Questions tagged [word-usage]

This tag is for questions about correctly using a word. The word has to be provided within the question. The question should be limited to the usage of one word. For the usage of complete phrases there is the tag phrase-usage.

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14 views

Pandemic vs pandemia

Pandemic, as suggested by Etymonline, was originally an adjective (mid 17th c.) which was later used also a noun (mid 19th c.). The term comes from Late Latin and, curiously, pandemic in English ...
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18 views

The Tinternet irresolution

Good time of the day. I had been wondering whether or not I can shorten "The Internet"; thus, I went online and stumbled upon the word Tinternet in the urban dictionary. Can you please tell me is it ...
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40 views

Which is the meaning of “living in chop”?

I am reading a science-fiction short story and I met this sentence that I can't understand. "living in chop” You can read the the whole sentence in the attached file. What does it means?
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1answer
40 views

“Way out at sea” meaning

enter link description here This is the third question from the editorial "I Don’t Want to Be the Strong Female Lead" from NYtimes. Butler felt to me like a lighthouse blinking from an island of ...
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23 views

Is “to be” unnecessary in this sentence? [migrated]

Which is the correct usage here? This Final location of these holes are to be to suit at field. Or this 2 Final location of these holes are to suit at field.
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18 views

what does it mean?All presents and acouted for [closed]

I saw that in first Episode of The Pin and Jake's adverture Seoson 1..what does it mean?
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27 views

Is sinisterness a word? [closed]

It seems like it should be, but Simplenote doesn't seem to accept it as one. If it isn't, what other words come close to matching its connotations?
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1answer
32 views

Learning proper word usage [closed]

Is it gramatically correct to call my classmate in a unibersity a unibersity coleague? Or is the term coleague used only for professional staff workers.
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36 views

Should we avoid using the word Endeavor when unlikelihood of success is implied?

When I was investigating the difference between the verbs Endeavor and Strive, I read a description which sounded quite ambiguous to me (possibly because I’m not a native English speaker). The exact ...
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21 views

Usage of maverick as an adjective for a thing [duplicate]

I saw on Google the formulation: "the maverick of the sea scrolls…". Would it be better, equivalent or incorrect, instead of saying for example "the maverick of frameworks", to say "the maverick ...
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1answer
36 views

In this sentence, am I really shocked or not?

I encounter one sentence that goes like this: Hardly am I shocked when I hear the devastating news. I looked "hardly...when" up in a Collins dictionary, and it says: If you say hardly had one ...
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1answer
43 views

conferring - to confer - meaning

I'm from Brazil and here the word confer (conferir) has the same meaning as check. But in the dictionaries online I couldn't find this meaning in its definition: https://www.merriam-webster.com/...
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2answers
72 views

You will vs you must

With it being a direct order with out a choice. Is it written You will pay for your sins. Or You must pay for your sins. Will seems stronger as You will no matter what. Where you must just ...
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1answer
37 views

AGO for physical distance?

I have come up with this sentence "I crossed the border 3 kilometers ago". I feel like ago is not the correct adverb since it's used in time contexts. Can you help me find the correct adverb? Thank ...
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23 views

Is “fence” intransitive in this case, or there's something I missed?

There's a definition for "fence" on the dictionary: fence /fens/ verb [intransitive] informal to buy and sell stolen goods The police suspect he has been fencing electronic equipment. https://www....
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53 views

Can I drop the word “like” in certain instances?

The particular example I am thinking of here is: "This sounds like a noble pursuit." I was wondering if it would be grammatically correct to drop the like: hence, "this sounds a noble pursuit." It ...
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21 views

About the use of get rid of word [closed]

I want to ask that which is the right sentence which i mention below.. So,in these ways i get rid of from my dull or boring moments.. Or So,in these ways i get of my dull moments. Which is the ...
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20 views

“As a whole” synonym

I want another way to say "as a whole" or "as a group" in the example below: "However, even though it can distinguish between file-backed and anonymous pages in usage accounting, it is unable to ...
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40 views

Can 'issuee' be used as 'employee' is used in respect to 'employer'?

I wonder if issuee is a word that can be used to indicate the other party, opposed to the issuer, in for example, a digital certificate issuing process? For example: The issuer of the certificate ...
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53 views

Is “unironically” a valid word?

Every spell checker I have, both ones that automatically spell check and those run after finishing a document or draft, seems to consider the word unironically to be incorrect. I have heard the word ...
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1answer
27 views

The usage of the word “chance” in this context? [closed]

Context: "But it was a chance stumbling upon a run-down, yet functional, laboratory in his late grandfather's home that solidified the young man's enthusiasm for chemistry." Could you give me some ...
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1answer
52 views

word usage in academic writing - possesses, beyond, ability [closed]

Could you help me to check if this sentence is ok? Beyond having similar osmosis potential to polymer sponges, it is desirable that the covering material possesses the ability of being dispersed by ...
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7 views

The accident “to” somebody or the accident “of” somebody? [migrated]

Which sentence is correct? Or are both or neither correct? The accident to my child was traumatic. The accident of my child was traumatic. Maybe the first one is correct as in English we say an ...
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1answer
62 views

Another way to say “before” or “in advance”

I am writing a (computer science) paper and want to express the sentence "A acquires the lock before B acquires it." in a more complex way. Can I say: "A acquires the lock antecedent to B." or can ...
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1answer
81 views

Funnily enough or Funny enough

How to say this correctly? In the first sentence I want it to be the way he said it, describing a verb, and in the second one I want to make it the way he is, describing a noun. And what part of ...
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60 views

Is “this is different than before” valid US English for “this is different from before”? [duplicate]

I have many times heard James Rolfe and Mike Matei (the video content producers), who I believe both grew up in New Jersey or in the city Pennsylvania, say things such as: Blablabla. This is ...
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22 views

The use of “booked” [migrated]

Situation: I’d like to have a haircut with a hairdresser named Lucy. Is it correct to say “I’ll have Lucy booked for my haircut next Tuesday?” Thank you.
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25 views

What does the “open exchange of information” mean?

