Questions tagged [british-english]

This tag is for questions related to English as spoken in Great Britain, and sometimes Ireland.

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2
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3answers
176 views

Is “repository” pronounced /rɪˈpɒzɪt(ə)ri/ or \ri-ˈpä-zə-ˌtȯr-ē\ or /rəˈpäzəˌtôrē/?

Is it /rɪˈpɒzɪt(ə)ri/ or \ri-ˈpä-zə-ˌtȯr-ē\? I'm confused, I've seen it pronounced both ways and I'm not not sure if it's an American/British thing or do people just use different pronunciations ...
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0answers
8 views

regarding the proper use of “To” in action [on hold]

"To register happiness and sorrow without sensory mechanisms, they themselves would cease to be." Is the expression used above grammatically correct, hence is this sentence grammatically correct?
5
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1answer
487 views

What did Jeremy Hunt mean by “slipped” to miss a vote?

Today in the UK House of Commons, Conservative MP and PM candidate Jeremy Hunt failed to take part in an important vote. He said: I missed votes today because I thought I was slipped and it turns ...
0
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0answers
25 views

Sentence grammatically correct? [on hold]

"They believe that ancient man in his naivety, as he stood just a step beyond the dividing line between humanoid and human being, was confused and bewildered by all that he saw around him." Is the ...
0
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0answers
13 views

Asking about subscription terms start noun, verb, adjectives

I need to create a database which holds subscription member. But, its confusing to name it. I need a terms to call start subscription date. month subscription. end subscription date. i call it ...
0
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0answers
24 views

comma before 'so that' in a long sentence in British English

Continuing https://ell.stackexchange.com/questions/203035/when-do-we-put-a-comma-before-so-that, consider the following British-English sentences: It is important to involve the application ...
3
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1answer
100 views

Britishism: see you fast

In Season Two Episode One of Happy Valley, the mentor constable explains to the new recruit how helpful it is to have a good relationship with the receptionist, Joyce: Oh, and get well in with ...
0
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4answers
132 views

How can I translate the French expression “travailler en alternance” to English? [closed]

I am looking to translate the expression travailler en alternance into English. I have found several answers on the internet but none seems to match my use case. I am still at school and I am ...
0
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1answer
36 views

Various mails in chain [closed]

Which is more correct to say See mail trail See trail mail I want to know the right sentence to use when writing mail. Some people use mail trail while some use trail mail. It puts me ...
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0answers
37 views

in this sentence, do you need a “because”?

is this sentence correct? To pick up an item, left click on its green box. You will walk to there and pick it up. If red, you cannot, you are too far away. Thank you
1
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1answer
38 views

Is there a rule for the (non-)capitalisation of Schadenfreude and sauerkraut? [duplicate]

The Cambridge Dictionary capitalises Schadenfreude but does not capitalise sauerkraut. What is the BrE rule for this (other than looking it up in a dictionary or style guide), if any? NB: According ...
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0answers
16 views

British English for possessive 's when a names ends with “s” [duplicate]

My son has a teacher that he wishes to give a gift to, Mrs. Coomes. What is the correct way to use what would normally be 's when the name ends with es? Another answer states adding es on the end ...
1
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0answers
28 views

Comma between two embedded relative clauses introduced by a verb, starting with relative pronouns, and connected with a conjunction?

Consider the following sentence: But the question of how to make sure that software is written effectively(,) and at the same time that it works correctly in all cases is bothering many software ...
0
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1answer
37 views

Is comma before 'and even' needed?

Consider the following sentence: Many businesses in the service sector, such as banks and insurance companies(,) and even telecommunication companies, use software intensively. In British English, ...
0
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0answers
15 views

'There’s no hope of their winning the match.' [duplicate]

I have seen this given as an exemplary gerundial construction in a B2/C1 level English exam's guidelines. Can anyone please explain, how is this sentence grammatically correct (the 'their winning the ...
0
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1answer
24 views

To collect someone or to pick someone - UK English

What would a receptionist say to someone having an appointment: "Please, take a seat; someone from company ABC is on the way to collect (?) you". What is more more idiomatic in a formal UK English: ...
0
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1answer
43 views

Is a comma after the word introduced by 'let alone' in the middle of a sentence needed?

