Questions tagged [american-english]

This tag is for questions related to the English language as used in the United States of America.

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-1 votes
0 answers
12 views

Reality is only a small part of the possible [closed]

Which sentence is correct or sounds more English. Reality is only a small part of the possible. or Reality is only a small part of what's possible?
-1 votes
0 answers
13 views

Which one is right? "to study" or "to be studying" [closed]

Hello which one is right? We’re going to study for the remaining 4 hours. or We’re going to be studying for the remaining 4 hours. I think they’re both right but I’m not sure.
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What is a word for being afraid of regarding something? [closed]

Eg: you are afraid of someone's gonna hit you on your back.
0 votes
1 answer
14 views

Should I write, "with value" or "by value"? [closed]

What is correct? Connecting people and technology by value Connecting people and technology with value I would like to express that the connection of people and technology happens in a way of added ...
-1 votes
1 answer
50 views

What do you call two people with opposite names?

What do you call two people with opposite names? Like: Gonzales Fernando And Fernando Gonzales I’ve been referring to them as Gängerdoppels in reference to Doppelgängers.
0 votes
0 answers
6 views

Does English "ALWAYS" follow SVO? [migrated]

if a sectence wasn't builded in this way, does this always mean that sentence isn't grmmaticaly proper.
-2 votes
1 answer
28 views

What is the meaning of "unpopular opinion"? [closed]

Please make me understand in easy words that what is the exact meaning of "unpopular opinion". Provide sone example please.
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2 votes
1 answer
89 views

“Still wanted” vs “still want”

In the following text, the speaker has not yet had dinner. I still wanted to get some climbing in before dinner. Does that sentence indicate the speaker still intends to go climbing, or only that ...
-3 votes
1 answer
46 views

What is the meaning of "Neanderthals on a day pass"? [closed]

Said as some sort of an insult I guess.
0 votes
0 answers
80 views

Why have Americans started reversing the term 'anymore'? [duplicate]

Here's an example: Someone who is attempting to say "I don't see any people wearing blue jumpers anymore" will instead say "I see people wearing blue jumpers anymore". I'm ...
0 votes
0 answers
5 views

Which of the following sentences is the correct usage of the question? [migrated]

Which of the following sentences is the correct usage of the question or most commonly used in the conversational context? Was the rental equipment returned today? Has the rental equipment been ...
1 vote
0 answers
22 views

What's the difference between "This being the case," and "That being the case,"? [closed]

Are they both correct? What's the difference between these two expressions?
0 votes
0 answers
7 views

English tense reporting tool online [migrated]

Is there any online tool available that just reports the tense of the English sentence. I'm just checking the scope of the project.I've seen lot of online tool that they are correcting and rewriting ...
0 votes
1 answer
33 views

My question is about lists of words in a sentence

I came across an example of a translator position description, and I got confused about the meaning of the word "Research". Is this word related to the word "copy" or is it ...
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-1 votes
1 answer
38 views

What is a metaphor or adjective to describe something that has gone through changes and will never be the same again?

I've been thinking about this for an hour and browsing for a definition, but nothing has come up. It would be great if someone can give me something with a meaning similar to what I'm asking for.
0 votes
1 answer
44 views

What does it mean to say "You're borrowing at nine and a half with no fixed rate"?

I heard this sentence in an animated movie (Fantastic Mr. Fox): You're borrowing at nine and a half with no fixed rate. I can understand he's borrowing money and its rate. But I have a hard time ...
0 votes
2 answers
105 views

Is there a difference between the first vowels of ‘bother’ and ‘August’ in American English?

