Questions tagged [parts-of-speech]

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2 answers
85 views

Is "Up" an adverb or not?

Since I heard that "He climbed the mountain up" is incorrect, I've been asking people why that is. The composition He (Subject) + climbed (transitive verb) + the mountain (direct object) + ...
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1 answer
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What noun would fit in the blank of the following sentence? [closed]

"It's in the past,you cannot change it" "I know I can't change the past but if ever I could, the first thing I would change is the ______ of your birth"?
1 vote
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Are possessive determiners like *my* adjectives or pronouns?

I'm reading the textbook "Complete English Grammar rules" by Peter Herring There are two forms of personal pronouns in the possessive case: possessive determiners, and possessive pronouns. ...
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0 answers
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'So' - So What? [duplicate]

There are so (!) many questions and statements that appear to have to start with so. I've always thought that 'so' followed certain conditions, or suchlike, therefore starting from scratch with 'so' ...
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-1 votes
0 answers
10 views

Identify the part of speech of prepositional phrase [migrated]

Every lie we tell incurs a debt to the truth. In the sentence above, what is the part of speech of the prepositional phrase "to the truth" and what is it the "reply" of? The term ...
-1 votes
0 answers
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Sentence analysis of the sentence [closed]

The spectacular collapse of Vladimir Putin’s army in Kharkiv province has revived concerns that Russia might resort to nuclear weapons. What are following terms of the above sentence? Subject Object ...
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1 vote
2 answers
45 views

Percipient vs Prescient

According to what I have come to understand, prescient is an adjective meaning psychic but percipient is a noun meaning a perceiver. So how can these two be synonyms? Can anyone kindly explain to me ...
0 votes
1 answer
35 views

Is “X is learning very like Y” grammatical in English, and if it is not, then why? [closed]

Like can be used as an adverb. I have seen that very can modify adverbs in another post (it just can’t modify verbs). Yet this sentence feels odd. Why? Why would the addition of much make the sentence ...
2 votes
2 answers
203 views

What is a named or unnamed word?

In the Star Assessments for early literacy, they refer to something called a "named word" and "unnamed word" without defining what that means. Examples include: Identify a ...
1 vote
1 answer
98 views

part of speech 'oat'

The word 'oat' in 'My father loves soy, coconut and oat milks'. I am not sure whether it is a noun or an adjective. My judgment is: since soy and coconut are all nouns, then 'oat' will also be a noun....
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8 votes
3 answers
1k views

"Exactly noon" parts of speech

What are the parts of speech in this phrase? exactly noon Any dictionary will say that "exactly" is an adverb, and that "noon" is a noun, but I haven't heard of adverbs modifying ...
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1 vote
1 answer
46 views

What part of speech do ordinal numerals belong to? [closed]

Consider the below sentence. On the first of February, the meeting shall take place. What part of speech does the ordinal numeral 'first' belong to? I am aware that under some analyses, ordinal ...
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6 votes
2 answers
101 views

Is ‘just’ an adjective in ‘just anyone’?

Given this sentence: Nina wouldn’t give her phone number to just anyone. I’ve checked several dictionaries (Oxford, Longman, Cambridge, Macmillan) for the word just from the example above. It looks ...
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8 votes
2 answers
3k views

Are there any class-changing prefixes in English?

Whenever I do a Google search about affixes, I find information like 'Prefixes usually do not change the class of the base word, but suffixes usually do change the class of the word' (UEfAP). As I ...
3 votes
1 answer
91 views

Is "before" also an adjective? [duplicate]

I searched "define before" in Google and found out "before" is not listed as an adjective in most dictionaries. Google's built-in dictionary, which is one of the Oxford ...
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2 answers
80 views

Is this infinitive a noun or an adverb?

In the following sentences... Watch me whip. You make me feel special. The word "whip" and the phrase "feel special" are infinitives without "to." However, I'm not ...
2 votes
0 answers
37 views

I am looking for a word that is synonymous with "syntactic expletive" to describe the purpose of the word "there" [duplicate]

It is a word that describes the purpose of the word "there" in a sentence such as, "There is a bird in the tree." Expletive is one word, but there is another, longer word, and I ...
0 votes
3 answers
69 views

Example word that is a homograph and preposition

My research involves the study of word frequency in American English and the importance of context when connecting text representations to different speech representations. I would like to know if ...
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0 votes
0 answers
24 views

"Past" as a Verb [duplicate]

I have come across a sentence in a financial media website Investopedia, which reads, "Time-barred debt is typically debt that has past the statute of limitations and cannot be collected." ...
0 votes
0 answers
16 views

Can an abbreviation of a verb be classified as a nominalisation?

For example, in the abbreviation for the fictional organisation "SCP Foundation", "SCP" is short for "Secure, Contain, Protect." Would this classify the term "SCP&...
2 votes
0 answers
40 views

'On board' as a complex PP

Consider the below sentence. On board the ship there is a crew of wise men. To which category of speech does 'board' belong in the above sentence? Insofar as I understand, 'board' is a constituent ...
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0 votes
2 answers
47 views

Are "close" and "open" verbs or adjectives? [closed]

I'm really hard stuck trying to comprehend whether these two words simultaneously have two natures. I read: The door is open The door is opened Difference? The door is close The door is closed ...
5 votes
3 answers
1k views

Can an imperative sentence have a subject?

Can an imperative sentence have a subject? This is a followup to this comment. User Schmuddi asserted that: English imperative sentences are subjectless. but did not cite any source or authority. I ...
6 votes
4 answers
4k views

Why is "brick" in "a brick house" a noun, whereas "plastic" in "a plastic bucket" is an adjective?

