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Slang is a type of language that consists of words, and phrases, that are regarded as very informal.

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Pejorative or factual representation? [closed]

Are not "power pig" and "power monger" also names for those who crave power at all costs?
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Where exactly did the slang phrase “digging it” come from

I'm a young native english speaker raised in Canada. At school me and most of my friends tend to use the phrase "Im really digging this", as to mean i'm really enjoying a specific thing or activity. ...
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Can you give me an example of metonymy using slang? [closed]

Can you use slang in an example of metonymy? For example, If I say, "his jacket is crispy" (crispy meaning really stylish). Or "put some panties on that window" (meaning roll that window up). I ...
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One butterfly pull the iron out the maiden [on hold]

There is a song called “Iron Out The Maiden” by Shahmen, here are the lyrics. I don’t understand this sentence: One butterfly pull the iron out the maiden Why “pull”, not pulls or pulled? And ...
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1answer
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Synonym for “sure” and “yes please”

When somebody suggests me something (maybe offering me something, or suggesting me for a proposal/plan), and I would like to show my agreement/approval for that. Instead of just saying "sure" or "yes ...
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1answer
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How to say “dulcet” in verbal English (or slang)?

For example, if somebody sitting next to me hummed or sang a song and I want to tell him that his song is dulcet, in a polite but informal manner (or even slang). How can I express that? Should I ...
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106 views

A term for: When a taste or smell of a product is being concealed by another product

Let's say, we create a smoothie and some ingredients are much stronger than others and they literally beat out the taste/smell of the other ingredients. a. We can't add durian because it will ...
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48 views

Is there a word for “person who wears rags”?

I'm trying to translate the common Italian insults "pezzente" or "straccione", which literally mean "someone who wears rags" (torn, old clothes). The meaning is "poor in a derogatory way". The ...
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In the context of gambling, specifically poker, do you post a bet or place a bet?

In the context of poker a player places/posts bets. Two particular types of bets are the blinds. I've seen "place a bet" and "post the small/big blind" but are the verbs interchangeable? I ...
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1answer
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Is “blow wise to” a dialectal/archaic phrase? What is its etymology?

But blow wise to this, buddy, blow wise to this: Never play cards with a man called Doc. Never eat at a place called Mom’s. Never sleep with a woman whose troubles are worse than your own. Never let ...
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1answer
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On being “snatched” in slang

Connie Eble writes in UNC-CH Campus Slang 2016 on the word snatched: looking attractive: That outfit is snatched This is the earliest and only record Green's Dictionary of Slang lists as a ...
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5answers
106 views

What's the opposite of “last-minute (Christmas) shopping”?

The question is in the title. I'd like to know if there is an idiom or phrase used for someone who does not buy at the “last minute”, the hyperbolic expression is often used when purchasing gifts, ...
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What do Americans call the Center Console of a car?

In Wikipedia it is a British English word. Do Americans have their own word for it? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Center_console_(automobile)
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1answer
87 views

What does “deserve a good kicking” mean? [closed]

I encountered this expression in a passage and did not understand. can anyone help explain? Thanks!
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1answer
330 views

Origin of the slang term “Becky” — was there originally a vulgar connotation?

Green's Dictionary of Slang provides only one 2017 citation for the slang term "becky." use of generic name to describe a white woman who is seen as using her inborn privilege as a means of ...
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8answers
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Origin, meaning, and derivation of 'boof' as a verb in U.S. slang

Recently, the following entry included in a page from a 1983 yearbook for a high school in the metropolitan Washington, D.C., area has gained considerable notoriety in U.S. politics: Judge — Have ...
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1answer
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Is the primary usage of “Daddy” sexual now? Why?

Just yesterday in chat someone intentionally misquoted Glen from Chucky, saying "dad." They then followed with: It's technically Daddy but that seems a bit awkward. Google ngrams shows usage of ...
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3answers
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Do “brownie points” derive from food-rationed “brown points”?

The OED has this to say about "brownie points." Brownie point n. [probably a development < brown-nose n. at brown adj. Special uses 2, but popularly associated with 2 and hence frequently ...
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2answers
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meaning of '4/5' (American slang?)

What is the meaning of '4/5' in this phrase? Azealia Banks' Insults Cardi B "You're illiterate, you're baby mama 4/5 to a man who has women crawling out of the woodworks with kids." — ...
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11answers
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When did “a buck” start being used to mean a unit of 100? (E.g. “a buck fifty” for 150 lbs.)

Before you answer, please note: I'm only interested in when this usage was established in common (American) parlance. I know what the term means and I don't need it defined, nor do I require an ...
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1answer
71 views

Is it okay to say “what ja doing?” instead of “what ya doing?”

I live in the Midwest and it is very common to hear people say "what ja doing?" instead of saying "what ya doing?" or "what are you doing?". Is this okay? Is using the 'j' sound instead of the 'y' ...
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3answers
386 views

responsible as to her keel

In the short story, The Last Cruise of the Judas Iscariot by Edward Page Mitchel, which tells the story of Captain Cram, a sailor in Main, who builds a schooner with three masts, which was considered ...
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“sink my jig” in nautical dialect

In a short story by Edward Page Mitchel entitled The Last Cruise of the Judas Iscariot, captain Cram, a sailor from Main, tells the story of him building a schooner with three masts, which was frowned ...
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1answer
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knocked clean out

In a short story entitled The Last Cruise of the Judas Iscariot by Edward Page Mitchel, Captain Cram, a sailor in Main, builds a schooner with three masts, which is considred by the town's people as a ...
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1answer
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How do you “leave all the beefin' to 50”?

