Questions tagged [british-english]

This tag is for questions related to English as used in Great Britain, and sometimes Ireland.

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41 views

How to syllabify “very” or “merry” etc in British English?

How should words like merry or very be syllabified in British English. I learned from the answer to my first question that words that have vowels like /ʌ ɪ ʊ ɛ/ should have a consonant after that ...
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1answer
32 views

Single word request: something does not disconfirm the superiority of the most widely used practice [duplicate]

I analysed different nonoperative management practices and all of them showed worse outcomes than surgery. The sentence I am writing: None of the nonoperative management practices disconfirms the ...
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1answer
24 views

Single word request: practice based on non-strict criteria

Context: Clinical decision making is highly varying, as there are no strict criteria between operative and nonoperative management. How to say this with one academically suitable word? Clinical ...
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1answer
54 views

I can form sentences in English grammar. I, somehow, just know what should I use in a particular scenario. But I don't know why it is used? [closed]

I can form any sentence in English with proper grammar and can write what I want to. I can also solve all types of problems in the language. I know, for example, where to use 'will' and where to use &...
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0answers
30 views

Why is personae a plural of persona? [closed]

Plurals in the English language usually end with -s (or -es, if a singular ends with -s), but personae? What kind of pluralization pattern is that, ending with -e instead?
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21 views

How to avoid the repetition of thanks in emails? [closed]

I am writing an email in the body of which I am making a request, and in order to make it politely, I am using this phrasing: "I would be grateful if…". It is very common for emails to be ...
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0answers
32 views

Capitalization of “mathematics” [closed]

Is "mathematics" as a subject capitalized or spelt with lowercase? Examples of partial sentences for context: ....discussing the challenges experienced when teaching mathematics to grade 11 ...
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2answers
46 views

Capitalization of “indigenous” [closed]

Does the word "indigenous" need to be capitalized in academic writing? For example, mid-sentence, is it: ...Indigenous methodologies or indigenous methodologies ...Indigenous knowledge or ...
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2answers
86 views

Is /ɜː/ realized as schwa [ə] in British English?

I have noticed that the vowel /ɜː/ (as in the RP pronunciation of "BIRD") sounds the same as the schwa [ə] (as in the pronunciation of "BUTTER" in RP). I assume the BIRD vowel is ...
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3answers
143 views

Where does 'po-faced' come from etymologically, geographically, and chronologically?

The entry for po-faced in Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003) reads as follows: po-faced adj {perh. fr. po chamber pot, toilet, fr. F pot pot} (1934) Brit : having an assumed ...
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2answers
25 views

Missing data: not registered vs not available

I have a scientific paper table that has a few missing values. Values are missing as they were not recorded (written by a doctor) on patients' medical records. Should I address these values as "...
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1answer
53 views

Is there a word for centering the English language that is disconnected from England?

I am looking to describe the centering of the English language (in a US-based but global business culture). The company itself is based in California, and what I'm seeing is an intersection of US-...
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1answer
58 views

What is the grammatical nature of “wrote” in the phrase “The Wrote and The Writ”?

In the song The Wrote and the Writ by British singer and songwriter Johnny Flynn, the title uses that phrase which comes from the the last verse of the song: If you're born with a love for the wrote ...
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0answers
90 views

Is the diphthong /aʊ/ generally realized as [ɑʊ] in British English?

I noticed that the diphthong /aʊ/ is pronounced by most British English speakers as [ɑʊ] (I may be inaccurate here). You can see the vowel /a/ on the vowel diagram below: I understand this diagram ...
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1answer
32 views

few/little/some software (in plural) [duplicate]

I would like to say: Available calculation methods are limited to few software. With "few", I mean 3 programs. However, "software" is an uncountable noun. "Some" and &...
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21 views

mobile network provider vs operator vs carrier

I need a term to describe a company that provides telephony and data connection for cell phones/mobile phones to "normal" users of cell phon/mobile phones in the UK & US. Is it mobile ...
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1answer
52 views

