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Questions tagged [american-english]

This tag is for questions related to the English language as used in the United States of America.

4
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3answers
70 views

When did the word “home” become synonymous with “house”, in contrast to an apartment home or condo?

Not long ago, I had a conversation with a gentleman working at my building. I asked him if he lived in the building and he said "No I live in a home." I thought that was a strange wording, but I ...
0
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1answer
58 views

Is “really” in the sense of “very”, American English, or British English?

Or is it both? If it is American English, what would be the British English equivalent, or vice versa. "I really like this dress" as in "I very much like this dress"
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2answers
99 views

What is the district police called?

I was chatting with a course mate in the morning and we talked about alcohol, then he mentioned ''in Poland you can't drink publicly, as the 'civic guard' may talk to you.'' Neither of us knew what ...
-2
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1answer
33 views

Looking for other ways to say [closed]

I am looking for a sentence for "I checked the coffee hotness level" in a past manner have any slag for that? and other ways to say this sentence
-2
votes
1answer
52 views

Right a wrong & wrong a right [closed]

You can say "right a wrong" & "righting wrongs" But can you say "wrong a right or "wronging rights"
0
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1answer
53 views

What does it mean “Do not mistake my silence for a lack of grief” [on hold]

I tried hard to fond the meaning of this quotation but failed. Can somebody described it? Quote doesn't make sense to me
0
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0answers
35 views

Why does this sentence not use a comma? I am pausing

"change my account choice, that way I would have had" i put this into word, and it wont let me count it as correct grammar, anybody know why?
0
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0answers
43 views

Do you stick to the original spelling of a name regardless of British or American spelling?

For example, NATO stands for "North Atlantic Treaty Organization", which is an intergovernmental military alliance between 29 North American and European countries, hence the American spelling of "...
0
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2answers
37 views

Form of the word “repeal?” [closed]

If someone were to say something got destroyed, they would say "the destruction of the..." What is this form for "repeal?"
0
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2answers
43 views

Clearer title in American English for Liaison? What is a good verb to use for the action? [on hold]

I've found using the word Liaison in general (especially as a title) in American English conversations is problematic. As many people seem to use it synonymously with manager or advocate. Is there a ...
-1
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0answers
23 views

What does the “grad credited” means in the context below?

- Context: Over 150 Grads Credited Throughout Marvel Cinematic Universe(headline) Grads from multiple degree programs have worked on all of the feature films in the MCU's "Infinity Saga," for a ...
0
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1answer
16 views

“Is there still any confusion?” Or “Is there any confusion still?”

I know after verb we can use "still". But what about interrogative sentences?
5
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4answers
2k views

How to pronounce “r” after a “g”?

I can pronounce the english "r" properly in most words but it sounds closer to a "w" when it follows a "g" and sometimes "k" sound. The words that are the most problematic for me are agree and agreed. ...
-1
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0answers
33 views

function name, “onButtonClick” or “onClickButton” [closed]

I am a Japanese Web developer. I want to be better at English. What is the proper name of a function that means, "when button is(was) clicked" ? "onButtonClick"? "onClickButton"? "onButtonClicked"...
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0answers
18 views

'read of' things vs read things [migrated]

I am reading articles in New Concept English and got confused by a phrase in the below context: We can read of things that happened 5,000 years ago in the Near East. here I don't understand why we ...
-2
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0answers
27 views

Redundancy errors

I have got a query on the differences between the usage of describe and tell about. To the best of my knowledge, normally describe and about won’t come together as describe itself means tell about. ...
0
votes
1answer
51 views

What does “Will Lift Sanctions” mean? [closed]

A Wall Street Journal headline from May 7, 2019 reads Pence to Announce U.S. Will Lift Sanctions on Venezuela Gen. Manuel Cristopher Figuera After He Broke Ranks With Maduro What does will lift ...
1
vote
1answer
133 views

Is this correct in American English: It has helped me developed

I've come across a brief overview about a Canadian sales representative that says : I grew-up in a family business specializing in short-term rental accommodations. Our resort, Tyrolean Village ...
0
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0answers
32 views

Can I say “join” a team lunch?

My friends asked me for lunch but I need to have team lunches this week. So I said "I will join our team lunch this week. You guys can leave." Is this okay? Also how to ask them to go?
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0answers
39 views

Are email salutations regional?

Best wishes is very popular ending for emails and replaces best regards in almost all emails I've received from academics in Cambridge (UK). At the same time I've never seen this used by American ...
0
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0answers
48 views

“on British soil” - How clear is this in American Eng?

I'd like to know how much is the use of "soil" in "on British soil" clear and natural-sounding for the American reader? Collins dictionary says on British soil is a correct phrase, I also compared ...
0
votes
1answer
49 views

Is the following bit of dialogue correct orthographically/grammatically for American English?

After being interrupted by the character he is talking to, the nameless MC says the following line of dialogue, referencing a situation that the character he is currently speaking with acted in. 「…...
-1
votes
3answers
58 views

A word for a substitute

I need a word for: an item that can be substituted for another due to that item not being readily available...OR what is the word for something that is used as a substitute while in a bind?
1
vote
1answer
65 views

Why can't we say that “Horses are a useful animal.” treats horses as a class or set of objects?

(1)Computers are important research tools. (2)Computers are an important research tool. We can say that the first sentence treats computers as discrete objects. The second sentence treats ...
15
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2answers
3k views

Is “snitty” a popular American English term? What is its origin?