How does someone "leave all the beefin' to 50"? Context From the latest song by Richard Colson Baker "Rap Devil" Let's leave all the beefin' to 50 (please) Em, you're pushin' 50 You can ...
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What connection (if any) is there in Australian slang between 'dinkum' and 'dink' (meaning a ride on bicycle handlebars)?

In an answer to the recent question, What is the American equivalent of a "backie"? site participant Chappo notes that in Australia the word dink is sometimes used as a noun to mean "a lift ...
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2answers
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What ever happened to “fink”?

(Child of the 70's here...) While in conversation with a millenial yesterday, I used the word "fink" to describe a low, sneaky, two-faced um, fink. She'd never heard the word. "Ratfink"? Nope. "The ...
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Slang Appellation for Plastic Surgeon?

Some years ago there were a few quite amusing, albeit slightly derogatory terms for plastic surgeons. A cursory Google has revealed but one: Sellout, which is a reasonable start. Others may exist, ...
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1answer
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Is the expression “to run someone out” an actual saying?

I’ve hear it before, but can’t seem to find an actually source that says it is a common phrase used. As far as I know, it means to kick someone out. But let me know if you’ve used it before or if it ...
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4answers
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Does “fu” mean weed?

Google translated "fu" as "weed" or "marijuana". However, dictionaries such as Merriam Webster and Dictionary.com don't have this definition. Does "fu" really mean "weed"?
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1answer
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What does the colloquialisms 'chav' and 'scouse' mean? [closed]

I have been watching channel 4's Countdown with Jimmy Carr on youtube recently and have heard them mention these two particular colloquialisms/slang and was wondering what exactly they meant?
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The meaning and usage of ‘stiffs’ in “Of Mice and Men”

I would really appreciate it if someone could confirm whether I have interpreted correctly the meaning of “stiffs” in the following excerpt “I had enough,” he said angrily. “You ain't wanted here. ...
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1answer
242 views

Victorian English slang: 'earnest' ~ 'gay'? [closed]

Is it true that Victorians would understand earnest in a slang sense to mean gay? For example, in Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest is there an assumed pun on "earnest"? This was suggested in ...
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When should I use “Keep it civil”?

Here is where I first heard the slang: Champion for Democracy? - Woodrow Wilson Towards the end of the video, Neidell urges viewers to post their views about Wilson and says: "Please keep it civil!",...
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Etymology of using “ya” instead of “you”

I have noticed that some people in parts of Maryland, Pennsylvania, Ohio often say "ya" instead of "you"? As in "Didya do your homework?" instead of "Did you do your homework?". Does anyone know ...
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Sentence connector after hardly/barely emphasizing the lack of ability/resource

What is the sentence connector that fits best in the following examples? He could hardly even make a profit with two employees, ..... three. She could barely even eat one pizza slice, ..... ...
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“There is a woman with a snapper.”

So far, I haven't found a clue to this use of the word "snapper" (1851) to describe an energetic, irrepressibly attractive woman at any of the 19th century slang websites so far. Here is part of the ...
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What is the meaning of 'skrt'?

I've been learning English for many years and recently found this word 'skrt'. I think people with hip hop background use this word a lot. And some use it as an adjective. From my understanding this ...
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2answers
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Is the word “flatulence” ridiculous sounding? [closed]

I ask because there is a small disagreement over the terminology that was used in the following (original) Travel.SE question My seatmate farts like rotten eggs. What ought the cabin crew do? The ...
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Slang meaning of word “ter” [duplicate]

I have recently completed reading “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone.” and as many others I experienced problems understanding Hagrid's way of speaking. In particular he often used word "ter". ...
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1answer
252 views

Alternative phrase for “breaking the glass ceiling”

I’d like to say something like: The prominence of IT has led to significant job creation while also helping migrants break the glass ceiling. Topic is on migrants and IT. Particularly, those from ...
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Origin of “dog(ging) it”?

The American Heritage Dictionary defines "dog it" as: Do less than is required; loaf or shirk. For example, I'm afraid our donors are dogging it this year. This expression originated in sports ...
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2answers
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Etymology/history of “dib-dob” as military slang for foreign currency

Dib-dob is used as a generic term for foreign currency (I've come across it for Euros and Dollars). I've recently heard this used by some RAF types, and had heard it before, from someone presumably ...
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565 views

Origin of slang “fire” meaning “cool” / “great” and does it have any relation to “fam”?

Fire as a slang adjective appears to be the bleeding-edge version of "cool." To some extent, the word appears to be interchangeable with dope. One thing that seems odd to me is that it often seems ...
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what exactly “How are you getting on with it” in this context means? [closed]

I have shared my new app URL with someone and asked for his feedback, he has replied: I’ve had a quick look, it seems pretty neat. How are you getting on with it? Cannot understand what exactly ...
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What does “Where is my 40, homes?” mean?

I was watching the show, Sons Of Anarchy. One of the characters said to another character who was Mexican : Where is my 40, homes? He said it with a Mexican accent and he was pointing at a stylish ...
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338 views

The term “handy” in “Of Mice and Men”

[Candy] "That's the boss's son," he said quietly. "Curley's pretty handy. He done quite a bit in the ring. He's a lightweight, and he's handy." "Well, let him be handy," said George. "He don't ...
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Should I use “the John” or “the john” when referring to the slang phrase for toilet?

Should I capitalize the "j" in John when referring to a toilet as "the john." The same goes for lazy Susan and other words that are also names.
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Short word to describe someone wearing smartglasses [closed]

My company is developing smart eyewear and I'm looking for a short word to describe the users of our smartglasses for English documents. The ideal wording would be understandable by British, US, and ...
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158 views

What does “well, I'll take that” mean? [closed]

What does "well, I'll take that" mean? when it's the answer to "I miss you" or "it was an amazing time" is it a phrase in American English?