Taking these classifications from Oxford's Lexico: plastic brick
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1 answer
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Unidentified word or construction [closed]

There is a puzzling sequence of words in the following text (bold type). We live in a society in which money is needed to survive. Unfortunately, many people work in no-end jobs just to have some ...
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0 votes
1 answer
32 views

What is the part-of-speech of "intimates" in this article? [closed]

Commander Robert Broadhurst told MPs yesterday that there were "several intimates" from the Chinese that the London leg of the Olympic torch relay would have been switched to another capital ...
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0 answers
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In "The car was parked", what part of speech is "parked"? [duplicate]

In "The car was parked", what part of speech is "parked"? I'm thinking adjective, but someone else thinks it's a verb.
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2 votes
4 answers
194 views

A to-infinitive is formed with 'to' plus the base form of a verb. What part of speech does 'to' belong to?

I want to go home. Here the word to belongs to what part of speech?
0 votes
1 answer
40 views

What do you call a verb/phrase following a noun ending in 'er' [duplicate]

Is there a term for the verb, and/or the pair of words, where the verb ends in 'er' following a noun? Examples: mind reader star gazer grounds keeper
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1 answer
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Grammatically analyze "Why drivers were left stranded" [closed]

Grammatically analyze below Why drivers were left stranded. "Why" is the interrogative, but not sure if it is describing drivers. "Were left" is the verb, but not sure the ...
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0 votes
3 answers
103 views

Do verbs refer to the tangible or the intangible? [closed]

This might be a dumb question but do verbs (or any other part of speech besides nouns) actually refer to elements of existence in a tangible way? To be clear I would say that something is tangible if ...
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4 votes
2 answers
255 views

Only as an adverb

Why is only an adverb instead of an adjective in the following sentences? Only Sue and Mark bothered to turn up for the meeting. Only an idiot would do that. Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/...
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What is the classification for a rote saying like "there but for the grace of God.."? [duplicate]

I'm not after the proverbial or apotropaic aspects of this, or chant or mantra. Just the "event-centric common utterance" aspects. "Knock on wood" is similar I guess. There's a ...
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1 answer
32 views

What is the function of "accountable?" [duplicate]

What is the function of "accountable?" I know it is an adjective describing people but is it a direct object? I want to hold the people accountable
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0 answers
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What is the function of "back to?"

What is the function of "back to?" I am guessing it is a preposition? It is time to go back to school.
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2 answers
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What is the function of "Monday?"

What is the function of "Monday?" Is it a direct object of starts or an adverb? Mask mandate starts Monday.
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3 answers
63 views

What part of speech is it? [closed]

DRIVING in the town centre is banned during the day. I think they should ban DRIVING in the town centre during the day What part of speech is DRIVING in these sentences? Is it a noun?
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1 vote
1 answer
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Why is "purchase" pronounced the same as a verb and as a noun, unlike other words such as increase? [closed]

Many words which can act as a noun and a verb pronounce differently in the different parts of speech. As a verb, the stress in on the second syllable, while as a noun, the first, such as INcrease (...
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3 votes
2 answers
97 views

Noun + Gerund Structure Differences [closed]

Just need your insights on the sentences that really boggle my mind. The first sentence below is an excerpt taken from the following article: The effect of smoking on bone healing It is difficult to ...
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1 vote
0 answers
31 views

What is the part of speech/ function of "John asked him?" [closed]

What is the part of speech/ function of "John asked him" below? Bob revealed the deep question John asked him.
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0 votes
1 answer
90 views

Is this a gerund phrase after hate?

"I hate not being able to control my temper." From my understanding, hate is one of those verbs that is followed by a gerund OR an infinitive. In this situation, is "being" a ...
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0 votes
2 answers
73 views

What is the grammatical function/ part of speech of "to increase funding" and "to help countries adapt?"

What is the grammatical function/ part of speech of "to increase funding" and "to help countries adapt?" The United States has been under pressure to increase funding to help ...
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0 votes
0 answers
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What is the part of speech of "over the past two quarters?"

What is the part of speech of "over the past two quarters" in the sentence below? Is it an adverb? If so what is it modifying? Yet the revenue and profitability figures of the three over ...
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0 votes
2 answers
95 views

Which part of speech is "as" in each example of mine?

I've come across something that has stumped me a bit. I think that the following usage of "as" is conjunctive. Am I correct? He is the same as the dog is. Is the following usage of "...
0 votes
0 answers
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What is the word class of "studying" in "studying hard is the key to success"?

This has caused some debate amongst myself and some others. The two claims are that in "studying hard is the key to success", that "studying" is either (1) a noun (gerund) or (2) a ...
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3 votes
1 answer
246 views

'Now' as a preposition or conjunction

In the below sentence, is 'now' a preposition or a subordinating conjunction? Most dictionaries (OED, Webster, AHD, etc.) say that 'now' is a (subordinating) conjunction in the sense of the below ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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It was a terribly difficult time for all of us. - adjectival preposition

It was a terribly difficult time for all of us. In this sentence, what is the role of the prepositional phrase "for all of us"? I think it's adjectival and it modifies the noun "time.&...
1 vote
1 answer
65 views

Top down or bottom up for reducing a sentence to all its parts?

I'm still learning grammar. I'm trying to figure out the steps to break down a sentence. My process now is to look at the sentence as a whole first. Then I classify it as either simple, compound, ...
0 votes
0 answers
156 views

What part of speech is "sitting"?

look at the man sitting on the bus. he decided to abandon his subway seat in favor of a woman standing nearby. What parts of speech are "sitting" and "standing"?
1 vote
1 answer
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What parts of speech are "like" and "to" in the sentence "Bobby does not like to walk"? [closed]

I realized that I want to be able to look at any sentence and understand what each word in that sentence is in terms of its part of speech, since I never really cared in school to learn the parts of ...
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