I came to know the word, “snitty” for the first time from the remark of Mr. William Barr during his testimony on his way of handling of Mueller Report in the Senate Judiciary Committee. Washington ...
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votes
1answer
61 views

Preposition “to” with places in present perfect

in BrE it is normal to say e.g.: "She's been to Africa twice." In the past simple, the preposition would be "in": "She was in Africa twice." Question 1: Why is there such a difference? Question 2:...
4
votes
1answer
75 views

In British English, which is more common — the em dash or the en dash?

I'm reasonably certain the em dash is more common than the en dash in American English. But which of the two is more common in British English?
2
votes
2answers
53 views

When was the term “reality” first used referring to a TV show?

According to Etymonline the expression is from the early ‘90, but they add no details: Reality television from 1991. Reality television as a genre appears to date back at least to the ‘40s as ...
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0answers
20 views

What does “break out the gavel ”mean?

In hopeless by coleen hoover sky says she will eventually "break out the gavel " any guesses what she means?
1
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3answers
45 views

is “Lighting the spark for XYZ” a meaningful phrase in english? [closed]

I am trying to translate or rather come up with an English expression for the German "den Funken überspringen lassen" for a title of an academic paper. My best solution so far is "Lighting the spark ...
1
vote
2answers
32 views

What is the correct punctuation for a repeated word?

I'm creating a presentation for school and I want to title my presentation "The not so secret secret to weight loss" My meaning is that people act as if it is a secret when in fact it is very common ...
0
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0answers
17 views

How to write : someone who don't or doesn't? [migrated]

Please help me to understand. My full sentence is "... as someone who don't/ doesn't only love his...". I have already tried them both and both sounds right.
0
votes
2answers
49 views

Is it deodoriser/deodorizer/deodouriser/deodourizer? In British English as well as American [closed]

British English would usually use "-our" and "-ser" and American English would use "-or" and "-zer". I don't seem to find an appropriate answer to this. Which combination is actually correct for ...
-1
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0answers
21 views

Usage with conjunctions

She bought one for her, one for him. She bought one for her, and one for him The horse ran out of the gate, across the field. The horse ran out of the gate and across the field. Are the ...
0
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1answer
16 views

Should I use 'on' or 'for' in these sentences?

If I called the ER about a patient of whom a doctor is taking care, should I say, 'may I speak to the doctor on the patient name John? I have a result on this patient?" or should I use for, "may i ...
-1
votes
1answer
13 views

Grammar clarification on a sentence [closed]

I am using this statement in my job application's cover letter. " Kindly requesting to consider my career interest and immediate availability." Mentioned sentence is showing it as grammar error. ...
3
votes
1answer
64 views

Synonym of Dream Interpreter

Is there any single word synonym from "Dream Interpreter" or the person who tells the meaning of the dream?
4
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2answers
90 views

Is differing pronunciation of “second” a regional difference? (US English)

According to Wiktionary the word "second" can be pronounced one of two ways in the US: /ˈsɛk.(ə)nd/ and /ˈsɛk.(ə)nt/ I've googled to try to find anything about the difference between these ...
0
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1answer
28 views

“Facing the resignation” meaning [closed]

What does it mean: "You'll just be spending your day working to overcome strains, trying to live your life and at various points facing the resignation that if you can't get your *** of this wheel ...
1
vote
1answer
36 views

Succinct, shorthand, (possibly) Latin word similar to “ala”

I'm trying to find the world that one would use to denote a connection to a person's idea. I'm writing a sentence where I want to make a simple connection to Jonathan Edwards' "Sinners in the hands ...
4
votes
1answer
61 views

Is “a such thing”… a thing?

John McWhorter, a Columbia U linguistics professor who hosts the excellent "Lexicon Valley" podcast, has on several occasions used the phrase a such thing where I would have said such a thing. I ...
0
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1answer
34 views

Difference Between “letter” and "paper in 19th century English

Recently, I found a civil war journal of a family member of mine who fought and eventually died for the North in the US Civil War. He notes what he receives from home, and he talks about receiving ...
0
votes
1answer
51 views

How would you describe the movement of a lever?

The story is that I was describing an action happens in the car park in class, and I got stuck, I said something like: "after putting a coin in the slot of the parking meter, then the lever would be ...
0
votes
1answer
41 views

What is considered as verbatim copying exactly? [closed]

I am always confused when it the word verbatim copying or word for word comes up. What does that exactly mean For example The statement below: Examining and investigating any electrical components ...
2
votes
1answer
52 views

Amn’t —-where it occurs in US

We moved to CA from Norfolk, VA as children. Our parents and grandparents are college educated yet we four all said “amn’t,” to the shock of our CA neighbors. We no longer say it but I wondered why we ...
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0answers
11 views

Using “went” in a statement [closed]

I would like to know if the below statement is grammatically correct. The context is that someone recently suggested us a solution that we already applied. "That's the solution we went with." Thanks....
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votes
2answers
68 views

Is it correct to say ‘I will go there in my own way’? [closed]

To express that I will use my own transportation means and route to get there rather than going with a group following the proposed route, can I say, ‘I will go (or get) there in my own way’? Does it ...
4
votes
2answers
83 views

“Class, open your books TO/AT page 13!”—Is it a matter of dialectal difference?

My original notion was, A) If there's a movement and a destination (as in the case of thumbing a book to reach a certain page), it should be to: Class, open your books to page 13! B) If there's ...
0
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0answers
16 views

-ic vs. -ical adjective forms when talking about categories/fields [duplicate]

I will bring forward examples coming from my field of studies. For long time I have been wondering whether there are rationales or regional variances applied to the usage of dichotomies like: ...
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votes
1answer
53 views

How to use “in which”

"He came by a couple of jobs in the field of journalism, in which he had to travel a lot between states, and so it wasn't very practical." Do I use "in which" here, and if so, should there be a comma ...