Questions tagged [grammar]

This tag is for questions about morphology and syntax, the two elements of grammar. DO NOT USE THIS TAG IF YOUR QUESTION IS ABOUT WHETHER SOMETHING SPECIFIC IS GRAMMATICAL. For such cases use the 'grammaticality' tag. Also do not use this for punctuation or spelling (orthography); those are not about grammar, and they have their own tags.

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Who, whom, free relative clause, to be [closed]

Should we have who or whom here? He's talking about people who run fast. I run fast. I'm who(m) he's talking about. I understand that "who(m) he's talking about" is a free relative clause ...
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3 votes
2 answers
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Is it correct to say "Don't put your expectation so high"?

While searching on the Internet, I found that another way to say it is "Don't set your expectations so high", but I didn't find anything related to "Don't put your expectation so high&...
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2 votes
2 answers
112 views

Non-defining relative clauses: use 'who' or 'which'

We don't use 'that' in non-defining relative clauses, so we need to use 'which' if the pronoun refers to a thing, and 'who' if it refers to a person. Is there any grammatical explanation why not to ...
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Future in the past with the word "then" [closed]

When we use the word "then" something changes in grammar or not. Is it correct? For example: If we decided to hit on girls on weekends, then we would do it like that, otherwise, we all would ...
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Is there a linguistic term that describes words that change pronunciation when combined together?

Examples of this include Breakfast which is just 'break,' and 'fast.' Of particular interest to me is helicopter, which is a combination of 'helico,' meaning spiral, and 'pter,' meaning wing. This is ...
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-1 votes
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Future tense, Past tense, Present tense [closed]

So in context, my friend and I are having an argument about this quote: Because they had an attitude with me, so I had an attitude back. I matched their energy cause i dont like people walking all ...
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-1 votes
0 answers
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In "success is counted sweetest", why does the verb 'counted' follow the adjective 'sweetest'? [migrated]

The question comes from a poem by Emily Dickinson: Success is counted sweetest By those who ne’er succeed. To comprehend a nectar Requires sorest need. In 'success is counted sweetest', why does the ...
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1 vote
1 answer
25 views

What is the meaning of "as a touch of elegance"?

A calligrapher is called upon to design and write announcements, place cards, etc, as a touch of elegance. What does "as a touch of elegance" mean? what does it modify? Does it modify the ...
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Is “The X that is the Y” good style?

I'm tempted to write a sentence like this, but I'm not sure whether that is proper English and good style: For that, we have to look into the magic black box that is the fast-Fourier transform. Of ...
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-2 votes
1 answer
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"I am new to" vs is "new to me" is the former correct grammar? [closed]

I often see statements such as: "I am new to JavaScript" or "I am new to carpentry" When someone has begun a new topic of learning. Clearly JavaScript and carpentry have no ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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What does the "they" represent? [closed]

I'm doing TOEFL speaking and noticed that in many conversations, speakers use "they" to represent the school or other institutions. For example, in TPO12's speaking part, the university is ...
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What is the meaning of "pale and cold"? noun or adjective? [closed]

...Soon the sharpened features, and sunken eye, and fallen jaw, pale and cold, bearing the manifest impress of death's signet, began to glow with returning animation.... The source: Leith in the time ...
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sentence transformation and meaning [closed]

It was not said that the liberal man does not care about riches because he gives to the wrong person, or at the wrong time, or in the wrong manner according to some other circumstance. According to ...
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1 answer
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Section Name: "Technical Background" vs. "Technical Backgrounds"?

