Questions tagged [grammar]

This tag is for questions about morphology and syntax, the two elements of grammar. DO NOT USE THIS TAG IF YOUR QUESTION IS ABOUT WHETHER SOMETHING SPECIFIC IS GRAMMATICAL. For such cases use the 'grammaticality' tag. Also do not use this for punctuation or spelling (orthography); those are not about grammar, and they have their own tags.

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Is this correct? “It sounds fun, isn’t it?” [migrated]

Do you say, “It sounds fun, isn’t it?” Shoud we say, “It sounds fun, doesn’t it?”
testtaker2's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
1k views

What's the phrase "10 years" used for in the sentence "I'm 10 years your senior"

Is the phrase "10 years" a noun phrase? Can I say "I'm your 10 years senior"?
Yong's user avatar
  • 187
0 votes
1 answer
51 views

What part of speech is the word "having" in this context?

What part of speech is the word "having" in the following? Having signed the contract, we went for a party.
Reem Abodeeb's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
59 views

What follows "not either"? "Or" or "nor"? [duplicate]

Consider the following sentence: I haven't heard from either you, (n)or her. If I started my sentence with "I have heard from neither you" then the "nor" would follow. My doubts ...
NPS's user avatar
  • 601
-1 votes
0 answers
31 views

Lack of experience "from someone" or "of someone"? [closed]

For example, I have two sentences: The lack of experience from me caused an error during operation. The lack of experience of me caused an error during operation. Which one is correct?
Halcyon Mo's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
60 views

Is the question grammatically correct? [closed]

Which of the following types of public accounting does not belong? a b c d One of the choices is not part of the public accounting and that is the intent of the question. However my understanding of ...
eng2024's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
151 views

Is the pronoun "it" after the verb "pushed" agreeing with the subject in the following passage?

If so, what is the subject that agrees with the boldface pronoun it in the passage? Matt had never mentioned his father or what he did, because I guess I’d never asked, or maybe I had and didn’t ...
Victor's user avatar
  • 13
0 votes
0 answers
63 views

Grammatical correctness of the sentence [closed]

Is this sentence grammatically correct? He had a football player friend who used not to throw bad jokes. I think that grammatically it would be more correct to write: He had a friend who was a ...
Серж's user avatar
  • 153
-3 votes
2 answers
83 views

It can't possibly be true, but somehow maybe

How is this sentence to be construed: 'It can't possibly be true, but somehow maybe.' ? Can you rephrase it? Source: https://youtu.be/X19aZ-MgibA?t=663 Would I Lie to You S17 E8. Non-UK viewers. 16 ...
sanya6's user avatar
  • 25
0 votes
1 answer
63 views

"Recorded on it" as a subject

I am unsure if the phrase "Recorded on it" can be used as a subject. He found a blueprint. Recorded on it was a device used by the Order. Does this sound grammatically correct?
Halcyon Mo's user avatar
-3 votes
1 answer
48 views

Is "overnight tonight" redundant?

I use the term "overnight tonight" regularly but also understand how it can be perceived as redundant. For me, "overnight" means passing from one day to another. While "...
Charles Bucket's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
55 views

What is this comma called? [duplicate]

A room furnished comfortably and tastefully, but not extravagantly. Is there any special name for this comma before 'but' and will the sentence work if we don't use it?
Vedansh's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
16 views

What are the highest quality textbooks for learning English grammar? [migrated]

I am a native English speaker, but I think my grasp of grammar is too weak. So, I want to know what textbooks or reference books others deem worthy of using to deepen and broaden their understanding ...
JBR's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
0 answers
29 views

Which pronoun for a photo caption? [duplicate]

Which is the correct pronoun, if you have a title for a photo that is, for example “John and me, outside our house”. To my mind that is the correct way to write it but others think it should be “John ...
Nikeyboo's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
12 views

To phrase + that clause = prepositional phrase (direct object) + noun phrase (complement) or object complement (infinitive phrase) + complement? [migrated]

Right from the get-go - I'm not a native speaker, so be understanding ;-), in my native polish the premium is placed on the form of the part of the speech, not in the distribution, that is, the part ...
Amadeusz Lis's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
18 views

What is subject of the verb 'makes' on this sentence? [migrated]

My sentence: What makes a sound a short vowel? And I want to know that what is the text 'makes a sound', is it a phrase?
สุพิณพร จิว's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
154 views

