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This tag is for questions related to the English language as used in the United States of America.

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0answers
30 views

Two articles in a row

Is there a correct English sentence which contains two (in)definite articles in a row such as: "a a"/"the the"/"a the"/"the a" ?
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2answers
310 views

Is “buffeted” the AmE version of the BrE word “buffetted”?

I am referring to the use of the verb "to buffet" meaning "(especially of wind or waves) strike repeatedly and violently; batter." The use of "buffeted" and "buffeting" is widespread. However use ...
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1answer
37 views

On the back of the package or at the back of package?

Is this sticker: "On the back of the package" or "At the back of package" I am confused. I do not know the use of on or at. Waiting for somebody's reply.
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4answers
73 views

What does “Don't hesitate and call 911” mean?

Does it mean I should or shouldn't call 911? Is it an implicit form of speaking? It's ambiguous.
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0answers
29 views

What do Americans use? Have got to be kidding Or… [on hold]

What is used by AMERICANS? You have got to be kidding me! You have to be kidding me!
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1answer
37 views

two prepositions following each other

This is a title of an article , does is make any sense in English grammar? The effects of the age on human trust in and acceptance of self driving cars. if you look at the sentence again, two words ...
6
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1answer
152 views

When did “escort” become an euphemism for prostitute?

Escort was originally a military and masculine term: 1570s, in military sense, from Middle French escorte (16c.), from Italian scorta. which was used figuratively from the first half of the 20th ...
2
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0answers
55 views

Does “discreet” mean “tactful” or “euphemistic”? [on hold]

Could the word "discreet" be used to mean like "tactful" or "euphemistic"? Example: Try to say no in a discreet way (i.e. say no in a careful and euphemistic way so as not to upset/offend someone ...
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0answers
14 views

What to say when someone says his day was exhausting? [on hold]

What can be the perfect question when someone says his day was so exhausting?
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2answers
72 views

Why is the phrase “cake walk” informally used to describe an easy to achieve task, while its origin says a different story?

From Oxford Dictionaries Online: cakewalk ˈkeɪkwɔːk/ noun 1. (informal) an absurdly or surprisingly easy task. "winning the league won't be a cakewalk for them" 2. historical a ...
9
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2answers
420 views

The meaning and usage of ‘stiffs’ in “Of Mice and Men”

I would really appreciate it if someone could confirm whether I have interpreted correctly the meaning of “stiffs” in the following excerpt “I had enough,” he said angrily. “You ain't wanted here. ...
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0answers
22 views

Advantages of public libraries [closed]

There are various reasons why public libraries are beneficial to our lives . First of all , we can access to thousands of books in there .With only a card and the promise to return it ,we can easily ...
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3answers
365 views

Hyphenation of “second most northerly” [on hold]

I've changed my mind a number of times about which of these variants works best: the second most northerly coffee shop in Seattle the second-most-northerly coffee shop in Seattle the second-...
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1answer
41 views

Difference between “where you're from” and “where you've come to”

I'm a Portuguese speaker and I am translating a video from English to my language. I now face this sentence "Are you a representative of where you're from or where you've come to?" What is ...
0
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1answer
44 views

This issue should be resolved now or it should have been resolved now

Sometimes we receive an office email from a native English speaking HR Admin as follows [as an example]: We are currently experiencing issues with printer..... Then sometimes later a follow-up email ...
0
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1answer
38 views

How to find English Paragraph For Translation Purpose? [closed]

I am looking for English paragraph but do not find any worth paragraph. The paragraph should have a short story, a short story with a meaningful word to translate it with my local language to get a ...
0
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1answer
33 views

Correct usage of in vs on

Which of the following statements is correct? And, what is the difference? What was decided in the call? What was decided on the call? By call, I am referring to a conference (phone) call. ...
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2answers
35 views

Potentially unprobed use of respectively to refer to an enumeration in a previous sentence [closed]

08/16 Since my question has been put on hold, then I will attempt to make what I am asking more clear. The order has completed it's deliveries to Texas and Oklahoma. Notice the enumerated list. ...
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2answers
73 views

Do I italicize or quote the title of a PDF for a citation?

