Questions tagged [american-english]

This tag is for questions related to the English language as used in the United States of America.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
-1 votes
0 answers
11 views

Is "It will be really helpful to me if you can provide some." grammatically correct? [duplicate]

Brother, I have completely run out of money. It will be really helpful to me if you can provide some. Is the last sentence grammatically correct? I am doubtful because we don't normally use "can&...
user avatar
  • 1
-2 votes
0 answers
22 views

Is "It will be really helpful to me if you can provide some." grammatically correct? [closed]

Brother, I have completely run out of money. It will be really helpful to me if you can provide some. Is the last sentence grammatically correct? I am doubtful because we don't normally use "can&...
user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
0 answers
21 views

My board is not responsible for the problem caused by what it approved? [closed]

Here is the HOA rule in my community about architectural changes. No building, fence, wall or other structure shall be commenced, erected or maintained upon the Property, nor shall any exterior ...
user avatar
-1 votes
0 answers
55 views

Why do Americans use "claim" all the time instead of "get"/"receive"?

I'm really wondered, why is verb "claim" so popular in meaning of "get" or "receive"? I see it everywhere in mobile apps and games ("claim bonus"), I even heard ...
user avatar
6 votes
2 answers
317 views

Is the phrase “nitty-gritty” racist?

A BBC article, dated 15 May 2002, asserts the expression nitty-gritty is banned from British politics (and also by police services) due to its supposedly disagreeable origin. The emphasis in bold is ...
user avatar
  • 85.4k
0 votes
3 answers
92 views

Are English Wikipedia articles written in British English (BrE) or American English (AmE)? [closed]

Wikipedia allows multiple languages for its articles. But how about dialects? English has multiple varieties. How does that work at Wikipedia? It's one thing to know the policy that Wikipedia has ...
user avatar
  • 117
1 vote
0 answers
29 views

Position of relative clauses after verb

I myself consider the sentence offset below to be correct; however, some of my associates regard it as being wrong. I would like your advice on it. The sentence is Jane Austen published 4 novels, who ...
user avatar
  • 21
0 votes
1 answer
47 views

displaced vs replaced

I generally know the difference between the 2 words. For example: The housing project was replaced by a new high-rise vs. Residents of the housing project were displaced when developers decided to ...
user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
31 views

Apostrophes in sentences with implied words [closed]

From a card game where the question is: How many apostrophes are in the following sentence? "Thats a bigger car than any of my brothers friends." Does "friends" need an ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
29 views

What is the exact word for vintage fashion which is returning in present time? [migrated]

My native language is not English. I want to know the word about fashion (past) which is returned in present. Remake is not the right word but I think something like this.
user avatar
  • 1
3 votes
0 answers
56 views

Reverse Tensing of the /æ/ Phoneme in American English?

I am a native speaker of a General American sociolect that realizes the /æ/ phoneme as [ɛə] before nasal consonants (e.g. 'fan,' 'stand,' 'ram'), and I've recently noticed that I've begun un-raising (...
user avatar
1 vote
4 answers
3k views

What does "Chop chop man bun" mean?

I was watching Haikyuu dub episodes and in one episode, the coach tells Asahi (one of the players): "Chop chop man bun". What does this sentence mean? I understand the "man bun" ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
57 views

Is it grammatically correct [nowadays] not to invert the NP and copula in an indirect question? [duplicate]

I don't know if this is a recent phenomenon, but for the last decade, I've noticed when English speakers make statements denoting there are/were unknowns, they usually phrase them with a question ...
user avatar
  • 9
15 votes
4 answers
6k views

Is “I'm working totes” new slang?

I was reading a New York Times article about a Dollar General employee who was fired from her job in Tampa, Florida, when her TikTok videos went viral. In these videos, the retail store manager ...
user avatar
  • 85.4k
0 votes
0 answers
45 views

Can "to be" be ommitted if it's implied? e.g. "These items need completed by Friday" [duplicate]

Can "to be" be ommitted if it's implied? i.e. Are the following sentences acceptable grammar? "These items need done by Friday" "These items need completed by Friday" ...
user avatar
  • 9
-4 votes
1 answer
79 views

History of "literally": Who changed the definition of "literally" to no longer mean "figuratively" in the first place? [duplicate]

According to my research, "literally" used to mean "figuratively", or at least it was used by many people to mean "figuratively" several centuries ago. Yet, although ...
user avatar
9 votes
1 answer
2k views

What is the origin of the word "latte" referring to a caffè latte?

