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Questions tagged [british-english]

This tag is for questions related to English as spoken in Great Britain, and sometimes Ireland.

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2answers
34 views

Translating a scientific paper from American to British

Over the last few years I have translated into English a fair amount of scientific papers for a Mexican scientist. Throughout this time, I noticed that by far the most common style requirement was ...
2
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2answers
30 views

the meaning of “fused the plug”

Context: "Why are we so worried about artificial intelligence? Surely humans are always able to pull the plug?" People asked a computer, “Is there a God?” And the computer said, “There is now,” ...
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2answers
25 views

Is it right? “I will definitely meet you, if i did not get engaged”

Recently I got engaged. Someone has asked me to meet up, but I denied. So I just want to know, is this sentence correct or not: "I will definitely meet you, if I did not get engaged"
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1answer
34 views

I feel hard to understand this sentence, can anyone help me please

Well, I read an article in terms of tourism and need to translate it but I have no idea what is this sentence is about. A substantial proportion of the population of modern societies engages in ...
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0answers
11 views

Learning anything comes in work throughout the life of any person. Is this statement correct?

Please need to know it's correct version. It's the expression of one of the student of O level for directed writing.
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3answers
44 views

I want to know if this this grammatically correct “the students have begun their usual morning devotion when the teacher entered”

I want to know if this sentence is grammatically correct. 'the students have begun their usual morning devotion when the teacher entered the class' I am confused with have begun and had began
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0answers
24 views

Origin of “name and shame”

According to the Phrase Finder the idiomatic expression name and shame was originally used as a noun phrase, From the Pennsylvania newspaper The Warren Ledger, October 1884: "None are ...
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0answers
18 views

crosstalk/crosstalks

I want to create a playlist of short sketches and crosstalk (a traditional Chinese comedic performance in the form of a dialogue) on my blog, and the title is "Sketches & Crosstalk." My question ...
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0answers
17 views

doubt about whether to use “review” or “reviewing”

My question is whether to use the word "review" or "reviewing" in the following paragraph: When this happens, the video may be too long, and consequently, its review/reviewing will take a lot time.
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2answers
41 views

What is another way of saying “unprofessional”?

I am marking undergraduate papers and I've been asked by Dep. Head to avoid using the term "unprofessional" to refer to students' reports. What is another nicer (but accurate) way of saying a report,...
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1answer
102 views

What does “crust of a rhinoceros” mean?

I've been reading Thank You, Jeeves by PG Wodehouse and couldn't understand what he meant by "The man must have the crust of a rhinoceros". Is this British slang? Can somebody explain to me what this ...
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0answers
54 views

Using of the pronoun 'She' with Objects

While I was watching 'dinnerladies' yesterday, I noticed that they referred to 'ladder' as (she) in lieu of (it), so I wonder if it was an idiom or accent. Thanks One of the contexts was like this. ...
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20 views

Anyone who always try to prove himself correct? [closed]

What is the word for someone who always try to prove himself correct.
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1answer
32 views

Dictionaries define past participle as a noun

Why do dictionaries define past participle as a noun[C]? For example in https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/past-participle
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0answers
11 views

Past participle as Adjective vs Past participle in Passive Voice

Is there a difference between using the past participle as an adjective and using it in passive voice? Do we consider it an adjective in the passive voice? For example- "it will be used", can we ...
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0answers
22 views

British English [migrated]

Can't see me staying here after this post:- "You must have 50 reputations in order to comment". SO what if I joined to comment on "this particular item" and it takes years to get reputations? I'll ...
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0answers
23 views

sincerity vs. earnestness

Watching the English: The International Bestseller Revised and Updated (2014) by Kate Fox, BA in Anthropology and Philosophy from Cambridge U. p. 79 HUMOUR RULES THE IMPORTANCE OF NOT BEING ...
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0answers
42 views

Kings & Queens or Queens & Kings? [duplicate]

I've been asked by one of my students why "queens and kings" is not correct but "kings and queens" is. Aside from saying it's a collocation, I'm wondering if anybody has any more information on this. ...
2
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1answer
38 views

‘serious’ vs. ‘solemn’

Watching the English: The International Bestseller Revised and Updated (2014) by Kate Fox, BA in Anthropology and Philosophy from Cambridge U. p. 79 HUMOUR RULES THE IMPORTANCE OF NOT BEING ...
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1answer
38 views

Due to not use in sentence [closed]

This is not due to or getting aggravated by malaria. Does it mean This is not due to malaria and also this is not getting aggravated by malaria?
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0answers
14 views

Rrported speech [closed]

I want to know the reported speech of this sentence 1-do you speak english ? 2- if I were you Id take an aspirin
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1answer
65 views

What is a word for someone who enjoys keeping fish as a hobby?

I am looking for a word for someone who enjoys keeping fish at their home. They have a pond with a large number of Koi Carp, as well as a room with fish tanks containing a variety of fish. This is for ...
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0answers
27 views

Root of Prepositions

Should preposition usage in English in phrasal verbs or other situations always make sense? For example, why do we say "On Sunday" instead of "in Sunday" or "on the bus" instead of "in the bus"? Does ...
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1answer
38 views

Is my syntax correct and is there a better version?

Here is the sentence: "Why is a conjugated system bigger, the smaller the atomic electron transitions?" I mean that when a conjugated system gets bigger, the atomic electron transitions get smaller, ...
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0answers
52 views

Multiple pronunciations of “where”

I've been an Australian English speaker my whole life but this was pointed out to me recently. Apparently I've been pronouncing "where" differently or incorrectly? Most of the people around me ...
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2answers
46 views

What does “of such” mean in this sentence?

