Questions tagged [word-usage]

This tag is for questions about correctly using a word. The word has to be provided within the question. The question should be limited to the usage of one word. For the usage of complete phrases there is the tag phrase-usage.

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1answer
24 views

Other word for “poorest”

There is a list of 12 people in a certain area together with their Net Worth (in Billions/Millions). In that list, there is a caption "Juan Dela Cruz is the poorest", which is unacceptable ...
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1answer
53 views

How to write formally and tersely that someone's work is utter nonsense and overly complicated? [duplicate]

How to write formally and tersely that someone's work is utter nonsense and overly complicated?
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1answer
37 views

Is something like a “car accident” hideable? [closed]

Hello everyone: Can I say, “He tried to hide the car crash from his father.”? Thanks
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0answers
37 views

What do we generally call the writing fluid found in a fountain pen? [closed]

I've even been looking for a while on Google, but no answer has been found. Can anyone give me this issue a solution, please?
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2answers
52 views

“Let Alone” in a sentence

For the sake of grammar, is this phrasing correct: Python is something that not all adults know, let alone do the children. or Python is something that not all adults know, let alone the children. ...
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1answer
29 views

Is it correct to say “I had been working in a bank since I left university until I I got married”?

Say I graduated from university in 2002 and I got married in 2016. And I worked in a bank from 2002 to 2016. We can use "from ... to ..." with the simple past tense, for example, "I ...
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0answers
14 views

Can the bold word “from” here be replaced by “with”? If so, does it sound idiomatic/natural?

The original sentence: "Some of his relatives would occasionally come to seek employment from him, but he would always turn them down out of principle."
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2answers
49 views

What's the difference between Synergy and Gestalt?

I recently discovered these 2 terms while looking for a single term to represent the phrase: The whole is greater than the sum of the parts. Which term better represent this idea? I'm a business ...
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0answers
12 views

Is the usage of nonetheless in the below sentence correct? [migrated]

I have written the below sentence. Panicked that his presence had been exposed, by his own folly nonetheless, Diego immediately jumped in the cover of the tree. The sentence here is supposed to mean ...
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1answer
28 views

Can “whence” be used to imply causation?

In mathematics literature, one often talks about implications and inferences. Several times I have seen "whence" used for this purpose. For instance: "Aristotle is a human, whence ...
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1answer
27 views

Vigilant - part of speech?

Vigilant is an adjective, so "The vigilant worker spotted a problem" is correct but what about "We must remain vigilant"?
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0answers
13 views

Can 'property' (in the ontological sense) be modified into an adjective?

I'm trying to describe the general concept of the scale of a property. By this I mean the order of magnitude of a property, like a mass being on the kg scale or the mg scale or whatever. I want to ...
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3answers
1k views

Does calling something a 'Novelty Act' bring down its image?

I'm really confused with this one, if one calls some performance a 'Novelty Act' does it imply they're trying lower its image or is it just neutral? Well, I looked it up on the internet and it says ...
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0answers
27 views

What would be a word to describe someone or something that causes progression? [closed]

The only word I can think of is "Progressor" but my browser puts a red wiggly line under it suggesting that it's not even a real word.
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1answer
22 views

is opportunity countable or non-countable?

I want to use the phrase "plenty of opportunities" in my essay, but I'm not sure whether opportunity is countable or not. Some people say that the phrase "plenty of opportunity" is ...
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1answer
24 views

“ablation on” or “ablation of”

Ablation studies are commonly used in academic publications to investigate the individual impact of a smaller subset of changes. In this context, I would like to know when do we use "ablation on&...
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0answers
30 views

The difference between “have got” and “have got to”?

I have been asked about the difference between Have got Have got to Are they considered as present perfect forms?
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1answer
37 views

Observation: “Take back” is used in impolite speech, while “Bring back” is used in polite speech. Is there any basis to this?

I'm an English teacher working with an advanced student. They asked me to teach them how to ask for help or support when things aren't going they way they should. I decided to teach him that it is ...
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2answers
39 views

Can you start a question using 'Meanwhile'?

When writing an email I started off with this sentence but now I am having doubts on using 'Meanwhile' at the beginning of a question. Meanwhile my absence, did you receive an answer to your mail by ...
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0answers
15 views

Correct use of the word 'opportunity' [closed]

Please let me know which usage of the word 'opportunity' is correct or better OR are both correct. a) This provides a person opportunities to learn from various experiences. b) This provides a person ...
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0answers
28 views

Is the phrase “I'm afraid” interchangeable with “I am afraid”?

I don't think I've ever seen the phrase/idiom used with the non-contracted "I am". If it's not interchangeable, would it be odd to see that phrase in a poem where there aren't any other ...
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0answers
20 views

The usage of “you” vs. “yourself” in an imperative sentence

In the sentence "Learn how to protect you and your property . . ." I believe that "you" should be changed to "yourself," since the understood imperative subject of the ...
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0answers
11 views

wish sentence with past perfect … before going [duplicate]

Seonaid! I often use your https://www.perfect-english-grammar.com It is very helpful. Now I need your personal help. Please can you help me? I am an English teacher and I have a question about ...
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2answers
62 views

Is 'ponder' acceptable as a quotative verb, for instance with inner dialogue?