In an academic context, how to name a section about multiple background or more basic topics: "Technical Background" vs. "Technical Backgrounds"?
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-1 votes
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Modal verb and conjunction usage in a sentence [closed]

Consider the following sentence: Forgiveness should not be granted but asked for. Is this sentence grammatically correct? If not, is it possible to see the rules governing this type of sentences?
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"Selling products, such as fresh produce, online can promote poor people to earn money." Is it grammatical? [migrated]

Selling products, such as fresh produce, online can promote poor people to earn money. Is the above sentence grammatical? I got feedback from my teacher that I cannot use "promote sb to do sth&...
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Wind blew through the leaves of the tree.. other verbs? [closed]

what's the verb? The same as the wind brushed against her cheek, but for trees?
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1 answer
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A query related to ‘must’ [closed]

A passport is must to travel abroad. In the above statement, what is must? Is it a noun, an adjective or a verb? Please give an example of how 'must' can be used as an adjective.
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-1 votes
1 answer
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How do you write effectively and yet avoid redundancy? [closed]

My question is perhaps more subjective than objective, although there are traces of objectivity in it. Hope I express myself clearly. In a recently published Stephen Budiansky's biography of Kurt ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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Which one of these two sentences is unnatural, and why? [closed]

A: It gets really hot when I use it for a couple of hours. Is it supposed to do this? (is it supposed to do like that?) B: No, it's not supposed to do that, but it can if you use it in direct sunlight....
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1 vote
0 answers
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What is the meaning of 'd? [migrated]

Man: Now Carly, that's my older daughter, has just had her seventh birthday, so presumably she['d] been in a different group? Could anybody tell me the meaning of 'd and the usage of it?
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1 answer
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In formal writing such as a reference, can an initial subject defining sentence imply the subject to several sentences thereafter? [closed]

I am writing a personal reference for a family member and trying to list several ways in which they have helped me without the sentence running on. I do not believe a colon would work in this case as ...
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Why isn't there a comma in "Unloose him Frodo!"?

I was rather shocked by the extremely sparse use of commas by Tolkien, but in most cases, it still falls "within reason". However, there is one place (so far) in The Two Towers which just ...
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0 votes
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38 views

In this sentence, should I use "hit" or "hits"? [migrated]

In this sentence, should I use hit or hits? I threw a small stone, then I was worried about a car with a driver inside; if the stone hit the car, I would be miserable.
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2 votes
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I am looking for a word that is synonymous with "syntactic expletive" to describe the purpose of the word "there" [duplicate]

It is a word that describes the purpose of the word "there" in a sentence such as, "There is a bird in the tree." Expletive is one word, but there is another, longer word, and I ...
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-1 votes
0 answers
20 views

Is my sentence correct? [duplicate]

“A lovely day had been had gallivanting….”? If yes, how come?
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1 vote
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Which role does the noun "number" play in the phrase ‘a number of ’?

I am confused with the role of the noun number in the phrase ‘a number of ’. Is the noun number a quantifier here or a collective noun? Some people argue that the number is a quantifier in "A ...
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-1 votes
0 answers
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An 18 years' sentence is not enough. He has killed more and more innocent people [duplicate]

Is the term "an 18 years' sentence" true or not? I has just read "someone once said a two years' journey is true. As a journey of two years = a two years' journey." and I has also ...
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0 votes
0 answers
33 views

Too young to marry each other or get married [migrated]

Which of the following is correct? A) I think the couple are too young to marry each other. B) I think the couple are too young to get married to each other. I know it's wrong to say "the film is ...
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5 votes
2 answers
94 views

Distinguish between this "and" that or this "or" that

Just wondering about this sentence I came across: It is difficult to distinguish between a misrepresentation or an exaggeration. I feel 'and' should be used in place of 'or'. Can someone confirm ...
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0 votes
1 answer
31 views

"Carried" vs "carrying" [closed]

When the tank carried/carrying the toxic gas derailed, the firemen tried to isolate the village from all traffic. Why is "carried" wrong in this sentence? And why should it be "...
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0 votes
1 answer
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Using nouns to modify names/numbers, e.g. teacher Smith, candidate Smith and room 5

I would like to know the rules of putting a noun in front of a name and number. I am not sure if the sentences below are grammatically correct. He's in the class of teacher Smith. It's announced that ...
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0 votes
0 answers
8 views

"In which ocean are The Bahamas?" or "In which ocean are The Bahamas located?" [migrated]

Which is more grammatically correct: "In which ocean are The Bahamas?" or "In which ocean are The Bahamas located?" Also "Where are the _____?" vs "Where are the ...
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-1 votes
0 answers
30 views

'to do something' vs. 'to be doing something' [migrated]

I have a question about the usages of to do something and to be doing something. What's the difference between them? Example: To do something: "This is a really big moment for us and for the team,...
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1 vote
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What is the predicate part of the sentence in an "X is ___ed" pattern?

