even when it's not.
0
votes
0answers
20 views

It's not mine, though

I have given something for them to use and saying "It's not mine, though". Is it correct to use this way?
0
votes
1answer
16 views

Is the expression “most number of participants” correct? [on hold]

Which is correct, "most number of participants" or "highest number of participants"?
0
votes
1answer
19 views

How to write “Stay up-to-date with notifications” or “Stay up to date with notifications”

Please help, how to write correctly "Stay up-to-date with notifications" or "Stay up to date with notifications". To me it seems to be an adjective here, therefore I would choose "up-to-date". ...
0
votes
1answer
24 views

“Photograph looks like X” or “Photograph looks like of X”

Here is my current sentence: This photograph may look like an exotic exoplanet Is this grammatically correct? As it is the subject of the photograph that looks like a planet, not the photograph ...
1
vote
0answers
24 views

How to say “how to use” in a more academic/formal way?

I am looking for a way of saying "how to use" a certain instrument or apparatus in a scientific context or just in general. I have thought of the following: mode of use method of use working mode ...
10
votes
12answers
3k views

What is the English word an overly skinny person? [on hold]

In Russian there is a jargon word "дрищ" (~ dreeshch) that usually (depending on the context) means either diarrhea or an extremely lean, usually undermuscled person, something like the one on the ...
0
votes
2answers
30 views

Meaning of very purpose?

I am confused about the word "very purpose" what does it mean & where we can use it. As per my English knowledge, I what I can guess is not making sense. It would be nice if get any assistance. ...
1
vote
2answers
24 views

Can there be a comma between the adverb and the noun of the last member of a series?

I saw a practice SAT question on Khan Academy: Certified Executive Chef Hilary DeMane has prepared confections for celebrities, governors, and even Ronald Reagan. The correct answer is filled in ...
0
votes
0answers
13 views

Repetition of indefinite articles [on hold]

I am really confused about the use of indefinite article, a. My question is that, should it be repeated like in sentence 1 or should it not be repeated like in sentence 2. What is the difference ...
0
votes
2answers
38 views

Grammar of “and”

"However, it considerably slipped and is estimated to dip to 83% and 78% in 1981 and 2021, respectively." is the above sentence grammatical true? I think the word "and" here connect two phrases "it ...
0
votes
1answer
47 views

“Are to” and “Have to”

There's a question in an exam paper to which there's only one answer: Students ______ to make tough decisions after the final exams are out. Between 'have' and 'are', which most suitably fills the ...
2
votes
1answer
40 views

Bain't = be not

Please read the passage taken from "A Few Crusted Characters" by Thomas Hardy: According to Wiktionary, "bain't" is the contracted form of "be not" and it is a British dialect. Therefore, the ...
0
votes
1answer
27 views

Irony and lack of self-awareness

They are not the same, are they? For example, if a person says: "I can't stand those f----ng people because they are so foul-mouthed!", I don't view the statement as ironic. But some highly-educated ...
2
votes
0answers
36 views

Be we all here?

The passage below is taken from Life's Little Ironies by Thomas Hardy. My question concerns "Now be we all here?". I understand that it means "Now are we all here?". The writer might have left the ...
-1
votes
2answers
38 views

A/an uniform vs a/an historic journey

Seeing as I'm new I apparently have to start a pseudo-duplicate thread rather than comment on an existing thread, so here it goes: If the reason for it being "a uniform" rather than "an uniform" is ...
0
votes
0answers
26 views

In Old English or in Middle English was “join” ever pronounced “jin?”

In Old English or in Middle English, was "join" ever pronounced "jin?"
-1
votes
1answer
23 views

Informal and maybe even childish word for “warranted”? [on hold]

In the context, What warranted such a punishment? what is another word for warranted that is particularly informal or juvenile, and stresses that characteristic?
1
vote
1answer
41 views

A word to describe things that reduce control

I'm writing about the concept of "that which has a chance of preventing the intended or desired result". I refer to it frequently and it's very inconvenient to define it every time so I need to find a ...
2
votes
2answers
58 views

Is “bescumber” transitive or intransitive?

Behold! Did my lawn mower bescumber my neighbor's fence (transitive), or did it bescumber on my neighbor's fence (intransitive)? Or should I switch to passive voice and say my neighbor's fence was ...
0
votes
2answers
51 views

Origin of the adverbial phrase “all but” meaning “very nearly”?

The definition of “all but” means “very nearly,” but this makes no sense logically. For instance, if someone says “That word is all but forgotten” it means that whatever word the speaker is referring ...
0
votes
0answers
22 views

Would a comma be needed for clarification or negation in the following sentence?

In the following sentence, is a comma needed after sky? I'm worried that without the comma the sentence could be confusing. The character looks up to the sky, expecting to see a dragon, but the reason ...
0
votes
1answer
31 views

What is the difference between “social butterfly” and “socialite”? [on hold]

I think both are one and the same but that word socialite may best describe a person formally and it may also describe person's lifestyle while social butterfly describes person who socializes at an ...
0
votes
2answers
150 views

word for the light at dawn

Is there a noun that describes the light at dawn in the same way as twilight describes the light at dusk? Similarly, is there a dawn analogue to the adjective crepuscular ? Many thanks for any ...

15 30 50 per page