Questions tagged [word-usage]

This tag is for questions about correctly using a word. The word has to be provided within the question. The question should be limited to the usage of one word. For the usage of complete phrases there is the tag phrase-usage.

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What is a way to say "take pride" without the implication of arrogance?

I want to say "our team takes pride in the quality of our output," but I don't want the audience or my teammates to get the sense that we are arrogant, flawless, or ungracious. How else ...
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0 answers
15 views

Meaning of “Recall” [closed]

What does “Recall” mean here? I even shunned physical therapy sessions after undergoing knee and hip replacements while working at the Persian Restaurant (one of my hip prosthetics was recalled, ...
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0 votes
0 answers
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English grammar "the something for something" [migrated]

I found on a bean can the phrase "the italian for healthy taste". I'm wondering if it's an English way to say or it's just a wrong sentence?
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1 vote
1 answer
33 views

Is it 'a' L-formula or 'an' L-formula? [duplicate]

In Logic & Mathematics textbooks, the terms 'L-formula', or 'L-term', or 'L-theory' are used. (Though for math, it is reserved to mathematical logic.) I've witnessed it first-hand, and I'm sure ...
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4 votes
2 answers
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What does "rule" mean in "the rule of law"?

What does rule mean in the rule of law? I understand the concept of it, but not the grammar. Does "rule" mean "control"/"domination"? Or does it mean "rule" as ...
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2 votes
1 answer
28 views

Can "multiply" be used with uncountable nouns?

If multiply means to increase or cause to increase greatly in number or quantity (OxfordL) does that mean that multiply can be used with uncountable nouns as well? Most examples I find are with ...
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Could you explain what "make pay" in this context? [migrated]

I'm not clear about the phrase used here. Does "pay" in this context mean to score? GOAL - Mohamed Salah Fulham 2-2 Liverpool After being so organised for most of the game, the Fulham ...
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-2 votes
0 answers
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How does "would" work in this sentence? [migrated]

I'm confused because the entire sentence is present. Why does the writer suddenly talk about the past? (to) Seal This verb originally meant to close a letter’s envelope by using wax and a ‘seal‘ or ...
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4 votes
1 answer
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Usage of the word "candle" to refer to a specific item in a list

In Maltese English, whenever items in a list are preceded by letters or Roman numerals instead of numbers, we would say that the list is made up of candles. Let us suppose we have the following two ...
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2 votes
1 answer
55 views

Is the phrase 'keep your act together' ever used?

At the beginning of the movie Klaus, the narrator, Jasper, says: Letters. You don't really write many these days, do you? But I bet there's one you never forget. Send it off to a certain plump guy in ...
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3 votes
3 answers
442 views

Can repertoire be used with respect to a library's books?

Instead of saying The library had a massive collection of books to choose from. could I use repertoire to make it The library had a massive repertoire to choose from. Although the synonyms of the ...
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-5 votes
0 answers
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https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/469562/what-is-the-word-for-saying-a-scenario-in-which-all-choices-lead-to-the-same-outcome [closed]

i don’t know what words to describe it. it’s a TikTok and it was about the “carrying your love with me” trend. she was showing her body shaking. and somebody said •“i don’t get it.” a reply •“she got ...
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Can someone arrange this very sentences with a grammatical diagram? [closed]

The posts you share here on your timeline have good articles with better experiences and wonderful pictures, I feel ecstatic in going through your page worth disseminating, this is my first time ...
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Shall/will; should/would [duplicate]

Let's try this again. Recently a very frustrated someone asked me, "What is this shall and will? How to know when to use shall and will? I proceded to give him a mini lecture on how shall/will ...
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Happy about + ing [duplicate]

The other day I was watching a movie and I heard the sentence "(you are) happy about my killing you". I think "happy about me killing you" would make sense, but I don't understand ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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Is "Sorry for the inconveniences" the right expression? [closed]

I know Sorry for the inconvenience and Sorry for any inconveniences are both commonly used, but is "Sorry for the inconveniences" considered wrong, even though it is grammatically ...
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1 vote
3 answers
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"both X and Y coexist" vs. "X and Y coexist"