I found, in the Cambridge dictionary, that the first vowels in American English of the two words August and bother are the same. They are all notated as a /ɑː/. However, I found in other dictionaries, ...
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1 vote
0 answers
15 views

Is it wrong when people say "from this year" instead of "starting this year"? [closed]

For example, I will work from this year. To me, it sounds a bit incorrect. Maybe it's best to say "from this year on" or "from this year onwards"? Maybe it's just better to say, &...
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0 votes
1 answer
38 views

Is there a proper/better way to write a serial comma separated list of dates? It feels like I shouldn't be mixing date commas with the serial commas

For example, consider the following sentence: The company mentioned the project in press releases dated September 13, 2020, May 21, 2022, and June 8, 2022. Is that the correct way to write it? It ...
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0 votes
1 answer
34 views

Welcome travelers and locals to your premises

"Welcome travelers and locals to your premises." I believe that sentence would be understood by Australian/NZ people. I'm just checking, is that something an American would understand and ...
3 votes
1 answer
465 views

What are searchers called?

Today my teacher taught me about using the prefix "re" to mean that you are doing something again. So for the word "Research" it means that you are doing some "search" ...
0 votes
2 answers
80 views

Meaning of "engineer" as a hotel employee

During a short stay at a hotel in Manhattan, I had a problem with the sink drain getting clogged. I rang the reception and described the problem. They replied: "I will send an engineer up right ...
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0 votes
2 answers
78 views

What are ways to describe when someone gives a curious look or if their interest is piqued

I usually use something along the lines of blatantly saying "He gave a curious look/shot a curious glance." However, does anyone know ways to describe someone gesturing with their face a ...
0 votes
1 answer
32 views

How would you punctuate a question with an explanatory sentence?

I'm trying to write an article, but I am confused about how to punctuate this question: How about a birthday gift? A little something to show you care. Should it rather be punctuated with an em-dash ...
0 votes
2 answers
54 views

Why do we say there is "something at hand" or "there is something a foot"?

I'm curious about the interpretation of the phrases when used to describe something mysterious or ominous implied in the context, as a figure of speech, not literally, particularly in literature? More ...
-2 votes
4 answers
64 views

I need explanation for a meaning of "was on borrowed time"

I'm studying English and I know a lot of words and wanted to read a book for my first time in English but there is sentence in the beginning of it that I can't really understand the meaning: And now, ...
0 votes
0 answers
30 views

"load the entire partition" or "load the whole partition"?

I'm translating some technical docs about distributed databases into English and I cannot decide which of the following sentences is correct or more natural in English? To modify a single record, the ...
0 votes
1 answer
40 views

Is it "come to" vs "come down" to a place?

When asking if they visit the city I live in, What should I say? Do you come down to xyz often? or Do you come to xyz often? Assume xyz is a name of a city. When instructing someone to come to a ...
3 votes
3 answers
125 views

How can I call rising or falling roads?

In my language we have a word to describe that kind of roads. How can I do this in English? is there a specific word for that or I can say just 'a road that goes up'?Also in my language we can use ...
0 votes
1 answer
29 views

What do I need to use adjective 'active selected' or adverb 'actively selected'?

In my commit message, I wrote something like: -disabled search button if there is no active selected filter and I got the following warning from my Integrated Development Environment (IDE) A. Make ...
0 votes
4 answers
231 views

Origin and usage of “sail off into the sunset.”

The AmE idiomatic expression “sail into the sunset” meaning to resolve or conclude things in a neat, happy, and satisfactory fashion. (The Free Dictionary) appears to be used mainly in a sarcastic, ...
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0 votes
1 answer
38 views

Legal transcript

How would you write the following sentences in legal transcripts: Mr. Doe, I understand your statement, but the question is, did you drink tea for breakfast? Do you add a comma after "the ...
0 votes
0 answers
22 views

How to announce an upcoming music album release?

I used the phrase "coming on July 29" below the track title in a promo post on socials, but wonder if it's proper American English? Pretty certain that I have seen this "format" ...
-2 votes
2 answers
56 views

How to interpret the following sentence?

I have fridge with broken/not-working compressor which needs replacement. I called a technician and he gave me a quote. Now the tricky part, I have a warranty/insurance and they asked me to fill out ...
2 votes
1 answer
220 views

Variants of the /æ/ sound?

