Questions tagged [slang]

Questions about “Language of a highly colloquial type, considered as below the level of standard educated speech, and consisting either of new words or of current words employed in some special sense.” [OED: 𝒔𝒍𝒂𝒏𝒈]

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What "On your approach" means in this context? [closed]

I've playing a game called gta san andreas and I've ran into this phrase Hey carl you gotta stay nice and low on your approach or you pop up on the radar And two questions crossed my mind that is: ...
curiousUser's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
60 views

What's the etymology of "noddle"? And is "noodle" a derivative?

Dictionary.com defines noddle as: noun Older Slang. the head or brain. What is the etymology of this slang? I've never heard the term "noddle" before, but I have heard the term "...
Scott Mitchell's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
33 views

What transitive verbs are there for when someone ignores your attempts to contact them? [duplicate]

I’m looking for transitive verbs that might fill in the blank in these sentences: We’ve been sending him emails every week, but he’s ___ed us, We’ve been sending him emails every week, but he’s ___ing ...
rrutouowrpeie's user avatar
6 votes
3 answers
117 views

When did "light (something) up" begin to mean shooting?

I was wondering if it would be period accurate if depicting someone like a soldier during World War I or II to say "light them up" to shoot the enemy and at what time the term came into use.
Dude Bruh's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
78 views

The meaning of schneid (not sure of the spelling) in colloquial British English (London centric)

The word schneid is used commonly in London (UK) slang to mean that someone is devious and not to be trusted - like a spy for example. It is highly derogatory. I have read that on this site that the ...
Mark Sutton's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
78 views

What is an adjective for a person who is attractive but doesn't like taking care of their appearance?

Like an attractive person but who doesn't wear make up, doesn't comb, and doesn't try to combine his clothes. Attractive in an edgy way, not caring about their look but still looking good. Being ...
Claire Perez's user avatar
-1 votes
2 answers
72 views

What's the exact meaning of 'Temprist'?

I look for a word that describes a person who loves music, food, jokes, metaphorically getting high. I mean a person whose MOOD or Temper is usually good and cheerful. And it's better to be a slangy/...
POP POP's user avatar
  • 25
0 votes
1 answer
116 views

Does referring to someone as a "rando" mean you didn't know who they were at the end of your interaction with them?

I got a message from a rando ... Some rando walked up to me and said ... It seems clear to me that the speaker here didn't know who this person was at the beginning of the interaction, when the ...
Sparr's user avatar
  • 1,271
2 votes
1 answer
156 views

Where does the second definition of applesauce, nonsense, come from?

Where does the meaning of nonsense in applesauce come from? I tried looking it up, and Etymonline says that The slang meaning "nonsense" is attested from 1921 and was noted as a vogue word ...
Sophia's user avatar
  • 21
2 votes
0 answers
276 views

'My bad' vs 'My bag'

Over the years I've noticed a non-insignificant amount of people use the term 'My bag' to admit guilt when getting something wrong (i.e. 'Mea culpa'). For example: "Happy Birthday!" "My ...
Daniel's user avatar
  • 21
8 votes
1 answer
1k views

What does "neat" mean in 1950s slang as a noun referring to a person? (see: Grease)

There are two instances in the play/musical "Grease" where someone is referred to as "a neat", and I'm having trouble figuring out the meaning. The first instance is after Danny (&...
Pipeline's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
180 views

Is "It's like watching Mitt and Mutt work" a reference to Mutt & Stuff? [closed]

Hey English community, I was watching Best Fails Of The Year | Try Not To Laugh and the sentence at the timestamp took me off guard, mostly because I've never heard it before and I really like it. I ...
Richard's user avatar
  • 21
-2 votes
2 answers
95 views

What's the meaning of "jolly weezer" on the show WW2BAM?

A TV presenter of "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire" lamented it would be a "jolly weezer" if the man made less than his wife on a game show. What did he mean?
Mike Panek's user avatar
5 votes
3 answers
1k views

What is the meaning of "burke a school" in Anticipations?

In Anticipations (1901), chapter 9, in the middle of a long passage, H. G. Wells wrote (referring to a personification of Jewish people): ... He is a remnant and legacy of mediævalism, a ...
Polichinelle's user avatar
-4 votes
1 answer
175 views

Is there a word for people you like but are a pain in the ass?

Is there a word for people you like but are a pain in the ass? Nothing too vulgar. I am not looking to call someone it, but affectionately think about them "that person is a complete [word]"....
luke's user avatar
  • 101
18 votes
2 answers
5k views

What triggered the slang term "epic fail"?

Epic fail is defined as a spectacularly embarrassing or humorous mistake, humiliating situation, etc., that is subject to ridicule and given a greatly exaggerated importance.(Dictionary.com) The ...
Gio's user avatar
  • 3,941
-2 votes
2 answers
163 views

Is "bugly" used in British English?

