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Questions tagged [verbs]

This tag is for questions about verbs. Verbs are words that express an action, occurrence, or a state of being. Add this tag to single-word-requests if you are looking for a verb. Add the tag word-usage if you are asking about the usage of the verb.

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Deck as verb and the accompanying preposition

As per Cambridge dictionary and others, the word 'deck' in its verb form means to decorate or add something to something to make an effect: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/dictionary/english/deck ...
Ammu's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
53 views

Is "The Shining" a title with a gerund, or a regular -ing noun? [duplicate]

Does using "the" or "a" in front of a gerund alter it somehow? "A painting," for example, is not a gerund, and if a book were titled "The Painting" it would not ...
Sarah's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
101 views

What do you call the difference between when a verb expresses an actual state vs a potential state? [closed]

Sometimes, the exact same verb can express two different but closely related meanings: The subject [S] is actually performing an action [V] The subject [S] is capable of performing an action [V] To ...
Quack E. Duck's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
48 views

Ultrasound and similar as a verb

There are various forms of medical imaging: X-ray, ultrasound, CT/CAT, MRI, PET. X-ray can be used as a verb ("they X-rayed my broken leg"), but can any of the others? They all sound strange ...
NL_Derek's user avatar
  • 143
-2 votes
1 answer
58 views

Meaning of joined in marriage [closed]

“I joined in marriage Ben and Nicole”… when the officiant write it in the marriage certificate can it have a double meanings? The first meaning is- I united in marriage Ben and Nicole- meaning I ...
Karen Lisbon's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
774 views

Is "parse out" actually a phrasal verb, and in what context do you use "parse"

I came across this text example about phrasal verbs: There's no better investment than the most comfortable sneakers Maybe your last beloved pair is kinda falling apart and desperately needs to be ...
hh_sonja's user avatar
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0 answers
38 views

Plural or singular? There is or there are? [duplicate]

In some book I have encountered the following phrase: There are a number of text conventions used throughout this book. and a question has arised: whether there should be used the verb is or the ...
Vlad from Moscow's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
18 views

"Could" at the beggining of a non-question sentence [migrated]

The sentence is: "Could we have found a buyer who would continue operations, I would have certainly preferred to sell the business rather than liquidate it." I can guess the meaning of "...
Tamir's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
525 views

Can we use 3rd person singular for "Come Find"?

I have the following question which Copilot, Gemini, and ChatGPT couldn't answer properly. I understand that in American English, people drop and in "Come and Find," and say "Come find.&...
mac's user avatar
  • 61
0 votes
0 answers
34 views

Subject + verb + personal object+ bare infinitive; such as "I demanded her pay her taxes" Can we follow this same formula for all subjunctive verbs? [migrated]

My main question was prompted when I realized that there were other cases where subjunctive can be used with other verbs, such as with like, ask, etc. So my question here is whether we can use the ...
PROCESIONES CELESTES's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
194 views

abǽde in context: which verb and inflectional form?

I'd like to know what verb and which inflectional form abǽde is in the sentence below. The passage is from one of Ælfric's homilies. A translation is available online, but it doesn't look literal ...
blokeman's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
115 views

Person who says they want to help, but doesn't want to do it when asked [duplicate]

I'm looking for a word that means a person who says that they're here to help, but when the help is asked for they don't really want to do it
Che Robinson's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
50 views

example sentences of the verbs, "deter, enrich, and help", which have content clauses as their subject [closed]

I am interested in the question of what kind of verbs allows a content clause as a subject. I found a list of such verbs in The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (P.957). amuse bother deter ...
Aki's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
49 views

Confused about the rules for verb + infinitive

I'm doing a worksheet in which rules for verbs + infinitive or gerund have to be completed. And there is one rule I'm really not clear about. It says: "An infinitive is often used to answer the ...
Rosie's user avatar
  • 79
3 votes
1 answer
176 views

“He feels himself expanding”?

