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Questions tagged [parts-of-speech]

for questions about parts of speech. In English the main parts of speech are noun, pronoun, adjective, determiner, verb, adverb, preposition, conjunction, and interjection.

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Why are the words "mobile" and "profile" pronounced differently in American English? [closed]

Why is it like that even though both of them end in the same letters?
Niklas's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
57 views

Is "arriving " a gerund?

All day there were ladies and gentlemen arriving at the Red House. is "arriving " a gerund?
saud Alhrb's user avatar
7 votes
5 answers
2k views

What part of speech is 'really' when it is spoken in a sentence on its own?

The word 'really' can be spoken in two ways, in a sentence on its own. Either in enthusiastic, and appreciative belief : You can run a hundred meters in 13 seconds. Really ? Or in cynical, one ...
Nigel J's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
69 views

Is "hidden away" an adjective? [duplicate]

Everybody in Raveloe talks of the weaver's money — he must have a lot hidden away in that cottage! Is "hidden away" an adjective ?
saud Alhrb's user avatar
7 votes
3 answers
642 views

Prepositions after, before etc. as temporal determiners

Huddleston and Pullum's CGEL (2002, pg. 356 footnotes) identifies last and next as (potential) members of the determinative category when used in temporal deictic expressions such as last week, next ...
Kyle F. Hartzenberg's user avatar
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1 answer
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What part of speech is the word "having" in this context?

What part of speech is the word "having" in the following? Having signed the contract, we went for a party.
Reem Abodeeb's user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
74 views

What is the part of speech of "to talk" in this sentence?

I was trying to understand how to translate this sentence into another language, and I realized I do not fully understand it in English! The sentence is: We chose to meet up to talk about the plans. ...
sudo rm -rf slash's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
343 views

Does the part of speech of "said" differ between dialects?

Note: This is similar to, but not a duplicate of, an old question on Linguistics SE. Consider these two sentences: One employee accused him of serious crimes, but said employee did not provide any ...
alphabet's user avatar
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1 answer
104 views

"Best" in "best known": an adverb?

I'm confused. I'm reviewing this grammar book of exercises relating to things like recognizing parts of speech. The book includes the the solutions at the end. One of the exercises is to read a ...
Mihai Danila's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
399 views

Part of speech of 'next' in 'next door'

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Page 356) says this in a footnote: There is also a minor use of such that belongs with the determinatives: see §12. We might also include last and next ...
JK2's user avatar
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1 vote
3 answers
306 views

What CGEL part of speech is the number in "well over 2000"?

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Page 385) has this to say about "cardinal numerals": 7.6 Cardinal numerals The cardinal numerals are primarily determinatives but they have ...
JK2's user avatar
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How did the word 'being' evolve into different parts of speech (noun, adjective, conjuction, participle)?

I'm trying to understand the different meanings of the word being. Merriam-Webster: being (noun) 1 a: the quality or state of having existence b (1): something that is conceivable and hence capable ...
ben svenssohn's user avatar
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2 answers
111 views

What part of speech is would and why does it seem to have no infinitive? [closed]

I have walked. I will walk. I walk. All of these immediate verbs have infinitive forms in to walk, to will, to have. Thus one can naturally say you seem to walk, you seem to will to walk, you seem to ...
TylerDurden's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
164 views

"I was born in 1961" is ‘born’ past participle or an adjective here? [duplicate]

I was born in 1961. Some dictionaries like Oxford Advanced dictionary, Collins and most other lexicographers say that born is the past participle form of the verb bear and they say that the sentence ...
Jvlnarasimharao's user avatar
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82 views

Is "as well as" a preposition here or conjunction?

A short passage from a book piqued my interest: Nevertheless, it is this third line of argument which offers the most hope, by bringing us into a largely unexplored area of moral philosophy which has ...
desmo's user avatar
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1 answer
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From which form of "longing" is the adverb "longingly" derived?

"Longingly" is the adverb form of "longing". Depending on where you look, "longing" is described as an adjective, a verb, or a noun: Oxford defines it as either a noun ...
Polynomial's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
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Can a present-participle (compound) verb which could function as an adjective be further modified with -ly become an adverb?

