Questions tagged [verbs]

This tag is for questions about verbs. Verbs are words that express an action, occurrence, or a state of being. Add this tag to single-word-requests if you are looking for a verb. Add the tag word-usage if you are asking about the usage of the verb.

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5 votes
3 answers
196 views

Is "create new" not pleonastic?

I wonder why the verb "create" is often followed by the word "new". Does "create" not imply "new" ? So, when I read in programming languages for example, "...
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-1 votes
0 answers
19 views

"I cannot get around to drawing as much as I want" or "I cannot get around to drawing as much as I want to", which one is correct? [closed]

Both sound fine to me. But I am not sure. Is the second better? Thank you for the help.
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-1 votes
1 answer
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Is it a verb or a noun?

I'm not sure if this is going to be a fruitful question or not, but what is the word riposte in the following sentence being referenced as, a verb or a noun? I like your riposte. Is the sentence ...
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6 votes
6 answers
2k views

Is there a single word for the "act" of praising a person with the intention of bringing down this person later?

Jack __ the other person. I am looking for a word that describes putting someone on a high pedestal only to bring him down later. Any word that follows this chain of activity may also do, praise-...
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2 votes
1 answer
28 views

Can "multiply" be used with uncountable nouns?

If multiply means to increase or cause to increase greatly in number or quantity (OxfordL) does that mean that multiply can be used with uncountable nouns as well? Most examples I find are with ...
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6 votes
5 answers
1k views

Euphemism for "kiss"

I am trying to use kiss as a verb, but with non-romantic connotations. I want it to express someone's reverence and longing after another person, in a context like: In spirit, he was __________ [...
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0 votes
1 answer
34 views

When is a "be" verb required? [closed]

There's common writing advice out there saying that you should eliminate most "be" verbs from sentences to make them sound better. Here's such an article that provides eight techniques to do ...
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0 votes
2 answers
49 views

To clutch in a gear changing context

I'm a portuguese speaker and we have a slang verb, "debrear", which means to step, all the way to the floor, on the clutch pedal, or, motorcycle-wise, to pull the clutch lever all the way in....
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3 votes
3 answers
114 views

Verb for enjoying solitude

Recently, I tried to ironize about the importance of private rooms in the office, likening them to "the air we breathe". ...And was lost for a word that says "enjoy our solitude in"...
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0 votes
2 answers
34 views

Which verb tense do I use for a secondary but perpetual action mentioned in a sentence that happened in the past?

I'm trying to write a sentence in which the primary action occurred in the past, but within that sentence is another subject-verb pair in which the verb describes a perpetual state of being. Here is ...
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-3 votes
0 answers
31 views

Does there exist word like “bloomic” in English language? [closed]

I’ve seen this word bloomic as someone’s Instagram username.
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0 votes
1 answer
72 views

Is the verb usage of "ladle" considered verbing?

She ladled water instead of soup... In this sentence, is "ladled" considered verbing or was it a regular and real verb before? I know informal English allows things like: "I'll ...
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4 votes
1 answer
58 views

Word order and length of noun phrase

Edwin Williams says here that some verbs in the frame [V NP AP]† like e.g. wipe admit NP and AP to invert freely (1) while others like consider don't (2a-b): they require NP to be "long" or &...
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1 vote
3 answers
71 views

What is another word for “say” and the like before a declarative sentence?

When writing a declarative sentence, the most common word used is probably “say”. Others like “state”, “shout” and “cry” also appear frequently. In my composition, there is this one sentence: ”Hear ...
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0 votes
1 answer
37 views

Is "unsubstantiate" used correctly as a verb?

I tried to register my mom for a regular zoom meeting, and I gave her email to the host of the zoom. After the meeting was over, I received this message from the host: (She unsubstantiated- maybe by ...
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-1 votes
0 answers
57 views

Why does singular "you" take a plural verb? [duplicate]

I read the material at the link Did English ever have a "you" plural?, and it did not adequately address my question. The three key paragraphs in the winning answer were “You and ye used to ...
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  • 3,307
0 votes
3 answers
80 views

Stack all the firewood today vs get all the firewood stacked today

1."Take a rest, Felicia, you don't need to get all the firewood stacked today." 2."Take a rest, Felicia, you don't need to stack all the firewood today." What is the difference in ...
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5 votes
6 answers
1k views

What is a verb for "to be identical"?