Is "bugly" (from 'butt ugly') used in British English? And if it is, is it more common in some regional dialects than others?
Swenglish's user avatar
  • 107
7 votes
4 answers
3k views

Can “spooky” and “sketchy” be considered synonyms?

German kids widely use a mixture of German and English (Denglish). I'm a German boomer, and strongly dislike my daughter's (24) usage of Denglish. Normally she simply uses correctly translated English ...
Batox's user avatar
  • 189
1 vote
1 answer
195 views

What are "weed" (the annoying plant) and "weed" (the drug) classified as that makes them treated differently grammar-wise?

"Weed" (the annoying plant you don't want in your garden) and "weed" (the psychoactive drug) are treated differently grammatically. Just some example sentences "There are ...
chausies's user avatar
  • 151
0 votes
0 answers
48 views

Are there any terms for the summer directly after high/secondary school?

Leaving school seems like such a huge event in our lives. There's this single summer where you have more freedom than you've ever had before with a group of people you've grown up with before you all ...
illiter8's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
128 views

Idiomatic expressions for falsity pt. 3: the guesser falsity - Translation of Spanish: ‘mandar fruta’

Introduction According to correspondence theory, if you say or think something that does not correspond to reality then you have said something that is false. While this is an obvious concept learned ...
tac's user avatar
  • 432
1 vote
2 answers
137 views

Meaning of . . . “you just meet me on the ballast, and we'll make it a barquentine.”

(From The Wrecker by Robert Louis Stevenson and Lloyd Osbourne, Chapter XI, published 1892) Passage 177 “I don't see it,” returned the captain drily. “One captain's enough for any ship that ever I ...
philphil's user avatar
  • 255
0 votes
2 answers
155 views

Idiomatic expressions for falsity pt. 2: the sophist falsity - Translation of Spanish: ‘versear’ or ‘chamuyar’

Introduction According to correspondence theory, if you say or think something that does not correspond to reality then you have said something that is false. While this is an obvious concept learned ...
tac's user avatar
  • 432
0 votes
1 answer
110 views

Meaning of . . . , "I'm laying a little dark"

(From The Wrecker by Robert Louis Stevenson and Lloyd Osbourne, Chapter XI; published 1892) Passage 176 “Well,” returned Nares, with the same unamiable reserve, “for a reason, which I guess you know, ...
philphil's user avatar
  • 255
1 vote
2 answers
357 views

What is the origin of the Australian slang “pommers” to refer to English people? [duplicate]

What is the origin of the Australian slang “pommers” to refer to English people? (I’m uncertain as to the spelling) Why is this the term that is used?
TylerDurden's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
100 views

Meaning of "get out" in "He gets out when he can" [closed]

In his famous hit Working Class Man, Jimmy Barnes sings: He believes in God and Elvis He gets out when he can He did his time in Vietnam Still mad at Uncle Sam I can't make sense of the second line. ...
Mitsuko's user avatar
  • 2,054
10 votes
15 answers
2k views

Idiomatic word/expression for someone ‘who has no feeling for the game’ - Translation of Spanish ‘pechofrío’

I'm having trouble translating the expression pechofrío (pecho frío, ‘cold chest’) from Spanish—specially Argentinian Spanish, I don't know if it's used in other countries. It means: s. masc. Persona ...
tac's user avatar
  • 432
0 votes
1 answer
71 views

Use of the word "cork" to signify a mistake? [closed]

A colleague who is a ELL used the word "cork" to signify a mistake/error/typo on a schedule. I thought that the four-day schedule was a cork. She says she thinks her English teacher was a ...
Miranda's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
489 views

When did the insult “up yours” come into existence?

The movie Blazing Saddles used everything and anything to get a laugh. When the African American sheriff, newly assigned to a rural town, patrolled the main thoroughfare he happened upon an elderly ...
Dat Diesel's user avatar
5 votes
5 answers
392 views

Origin of the word "blackbirding" for a type of slave trade

I read about blackbirding on Wikipedia and tried to figure out why it is called blackbirding. I could not find anything in that article about its etymology, just this simple introduction: The owners, ...
pipe's user avatar
  • 509
1 vote
1 answer
146 views

Afro American specific slang [duplicate]

I'm from South America and I've been fluent (at least in my opinion) in English for several years as of now. With this in mind it has really called my attention lately that I've heard Afro-American ...
Cristian Baeza's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
212 views

What exactly is the meaning of the word "Feddy" here?