What does the "open exchange of information" mean? For example, in order to find the truth about history, there must be an open exchange of information? Could I re-write the sentence and make "...
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1answer
40 views

Meaning of Erin [closed]

I usually come across the following combination a lot on online stores: "Erin Recommendations" or "Erin Recommends" Could anyone clarify the meaning? Thanks in advance
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30 views

“not so useful as” vs “not as useful as” [duplicate]

I do not understand whether the first or the second sentence is correct, or perhaps both? No other metal is so useful as iron. No other metal is as useful as iron. Although the latter feels ...
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1answer
29 views

Capacious critical thinker - is this a correct usage of the word “capacious”?

I just read on some internet page that a distinguished History professor at a leading California university described one of her students as a "capacious critical thinker". Other than from the ...
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1answer
69 views

Difference between “at rest” and “not in motion” [closed]

Is it incorrect to say that a machine is "at rest" when it is not moving ? I'd tend to use "at rest" for living organisms and use something like "not in motion" for machines and devices, but maybe I'...
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33 views

synonyms of “project”, “assignment”, “task” from end-user point of view

I'm compiling a FAQ section and for the last 20 minutes, I can't decide which of the following sentences fits or maybe none of them fits. Example sentences: How long does it take to complete ...
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37 views

Do we say “to lean the broom AGAINST / ON the corner of the room” or “to lean the broom IN the corner of the room”? [migrated]

lean [transitive] to make something rest against something in a sloping position lean something against something Can I lean my bike against the wall? She leaned her head against his ...
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1answer
59 views

Is “out of … reasons” as fine as because of, due to, for?

Examples Take sentences like: Because of her alcohol addiction, she spends an extra $20 on booze every day. Due to her alcohol addiction, she spends an extra $20 on booze every day. If ...
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28 views

“On [Subject]” vs. “Of [Subject]” in Titles

I see "On" and "Of" in the titles of many essays, and was wondering what the difference between the two is. For example, what is the difference between, "On Sadness" and "Of Sadness"? "On Grief" vs "...
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43 views

When to use 'conflict' as uncountable noun?

I previously believed that conflict is a countable noun. Lately, I have encountered a sentence... Translation is possible, and yet we are still bedeviled by conflict. After that, I tried to ...
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22 views

using the word thank-you's

I am putting together a brochure for a gift box business. I am listing Client thank-you's as one of the bullet points. Do I have it listed correctly? and does it need an apostrophe?
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3answers
60 views

Appropriateness of the word 'buddy' in America

I would like to know if addressing an American with the word 'buddy' would be considered offensive. If the answer is yes then would it be considered offensive by an American irrespective of the ...
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1answer
44 views

Is 'thrive to become' used correctly in this sentence?

I came upon a sentence 'Thrive to become an efficient and adaptive IT organisation' describing future company goals. It seems to me that 'strive' would be more appropriate word here. Is 'thrive' used ...
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1answer
49 views

Taught me or showed me?

What is the correct way of saying the following sentance.. This experience has taught me the importance of waiting. This experience showed me the importance of waiting. I think the second ...
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43 views

No animals vs. No people vs. No one

With count nouns, "no" is more often followed by plural nouns to mean "not any" or "zero". It is more idiomatic to say: (1a) There are no animals in the field. (2a) No dogs are allowed here. than: (...
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2answers
3k views

Meaning of 'He can't be bleat' in Witcher TV series song 'Toss a coin to your witcher'

I've been wondering about this particular lyric in the song 'Toss a coin to your Witcher' from the new Netflix series 'The Witcher' The verse goes like this: They came after me with masterful ...
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1answer
51 views

Can “doubt” be used as a synonym of “question”? [duplicate]

In several stackexchange areas, I have seen posts like this, where database design is just for the sake of example. I have a doubt concerning database design. Where I would have said I have ...
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46 views

agreat vs. a great vs. greater [migrated]

Here is a quotation from the movie Great Expectations Part 2 (1999; Director: Julian Jarrold) If the danger would be 50 times agreat I should still have come to you. The meaning is clearly "...
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1answer
89 views

Does the word “commute” apply only to work? [closed]

The title is the question. We usually say something like "my commute takes an hour", because the commute being "to work" is implicit. But is it required? Or I can say "I read a book on my bi-weekly ...
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1answer
57 views

Does the word “inebriate” work for marijuana usage?

I've found conflicting answers online. Does the word "inebriate" only apply to the effects of alcohol or also to the effects of cannabis, or any other intoxicant?
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47 views

What’s the original sense of the term “alveary”?

Lexicographer John Baret published, in about 1574, a dictionary of the English, Latin, and French languages, with occasional illustrations from the Greek. The dictionary was called An Alvearie, or ...
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1answer
82 views

How to use “thingamajig” [closed]

I know when I have to use thingamajig, yes, when I don't know the precise word during the conversation. What I want to know: Is that word can be used in written language as well? How to use that ...
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42 views

Unambiguously using 'or' to indicate something that is equivalent in meaning

Or is most commonly used to indicate an alternative. For example: I can walk, jog, or run to the park. Is it Ms. or Mrs. Jones? The assailant's jacket was green, blue, or purple. I cannot recall. Or ...

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