Latte, as in the usage I'd like a latte (example from Cambridge English Empower, 2015) is ubiquitous among English speakers who have visited coffee bars or seen them in film or TV. It means a caffè ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
69 views

Question about Dog and Dog's female

I am a non-native speaker trying to learn English. I have a question about an animal. Why is "dog" considered a good word and while its female equivalent, "bitch", is considered a ...
user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
28 views

"Load features" or "Loading features"?

Context: An application can load and save data. These operations have different features. What sounds more natural in the US English to describe them - "Load features" or "Loading ...
user avatar
  • 3
0 votes
1 answer
56 views

Is "yet again" negative in the sentence?

Usually from what I learned, "yet" is used as a negation in the sentence, like "...have not...yet". However, if the sentence is "He failed the test yet again". Here, is ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
123 views

Where does the "1-10" attractiveness scale come from?

When did the "1-10" attractiveness or beauty scale become part of our vocabulary? I've seen quite a few papers and books using a 1-10 attractiveness scale around the 1970s for several ...
user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
48 views

What's the American or British English equivalent to "take a download from", meaning get to know the information from someone?

In Indian English, we often use the phrase "take a download from" which isn't common outside India or at least South Asia. This phrase means to get to know the information from someone. For ...
user avatar
16 votes
1 answer
1k views

Is Iroquoi the origin of American idiom “cuts no ice with me”?

In Patrick O'Brian's novel The Fortune of War, two of the characters are discussing American English and the following dialogue takes place: ‘Why, sure,’ said Evans, in his harsh nasal metallic bray, ...
user avatar
  • 319
1 vote
1 answer
81 views

Is 'peasant' generally considered derogatory?

Is peasant when used in general to describe a modern socioeconomic class considered to be derogatory? Apparently there is no issue when talking about European history... I read in the Brtitannica ...
user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
29 views

Long-term or Long Term? [duplicate]

I'm creating signage for "Long-term Ventilation Unit" and am keeping it as how I just wrote it. But when Googling, I became slightly confused on whether it is "Long Term Ventilation ...
user avatar
32 votes
5 answers
7k views

Where did the third syllable of the letter W in WD-40 go?

Today, I was taking a look at how to pronounce the name WD-40. A quick google search dropped me here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e8SwN_qw3AA My Spanish ear is very new to the English language, ...
user avatar
  • 479
0 votes
2 answers
52 views

Confusing wording: “Your event cannot be less than 72 hours away” Event within 3 days: false. What does the false imply? [closed]

I requested an exchange for tickets for a concert. The exchange was requested the 16th around 11:30PM. The concert is on the 19th at 9pm. The fine print read the exchange will be invalid if “the event ...
user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
1 answer
33 views

People who extract raw materials [closed]

People who extract raw materials from the ground are called what
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
31 views

Do we use verb + s/es after singular they? [duplicate]

I am not an American. I think it is in America where they invented the idea of singular they. You don't know the gender of someone, you refer to him/her as they. I am thinking if I should use the verb ...
user avatar
  • 111
0 votes
0 answers
13 views

Article use in English (America) [duplicate]

When we should not use "The" article before of phrase? I am confused when I have to use "The" or not before a construction like this noun+of+noun.
user avatar
5 votes
0 answers
165 views

American vs British English: using 3rd person singular pronoun or person's name?

I grew up in the UK and now have a lot of American friends and colleagues; I tend to notice an almost systematic difference in the way Americans use 3rd person singular pronouns in preference to a ...
user avatar
  • 151
-1 votes
1 answer
19 views

'Start Use <App Name>' VS 'Start Using <App Name>' [closed]

We are working on a paywall page within our app. The app is called Retouch. We were wondering what is the right way to showcase the title of the paywall. Start Use Retouch Start Using Retouch Is ...
user avatar
  • 127
3 votes
2 answers
107 views

American using weak conjugations for BrE strong and vice versa

Reading American literature of questionable quality, I often come across words like leaped, kneeled and creeped, and they always cause this Englishman to hesitate. Can anyone explain the usage? I ...
user avatar
  • 39
5 votes
1 answer
556 views

Pronunciation: /ɪ/ becomes /ə/ in "William" or "Wilkinson"?