I've been playing a game and after completing a mission, one character ask to another the following: How you doing on the feddy? From the context, I assume that it's somehow related to money, but I'...
gamer123's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
208 views

What's the meaning of "not no small feat"? [closed]

I didn't understand meaning of "not no small feat" in this sentence: I want y'all to meet Deltron Zero, hero, not no small feat. From Deltron 3030's song 3030 Verse 1, 2nd line I know what ...
Walter Bishop's user avatar
28 votes
2 answers
3k views

At a 2:40 rate — slang for high speed

I've run across the phrase "at a 2:40 rate" in mid-19th Century sources. The context suggests that it means "at high speed," but I'd like to know the derivation. If it means a mile ...
Seth Masia's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
1k views

Why is a good-looking or sexually attractive person called a 'snack'?

Why is a good-looking or sexually attractive person called a 'snack'? Young people often use it this way, and it's a sense listed in some dictionaries. a sexually attractive person. "it's clear ...
Alireza's user avatar
  • 461
0 votes
3 answers
99 views

‘We curled through the library’?

Is there a word similar in sound to 'curl' or 'furl' or a connotation of either that applies in a sentence like “we curled through the entire library” to imply searching or something of the like? I ...
guest's user avatar
  • 71
4 votes
4 answers
2k views

Origin of prefix "Mc" McDonalds or Monty Python?

The "Mc" prefix in the USA is used in, for "McMansion" to mean, I think, characterless and identical (as in McDonald's restaurants which I think were the first really big chain ...
releseabe's user avatar
  • 593
0 votes
1 answer
44 views

Looking for idioms [closed]

Is there an idiom for someone who's doing you a favor with someone else’s property or money?
Tarza's user avatar
  • 1
2 votes
1 answer
119 views

Unusual conjugation of "to be" [closed]

I encountered several times a certain type of sentences (in colloquial contexts) which were clearly grammatically incorrect but seems to be widely spread and, as a non-native English speaker, I would ...
Falcon's user avatar
  • 121
4 votes
1 answer
440 views

Meaning of "get the tags"

The song One Piece at a Time written by Wayne Kemp and made famous by Johnny Cash in 1976 tells the story of a man who steals Cadillac parts over several years and builds his own car. The song ...
Peter Phipps's user avatar
-1 votes
2 answers
44 views

Scoring attempt in ice hockey slang

Please spell me that word which ice hockey commentators use when a player tries to score. For me it sounds like [vimaunt]. Example: https://youtu.be/53Gu1JsOmGI on the first seconds (00:02). I’ve ...
igops's user avatar
  • 119
11 votes
4 answers
3k views

Word for the loss of one parent

When one has lost both parents due to death the word orphan is used. This word is generally but not always used for children. It can in spoken English also be used for adults. My question is what ...
Autistic's user avatar
  • 356
-3 votes
1 answer
2k views

When "play" has a sexual connotation, what type of sex does it refer to? [closed]

Urban Dictionary includes one explanation of "play" : Anything to do with sexual relations: fooling around, making out, oral sex or having intercourse. However, most of the formal-language ...
RomanGhost's user avatar
8 votes
2 answers
1k views

What does TOOLER mean in Rugby school slang?

Poet Rupert Brooke's father was a housemaster at Rugby School. His nickname among pupils was "Tooler". What did it mean?
user289091's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
99 views

History of "dummy" as adverb?

The meme-y term "dummy thicc" uses "dummy" as an intensifier modifying "thicc" (meaning curvy). How common is this usage of "dummy"? How long has it been around?...
joshuahhh's user avatar
  • 131
1 vote
1 answer
894 views

Among younger speakers, is 'bro' now gender-neutral?

I often hear 'bro' being used in a gender-neutral manner among younger speakers (mainly teenagers), and I'm wondering about the specifics of this trend. (Or at least it seems like a trend to me.) Here ...
Heartspring's user avatar
  • 8,610
4 votes
1 answer
1k views

What is the etymology of the expression "spit bath"?

I am researching the idiomatic expression “spit bath,” which is common in the U.S.A. and mean bathing the entire body with a basin and washcloth instead of a shower or tub. There are many other idioms ...
Mirliton's user avatar
11 votes
2 answers
2k views

"Swear" as a noun as opposed to "swear word"

I'm a teenager from Chicago. During my childhood (and, presumably, that of almost all English-speaking children), I was taught that some words were "bad" words; these words were ...
Graham H.'s user avatar
  • 890
6 votes
1 answer
70 views

Anyone have details on NE PA slang term “Grauner”?

My dad grew up in the Anthracite coal region of NE Pennsylvania. NEPA is known for a pretty unique accent, phonetically more Midwest than Philadelphia or New York, and a lot of vocabulary that ...
user478720's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
1k views

Where and when did "booby prize" originate, and in what context did it become popular?

Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003) has this entry for the term "booby prize": booby prize n (1889) 1 : an award for the poorest performance in a game or competition 2 : ...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
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