There're literally thousands of conflicting APA styles on the internet, even different universities with different professors using different standards. It's a truly atrocious system that does nothing ...
0
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1answer
18 views

Sentence construction/comma usage

So, as a rule of thumb if you remove a word or clause which has been enclosed with bracketing commas then it shouldn't destroy the meaning of the sentence. Does this idea/rule apply to all aspects of ...
-1
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2answers
71 views

Is it correct to say “the truth is” when the rest of the sentence is in the past?

Is it correct to say: The truth is, he was a great explorer. Or do I have to say: The truth was, he was a great explorer. Or are both okay?
3
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2answers
100 views

How does “aboriginal” mean “unsophisticated”?

A list of SAT vocabulary words from www.FreeVocabulary.com gives the following definition for the word aboriginal: aboriginal adj. Primitive; unsophisticated. I know that aboriginal means a ...
1
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0answers
37 views

Is there a single word that can be used to express a recurring unshakable feeling of an imminent and inexorable death? [closed]

I need to know if there is a single word that sums up an unshakable feeling of inexorable and imminent death. As if I were to say: Man, I just can't get over this unshakable feeling of inexorable ...
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2answers
65 views

How did “dial back” come to mean “to reduce pressure on sth”

In a recent article from CNBC they say: ”Trump will dial back his trade pressure if markets tank.” Dial back/down is defined by Longman Dictionary as an AmE phrasal verb meaning: to reduce ...
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1answer
77 views

In my house, “there were” or “there was” many toys

Which of the following is correct and why: 1) In my house, there were many toys. 2) In my house, there was many toys. An answer with an explanation would be greatly appreciated.
3
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2answers
508 views

Is the pronunciation difference between “BrE deuce” vs “AmE deuce” systematic?

While checking the exact pronounciation of the term deuce, I noticed that there is a clear difference between BrE /djuːs/ and NAmE /duːs/. While it is true that pronunciation has more exceptions ...
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2answers
92 views

Is veterinary as a noun a current AmE usage?

The more common term to call a doctor who’s specialized in taking care of the health of animals is veterinarian often shortened to vet. veterinary is the related adjective accoding to the Cambridge ...
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0answers
25 views

“The second half of the 18th century is justly called the age of Petipa or the age of the <> in ballet” VS “The 18th century in ballet is justly…”

Where should I put "in ballet" to achieve maximum nativeness? Also, do I need quotation marks in "the age of Petipa"? Thanks.
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0answers
37 views

“At Camp” vs. “On Camp” in English

I have recently noticed that English speakers from England tend to use the phrase "on camp" when referring to summer camp, as in "I spent three weeks on camp this year." I have only heard "at camp" ...
1
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1answer
43 views

Usage of “it's to”

When I finally wake up, it's to his arm slung over me, holding me close to his chest. The sentence above is the extract of a reading source. What possibly could be the meaning of "it's to..."? ...
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0answers
36 views

What is the best way to remember causality verb and how to identify it easily anywhere? [migrated]

I am getting a bit to confuse while considering whether it is causality verb? I need some help/tips to detect it easily as well any similar topic like causality verb which resembles to it.
1
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0answers
33 views

“ booking of our sudent or for our student”? Are there any differences between American and Br english?

is there a difference between saying: "we would like to confirm the booking of our sudent or for our student"? Are there any differences between American and Br english? It's supposed to be part of ...
1
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1answer
63 views

English word or phrase that is a more general version of “forge” or “foundry” [closed]

I have been google searching and racking my brain trying to think of a word or phrase that captures the essence of "a place the specializes in making things". I like both the term forge and foundry, ...
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7answers
19k views

Is there a gender neutral equivalent of “manspreading”?