Basically, this derives from an NLP problem I am facing in software development. NLP stands for "Natural Language Processing", and it is ML dependent. Since it depends on ML, it is ...
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2 votes
0 answers
41 views

Is "vary" a stative verb? Can it be used in Continuous?

Is "vary" a stative verb? According to Merriam-Webster it has both intransitive vary [intransitive] 1: to exhibit or undergo change the sky was constantly varying and transitive usages ...
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2 votes
2 answers
203 views

Is "none" when used alone without antecedent singular or plural (for context, I'm talking about people): "None [are/is] here"?

I know that "none of [...]" can be both singular or plural, but when I use it alone in a sentence, without the "of" and without any other nouns, can it be both singular and plural ...
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1 vote
0 answers
22 views

Grammatical correctness of "He hasn't punished one of them— not one of them— since baby is born," [duplicate]

So I was reading a story called 'Desiree's Baby' and I saw this sentence appear, when one character (Desiree) was telling her mother that her husband was so happy upon the birth of her child, that he ...
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0 votes
0 answers
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Please is it "the language barrier" or "language barriers"? I feel both sentences mean the same thing. Am I right? [migrated]

I feel that learning English is important for everyone since it reduces language barriers/ the language barrier. It is important for everyone to learn English since it reduces language barriers/ the ...
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0 votes
1 answer
41 views

"to there" or "to...there"

Is it possible to write "to there" instead of the standard "to...there"? E.g.: "For the walls of the room a blue color was chosen, to there create a cozy atmosphere" To ...
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2 votes
1 answer
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Why isn't it "I will have been running, lest they have been catching me"?

The phrase in the title is obviously incorrect; however, I'm having difficulties figuring out how it could actually be grammatically constructed. To be clear, I'm aware this is a ridiculous ...
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5 votes
1 answer
113 views

Can an adverb be the subject in a sentence?

Does 'carefully' function as the subject in the below sentence? Carefully does it.
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2 votes
1 answer
39 views

Is "that of" used here correctly?

I wonder if "that of" used in the following question doesn't create grammatical error. If it does, then I also wonder the corrected form or alternatives. The statement: The running time ...
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0 votes
0 answers
67 views

Grammatical redundancy in an English sentence

Please, help me with my course work. I'm writing about grammar redundancy (It's when some grammatical meaning in the sentence is repeated twice or even more). BUT I didn't find any examples of it on ...
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Is This Sentence Grammaticaly acceptble? [migrated]

Can I say [I insisted on that the event was a turkey]? I know that we say: sb insists on sth. But I didn't know before yesterday that we can say: sb insists that So is it common or correct to say: ...
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2 votes
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What part of a sentence is "regarding X" classified as?

In the process of learning Japanese, I've been doing some grammar analysis on sentence structure (across languages), Eg. subject, object, etc. I've come across something I haven't heard of before: the ...
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What pronouns should I use to refer to humanity?

I am writing an essay on existential risks and I want to refer to humanity but also need to say "we" and "our" in order to make the delivery of the message practical to each of us ...
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3 votes
1 answer
222 views

Using two if-part in a sentence

I've found a sentence and don't understand the grammar here. It's the first time I've seen two if conditions in one sentence. Can anybody explain what it was and what grammar was used in the sentence? ...
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-1 votes
0 answers
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What style, term, or phenomenon is this phrase is an example of?

The following phrase is an example of which grammatical, literary, or linguistic style, term, or phenomenon? Good times; have them. or Good times: feel them. For context, I was browsing Wikipedia ...
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1- How do you like to be when...? 2- using close as a verb: get close, approach [migrated]

I had an argument with my teacher. in an exercise of ordering the words to form a sentence, I found a "maybe" strange one. the sentence I made is this: How do you like to be when a business ...
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