Paste data in/to/into the Excel-based calculator

I am writing an instruction for an Excel-based calculator. Which preposition should I use? Paste data in/to/into the calculator
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2answers
115 views

Pronunciation of “master” and “plaster” in Northern England

A pattern I've noticed in Northern England is that people of my age (born in the '90s) pronounce words like “master” and “plaster” with a short A (/a/), whereas anyone of my parents' generation (born ...
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21 views

Noun + to + Verb - Grammar Structure

I saw this sentences below somewhere and am struggling with the grammar structure. " Britain to restrict promotion of unhealthy food from April 2022 " Just wonder why is " to " ...
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1answer
72 views

What is a British English equivalent to 'Fussbudget'?

Lucy from Charles Schultz's Peanuts strip is often described as a 'fussbudget', for example here: 'Lucy: Fussbudget to Feminist'. What is a British English equivalent to 'fussbudget'?
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3answers
62 views

What does “prolonged mental inventory” mean? [closed]

This passage is adapted from Saki, "The Schartz-Metterklume Method", originally published in 1911. She wired a vague non-committal message to her destination to say that she was coming on &...
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2answers
73 views

American reading of the British expression “look around impressively”

In British English, "he looked around the room impressively" is a somewhat common expression (warning: I grew up in the colonies and lived in the UK for only about 5 years, so please correct ...
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14 views

Comma use: Physical therapy hours were derived from the funding codes for rehabilitation, which, for the most part, have pre-defined lengths

Sentence Physical therapy hours were derived from the funding codes for rehabilitation, which, for the most part, have pre-defined lengths. Is it correct to put commas before and after "which&...
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1answer
47 views

What is the difference between “particular” and “specific”? [closed]

I am a beginner and I really like to learn English. I sometimes come across phrases where the meaning seems to be the same, but the difference lies in the little things. Could you tell me what is the ...
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1answer
16 views

Guidance in/on research and life

Should I use "guidance on" or "guidance in" in the following sentence? Google search showed that "on" is more often used. Thank you for the guidance not only on research ...
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1answer
43 views

Single word to express “all around support”

If somebody helped an author in many topics, how to express this with sincere gratitude? SENTENCE It is a genuine pleasure to express my sincere gratitude and appreciations to people supporting me ...
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1answer
24 views

What does the apostrophe in the expression ‘I’ faith’ mean?

In older translations of Latin texts (and I would presume Greek as well), the phrase I’ faith is quite common. Examples from Plautus’ Menaechmus 2.2 and 2.3: CYLINDRUS I’ve catered well, and to my ...
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19 views

Correct preposition use: regional comparisons in/of health care utilisation

Which would be correct preposition use: regional comparisons in health care utilisation regional comparisons of health care utilisation
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1answer
30 views

Single word request: a non-changing temporal trend [closed]

Is there a word for describing a non-changing temporal trend? Stasis? E.g. expenditure on health care did not change between 2000-2020.
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2answers
26 views

Word request: different-level factors?

Let's suppose that clinical care is poor due to numerous reasons: policy-making, insufficient resources, specialists, education, non-use of standards etc. How to say this in one word that describes ...
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1answer
31 views

2 times higher or 2-times higher? [closed]

which of them should be preferred in academic British English? 2 times higher 2-times higher and would how to write a ranging difference 2-3-times higher
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3answers
108 views

How and when did the ('chiefly British') sense of 'wheeze', meaning 'good plan, scheme' arise?

The American Heritage Dictionary entry for this sense of wheeze adds only a [chiefly British] caveat: wheeze ... [noun] ... [chiefly British] A clever scheme. Collins adds a [slang] caveat: ...
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3answers
82 views

How to say in a compact way: an increase of something is due to decrease in something else

I am examining temporal trends in the sale numbers of apples, pears and bananas. And I found a significant 5 percentage point increase for apples and a significant 5 percentage point decrease for ...
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1answer
75 views

How is /ɑ:/ realized in British English: [ɑː] or more relaxed than [ɑː]?