For example, if the height of an platform is such as to be sickness-inducing, then could the platform be said to be sickness-inducingly high? Or take the example of mind-boggling -> mind-bogglingly....
TylerDurden's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
362 views

Is "unalive" both a verb and a noun?

An emerging colloquialism that is trending at the moment is "unalive", used, for example, in the sentence: The police officer who was sued has a tendency to unalive someone he stops for a ...
ohwilleke's user avatar
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1 answer
64 views

What parts of speech are in 'assisting the Allies'?

There is the sentence: In 1917, the United States entered the War assisting the Allies. The problem is 'assisting the Allies.' What parts of speech are they? Are they a type of clause? Adjectival, ...
Omega_Pixel's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
282 views

What is the word class of 'third' here?

What is the word class of third in the following sentence? When two dogs fight over a bone the third carries it away. Is it a pronoun (because it replaces dog) or an adjective describing the third ...
elstiv's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
168 views

"Give me what you wish".. here what part of speech is "what"?

Why is what is a certain type of part of speech as used here?
Ftz's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
416 views

Is 'dead' a form of the word 'die' or 'dies'?

Can you help settle a debate for me and my friends? Last night we were playing a rather silly word game where you have a card with a word or phrase on it, and you have to try to get your teammates to ...
jlund3's user avatar
  • 347
0 votes
3 answers
204 views

What does "Stack Exchange" function as in "I love Internet forums, for example Stack Exchange"?

Notice that in the sentence I love Internet forums, like Stack Exchange "like" is a preposition and "Stack Exchange" is its object. Substitute "like" with "for ...
user avatar
4 votes
3 answers
567 views

What part of speech is ‘just’ in the sentence “It’s just me”? [closed]

I looked up just in some dictionaries, and they all say it’s an adverb (or at least, that it can be an adverb; apparently it can also be an adjective, a noun, a verb, or even an interjection): ...
Andrew Li's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
274 views

Can “standalone” ever be an adverb?

Is it correct to use word standalone as an adverb? All the major dictionaries only mention that it is an adjective. However, I’ve seen many sources use it as an adverb. For example: This program can ...
Danny's user avatar
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-1 votes
1 answer
114 views

What is 'fighting' in 'He went down fighting'?

What part of speech would the word fighting be in: He went down fighting.
Michael Munta's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
267 views

In the sentence: "I went to school on Sunday afternoon." when it follows a day of the week, is the word "afternoon" an adjective/noun.....? [closed]

In the sentence: "I went to school on Monday afternoon." or "It was a beautiful Monday afternoon.....", is the word "afternoon" an adjective/noun.....?
Laur's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
694 views

Is "Up" an adverb or not?

Since I heard that "He climbed the mountain up" is incorrect, I've been asking people why that is. The composition He (Subject) + climbed (transitive verb) + the mountain (direct object) + ...
A S's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
250 views

Are possessive determiners like *my* adjectives or pronouns?

I'm reading the textbook "Complete English Grammar rules" by Peter Herring There are two forms of personal pronouns in the possessive case: possessive determiners, and possessive pronouns. ...
Andrew Li's user avatar
  • 161
1 vote
2 answers
193 views

Percipient vs Prescient

According to what I have come to understand, prescient is an adjective meaning psychic but percipient is a noun meaning a perceiver. So how can these two be synonyms? Can anyone kindly explain to me ...
kiara dobrial's user avatar
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1 answer
39 views

Is “X is learning very like Y” grammatical in English, and if it is not, then why? [closed]

Like can be used as an adverb. I have seen that very can modify adverbs in another post (it just can’t modify verbs). Yet this sentence feels odd. Why? Why would the addition of much make the sentence ...
samuelnihoul's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
220 views

What is a named or unnamed word?