My mother language is not English, so please give me a clear explanation of what does "of such" mean in this sentence? I could not find an equivalent in my language. The sentence is: encourage ...
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1answer
44 views

Alternative sentence of “May I come in, please?”

What do you usually say in the UK when you come into the class while the teacher is teaching. Is it ok to say "excuse me, sir or miss" or "May I come in, please"? are there any other ways to say this?
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3answers
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Is it “in” or “on” HNQ?

Stack Exchange has a special feature that displays the hottest questions from its 170 or more sites across the network, it's called Hot Network Questions or HNQ for short. Most users will see to ...
2
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1answer
31 views

How come we write drought and draught but pronounce [draut] and [dra:ft] or write enough and though but pronounce [i’naf] and [đou]? [duplicate]

How come we write drought and draught but pronounce [draut] and [dra: ft] or write enough and though but pronounce [i’naf] and [đou]?
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1answer
25 views

Type of usage/accuracy

As the boy tames the wild bird, it evokes pleasure in him away from his hardship in society; the bird is bettering us here. verb gerund or present participle: bettering improve on or surpass (an ...
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1answer
50 views

Meaning of sentence. “He is not vigilant like you”

He is not vigilant like you. Does it mean that you are vigilant. Or you are not vigilant like him. I am really confused by the sentence whether it's a compliment or complaint?
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2answers
185 views

Why are pubowners called landlords in the U.K.?

I just came across the fact that Brits call the owners\operators of their pubs landlords, (on the new show "The Reluctant Landlord"). Being from the USA I am only aware of the term landlord being used ...
0
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2answers
40 views

Of which or of which the

Would you say, "a flat of which windows were broken" or "a flat of which the windows were broken"? Of course the best solution is "A flat the windows of which" or "whose windows".
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4answers
63 views

What do we call people who are into various sports?

What do we call someone who is into different sports including biking, mountaineering, tracking, and other similar sports?
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2answers
107 views

Did Miranda cross the Atlantic?

US entertainment media have an outsized influence on other countries and cultures. For instance, apparently in some places the emergency services now have to respond to "9-1-1" calls in addition to ...
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3answers
58 views

Does the word “episode” apply to each individual broadcast of a TV program, no matter what the content each time?

Our studio has a one-hour TV program which runs three times a week and broadcasts different films. The content of the program is usually like the following, so can we call each broadcast an episode of ...
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1answer
79 views

A certain pronounciation of words like 'me'

I have noticed that in some British dialects, the long 'ee' sound is rendered as 'ay'. For example, 'me' as 'may', 'see' as 'say'. However, this is only an approximation as I am not sure how to ...
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0answers
28 views

Type of usage phrases/conjunctions

She'd lived in Seattle her whole life, grew up there. *They have got no family I know of, no children. Would these types of usage be informal only and require conjunctions in formal writing.
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1answer
29 views

Is it OK to use two consecutive 'that' in a sentence? [duplicate]

Is the usage of 2 consecutive 'that' in the following sentence correct, because it looks a bit odd? Should these be separated by comma perhaps? "While I agree that strength and size definitely gives ...
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5answers
446 views

Conjunction Reduction British English vs American English

I am finding there is a difference in what is acceptable between American and British English. I posted this question on Facebook: "Grammar friends, I need your help! Is omitting the pronoun the ...
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1answer
53 views

What does “being let go” mean? [closed]

I am wondering what is the meaning of the below sentence. You are not being let go. For me it can have 2 meanings: You are not allowed to leave You are not asked to go But, i dont know which one ...
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2answers
28 views

What should we use here? [closed]

Which one I should use and why? There are being fewer jobs for young people these days. There are fewer jobs for young people these days. Personally, I think I should use first one because of ...
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3answers
72 views

Should 'be' or 'is' follow 'that'

Which is correct and why? 'a proposal that the resolution be adopted' or 'a proposal that the resolution is adopted'
2
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1answer
97 views

Is there a gray area between scrumping and foraging?

A user on The Great Outdoors chat forum asked whether picking a neighbor's berries from bushes that were near her boundary fence was scrumping or foraging. So naturally, I looked up both words. ...
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3answers
87 views

Technical term for an outrageous exaggeration [closed]

I have a mind blank for a term in English. I wanted to describe a sentence I made. It's a technical term for when making an outrageous claim, not based in fact, but used for the purpose of impressing....
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2answers
76 views

Confused by a phrase I heard in Downton Abbey

I'm a native English speaker and I know that the English spoken in the show by the aristocracy is in the dialect of received pronunciation. I've been learning about the various dialects in England ...
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2answers
80 views

What is the grammatical name of prefixing a word by “A”?

I've noticed that in English, "some words" (I don't know if it could be used on all words) could be prefixed by the letter "a" to change the meaning, here are a few examples: Side and Aside ...
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1answer
33 views

Type of usage/ term

His features contort with obvious pain as he tells his story, his memories of Caroline clearly something he holds precious. What makes the bolded section dependent? What's it missing to form a clause....
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1answer
31 views

On the double meaning of evaluation

I know that evaluation can refer to both the process and the result, but when you say something is an evaluation of another thing, like fact is evaluation of claim (forgive the choppiness, the ...
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4answers
137 views

Idiom for premonition

I am trying to remember an idiom that is used when someone has a premonition about something, often coincidentally i.e. I am thinking about someone and then they call me. I know there is the ...