I want to say "X and Y coexist" in an article but my co-author repeatedly suggested wording it as "both X and Y coexist". We are not native speakers but her command of the language ...
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-1 votes
1 answer
76 views

Can "attack-on" be considered a new English word? [closed]

I was curious about making new words in English and comparing this process to my native language. I wanted an adjective that describes a person who is actively involved in attacking different places. ...
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0 votes
3 answers
60 views

Can ''anecdote'' be synonymous with ''detail'' or ''small point''? [closed]

As in, would it be correct to write something like: It is simply anecdotal that I didn't finish college? Further, can it be used in this sense in the form of a question? E.g., This is only an ...
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3 votes
2 answers
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Does the word metaphor always require an article and why?

For example, can I say, I like your use of the word riverine as metaphor? Or, must I say, I like your use of the word riverine as a metaphor? Grammarly seems to think that the article "a" is ...
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0 votes
0 answers
63 views

Does "chagrin" mean embarrassment or annoyance?

I originally learned this word studying for the GRE: https://s3.amazonaws.com/magoosh.resources/magoosh-gre-1000-words_oct01.pdf chagrin (noun): strong feelings of embarrassment Much to the the timid ...
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1 vote
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Parenthetical "read out loud" for word substitution

I want the reader to see the word A, but read it as B. Or, to put it another way, I would like the reader to read A while thinking at its true meaning B. I think I can accomplish this generally by: If ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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Is "unsubstantiate" used correctly as a verb?

I tried to register my mom for a regular zoom meeting, and I gave her email to the host of the zoom. After the meeting was over, I received this message from the host: (She unsubstantiated- maybe by ...
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1 vote
2 answers
59 views

What's the meaning of "so in"?

I couldn't find anything about "so in" in my research on Google. I heard people say it. And today I saw that on a Facebook post. So here's the context- You want long hair but short hair is ...
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3 votes
1 answer
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Is the following example of a phatic hiatus appropriate or is it misleading?

On page 203 of the novel ‘That Hideous Strength’ by C.S. Lewis, an example of a phatic hiatus follows this opening statement: “The cardinal difficulty in collaboration between the sexes is that women ...
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What's the difference between "so" "very" and "too". Is it right to say "Don't drive very fast!" [migrated]

I have trouble understanding the differences between "so" "very" and "too". Are these following sentences correct to say so? And what are the differences? Many thanks! &...
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8 votes
1 answer
137 views

What is the meaning and etymology of the phrase "T4"?

I have often heard Orthodox Jewish kids use a phrase "t4". It usually means "just throwing this out there for attenton" but I am not exactly sure. I have finally seen this in-print ...
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1 vote
3 answers
133 views

What is a word for "to create a universe"? Can 'universalize' be used?

Per Lexico, universalize means: Give a universal character or application to (something, especially something abstract) ‘theories that universalize experience’ Can this definition include the sense ...
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1 vote
2 answers
42 views

Word for "it is so because we say so, period." [closed]

What's a word for the reasoning / leadership mindset of "it is so because we say so"? Or a regime / rule based on such a mindset, with the issuing of unexplained and seemingly arbitrary ...
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4 votes
3 answers
161 views

Word for something that must happen when it should happen and must not happen when it shouldn't

This question has been bugging me all day. My biology teacher was describing red blood cells (RBC) and said that blood clotting must occur when it should and must not occur when it should not. If the ...
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1 vote
3 answers
144 views

Is the verb ‘recollect’ used in American English? How is it different from ‘remember’?

I (American English) am a plaintiff in a lawsuit taking place in Malta (UK English) that involves some British people as well as some Americans. When cross-examining a British person, many of his ...
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1 vote
1 answer
74 views

Are primary forms the same things as primitive forms? [closed]

Which of these is better or worse than the other? (Note that the pronoun it is here referring to some 3D object.) You apply all the transformation data so that it won’t reset back to its primitive ...
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10 votes
2 answers
2k views

Why "monatomic" and not "monoatomic"?