This YouTube channel asserts that the /æ/ sound has four variants depending on the consonant that follows it; /æ/ in apple and /æ/ in mango should sound a bit different, for instance. https://www....
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-3 votes
2 answers
57 views

Using upon/despite in a sentence [closed]

Recently I came upon this question in an English test: All the people hated Sally. However, ____ learning that Terry was the defense lawyer in this court case, they were on Sally's side. The given ...
1 vote
1 answer
22 views

"..., not less so." [closed]

Here is a sentence I found in the official guide to the TOEFL iBT test. Well, I personally think that the Great Depression of the 1930s actually makes this more understandable, not less so. I found ...
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8 votes
1 answer
1k views

Is there more difference between European and American English than between European and American Spanish?

As a Spanish (Spain) speaking person I can notice the differences between European and American Spanish. Is there also such a big difference between European and American English? Vocabulary and ...
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0 votes
3 answers
69 views

Does spot have a negative connotation to it?

We are searching for a word that would mean place/site. The word spot sounds nice to us, as in Let's go to that spot. However looking at the definition, it is also used to mean a stain. So we wonder ...
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-4 votes
1 answer
34 views

What is the proper number formatting for a legal document from the Supreme court? [closed]

Do federally-issued legal documents in the USA require numbers spelt out, or in number form? I took a look at this site concerning Citation, Grammar and Style Guides from Loyola School of Law, but it ...
13 votes
4 answers
2k views

Can "due" meaning "owed" be used without "to" in AmE? e.g. "the recognition which was due her"

Encountered the following in a text I'm proofreading. ...tries to salvage the dignity due the situation My instinct is to correct this to ...tries to salvage the dignity due to the situation but ...
0 votes
2 answers
46 views

"Lecture notes in" or "Lecture notes on"

I have seen both options used interchangeably, is there a reason why? Example with on: https://www.springer.com/series/15362 Lecture Notes on Data Engineering and Communications Technologies ...
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2 votes
2 answers
90 views

What is the meaning of “Donald Trump says Ivanka ‘checked out’…”

What is the meaning of "checked out" in Donald Trump says Ivanka ‘checked out’? "Ivanka Trump was not involved in looking at, or studying, Election results. She had long since checked ...
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-2 votes
1 answer
87 views

Why is weekend so called in the U.S., when it is not the end of the week by the reckoning that is standard there?

It is well known that in some parts of the world Monday is generally regarded as the first day of the week, while in others that status is bestowed on Sunday. Given that, in a continuously repeating ...
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3 votes
3 answers
120 views

Do American pronounce "she looked at me" as /ʃiː lʊkt æt mi/ or /ʃiː lʊkd æt mi/?

Although some people say that flap-t [ɾ] is used if phonemic /t/ is between two vowels as in matter [ˈmædəɹ], I think that definition is incomplete because if phonemic /t/ occurs before a stressed ...
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1 vote
0 answers
28 views

Per vs every when followed by something non singular

In a list of prices, I see: $1.99 per 3 days $49.99 per 3 months $1.99 per day $199.99 per year $9.99 per week The first 2 seem awkward to me the last 3 seem fine. If I replace per with every, they ...
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0 votes
0 answers
64 views

Is there a name for how some people pronounce their s slightly differently?

I've noticed how some people pronounce the s sound in words using their upper teeth teeth and lower lip (instead of the conventional mostly internal way). This makes it sound almost lispy. I don't ...
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0 votes
1 answer
51 views

Can "is" in "is a" be omitted?

Can the "is" in the following sentence be omitted? "Those who think a cure for Alzheimer's Disease is a possibility must act now."
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7 votes
3 answers
981 views

Is the phrase “nitty-gritty” racist?

A BBC article, dated 15 May 2002, asserts the expression nitty-gritty is banned from British politics (and also by police services) due to its supposedly disagreeable origin. The emphasis in bold is ...
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0 votes
3 answers
120 views

Are English Wikipedia articles written in British English (BrE) or American English (AmE)? [closed]

Wikipedia allows multiple languages for its articles. But how about dialects? English has multiple varieties. How does that work at Wikipedia? It's one thing to know the policy that Wikipedia has ...
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