Who knew that the term manspreading is considered deeply sexist? I didn't A nameless user proposed to delete the term from an answer of mine. His explanation was “remove misandry”. I had written ...
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1answer
41 views

Is there a word to describe words that look like antonyms but are synonyms?

Words like flammable/inflammable, valuable/invaluable, etc. It doesn't look like there is a specific word to describe this phenomenon.
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3answers
35 views

Is there a word or phrase for questioning authority?

I'm looking for a word or phrase that questions authority but not to the point of open defiance. As an example: Boss: I think my plan is the best plan and we're going with it. Employee: Well, it may ...
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6answers
3k views

How to use the prepositions “apud” and “chez”?

I couldn't find many examples of apud and chez as prepositions; I just found one description on Wiktionary: apud 1. Used in scholarly works to cite a reference at second hand. Jones apud ...
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4answers
1k views

Origin of “the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree”

According to the following source the adage The apple doesn't fall far from the tree originated in AmE in the first half of the 19th century: The first recorded use in the USA was by Ralph Waldo ...
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0answers
49 views

Consistency. If I write 'recognize' with a 'z' do I have to write 'characterize' with a 'z' too?

I'm translating a book and need to keep the English orthography consistent. I'm a native 'British English' speaker. I know in British English you can often use either 'ize' or 'ise' endings. My ...
3
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4answers
95 views

Detached to or detached from

What does it mean "to be detached to something"? I have heard this word only with "from", is it the same meaning or the opposite ? The verb was used in the context : An important key element here is ...
12
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3answers
2k views

Is 'server', as used of restaurant server, only an AmE expression?

I noticed, in an article recounting the very robust and competent response of a young lady to inappropriate conduct, that she was described as a 'server'. I have never seen this use of the word ...
3
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1answer
39 views

What does this sentence mean from “The woman in the window”?

she is a Bad Cop, no doubt about it, and with disappointment I realize that Little's aw-shucks shtick must be just smoke What does the line in bold mean - aw-shucks shtick must be just smoke. This ...
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1answer
41 views

Drop-off in British English?

As I understand, the term drop-off can mean a steep decline in, say, sales; however, an abrupt cliff is not called a drop-off. Only in American English is drop-off used to describe a cliff's steep ...
6
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5answers
416 views

What does “It’s just another day in paradise.” mean in political and diplomatic context in association with U.S. and Russia summit talks?

I came across a phrase, “It’s just another day in paradise” in an article by The Hill (July 20) that came under the title, “Trump demoralized his own team with dizzying Russian moves.” It reads; “...
3
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1answer
47 views

Use of “comma”, inside the quotation marks or after it? [duplicate]

I am having confusion, where to put comma, in the following case after the word water: There are roughly 1000 different words for “water,” as well as for “louse”. Or should I use put comma after ...
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0answers
136 views

What does “double trouble” mean in this situation?

I have been dating with a girl from USA for 8 months. She just posted first picture of us on her Facebook with caption "Double trouble". What does she mean?
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3answers
77 views

What does the D in “D-Ore” stand for? [closed]

When American journalists talk about a senator, they reference them as "D-State.Abbr.", e.g. Sen. X, D-Ore. Which means X is senator of Oregon (am I right?). I want to know what does the "D" ...
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1answer
54 views

How can I improve my speaking? [closed]

When I speak I use a small vocabulary, even though I know a lot more than that. Those words tend to be vague and boring. I know other alternatives for those words, although it doesn't come out ...
1
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3answers
159 views

How do you say “mental” in American dialects of English?

I usually refer to Cambridge Dictionary for pronunciation. For mental they have the IPA of: mental adjective · UK /ˈmen.tᵊl/ US /-t̬ᵊl/ When I click on the US pronunciation, I hear them ...
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0answers
28 views

Thanks for your help and involvement! I did not expect such willingnesses! Is this correct?

Thanks for your help and involvement! I did not expect such willingnesses! Or I didn't expect you would be so willing to help me! Is this correct? (The point is that I asked someone for help in ...