Questions tagged [word-usage]

This tag is for questions about correctly using a word. The word has to be provided within the question. The question should be limited to the usage of one word. For the usage of complete phrases there is the tag phrase-usage.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
2 votes
3 answers
100 views

Why did ‘brainwash’ develop to be a negative word?

I was pondering this recently. Why didn’t the word develop to have positive meaning, as in: you wash your brain from the toxic thoughts, and instead come to mean indoctrination? Are there other words ...
user avatar
-1 votes
0 answers
11 views

How does a person say they care but can’t solve anothers’ problems if they don’t accept responsibility for their life and finances [migrated]

My sister constantly wants to lay her problems on me and expects solutions, ie she earns a good salary driving a truck but basically lives in her truck but wants to live with me when she isn’t driving ...
user avatar
  • 1
-2 votes
0 answers
13 views

What does 'its' mean in this context? [closed]

A variable X is a cause of a variable Y if Y in any way relies on X for its value. Which variable's value is referred by its? X or Y? My guess is X, because the position of its in this sentence is ...
user avatar
  • 1
-1 votes
0 answers
32 views

Is "Annular Ring" redundant? [migrated]

I've come across the term annular ring in parentheses following washer in my calculus textbook: "has the shape of a washer (an annular ring)". The definition of this word in Merriam Webster ...
user avatar
  • 99
0 votes
0 answers
18 views

To act as [insert profession]

Would it be correct, in English, to say: I acted as an engineer in that company I acted as a lawyer in that firm And, more generally: To act as [profession]
user avatar
-1 votes
0 answers
21 views

What does "hell-turding away" mean here?

Just as we were reaching the cottage, we saw two women in the street. One of the women was Old Mrs Adams. She was shouting at another. Hell-turding away. From the book How to Stop Time by Matt Haig
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
5 views

Convert these to first person [closed]

This chapter introduces an interaction model for information search that is tailored to children’s inquiry-based learning practices
user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
0 answers
15 views

Confused about which between "does" and "will" should I use [migrated]

Which among these two examples are gramatically correct? A: "DOES the disadvantageous offer still remain on the table?" B: "WILL the disadvantageous offer still remain on the table?&...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
34 views

In what varieties of English is "working" used (as a gerund) instead of "work" (as a noun)?

A recent question on the English Language Learners Stack Exchange concerned the use of the phrase "have been knowing" (as opposed to "have known"). While the latter is standard in ...
user avatar
  • 628
-1 votes
0 answers
20 views

How to use he/she (or another word) when we dont know what the other person is a man or woman? [duplicate]

So in meetings, text, documents etc, and speaking to other people we discuss what users should do or will do. So for example, a sentence could be 'the user enter his/her username and then he/she ...
user avatar
-1 votes
0 answers
10 views

Why didn't the example here use "too"? [migrated]

I was reading about excess and in one of the examples I found this, They both eat to excess. Why didn't this use 'too' instead of 'to'? It does not make sense to me, I don't know why.
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
33 views

What is a good verb to be used with ‘possibilities’ in this context? [closed]

After showing all the restrictions, I will investigate the possibilities that still … for activism. The verbs coming to my mind are hold and maintain. But I don’t know if these are good choices, and ...
user avatar
  • 2,235
1 vote
1 answer
32 views

What is the usage of "considerably" outside of comparative constructs?

I have noticed that all the examples for "considerably" in Lexico (which is based on the OED, I believe?) are comparatives: considerably [adverb]: By a notably large amount or to a notably ...
user avatar
  • 864
0 votes
0 answers
17 views

"Support to do" or "Support doing" [migrated]

I am writing features for our product, such as: Support to repair corrupt Outlook PST file. Support to recover message body and subject. ... However, the Grammarly extension in Chrome will always ...
user avatar
  • 99
-2 votes
0 answers
31 views

Which of two connotations springs to mind upon hearing the word "whore"? [closed]

Although the dictionary lists "prostitute" as definition number one for the word "whore", it qualifies that entry as being "somewhat old-fashioned". I have always taken &...
user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
110 views

When does "actively mislead" entail an intent to deceive?