(From A Terrible Kindness by Jo Browning Wroe, Part II Cambridge Choir, chapter 20) William, the chorister, is enjoying himself The putting on of his cassock and the graceful. weighty swing of the ...
philphil's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
31 views

Usage of “Effects” [duplicate]

I came across this sentence: “This new patch commit can be cherry-picked directly to the main branch to fix the bug before it effects more users.” I find the usage of “effects” here to be weird. Is ...
Uri Greenberg's user avatar
-4 votes
1 answer
63 views

Usage of 'convalesce' as a transitive verb

Would something akin to the following parse? "Over time, the regimen successfully convalesced the patient." None of the examples given in definitions of the word I can find using ...
Era's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
43 views

Singular or plural: "30 subjects put(s) us"

Is singular or plural correct in this case? We believe that 30 subjects put us comfortably above the field’s average for similar studies. We believe that 30 subjects puts us comfortably above the ...
MrASquare's user avatar
-1 votes
3 answers
157 views

What is a term to describe "attempting to refute?"

Is there any way of describing the attempt of refute rather than just saying refuting? In conjunction, I would usually just further elaborate upon the verb with more descriptors and/or visualization, ...
My Info's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
44 views

Can 'to go ahead' imply 'to pave the way'?

One meaning of English phrasal verb 'to go ahead' is 'to travel in front of other people in your group and arrive before them'. Starting from that meaning, it can potentially also be used in a ...
user avatar
11 votes
1 answer
818 views

Someday, I _____ give anything... future optative? (asking for my dog)

Apparently, when a human pets a dog it produces a particular reaction in the brain akin to solace or well-being. I have a theory that when a dog licks a human, there is a reciprocal effect for the dog....
CWill's user avatar
  • 1,438
-2 votes
1 answer
81 views

Is it proper grammar to start a sentence with the word "reference"?

The sentence "Reference these materials" sounds wrong to me, but I cannot figure out why, assuming I'm correct. The intended meaning is "use these materials to further your ...
BrDaHa's user avatar
  • 117
0 votes
1 answer
166 views

as if a penguin was or as if a penguin were [duplicate]

I've searched several questions about this, but can't find what I want to know. This is a problem in the English test in the country of Asia region. And our teacher has a doubtful reputation for his ...
Sense of Study's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
44 views

What is the associated verb for a civil partnership?

“My friends are getting married [at their wedding].” “My friends are getting _________ [at their civil partnership].” What is the correct verb? United? Partnered? Unionised? There doesn’t seem to be ...
Darren's user avatar
  • 165
-1 votes
2 answers
64 views

Do the lyrics of 'more than words' contain a Grammar fault? [closed]

I have a question about the song 'more than words' from Extreme. Saying I love you, is not the words I want to hear from you. Shouldn't it be 'are not the words'?
Casper's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
38 views

He doesn’t go fishing with friends(,) as he once promised [ [not] to]

I am trying to translate a sentence. Which is the correct interpretation? He doesn’t go fishing with friends(,) as he once promised. = He doesn’t go fishing with friends, as he once promised to. He ...
sanya6's user avatar
  • 25
3 votes
2 answers
552 views

Usage of 'Seems' in Sentence as Verb

What type of verb is 'seems' in the following sentence?: It seems that the traffic will be heavy during rush hour.
GrammarEnthusiast's user avatar
6 votes
11 answers
3k views

Ways to Say "Forcibly Inducted"

As a combatant, your family's safety is threatened by your captors. "Return to your platoon as a spy for us, and your family's lives will be spared." You accept the terms with steadfast ...
Vepuei's user avatar
  • 77
1 vote
2 answers
54 views

Is the construction "to try and [verb]" now considered standard, as in "to try and explain......"? [duplicate]

This question is about a construction that I find mildly (only mildly) irritating, but baffling. See example below. I know what the phrase means when it is used, but why do people use it? Has it ...
ab2's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
23 views

What verb and subjective fits for synaptic current? [closed]

From Wikipedia's entry for Synapse: In the nervous system, a synapse is a structure that permits a neuron (or nerve cell) to pass an electrical or chemical signal to another neuron or to the target ...
Gaslight Deceive Subvert's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
29 views

Is the word "bridge" used to indicate measurement of something in this sentence?

I was reading a scientific article about historical archaeology and then suddenly I came across this part in the article; "Understanding the development of mass marketing and mass consumption as ...
PROCESIONES CELESTES's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
36 views

Is there a difference between the verbs “book” and “prebook”? [duplicate]

I have been seeing the term "prebook" used in business conference marketing. Here’s an example: “Be sure to prebook your one-on-one consultation with a product expert ...” Is that any ...
debbiesym's user avatar
  • 1,054
7 votes
1 answer
438 views

Adverbs in the mid-position when there is more than one verb

I am doing a worksheet about adverbs. For adverbs of certainty like 'probably' and 'definitely', it says that they go in the mid-position and it gives this rule: "mid: before main verb; if the ...
Rosie's user avatar
  • 79
0 votes
1 answer
57 views

Verb or predicate adjective?