There has been a question on ELU about the acceptability of transitive ponder (ponder an issue) versus ponder about (etc) an issue. This question asks rather about the acceptability of ponder in an (...
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1answer
33 views

Between “Expert knowledge” and “Working knowledge”

I wonder how best to describe a position between "Expert knowledge" and "Working knowledge" (as in "Expert knowledge in HTML/CSS", "Working knowledge in JavaScript&...
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0answers
10 views

“As per recommendation” or “on recommendation of” which one is better to use in a formal letter

"As per recommendation" or "on recommendation of" which one is better to use in a formal letter ? I have seen both usage .however,I could not understand how to use it in a sentence....
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0answers
37 views

Correct usage between two word conceive and pregnant

I am confused about the 2 terms used to say that a lady is bearing a life/child in her womb, they are as follows:- To conceive a child. Getting pregnant. Are they used differently with time like if ...
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0answers
23 views

Period after website name and email? [closed]

Please let me know whether I need to put a period when the sentence ends with a website name or an email. Thanks
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1answer
15 views

Generalization or definition of the word “from” when used in “I returned to the city from having travelled the world”

I contrived this sentence, but had a hard time explaining how to construct sentences of similar nature, the sentence being He returned to the city from having travelled the world Meaning, "[...
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0answers
12 views

Is the double word necessary in this sentence?

Can anyone let me know if I can replace the second 'problems' (at the last of the sentence) with the word 'them'? I prefer not to use the word 'problems' twice in my sentence. They too faced the day-...
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0answers
16 views

I have a elderly domiciliary business and trying to write a motto but not sure about the punctuations

my motto is Tailored compassionate care, at home. Do you think it makes sense? Is the use of the comma correct? I can be more specific and rewrite the motto to Tailored compassionate care, in the ...
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0answers
38 views

Starting a question with “Dare I”

For question sentences that start with "Dare I" like "Dare I join them?" can it mean: Should I take the risk of joining them? Or does it strictly mean: Do I have the bravery to ...
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3answers
39 views

Can 'optimise' be intransitive verb?

Gans calls these ‘prediction machines’, because these algorithms make forecasts about the outcomes of decisions and optimise accordingly (based on definable trends in behavioural data). In this ...
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1answer
11 views

Remaster “contextual” synonym

If remastering means to remake an audio or video recording of better quality with new technologies, then what’s the equivalent verb for remaking a document or publication i.e. book with new ...
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2answers
898 views

How is “officially” used in a non-literal way?

An article called 'I am Officially Sick of COVID-19' got me thinking about this non-literal usage of 'officially'. I'd be interested to hear some explanations of how to correctly use this. My feeling ...
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0answers
23 views

Is estimatedly a word?

Is 'estimatedly' a word? My spell checker highlights it and Google returns only 35k results so I guess it is not, though I cannot "see" what is wrong with it. I am using it in this context: ...
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1answer
37 views

Recommend something “better” or “more” than

I've been wondering what would be more grammatically correct to say: I recommend this better than this. Or I recommend this more than this. Are there better (colloquial) ways of expressing this ...
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1answer
14 views

Uses of the word “graze”?

Graze: (of cattle, sheep, etc.) eat grass in a field. "cattle graze on the open meadows" So why do we use the following: He is grazing the animals. What's the logic behind this?
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1answer
7 views

Do another pass through a list of things

Is it right to ask someone to "do another pass through the questions" when you want them to take another look/check/examination at a few questions? For example: Bob: I think we are done now,...
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2answers
38 views

Word for someone who only tells the truth when it benefits them [closed]

What do you call people who speak the truth, but only for their own benefit?
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1answer
30 views

A word that describes someone who is obsessed with the concept of love

I am looking for a word that describes a person who is obsessed with love and romance, not particularly a person, but life and everything it has to offer. Someone who romanticizes everything. I don’t ...
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0answers
22 views

what is the difference between propaganda and hoax?

I was looking for definitions of propaganda and hoax. The problem is that people in the internet are trying to post their own definitions without a clarification. At the end I chose these following ...
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0answers
14 views

assist in and assist on difference [closed]

Consider the line I can assist you on the same. This is in reference to teaching a subject.. Is this line correct ? Or should it be I can assist you in the same ? Also anyone can suggest a better way ...
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0answers
18 views

Have yet and haven’t yet

I’ve done some search on google and found a meaning of the word “yet” is “If you have yet to do something, you have not done it” (definition by Cambridge Dictionary), an example is: They have yet to ...
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0answers
28 views

Is this correct usage of the word room?

My friend was facing some hardships due to this pandemic and I texted her that she can reach out to me anytime if she wants someone to talk and she replied with "Thanks for providing me this room&...
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1answer
79 views

What is the gender-neutral way of saying “gentlemen’s agreement”?

How can we refer to a gentlemen's agreement in a gender-neutral way in English? In Spanish we use palabra de honor meaning “word of honor”, which carries no assumption about anyone’s sex.
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0answers
28 views

“Scribble me a line” does that sound rude?

I’ve been using this construction for quite a long time, while giving anybody my contacts in the informal situations, meaning “write me if you have time and inspiration” and I have no idea where I ...
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2answers
46 views

Is there a difference in the actual meaning of these two sentences (average x mean)?

I'm really confused about if these two sentences actually mean the same, and if they're really interchangeable. I'm writing a scientific paper to be published in an Agronomy Journal. "Mean fruit ...
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1answer
56 views

What do words mean anymore?

One of my math students was recently solving some word problems and gave up on one with the note: "Who knows? What do words mean anymore?" An amusing comment but also an intriguing syntax. ...
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2answers
41 views

“Inaccurate” means “completely wrong”? [closed]

I wonder if you could tell me, the word "inaccurate" means "completely wrong" or "Not precise"? For example, consider the following sentence: Your estimation is ...

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