Background Sometimes I see the term "actively mislead", but I am not confident when it is implied that something was done intentionally to deceive. A previous question here asked Does "...
user avatar
  • 125
5 votes
1 answer
169 views

Bot, za and the like

The trend of using the last part of words, bot for robot or za for pizza for instance, appears to be from the late ‘60s as suggested by Etymonline: The method of minting new slang by clipping ...
user avatar
  • 1,367
2 votes
0 answers
91 views

What are attractions at fair called, where you buy food? [migrated]

What are the houses called where you can buy food at fairs? Like the shops, are they called stalls? And what are other attractions in a fair called? Is fair even the right word or is adventure park ...
user avatar
-1 votes
0 answers
54 views

Use of the word "midwife"

A midwife is a person who helps a woman give birth and I believe a woman can use "my midwife" to refer to an individual who assisted/will assist her during childbirth; my question is, can a ...
user avatar
  • 1
-1 votes
0 answers
55 views

Why do Americans use "claim" all the time instead of "get"/"receive"?

I'm really wondered, why is verb "claim" so popular in meaning of "get" or "receive"? I see it everywhere in mobile apps and games ("claim bonus"), I even heard ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
24 views

If I'm ranting I'm the ranter. So is the subject of said rant the rantee? Or the person hearing it? What's the other called, then?

...and do they have a suffix of their own? Cambridge says "-er" is "added to [...] verbs to form nouns that refer to people or things that [do/are performing] that particular activity&...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
64 views

What are the origins of "tech" as an abbreviation for "technology?

I'm trying to trace the origins and rise in popularity of the abbreviation "tech" from "technology." From what I can tell, the term began taking off in popular culture around the ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
114 views

Difference between "provocative" and "thought-provoking"

In some dictionaries, provocative has two meanings: (1) Causing annoyance, anger, or another strong reaction, especially deliberately. (2) Arousing sexual desire or interest Some other dictionaries ...
user avatar
  • 133
29 votes
6 answers
5k views

Is it common for native English speakers to confuse "18th century" with "the 1800s"?

As a non-native English speaker, I've only ever referred to "1700-talet", meaning "the 1700s" or "the 18th century". In English, it's by far most common to say "18th ...
user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
21 views

"I wonder what to start work on" - does it sound fine? [closed]

For example, I'm looking for a task to work on, is it fine to say it?
user avatar
  • 1
-1 votes
0 answers
15 views

Should has of have be used with Zero [duplicate]

Which is correct? Zero PPO complaints has been received OR Zero PPO complaints have been received.
user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
0 answers
24 views

Should I use "portion" or "proportion"?

I have some balls, and some percentage q \in (0, 100%) of them are green (for example, q = 30% or 1/3). Should I say "A portion q of the balls are green" or "A proportion q of the balls ...
user avatar
  • 101
0 votes
0 answers
15 views

Using the word comfort in a sentence?

Is it correct to use "I was in comfort" in a sentence? For example, I was in comfort until my mother woke me up.
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
45 views

What is the grammar of "I'm home"? [duplicate]

Why do we often say "I'm home" rather than "I'm at home"? How is the former even grammatically correct? Should this be thought of as a use of a "phrasal verb", "to ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
24 views

The use of the word "along"

Say I want someone to fold a rectangular sheet of paper so that I get a cylinder with the longer side as its height. Roll the sheet of paper along its shorter side. Is this correct? Or should it be ...
user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
0 answers
32 views

Can we use "just like the old times" with present tense?

Can we use "just like the old times" with present tense? For example: She robs trains, just like the old times. Is this correct and natural?
user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
44 views

If I say my profession is x, does that imply I am employed right now?