In the Star Assessments for early literacy, they refer to something called a "named word" and "unnamed word" without defining what that means. Examples include: Identify a ...
SurpriseDog's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
127 views

part of speech 'oat'

The word 'oat' in 'My father loves soy, coconut and oat milks'. I am wondering why the 'oat' is treated as a noun
Arlo's user avatar
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8 votes
3 answers
2k views

"Exactly noon" parts of speech

What are the parts of speech in this phrase? exactly noon Any dictionary will say that "exactly" is an adverb, and that "noon" is a noun, but I haven't heard of adverbs modifying ...
gotube's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
156 views

What part of speech do ordinal numerals belong to? [closed]

Consider the below sentence. On the first of February, the meeting shall take place. What part of speech does the ordinal numeral 'first' belong to? I am aware that under some analyses, ordinal ...
Eric's user avatar
  • 706
7 votes
2 answers
256 views

Is ‘just’ an adjective in ‘just anyone’?

Given this sentence: Nina wouldn’t give her phone number to just anyone. I’ve checked several dictionaries (Oxford, Longman, Cambridge, Macmillan) for the word just from the example above. It looks ...
Lone's user avatar
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8 votes
2 answers
4k views

Are there any class-changing prefixes in English?

Whenever I do a Google search about affixes, I find information like 'Prefixes usually do not change the class of the base word, but suffixes usually do change the class of the word' (UEfAP). As I ...
Alim Karaçay's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
243 views

Is "before" also an adjective? [duplicate]

I searched "define before" in Google and found out "before" is not listed as an adjective in most dictionaries. Google's built-in dictionary, which is one of the Oxford ...
xiver77's user avatar
  • 185
0 votes
2 answers
125 views

Is this infinitive a noun or an adverb?

In the following sentences... Watch me whip. You make me feel special. The word "whip" and the phrase "feel special" are infinitives without "to." However, I'm not ...
Heather Leland's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
37 views

I am looking for a word that is synonymous with "syntactic expletive" to describe the purpose of the word "there" [duplicate]

It is a word that describes the purpose of the word "there" in a sentence such as, "There is a bird in the tree." Expletive is one word, but there is another, longer word, and I ...
Mikki Resendez's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
105 views

Example word that is a homograph and preposition

My research involves the study of word frequency in American English and the importance of context when connecting text representations to different speech representations. I would like to know if ...
Joseph's user avatar
  • 103
0 votes
0 answers
38 views

"Past" as a Verb [duplicate]

I have come across a sentence in a financial media website Investopedia, which reads, "Time-barred debt is typically debt that has past the statute of limitations and cannot be collected." ...
Stannis John's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
31 views

Can an abbreviation of a verb be classified as a nominalisation?

For example, in the abbreviation for the fictional organisation "SCP Foundation", "SCP" is short for "Secure, Contain, Protect." Would this classify the term "SCP&...
Demon In Denim's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
51 views

'On board' as a complex PP

Consider the below sentence. On board the ship there is a crew of wise men. To which category of speech does 'board' belong in the above sentence? Insofar as I understand, 'board' is a constituent ...
Eric's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
420 views

Are "close" and "open" verbs or adjectives? [closed]

I'm really hard stuck trying to comprehend whether these two words simultaneously have two natures. I read: The door is open The door is opened Difference? The door is close The door is closed ...
Takashi Hensi's user avatar
5 votes
4 answers
2k views

Can an imperative sentence have a subject?

Can an imperative sentence have a subject? This is a followup to this comment. User Schmuddi asserted that: English imperative sentences are subjectless. but did not cite any source or authority. I ...
David Siegel's user avatar
6 votes
4 answers
5k views

Why is "brick" in "a brick house" a noun, whereas "plastic" in "a plastic bucket" is an adjective?

Taking these classifications from Oxford's Lexico: plastic brick
peisander's user avatar
  • 305
0 votes
1 answer
48 views

Unidentified word or construction [closed]

There is a puzzling sequence of words in the following text (bold type). We live in a society in which money is needed to survive. Unfortunately, many people work in no-end jobs just to have some ...
LPH's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
32 views

What is the part-of-speech of "intimates" in this article? [closed]

Commander Robert Broadhurst told MPs yesterday that there were "several intimates" from the Chinese that the London leg of the Olympic torch relay would have been switched to another capital ...
jerlx's user avatar
  • 41
0 votes
0 answers
23 views

In "The car was parked", what part of speech is "parked"? [duplicate]

In "The car was parked", what part of speech is "parked"? I'm thinking adjective, but someone else thinks it's a verb.
gddb's user avatar
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