What is a verb for the meaning "To be identical"? identical adjective Things that are identical are exactly the same. Collins For instance, instead of saying "Diamonds are never ...
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0 votes
0 answers
34 views

Predicates of apparent temperature

Predicates of apparent temperature like cool, warm, hot, cold, etc., can express both states of things or people (1b) and (more generally) the state of the weather (1b). (1a) It is now finally cool, ...
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  • 369
6 votes
1 answer
1k views

What's the archaic past tense for "say"?

And his disciples came to him, and awoke him, saying, Lord, save us: we perish. And he saith unto them, Why are ye fearful, O ye of little faith? Then he arose, and rebuked the winds and the sea; and ...
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0 votes
0 answers
16 views

Can 'unwind' be used in German in a sense that means 'to relax'? [migrated]

I want to say 'to unwind' in German and for it to mean 'relax'. Is this a synonym of the word over in Germany too? Or will is it only used literally, as in to unwind a piece of string?
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0 votes
2 answers
107 views

"She bore a child" vs "She gave birth to a child"

The sentence "She gave birth to a child" or "She had a child" is normal. But the verb ‘bear‘ also means ‘to give birth to young‘. Therefore, is the sentence "She bore a child&...
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0 votes
1 answer
60 views

Usage of a verb "encode": is it possible to use it like "something encodes some information"?

In a scientific context, I want to use the word "encode" in such a way as "The object A encodes the object B.", or "The object A encoding the object B is defined by ..."....
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3 votes
1 answer
376 views

Is it "increase" or "expand" when talking about vocabulary?

When my son said he doesn't recognise all the words in Wordle I commented that he is thus increasing his vocabulary. He then contended that the correct word should be expanding. Who is correct? What ...
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-1 votes
2 answers
35 views

One word or accurate phrase for upgrading previously learnt skills [closed]

I am building my resume to apply for jobs and placement drives as I have started my last year of computer engineering. This is the objective/ intro part of my resume: I am a 4th Year Computer ...
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1 vote
3 answers
133 views

What is a word for "to create a universe"? Can 'universalize' be used?

Per Lexico, universalize means: Give a universal character or application to (something, especially something abstract) ‘theories that universalize experience’ Can this definition include the sense ...
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2 votes
1 answer
114 views

Is the word "work" a noun or a verb in "Get something to work"?

We are having some dispute over the sentence below. I've tried everything under the sun to fix this lock, but I just can't get it to work. All of us agree on the meaning of the sentence. However, ...
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1 vote
0 answers
18 views

What verb form can be used after wish/hope? [duplicate]

I understand that there is a backshift occuring with "wish" - I wish you were here (now). I wish I had tried (yesterday). What if we are referencing to the future? Can there ever be "...
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1 vote
3 answers
144 views

Is the verb ‘recollect’ used in American English? How is it different from ‘remember’?

I (American English) am a plaintiff in a lawsuit taking place in Malta (UK English) that involves some British people as well as some Americans. When cross-examining a British person, many of his ...
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0 votes
3 answers
81 views

I know that "What do you here?" is a valid sentence, but I can't quite parse it to explain to others

I've always been bothered by how people say the translation of Castlevania: Symphony of the Night is terrible and full of errors, and the number one thing they point to for the error part of the ...
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-1 votes
1 answer
28 views

Which is correct? Suggest me the best out of it [closed]

I wish no human will ever get trapped like this. I wish no human ever get trapped like this. I wish no human ever gets trapped like this.
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1 vote
5 answers
82 views

Word or phrase to describe bashing one's opponents to make oneself look good

Is there a word, phrase or expression that would describe the action of defaming or speaking ill of someone just to raise your own standing or reputation? I'm looking for something like what you ...
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0 votes
0 answers
22 views

Can resign be followed by a to-infinitive?