In this sentence, is the verb "is" or "is central"? The principle that an action must be judged on the basis of its foreseeable consequences is central to many areas of the law I ...
AfterWorkGuinness's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
38 views

Is there a formal word describing a person or technology consuming most of the resources, which leads to unfairness? [duplicate]

For example, there are two technologies (X and Y) sharing a resource, but due to some reason, technology X always uses 90% of the resource and leaves only 10% for the other. And I would do something ...
wzFelix's user avatar
  • 11
1 vote
1 answer
60 views

Is helped a helping verb?

In the sentence "She helped build the house." Is the verb "helped build" where "helped" is a helping verb? Similarly, in the sentence "I helped discover tombs of ...
AfterWorkGuinness's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
79 views

What is a word that describes "to trudge through" a liquid but for milk? [closed]

I am talking about Words like "bemire" and "daggle". I want a word verb that describes the act being sludged/dragged/ran through milk, and the noun for the soiled object in that ...
user499851's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
168 views

Look forward very much to

One example of Cambridge grammar confuses me. I look forward very much to hearing from you soon. Is the sentence correct? Why does it put "very much" together with verb phrase "look ...
Kebab King's user avatar
13 votes
9 answers
4k views

A word for a man of few, but well thought-out, words

I recently lost a friend and I’m looking for the words to describe him. He was a man of few words but his words were deliberate, they weren’t spur of the moment thoughts. He meant the things he said ...
Amie's user avatar
  • 131
1 vote
1 answer
89 views

Is there a difference between "maltreat" & "ill-treat"?

Is there a difference between maltreat and ill-treat or are they interchangeable, since both refer to rougher treatment?
user497255's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
84 views

Comma before a moved verb

I can't seem to find a definitive answer for this, and my colleague and I are disagreeing on it: Your next obsession, found. Your next obsession found. It was an advertisement, as in something like ...
humble.rebel's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
29 views

Correct use of the verb in terms of pronoun and number

I'm an English student yet, and today I had this sentence and this question. In the sentence: "I am a person that does not like routine but rather tries to maintain an overall healthy lifestyle.&...
MariaD's user avatar
  • 11
-1 votes
0 answers
43 views

Is 'angle' used as a verb to mean 'to fish' acceptable in English? [duplicate]

I can angle fish. Is this sentence grammatically justifiable? I like angling Is the verbal noun form grammatically correct?
A J Hareendran's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
142 views

Can 'angle' be used as verb to mean 'to fish'? [closed]

Can 'angle' be used as a verb in the sense 'to fish'? If so, is it an American usage?
A J Hareendran's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
54 views

Why is it "I began to look around" and not "looked" [duplicate]

I'm trying to help a German friend with their English, why is it "I began to look around" and not "I began to looked around" And I'm unsure how to explain it to her simply. Thank ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
1 answer
53 views

Why does this sentence not mean reliable primary sources X (verb) the debate of the historians?

Why is the third "that" not implying the primary sources modify something about the historian's hot debate? It is a sad but just indictment of some high school history textbooks that they ...
Coo's user avatar
  • 99
1 vote
2 answers
130 views

All I was saying "is" ... or All I was saying "was"

Which of these is more appropriate? All I was saying is that you're the more responsible one or All I was saying was that you're the more responsible one Both feel correct to me.
whoisit's user avatar
  • 111
4 votes
3 answers
486 views

Excuse: verb /ɪkˈskjuːz/ vs noun /ɪkˈskjuːs/ - Does this follow a pattern?

I would like to know if the word excuse, with different pronunciations as a noun and a verb (homographs) follows some kind of phonological pattern of SoP conversion (in either direction) The only ...
GJC's user avatar
  • 2,509
1 vote
1 answer
98 views

Can I omit "to" in infinitives as object?

I was reading a book, and then the following sentence appeared: "Our wisest move at this point is retreat" But this is not the only case where I've seen this, there are also sentences that ...
The_Soul_Eater's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
296 views

Which is correct has or have Neither of the balls has/have any air [duplicate]

Neither of the balls has/have any air. Use has or have?
user493319's user avatar

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