Consider the following British-English sentence: It is difficult for the decision-makers to believe, let alone accept(,) that the increased hardware-security would outweigh the production loss ...
0
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1answer
36 views

I have got a car (Present Simple or Present Perfect?)

I was taught that ‘have got’ means tener and you can also use ‘have’ [Present Simple] I have got a car./I have a car I haven't got a car./I don't have a car Have I got a car?/Do I have a car? ...
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0answers
46 views

not seeing why a Sikh should put on airs with me [closed]

I asked Narayan Singh what he would do in the circumstances. “That will be a simple matter, sahib,” he answered. So I damned him suitably, not seeing why a Sikh should put on airs with me. “Any ...
0
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0answers
75 views

So I damned him suitably, not seeing why a Sikh should put on airs with me

I asked Tom what he would do in the circumstances. “That will be a simple matter,” he answered. So I damned him suitably, not seeing why a Sikh should put on airs with me. “Any ignorant fool can say a ...
31
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6answers
8k views

Sleepy tired vs physically tired

I'm trying to figure out if there is a better way to distinguish between being sleepy-tired, and being physically tired. Scenario A: You didn't get much sleep last night. It's only 10am so you've not ...
0
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0answers
39 views

“Flat” joke in the “Courtroom” sketch of A bit of Fry and Laurie

One of my favorite sketches from "A bit of Fry and Laurie" series is the courtroom sketch. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SVRODdXVI3Q There is, however, a little detail in the sketch I am having ...
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0answers
41 views

“Search up” in place of “look up” or “search for”

My school-child insists that amongst (British) English youngsters, “search up” is now commonly accepted, e.g., “Search up doolah on Google.” Is this really a common (emergent) use?
1
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1answer
56 views

Is “mad” used as an intensifier in the UK?

I mean mad as in 'mad good' 'mad props' etc which mean ''very good'' or ''much propers to you'' or intensifies the ''good'' part. I hope its more clear now?
0
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1answer
47 views

Ground Floor versus First Floor; Who is Less Wrong? [closed]

In the UK we say 'ground floor' and in the US they say 'first floor' for the lowest level in a building. As I am fairly sure, no-one else in the world uses this terminology. Does this make Britons ...
0
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0answers
48 views

I don't want to make any excuses for myself

Is this sentence correct? For instance the context is that I'm talking with a friend and I'm telling him I don't want to make any excuses for myself. Sounds a bit odd, what can I do to make it more ...
3
votes
1answer
94 views

Differences in swearing - UK vs US [closed]

I often watch american series and they all swear like: "fuck", or "don't fucking do this", "what the fuck!" on the softer side: "Jesus Christ!", "Jeez". But I was wondering is, what are the British ...
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0answers
27 views

How does one use a forward slash that applies applys between two interchangable phrases; as opposed to two interchangable words?

For example, 'Continuous Integration/Continuous Deployment' would mean, in essence, 'Continuous Integration Development'; or 'Continuous Continuous Development'. This does not seem to amke too ...
1
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2answers
38 views

What is the phrasal verb for working hard?

I can't recall that phrasal verb and I'm upset. It's like a 's**** away' phrasal verb. Also, if I've got it right, it means to work hard, but it's not slave away. Anyone?
0
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1answer
22 views

What is meaning of “Wrestling words into submission”? [closed]

I came across a sentence which goes "I knew I wasn't meant to spend my life locked away in a silent room alone and half-crazed, wrestling words into submission." Can some please tell me what it means?...
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0answers
48 views

Change in pronunciation of “leverage”

Why have British people recently started pronouncing leverage as "levverage" (ie: the US pronunciation)? This is especially apparent now in reporting financial and political trends. I have spent my ...
1
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2answers
134 views

What is a secondary school graduate called?