I was looking at Wiktionary's list of catenative verbs and noticed the list was far from exhaustive. I added "deign," and, having finished reading the list, I was trying to think of others ...
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1 vote
0 answers
31 views

What is the proper verb form to use after "a breadth of [plural]" [duplicate]

Which of the following sentences is the correct conjugation: A breadth of organisms depends on water. A breadth of organisms depend on water. I believe the subject of the sentence is singular, "...
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1 vote
1 answer
65 views

The phrase "belong to" in a question [duplicate]

Can we separate the words "belong" and "to" in a question like this? To what language family does English belong?
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0 votes
1 answer
38 views

Restating preposition in a conjunctive phrase to avoid ambiguity

Take the following sentence: This study analyzed how perceptions of poverty and welfare policies influence social movements in the US. My first interpretation, and I suspect the first interpretation ...
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0 votes
0 answers
28 views

Why 'begun' instead of 'began' in the following sentence?

I read the following passage from the instagram account of a trans celebrity describing their romantic life pre/post-transition, and was a bit irked by the use of 'begun' (which is funny, because it ...
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0 votes
0 answers
19 views

Is there a term for "adverb verb"s and/or "redundant adverb verb"s?

This is a meta question of this one: How can I omit adverbs to impart a strong feeling? Like the original question, I'm trying to find some tool/list/book that helps one convert "adverb verb"...
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2 votes
1 answer
118 views

What's the meaning of 'couldn't make your car'? [duplicate]

It was a situation that the police were trying to stop a driver who ran two stop signs. The driver finally got out of the car and said "I couldn't make your car". From a publication article ...
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-1 votes
2 answers
68 views

"The shadows born" is the use of "born" correct in this sentence? [closed]

I'm writing a story that will be published on a couple of websites. It is a fantasy story that talks about creatures called "The Shadows". I'd like to title the story "The Shadows Born&...
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0 votes
0 answers
8 views

Subject-verb agreement when citing papers with multiple authors? [duplicate]

Suppose my in-text citation is Hu & Smith (2010). Should I cite the paper, i.e. "Hu and Smith (2010) says"? Or should I cite the authors, i.e. "Hu and Smith (2010) say"?
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0 votes
2 answers
41 views

Are "close" and "open" verbs or adjectives? [closed]

I'm really hard stuck trying to comprehend whether these two words simultaneously have two natures. I read: The door is open The door is opened Difference? The door is close The door is closed ...
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0 votes
0 answers
39 views

What does "You can step" mean?

It's from the movie Love Jones (1997) Two black men talking about one of them bringing to a party a woman despite that he's married. Here's their conversation: "But you're married and all". ...
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1 vote
0 answers
42 views

Comparative Adjective vs Noun; cleaner vs cleaner [duplicate]

I am curious if there is any reason that English converged to using similar suffix for both comparative adjective, and for noun. For example, as shown in the title, "cleaner" could mean both ...
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2 votes
1 answer
221 views

Trying to explain grammatical error in fragmented compound sentence [closed]

It was a turning point that led us to discover the unique opportunity to apply the technology to aerospace, and the company rebranded as *****. Could somebody possibly help me explain what is wrong ...
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0 votes
1 answer
44 views

Is "rid" a noun in "I want rid of him"?

The Oxford Dictionary regards rid as a verb only. However, is rid a noun in I want rid of him? If rid is a past participle, then, can it be followed by want?
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  • 2,660
0 votes
3 answers
30 views

Commence from or Commence to? [closed]

How is "Commence" correctly placed in a sentence as below? The holiday will commence from Monday 2nd of May to Wednesday 4th of May (or) The holiday will commence on Monday 2nd of May to ...
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7 votes
5 answers
3k views

Why isn't "witness" the third-person singular form in the example sentence?

The Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary gives, for the word witness, an example sentence as follows: (Original Version) Authentic Italian cooking is very healthy —— witness the low incidence of ...
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  • 2,660
1 vote
0 answers
31 views

Is the word "lured" an adjective or verb in the sentence "I feel lured by the chance to start over again." [closed]

While I understand the verb "feel" is often followed by -ed adjectives when talking about emotional states, "lured" itself is not an adjective. So I am not sure what to make of the ...
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1 vote
0 answers
21 views

Practicing sentence structure exercises. Did I handle the verbal phrase correctly?

I'm a writer who was never really taught all that soundly the formal aspects of parts of speech. Basic public school education. Was an English major, but we focused on the act of writing moreso than ...
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