Questions tagged [synonyms]

A synonym is a word that means the same, or almost the same thing, as another word.

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14 views

What is the word for students under the same advisor

I'd like to know what is the word to describe students under the same advisor in graduate program, e.g. PhD program. Normally, students in the same department who attend the same classes are called ...
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30 views

What do you call a person who believes that everybody around is selfish? [on hold]

What do you call someone who thinks the whole world is driven by self interests and full of negativity. I believe there's a word for that but I'm unable to recollect it. It's usually used in sentences ...
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2answers
71 views

Is the sentence I want to get as a tattoo correct? Is it even a sentence? Can I shorten it?

In an effort to save my health, I do not smoke most of the time, I refrain from eating animal products almost always and I work out quite regularily. However, in order to not even slip one more time (...
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2answers
39 views

Synonym for restrictions that are cumulative

I'm looking for the proper word to describe restrictions that "add" up in computer talk. Let's say that someone can set the authorization to get into a system as: password: User must provide correct ...
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Word for asserting/reaffirming your higher rank in social/professional power structure?

My mind keeps coming back to words such as motioning, stepping or puffing but I know these aren't the words. i.e: When someone higher in the power structure asserts their superiority over you
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My brain is constipated, surely that's not correct

I am unable to finish a project I am working, I just don't want to do it because the ideas to make it awesome are not flowing, I am not procrastinating, I want it completed, the only way I can ...
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18 views

Synonyms of agree or permit [on hold]

What could be the synonyms of agree or permit starting from 'p' which is a 6 letter word?
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1answer
58 views

Gender-neutral equivalent of “to a man”

Is there a Gender-neutral equivalent of "to a man"? I mean the expression "to a man" in the sense of "each and every one". For example: The skydivers, to a man, felt they had taken all ...
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1answer
46 views

what's the scientific term for “natural” in “natural blonde”

Jim Rogers (a famous investor) is very enamored with the natural blondeness of his current (third) wife. See here: and here: I once came across an interview of his where he described her as a "...
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1answer
76 views

Phrases that mean “I have no idea”

What phrases can be used interchangably with “I have no idea”? I request two types of answers: Polite forms of saying it. Casual forms of saying it. "I have no idea" seems simple and ...
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27 views

Distinction between prefixes 'super-' and 'extra-' in similar contexts

From my understanding, both the prefixes super- and extra- can mean above or beyond, though a possible distinction could be as follows (from the answer to this question): ...using super-something ...
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Craggy and rugged; difference in meaning [closed]

What's the difference between the words "rugged" and "craggy"? The Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary defines both words in a very similar way. The dictionary defines "rugged" as having strong, ...
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Usage of words in accordance to Cambridge and Oxford dictionaries: 'vague' vs 'arbitrary' [closed]

Lexico defines arbitrary as Based on random choice or personal whim rather than any reason or system, the antonym of choice here being 'reasoned'. It furthermore defines vague as Of ...
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5answers
139 views

Is there a word for somebody who's fond of hard alcohol as opposed to beer or wine? [closed]

I'm currently writing a birthday invitation in which I want to state that I'll also provide hard alcohol for those who prefer it over beer. Is there a word to describe people with this preference? ...
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1answer
29 views

See/View different meaning example [closed]

I am not sure when I should use in the sentence "see" or "view". If I want to say for example: My teachers see/view giving lectures to me as a waste of time. What is more correct please? See feels ...
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6answers
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One word for a harmful idea/plan [closed]

Is there one word for a harmful idea/plan? (All that comes to my mind is evil/wicked idea, but it's two words, and anyway it's actually a synonym for brilliant/cunning idea.) The whole idea to ...
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3answers
79 views

What does it mean to `Muse through a document"? [closed]

I remember I learned this word "muse" while listening to a vocabulary builder audiobook. I believe it meant "to go through a document very carefully". I tried to google the meaning of the word but I ...
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3answers
60 views

What's the difference between “rind”, “peel”, and “skin”? [closed]

I usually see rind, peel, and skin used interchangeably, But is there any meaning behind them? For example: banana peel vs banana skin vs banana rind Which one should we use for each thing? And ...
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2answers
55 views

Can 'obsolete' and 'defunct' be used interchangeably?

'Obsolete' is defined as No longer produced or used; out of date. and 'defunct' is defined as No longer existing or functioning. The meanings sound close to each other though the latter should ...
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2answers
51 views

Formal alternative to “that'll do” [closed]

I use "that'll do" in circumstances where I acknowledge that something is sufficient. What is a formal alternative for this phrase, that can take place in a formal letter or a conversation ? ...
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1answer
29 views

Which word can replace “provision” in this excerpt from Pride and Prejudice?

The sentence is: "Without thinking highly either of men or of matrimony, marriage had always been her object; it was the only honourable provision for well-educated young women of small fortune, and ...
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1answer
55 views

What word do we use for a person who acts on behalf of a computer?

For example, a chess player is playing against a computer program, but on a real-life chess board. Every time the computer makes a move, a human makes that move on the chess board on behalf of the ...
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0answers
43 views

When would one use the word “participance” in place of “participation”?

The Oxford English Dictionary includes three words that all appear to have the same meaning: participation, participance, and participancy. I'm curious if there is a difference between the three. ...
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3answers
82 views

What do you call a girl having big eyes?

I am trying to describe a big-eyed girl. I was not getting a proper phrase in English to describe her eyes. What is the proper one-word phrase for the big-eyed girl in English? The title looks odd ...
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1answer
54 views

What's the difference between “stochastic” and “random”?