Grammar analysis of ‘the amount of money there is to be made’

the amount of money there is to be made Here between ‘money‘ and ‘there’ I guess that a relative pronoun is omitted but I’m not sure whether it is a subjective one or an objective one. I’d appreciate ...
Chloe's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
56 views

Usage of "spend time"

I live in Japan and have noticed that a lot Japanese people are prone to say/write "I spent a good time with my friends/family/kids." It has always rubbed me the wrong way, and when I can, I ...
TFlo83's user avatar
  • 168
-1 votes
0 answers
41 views

Placement of a relative pronoun [migrated]

Please consider the following sentence: Ada Lovelace is the first computer programmer in the world who wrote the code for analytical engine. Is the placement of the relative pronoun "who" ...
lamia boudaoud's user avatar
-1 votes
0 answers
68 views

"The last time" usage in the past narration

I came across the following sentence while reading "A Clash of Kings" book by George R. R. Martin: A few of the other patrons were giving him sideways looks. The last time he ventured out, ...
Denis's user avatar
  • 121
-1 votes
0 answers
13 views

Is it in time or on time? [duplicate]

Is it in time or on time? How do you use it in a sentence eg I hope they would able to come in time or on time for my performance
oby's user avatar
  • 1
1 vote
2 answers
103 views

Grammatical Coherence in Hanna Arendt's Writing [closed]

I've recently come across a quote by Hanna Arendt in her 1963 book Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil that looked quite interesting: "It is in the very nature of things ...
Andrei Suslov's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
27 views

Is it "the case" or "the cases"?

I'm writing a mathematical thesis and I have a theorem/sentence which is like This is proven for the case h = +/- 1. So actually it is "the cases h = +1 and h = -1". Here it is shortened ...
Lereu's user avatar
  • 101
-1 votes
0 answers
45 views

Using "got" for present is that correct? [duplicate]

I'm really confused, I saw on a tv show : "I got school" or "i got some food" for present situations and i dont't understand why. Because got is a past form, or am I wrong ?. ...
sarah k's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
17 views

Usage of help+to [duplicate]

Recently I’ve written an essay and have used help+to in the sentence: Preparation plays an important role as it helps to work on soft and hard skills. My teacher said it’s incorrect to write help+to....
Lisa's user avatar
  • 1
1 vote
0 answers
30 views

The Reader Over Your Shoulder by Robert Graves [migrated]

Does anyone know if there is a contemporary book that explores style in a similar way to The Reader Over Your Shoulder?
Zay's user avatar
  • 11
2 votes
2 answers
133 views

Does the Big Mess Construction include structures like {[Det quant] + [Adj comp] + [a] + [N]} or {[neg Particle] + [Adj comp] + [a] + [N]}?

In the question [What is the grammar underpinning] You're too clever a man to imagine this, Laurel explains that this is termed the Big Mess Construction (see Arnold & Sadler; 2014) She made ...
Edwin Ashworth's user avatar
-1 votes
0 answers
66 views

What's the correct: bread with cheese or bread and cheese? [migrated]

When you want to put them together, should you say "bread and" or "bread with"? Do North American use "with" and "and" inverted in this case?
Moisés Soares's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
66 views

Why is 'a' used between smooth and gloss? [duplicate]

I am reading a book (A Promised Land) and there is a sentence that I don't understand: I still like writing things out in longhand, finding that a computer gives even my roughest drafts too smooth a ...
merrona's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
65 views

Comma before a moved verb

I can't seem to find a definitive answer for this, and my colleague and I are disagreeing on it: Your next obsession, found. Your next obsession found. It was an advertisement, as in something like ...
humble.rebel's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
548 views

Using the word 'yore' in ways other than "of yore"

Whenever I read the word 'yore' in a sentence, it's almost always used to say "of yore". For example: "The ways of yore have withered" Are there other grammatically valid ways, ...
Ludvig Boysen's user avatar
-1 votes
0 answers
26 views

Political Party as a Collective Noun: Plural or Singular? [duplicate]

I am writing a journal article, and a peer reviewer complained that I am alternating between plural and singular use of political party. I tried to look online, but the information seems a little ...
partyresearcher's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
29 views

Order of words with verb - "there is" vs "is there" [duplicate]

I just came across two very similar phrases. They seem to me both grammatically correct and normal, but I cannot quite justify their existence. They are : 1)...where not only is there only a small ...
alex varner's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
7 views

Usage of appropriate Definite Article [migrated]

Q. Mrs. Kanwal is ............ Principal of this school. (1) no article (2) a (3) an (4) the Some people is saying that there will be "no article" before Principal the give reason as ...
user342326's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
44 views

How would you characterise the difference between the grammatical structure of these two sentences?