I think graduate indicates only a university graduate in British English, but in American English can it perhaps also suggest a high-school graduate as well? Could anyone tell me something about ...
1
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0answers
30 views

What are the English phrases/words a foreigner should not use? [closed]

Do you know this feeling, when somebody is trying to use a word they heard somewhere and think that it's relevant and will be suitable, but it actually isn't because they are not the generation that ...
1
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1answer
100 views

“Welcome” or “Welcomed” in British English or American

If I was telling someone "you're most welcome, and accepted." should I've said most welcomed instead of welcome?
2
votes
2answers
41 views

Should 'known as' be followed by quotation marks?

e..g This is how he became known as 'the ape king'. or 'from then on, he became known as 'the smartest man in Britain'. Or should this be without quotation marks?
2
votes
1answer
58 views

Sentence structure:When should I put the noun in front of the verb?

The four sentences below are all correct but I don't know when exactly I should put the noun in front of the verb after 'than'? a.The Internet allows more direct and open communication than does the ...
0
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0answers
19 views

What is the meaning of this?

I saw a person saying to his friend (right before he was about to leave) you will always be a part of me What does this actually mean?
2
votes
1answer
79 views

Why do American people use simple past instead of present perfect with “ever”? [duplicate]

I would say British English seems to adhere to English grammar books that I learned in school more than American English. For example, I was taught that we use present perfect with "ever" because the ...
0
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1answer
29 views

Using phrases in email to prof (academic)

1. "I hope you are doing well" Will be it polite, if I write it in an email to Proff/start an email with it? He was ill, and we wrote me about it 2. Thank you for taking time from your busy schedule ...
2
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2answers
69 views

The interpretation of the word “pry”

Can the word "pry" be interpreted negatively (offensively)? For example, “to pry into other people's affairs” or is it still possible to interpret the meaning just as “curious”? I am interested in the ...
0
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1answer
38 views

Should commas really be put in the beginning of a sentence if I put something in front of the subject?

I am currently a student at a school with a fairly low english level. I live in a non-english country. I am bringing this up not becuase it really changes anything, but rather to clarify that the ...
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0answers
25 views

Meaning of “tugging at his oar”

What meaning of idioms "tugging at his oar"?. Context of it is "He is now to be considered as 'tugging at his oar,' as engaged in a steady continued course of occupation, sufficient to employ all his ...
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0answers
30 views

Is the sentence 'I am aspiring Chartered Accountancy' grammatically correct?

My friend is unsure whether to put it in his credentials for an internet site or not. I am also not entirely convinced that it is correct. It makes sense but doesn't look correct. What am I missing? ...
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1answer
67 views

Which is standard usage in British English? [duplicate]

Which is standard usage in British English? He said, 'Bite me.' He said, 'Bite me'.
3
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4answers
79 views

Meaning of “levee”

I read in "The life of Samuel Johnson" and see this sentence: On Saturday, July 9, I found Johnson surrounded with a numerous levee, but have not preserved any part of his conversation. I look ...
1
vote
1answer
57 views

“Frit” as dialect for “frightened” - which dialects, especially as simple past?

Out walking the other day I came across a lovely West-Country-ism from a local walking her dog - frit, meaning frightened, in "you frit him" (referring to a startled dog). The speaker sounded local (...
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0answers
20 views

“customisation” vs “customization” Which is correct? [duplicate]

"customisation" vs "customization" Which is correct? As per MS Word, customization is correct but Google Chrome correct it to "customisation" Thanks in advance.
0
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1answer
20 views

Is “have understanding” right to use? Or should it be replaced with “understand”? [closed]

Is "have understanding" right to use? Or should it be replaced with "understand"? Thanks in advance.
0
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3answers
42 views

Meaning of “but” in this context [closed]

I read this sentence in The Life of Samuel Johnson: "The booksellers who contracted with Johnson, single and unaided, for the execution of a work, which in other countries has not been effected ...
-1
votes
1answer
55 views

What does “numbers” mean here?

I see this paragraph in The life of Samuel Johnson About this time he made one other effort to emancipate himself from the drudgery of authourship. He applied to Dr. Adams, to consult Dr. ...