I sometimes hear words like "Willam" or "Wilkinson" pronounced like /'wəl-jəm/ or /'wəɫ̩-kən-sən/, rather than /'wɪɫ̩-jəm/ or /'wɪɫ̩-kən-sən/. In other words, the /wɪɫ̩/ cluster is ...
user avatar
  • 53
10 votes
4 answers
2k views

Usage of the phrase "do not play the saint"

I have noticed that some Maltese-speaking people tend to use the phrase "do not play the saint". It's intended to mean "Do not act all innocent" or "Do not act so 'holier-than-...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
74 views

Why do they refer to the main character of this 1951 Disney short as literally "Fat"?

In the 1951 animated short titled Tomorrow We Diet*, the main guy (Goofy) is repeatedly referred to as "Fat". Not "being fat", but literally "Fat": Hello, Fat! Where to,...
user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
231 views

Are Canadianisms like "aboat" equally common on the American side of the border, adjacent to it?

Most Canadians live close the the border. If you cross to the American side of border, in a rural area, do Canadianisms (1) like "aboat" (2) suddenly become much less common? Since this ...
user avatar
  • 1,281
1 vote
1 answer
114 views

Can the idiom "fall off the wagon" be said to be "chiefly American"?

I read an answer on another site which referred to the idiom of falling off the wagon as being "chiefly American". That got me curious since I would have thought that this particular idiom ...
user avatar
  • 20.7k
0 votes
2 answers
68 views

Unnecessary preposition "of" in qualifiers [duplicate]

I notice that people will use "of a"/"of an" when describing a quality of something, rather than "a"/"an" alone. I would only add the "of" in a ...
user avatar
  • 109
0 votes
1 answer
37 views

What is the meaning of these words? [closed]

group of six rough frame buildings was bisected by a narrow dirt street; there was a scattering of tents beyond the buildings on either side. The wagon passed first on its left a loosely erected tent ...
user avatar
  • 57
0 votes
1 answer
77 views

Simplification of 'ou' in suffixes of American words which differ from British version

As mentioned in other posts (like here), words which contain an 'ou' in their British spelling are typically spelled with an 'o' in the American equivalent. I'm interested in the reasoning and ...
user avatar
  • 101
15 votes
3 answers
2k views

Use of "Say ..." to begin sentences, particularly in BrE versus AmE?

We were looking at this sentence, or actually a line of dialogue: They're in the car. JACK Say John! I better concentrate. Would you be able to figure out the AC? Our colleague Jane who is generally ...
user avatar
  • 11k
0 votes
0 answers
31 views

How do American speakers use the present subjunctive in a less formal way on American-English? [duplicate]

Although we don't use present subjunctive often, there are some kind of times you practically need to use it. For example, in British-English you usually use "should" in the present ...
user avatar
  • 21
2 votes
1 answer
119 views

How do American speakers use the present subjunctive in a less formal way on American-English?

Although we don't use present subjunctive often, there are some kind of times you practically need to use it. For example, in British-English you usually use "should" in the present ...
user avatar
  • 21
2 votes
1 answer
59 views

Is "I'm glad you were able to make it" often used sarcastically? Ambiguous? Help understanding something that happened to me [closed]

I've lived in the US for 17 years and I thought I had a good grip on the English language, but something interesting happened to me and it has bothered me for a while. I am hoping someone with deeper ...
user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
56 views

What's the difference between "itself", "his notion of its self" and "that self" in the sentence below? [closed]

It came to him that he had turned away from the buffalo not because of a womanish nausea at blood and stench and spilling gut; it came to him that he had sickened and turned away because of his shock ...
user avatar
  • 57
1 vote
0 answers
16 views

Saying working sequentially and alternately [closed]

I have several work experiences as data engineer and data analyst which sums up like this 2010-2011, data engineer at abc.ltd 2011-2012, data analyst at xys.ltd 2012-2013, data engineer at corp.ltd ...
user avatar
5 votes
4 answers
22k views

What does the expression "He went white ribbon when I was ten" mean?

I just watched the movie 'Nightmare Alley' and, in one of the scenes, the main character when describing his childhood with an alcoholic father says: He went white ribbon when I was ten. What does ...
user avatar
  • 153
10 votes
1 answer
2k views

Is the word "chum" to mean friend a common word?

Does the average American know its meaning? Is it used commonly in the spoken language? What connotations does it have? Is it gender specific?
user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
926 views

What is the meaning of "missed the lights", when talking about shooting an animal?

This sentence is from a novel about a party going to hunt buffalos and my question is about the meaning of this sentence "missed the lights" and this is the complete sentence: He said: ...
user avatar
  • 57

1
2 3 4 5
68