How would you characterise the difference between the grammatical structure of these two sentences? in a weird way, you were fun you were fun in a weird way The latter seems to be modifying 'fun' ...
cretin's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
0 answers
56 views

"Remember of Majesty" - is this title correct?

There is a game, called "Remember of Majesty", but using a verb without any pronoun looks unfamiliar to me. Is this a correct construction? What's the meaning of the title? Is it like "...
Vladislav Rastrusny's user avatar
14 votes
2 answers
4k views

'I think IT unlikely that our team can win'. <--Is IT the object?

We think it unlikely that our inexperienced team can win a single > game this season. Is "it" the direct object? If it is, what is the function of the noun clause "that our ...
cookie234's user avatar
  • 259
0 votes
1 answer
26 views

What is the focus of the statement included below [closed]

What is the focus of this statement: "You will be responsible for developing and executing marketing initiatives to enhance brand awareness, increase customer acquisition, and drive revenue ...
Mhluzi Bhaka's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
84 views

"you might as well be hanged for a sheep as for a lamb" grammatical analysis

How is the last part of "you might as well be hanged for a sheep as for a lamb" grammatically correct, that is "as for a lamb"? Don't we use the structure "as for a something&...
Saim Doruklu's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
173 views

UK vs USA grammar, past tense usage of "were stood" and "found…stood" that jars my American mind

One of my favorite authors uses past tenses in the following manner: Other than Camden and Luke’s cousin Alex, who were stood outside the main doors talking, no one was in sight. An American would ...
dlbruce's user avatar
  • 41
0 votes
0 answers
23 views

Where do commas go when interjecting within a list? [duplicate]

Where should commas go in a sentence like the following: Consider the size quantity and most importantly price. To address the elephant in the room, I side firmly with the oxford comma in most cases,...
Jordan Kizer's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
86 views

What is the category name used for words describing mathematical operations?

Refer to this question for more examples. We have multiplication, which has "multiply" as the verb. But we say "a times b". Similarly, we have division, which has "divide"...
aghast's user avatar
  • 201
0 votes
2 answers
124 views

Can 'angle' be used as verb to mean 'to fish'? [closed]

Can 'angle' be used as a verb in the sense 'to fish'? If so, is it an American usage?
A J Hareendran's user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
38 views

Though and Despite [closed]

We want you to be aware that we're doing our utmost, ------- we will not be able to provide you with a personalized experience on our website. (A) despite (B) though The answer given is "though&...
Sam's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
2 answers
53 views

Syntax and semantics of implications with different arrangement of propositions

I have two statements If swimming is allowed in the shore, then sharks have not been spotted. If sharks have not been spotted, then swimming is allowed. I am a maths student, so based on that these ...
tbhaxor's user avatar
  • 103
0 votes
0 answers
52 views

"Necessary" and "should" in English grammar

In modern English, is the "should" in the following sentence grammatically appropriate? It seems redundant to me: It's necessary that you should be prepared for the worst. It's important/...
Robert Willison's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
97 views

Use of 'And more' to end a list [closed]

Can I conclude a list with 'And more' because a platform offers numerous features, and listing them all there will make it ineffective? The items aren't a grocery list where the user will not have the ...
Vishvendra's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
59 views

Do I need an indefinite article, talking about exposition in literature? [closed]

For example: It's only (an) exposition, but I already love the story.
venor's user avatar
  • 11
0 votes
1 answer
48 views

Why does this sentence not mean reliable primary sources X (verb) the debate of the historians?

Why is the third "that" not implying the primary sources modify something about the historian's hot debate? It is a sad but just indictment of some high school history textbooks that they ...
Coo's user avatar
  • 99
-1 votes
1 answer
73 views

May relative adverbs possess consequential nominal descriptors?

May relative adverbs possess nominal consequents? e.g. wherefrom = "from which" and "the proclamation, from which announcement were ascertained the new regulations..." is a valid ...
Mesothorium's user avatar

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