I am not employed right now but I'd like to communicate that if I work, I'd work as x. I don't want them to think I am currently working. Is there a better phrase than My profession is x ?
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
30 views

How use the word "surge" properly? [closed]

Would it be correct to use the word 'surge' at the very end of a sentence? For instance: X has made Y surge. Or would you rather say X surged Y?
user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
383 views

Confused in the usage of "where" in a non-interrogative sentence

I was writing an essay, but I came across a weird sentence: Where peace prevails, justice prevails. In the above sentence, I am confused if the usage of "where" at the beginning of the ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
12 views

Asking that something "does" or "do"? [duplicate]

Consider the following sentence: We ask that the diagram commute. My hunch was that it should be "commutes" and not "commute". I know that for the sentences starting with "...
user avatar
  • 103
0 votes
0 answers
22 views

Act of intentional deceit [duplicate]

I’m not looking for mislead, beguile, or con. It’s akin somewhat like red herring and it’s the practice of intentionally leading someone to a false conclusion usually for the sake of disproving them. ...
user avatar
  • 1
4 votes
3 answers
98 views

When did “shrinkflation” first appear in writing?

With the recent trend of increasing inflation a new term has come to the fore: shrinkflation. The noun shrinkflation is a blend or portmanteau word formed from the verb ‘shrink’ and the noun ‘...
user avatar
  • 59.5k
0 votes
0 answers
19 views

Why is "should" used instead of "would" all over The Fellowship of the Ring? [duplicate]

Over and over again, the author uses "should" where "would" would be right: I don’t know half of you half as well as I should like; and I like less than half of you half as well ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
44 views

When is it appropriate to use the word "flavor" to describe different types of food/drink?

Recently my partner and I were gifted a variety box of Sees candies (one of those assorted boxes that contains individual chocolates of different types with different fillings and shapes). My partner ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
30 views

Is "the art and craft of ..." a common expression in English?

As a German I am wondering whether "the art and craft of" (e.g.) teaching, cooking, etc. as in the title of a book I recently came across ("The art and craft of problem solving") ...
user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
0 answers
10 views

What is the word for extra, unneeded descriptive words describing something in a sentence? [duplicate]

What’s the term for extra, synonymous unneeded adjectives describing a noun or verb in a sentence?
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
29 views

Is it correct to say that similar groups show high levels of "stereotypicity/stereotypicality"?

I am writing a scientific paper describing a group of cells that are consistently patterned together through different developmental stages. Phrased another way, the components of the groups are the ...
user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
351 views

What does Jesse Stuart mean by "weaker devour the stronger"? [closed]

When I was reading the short story Love by Jesse Stuart, I came across this sentence, the weaker devour stronger even among human beings. Can the weak really devour the strong? I think it would make ...
user avatar
  • 49
0 votes
1 answer
50 views

Is it necessary to write "by" before a percent increase? [duplicate]

In the sentence, "Immigration increased by 28%", would the "by" be correct or could the sentence read, "Immigration increased 28%"?
user avatar
7 votes
3 answers
1k views

What's the proper usage of the word "legion" in terms of a large, indefinite number?

The usage of the word "legion" sometimes sounds awkward to me. E.g., His fans are legion. To make it make sense, I replaced the word with "numerous", but it's still a "false ...
user avatar
  • 303
0 votes
1 answer
35 views

The usage of the words “Decagon” and “vertex” [closed]

I am writing a blog in which I present a 10-element model of “motivation”. That is to say, I have identified ten components which affect the motivation in people. The audience of this blog is ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
53 views

Can you "finish" something because you don't plan to do it?

Q: "Have you finished washing the car?" A: "I don't plan to wash the car, so yes, I am finished washing the car." Is this appropriate usage of the word "finish", or is it ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
16 views

The identifying properties of "it/that" against the question of "who" [duplicate]

When I ask the question "who broke the bike?" and I respond with "it was Jane", is the word 'it' a pronoun identifying Jane? My understanding is that 'it' is referring to "the ...
user avatar
  • 1
1 vote
0 answers
34 views

Looking for a term to describe this juxtaposition

Our city is planning to re-purpose a Confederate Civil War Memorial by adding the names of Union soldiers & former the slaves who were freed in that era and fought for the Union. Would the joining ...
user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
298 views

Crenellated or Castellated

I read an article today. https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-60767454 It used the word "crenellated". I thought I knew the word "castellated", but I'm getting more confused. ...
user avatar

1
2 3 4 5
134