"Mono" means singular, and "atomic" stands for the atom. So combining them will give a single atom - "monatomic". But why is this so? Why can't it be "monoatomic&...
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3 votes
1 answer
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Is "before" also an adjective? [duplicate]

I searched "define before" in Google and found out "before" is not listed as an adjective in most dictionaries. Google's built-in dictionary, which is one of the Oxford ...
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0 votes
1 answer
83 views

Is "a normal woman" correct?

Normally, we say "an ordinary woman", but I read an article about Kate Middleton recently, the Duchess of Cambridge, it says she isn't a normal woman. From the article, I can tell that the ...
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0 votes
0 answers
30 views

Is "head data" a true alternative to "header data"?

Our software uses the term "head data" for which I think should be called "header data". If I look up the German translation "Kopfdaten" on Leo, I only get "header ...
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1 vote
0 answers
39 views

"a bit" vs. "some"

Disclaimer: I'm a German native. I'm working on some software with a coworker from US. He just sent a message saying "if we decide to actually publish this as a real package, I'd like to clean it ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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What would be the modern equivalent of " ... is around the corner yet"?

Here's a neat article covering the differences between yet and still: https://keydifferences.com/difference-between-still-and-yet.html There is, in Mark Twain's Connecticut Yankee, a sentence that ...
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0 votes
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when to use move-in vs move in in general english [duplicate]

is there a difference between move in vs move-in? It seems to be the same 'Want to move in to my house?' vs 'Want to move-in to my house?'
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1 vote
1 answer
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Can the word 'partner' mean 'customer/client'?

My question stems from the fact that the word 'partner' is excessively used in the former USSR countries when referring to or addressing their customers/clients/buyers. Russian-speaking manufacturers/...
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0 votes
1 answer
56 views

Is ‘platform’ used correctly in the intended sense in this context? [closed]

Dating websites and dating apps are today very popular, but we don’t know how successful finding relationship via such platforms is. What percent of those using dating platforms find the right partner?...
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3 votes
2 answers
58 views

Using "Nominal" in software engineering

I hope this doesn't sound like a silly question but recently some work was done on some software and someone asked me if everything was working and I responded "everything is looking nominal"...
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0 votes
1 answer
57 views

Is the use of words "institute" and "college" together in naming an institution right?

Is it right to use the words "institute" and "college" in naming an educational institution namely "Institute of Public Policy & Leadership College"? It is an ...
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3 votes
2 answers
210 views

Is "none" when used alone without antecedent singular or plural (for context, I'm talking about people): "None [are/is] here"?

I know that "none of [...]" can be both singular or plural, but when I use it alone in a sentence, without the "of" and without any other nouns, can it be both singular and plural ...
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0 votes
1 answer
44 views

throwing roses in the museum gallery to slack-jawed guests

The Associated Press (AP) has printed the following story, where the boldfaced "to" is used: PARIS (AP) — A man seemingly disguised as an old woman in a wheelchair threw a piece of cake at ...
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1 vote
0 answers
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What is the difference between "presume" and "preassume"?

Preassume (third-person singular simple present preassumes, present participle preassuming, simple past and past participle preassumed) (transitive) To assume in advance; to presume. Wiktionary How ...
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2 votes
1 answer
68 views

Why isn't it "I will have been running, lest they have been catching me"?

The phrase in the title is obviously incorrect; however, I'm having difficulties figuring out how it could actually be grammatically constructed. To be clear, I'm aware this is a ridiculous ...
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4 votes
1 answer
78 views

The origin of and the difference between primogenitor, primogeniture and progenitor

In Etymonline, the etymology of primogenitor (and primogeniture) is very similar to progenitor. The word's meaning: Ancestor or forefather. However, nowhere do I find the reason of the split from the ...
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10 votes
12 answers
5k views

Is it considered rude or inappropriate to frequently address others as "friend" - often in a disingenuous fashion?

Recently, I have encountered (what I think is) a fairly common usage of the word "friend" that I consider to be insincere and offensive, but when I brought this up with the offending party, ...
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0 votes
0 answers
58 views

Difference between roaring 20s and raging 20s?

One article A recession in America by 2024 looks likely from The Economist has a subtitle named: From the roaring to the raging 2020s From Google's online Dictionary(which is from Oxford): roaring ...
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