I know that /ɑː/ is open back unrounded vowel and is found a lot in British English. It is the vowel in bath, father, bar, car etc in British English. In American English, this vowel is found in bar, ...
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2answers
75 views

“Ridiculous” - what an ambiguous word. Please help to understand [closed]

I've been trying to understand the meaning of "ridiculous", but I am still confused. I can see it is used in both positive or negative ways. When someone likes something, they say with a ...
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56 views

Do British English-speakers call American Lieutenants 'lef-tenants' or 'loo-tenants'?

In British English, the military (and police) rank of 'lieutenant' is pronounced 'lef-tenant'. In American English, it is 'loo-tenant' (approximately). Are these treated as two distinct pronunciations ...
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1answer
37 views

Which one is correct “John is in the third” or “John is in the third place”? [closed]

If I want to ask someone in the picture, like 'Where's John?' or 'Which one is john?' which answer should it be?
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47 views

What's a wedding pip? [closed]

At a wedding, the son of the bride said, "I wish I could have put up a pip for you." What was he talking about?
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1answer
45 views

Does the em dash take precedence over the comma?

In a sentence like: While I would love to do A, I cannot wait to do B. If I add a set-off clause right before the comma, which of these is correct? While I would love to do A—for reasons X—I cannot ...
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14 views

Definite article use. Baseline characteristics of (the) included patients

Could you help me with definite article use in a table caption. Should I use or not "the" there? Table 1. Baseline characteristics of included patients. Table 1. Baseline characteristics ...
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0answers
11 views

Definite article use with “median”

I have seen the use of both options; however, which of them is more correct? Preceding text: A total of 500 patients were included in the study. ... Median patient age was 50 years. The median ...
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2answers
29 views

Differentiating new (wife and children) and old family (parents) in a dedication

I am writing a dedication: To my family, parents and mentors Parents were also my family when I was a kid. Thus, may this "overlap" in the differents terms cause confusion? A wordier ...
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0answers
18 views

Comma use: Finally, only 10% of patients, being not admitted to hospital care, received rehabilitation

Finally, only 10% of patients, being not admitted to hospital care, received rehabilitation. Finally, only 10% of patients, not admitted to hospital care, received rehabilitation. How should I use ...
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10 views

Although (the) majority of (the) patients had surgery,

I have a paragraph about the proportion of patients treated surgically. One of the paragraph's sentences is as follows: Although the majority of patients had surgery, 6% received non-operative ...
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1answer
38 views

Problem with passive form [closed]

I am trying to solve an exercise where you have to rewrite sentences into passive form. I am having a problem with these sentences: Someone empties our bins every week. submit: Our bins are emptied ...
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1answer
34 views

What if money were beautiful - vs was beautiful [duplicate]

This website, https://celo.org/about - has a statement (screenshot below should it be removed in future) The statement is "What is money were beautiful?". This does not make sense to me. In ...
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5answers
637 views

Is this just an error or am I missing something?

I ran across the following passage on a package of tea: "As the farmers all our teas come with a Tea Passport guaranteeing quality and sustainability from bush to cup". I don't see how this ...
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2answers
168 views

Is the short-e pronounced as [e] or [ɛ] in standard English? [duplicate]

In many English dictionaries, I saw the phonetic symbol of short-e is /e/ such as in bed (/bed/). However, I'm taught that the pronunciation of that is /ɛ/. Which one is right in standard English? ...
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1answer
54 views

What does the expression “the school first XI rugger team” mean? [closed]

I found this sentence in a novel set in Cornwall. The complete sentence is: Daddy is very proud that you have made the school first XI rugger team. The boy in the team il 16 y.o. and he lives in the ...
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1answer
97 views

Is 'dirgible' good American English?

I have had a disagreement with my ten year old about the pronunciation of dirigible, which she was saying 'dirgible'. When I queried this, she explained that an animated movie on Netflix had it as '...

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