Is one just used to sound fancy? Webster defines the former as the latter: Definition of stochastic 1 : RANDOM specifically : involving a random variable a stochastic process 2 : ...
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1answer
36 views

Is “magnum” a valid word to cover “big”? [closed]

This word is mostly unusual to use in speaking, so here my question. Magnum comes from 1788 in English as "large wine-bottle," usually containing two quarts. As the name of a powerful type of handgun,...
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2answers
41 views

Increase/increment and decrease/decrement

I know that there are differences between increase and increment and decrease and decrement in general. E.g. increase/decrease can be used as verbs whereas increment/decrement cannot, and increment ...
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0answers
47 views

To prise open the gap between price and prize [migrated]

The words "price" and "prize" and "prise" are easily confused. They mean different things*. It is not a difference of writing between US and British English. Part of the confusion is that "price" ...
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1answer
43 views

To dress vs to clothe

Is there any difference in meaning between "to dress" and "to clothe"? According to the Cambridge Dictionary “to clothe" is "to provide or cover someone with things to wear". Therefore, I infer that "...
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3answers
1k views

jersey vs sweater

I checked today the definition of "jersey" in Word Reference dictionary (https://www.wordreference.com/definition/jersey) and found: a close-fitting knitted sweater or shirt I think that the ...
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0answers
39 views

Is there a synonym for “flunky” that specifically denotes a failed student at university?

Am searching for a term to denote a person who has failed within a university, ie. someone who could not excel in his or her course of study. Not a dropout, per se, or someone who simply could not ...
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3answers
109 views

An English or French word that summarizes 'A very attractive or seductive looking woman' [closed]

I'm looking for a word (English or French) which summarizes 'A very attractive or seductive looking woman'. Also looking for a word or term that explains the Women Beauty. Edit: Out of my research, I ...
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2answers
55 views

Which words to use to characterize a person who likes to understand things deeply? [closed]

I want to use this phrase in my CV: person who always tries to understand the very essence of processes and things. The idea is to show that I like to understand things deeply. My concern is that ...
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3answers
90 views

Is 'faithless' a literary version of 'unfaithful' (in the context of a spouse)?

Microsoft® Encarta® 2009. defines 'faithless' as: faithless, (of a spouse): unfaithful (literary) Is 'faithless' really the literary term for 'unfaithful', unlike unfaithful which would supposedly ...
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2answers
58 views

Unnamed vs Untitled

What is the difference between Unnamed vs Untitled. Are they interchangeable? Can 'Unnamed' be applied to a book, composition, or other artistic work?
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4answers
88 views

Word for calling out to a deity in frustration?

Like when Zuko yells at lightning to strike him (but ideally more in the sense of insulting a deity). Imagine standing on top of a cliff during a thunderstorm, clenching your fists and and screaming ...
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16answers
2k views

Word or idiom defining something barely functional

How can I refer to something that barely works given a certain context and can get broken at any moment? The thing is: I wrote some geometry calculations in an application that will work in our ...
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1answer
48 views

What word describes someone who would never criticize his or her country, city, community or group that he or she belongs to? [duplicate]

There are people who would never have any criticism of country/city/community or group to which they belong to. For example: Most people living in a certain city have to use public transport which ...
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3answers
155 views

A positive word for someone who is viewed like a sister, but isn’t one

I’m trying to say that someone is a character’s ‘fake sister’ – that is, she was taken in by the character who now considers her to be as close as a sister – but it in a positive light. Fake sister ...
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1answer
49 views

Cohabit versus Cohabitate? [closed]

What is the difference between cohabit and cohabitate? I know the general definition of these words, but I cannot distinguish between the two (i.e., in my mind the definitions are identical).
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1answer
176 views

Is “girl” a valid synonym for “young woman”?

This question emerged out of a discussion on Mastodon about Ivanka Trump being called a girl, where it was claimed that “girl' is synonymous with 'young woman' in English”. Is this true? Is it sexism ...
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1answer
56 views

What do you call this job in English? [closed]

I'm asking for a bit of advice for my kid's summer homework :-) I'd need to find out "what are their jobs" based on the below objects. I'm missing the last one, but I assume it starts with "T" as ...
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4answers
1k views

Is there any difference between “result in” and “end up with”?

Seeing some example sentences of each phrase on my dictionary, I felt "end up with" was used for a kind of negative result and "result in" was more general. Is that correct? Here are some of the ...
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1answer
59 views

Alternatives to “You're Welcome” [closed]

I've noticed there are a lot of alternatives in English to "Thank you", but I am struggling to come up with any for "You're welcome", though it would be said nearly as often. Can someone please point ...
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8answers
556 views

Word to describe someone doing something even though told not to

I'm looking ideally for a word to describe someone who does something even when they're told not to. Like, if they're told not to do something like a dare, or just to not go and do such-and-such, they ...
2
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1answer
57 views

An English Descriptive Word for Two Words

I'm currently after a synonym for "middle-aged". However, I'm needing the word to be appropriate to describe a non-living thing. Middle-aged is more or less associated with animals and humans, not ...
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1answer
28 views

What would be a proper synonym to “make habitable”?

I'm looking for a one word synonym to "make habitable". It would describe the transformation of a location where people can't live, such as the bottom of the ocean, or Antartica. Most official ...
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2answers
111 views

“Not my preference”, “not my favour” or “not in my favour”?

I'm considering the following situation: A asks B whether B would like to take the Job X. But B actually prefers another Job Y. So I think that B can simply answer that "Job X is not my preference....
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1answer
23 views

A good word for the mix of Date Of Birth or “Date Of Birth” of a organization (founding date?) [closed]

I guess there is quite some overlap in the concepts. Is there a good word that would work well for both cases? Albert Einstein / DateOfBirth FC Barcelona / DateOfBirth
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1answer
49 views

Synonym for “the end of” [closed]

Basically, I wanted to paraphrase the following sentence : These subjects have been profoundly studied since the end of 1950’s. What could I use instead of the bold part? Please make light on me. ...