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Questions about the use of Latin words and phrases in English.

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1answer
57 views

Adjectival form of “ipso facto”

I am looking for either a literal Latin adjectival form of "ipso facto," or--more interestingly--an adjective with a very closely equivalent meaning to that of the adverb "ipso facto." Though there ...
0
votes
2answers
34 views

phd with summa cum laude or phd summa cum laude

I am uncertain between the following two sentences: 1) I received my Ph.D. in (subject X) with summa cum laude. 2) I received my Ph.D. in (subject X) summa cum laude. Which one is better? Or maybe ...
6
votes
3answers
108 views

Do there exist male names that derive from female names in English?

I've seen a lot of female names that are simply derivatives of male names, mostly of biblical origin: Michaela, Michelle from Michael, Michel Joan, Joanna, Joanne, Jane, Jean from John, Jean ...
0
votes
1answer
50 views

What is the word for when something is currently unavailable?

I think it starts with L (also maybe latin origin) For example I'm waiting to get a package but I'm not even sure package has been even sent. So package is in L... (maybe not best example, I'm not ...
6
votes
0answers
262 views

Is “ no news is good news” of Italian origin?

According to Phrase Finder, the origin of the famous proverb “no news is good news”: The earliest version of this familiar saying was attributed to the English King James I, who wrote in 1616, 'No ...
2
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2answers
126 views

Traditional vs. classical pronunciation of Latin words in English

Has the traditional pronunciation of Latin fallen completely out of favor in English, or do any prescriptivists still recommend it? Is it any more common in British English than in American? A quick ...
9
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6answers
3k views

How to use the prepositions “apud” and “chez”?

I couldn't find many examples of apud and chez as prepositions; I just found one description on Wiktionary: apud 1. Used in scholarly works to cite a reference at second hand. Jones apud ...
3
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2answers
224 views

How did we get both sub- and infra- prefixes?

It seems that both sub- and infra- are prefixes that mean "below", leading to their use in different words to provide a similar meaning. We even have some words that are the same apart from these ...
4
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1answer
107 views

The etymology of 'substance'. Does it mean 'sub'-'stance'?

I am aware of the etymological fallacy and aware that the fallacy itself, also, does not always hold good. In other words, a word's pedigree may, or may not, be the reason it means what it means, ...
6
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3answers
807 views

Insight into the pronunciation of the word algae?

Can anyone provide some insight into the pronunciation of the word algae? Various dictionaries give either the /g/ version as in gear or the /dʒ/ version as in jeep. For example: https://dictionary....
2
votes
1answer
118 views

Why is the latin classification of the Armadillo translate into English as “Gorilla”? [closed]

The Latin classification of the Armadillo is Dasypus, which directly translates to gorilla in English. Can someone explain why that is, I am confused.
38
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2answers
4k views

Is the etymology of “salary” a myth?

Since, perhaps forever, I had always ‘known’ that the English word salary was derived from the Latin salarium, to the time when Roman soldiers were paid in salt for their service. Salt was a highly-...
1
vote
2answers
336 views

Using 'e.g.' in place of 'for example'

I'm looking at a text that regularly uses "e.g." in place of "for example", such as the following: "This parallel composition can be transparently split between two cores, allowing, e.g., for faster ...
14
votes
3answers
3k views

Where are all the Latin words?

It's often said that Latin and French each contribute about 29% of the English lexicon, with Germanic words an additional 26%. Wikipedia has a list of English words derived from Latin, however, a ...
2
votes
4answers
354 views

Who changed the way vacumn was spelled 40 years ago?

I noticed Robin Michael, who is on this site, stated she learned to spell vacumn as did I in school around 40 years ago. I always scored the highest in my English class and won spelling bees back then....
1
vote
1answer
236 views

Why is “genera” the plural form of “genus”?

I'm not familiar with irregular Latin pluralization, so this may be a simple question with a simple answer. Other Latin words ending in "us" don't pluralize to "era"
2
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3answers
232 views

What is the cultural origin of “Thrice Honored”

"Thrice-Honored Father", "Thrice-Honored Rulers" or the like. The term appears in the mid-nineteenth century books. For example: here and here and here and here. It has a classical feel to it -...
2
votes
1answer
309 views

The plural of “vena cava”

The plural of the English loadword vena cava from Latin is venae cavae. What are the etymological and grammatical reasons for this plural? Why are both words in a single term pluralized? And are there ...
1
vote
1answer
347 views

What does Latin “et alios” mean? [closed]

As I learned from Wiktionary site, there are exists these Latin phrases: et alii - And others; used of men or boys, or groups of mixed gender; masculine plural et aliae - And others; used of women or ...
1
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2answers
98 views

Is the pro in processor Latin or Greek? [closed]

I want to describe single processor and many processor systems, and it seems like "uniprocessor" and "multiprocessor" are the accepted terms. However the "pro" in process looks Greek to me, which ...
9
votes
3answers
1k views

Is “acediast” too rarefied to be acceptable in literature? [closed]

I'm editing a manuscript where the word "acediast" appears a perfect fit, but Merriam-Webster is the only online dictionary I can find that lists it as a word, with the exception of a few scrabble ...
20
votes
1answer
1k views

Why do some ---ify verbs have a different noun ending?

The following verbs follow a pattern as to their associated noun: rectify / rectification amplify / amplification exemplify / exemplification sanctify / sanctification clarify / clarification ...
1
vote
2answers
663 views

Plural form of i.e [closed]

What is the plural form of i.e. (that is)? Is it that the same i.e. is also used in its plural form? But I have not yet come across such usage. Thanks.
3
votes
3answers
269 views

Is the '- etum' suffix exclusive to tree plantations?

I was familiar with the word 'arboretum', a plantation of trees for ornamental or scientific purposes, but not with 'pinetum' which I heard for the first time yesterday. Then I discovered 'coniferetum'...
2
votes
3answers
977 views

A Latin word that is like the word “trinity” but for “five fold” or “five as one”

I read that the word "trinity", a Latin based word, literally translates as "three fold" or more specifically "three as one". That being the case, what Latin based word would I use to express, "five ...
0
votes
1answer
290 views

How to pronounce eu in a latin word?

How should I pronounce the latin name Sporosarcina pasteurii? According to Pronunciation of Biological Latin : "Latin biological names in English speech are usually pronounced with English letter ...
1
vote
1answer
796 views

How are plural forms like “status” pronounced?

The question What is the plural form of "status"? caused me to think about how plural forms like "status" are pronounced. There seems to be some variation, and I had a hard time finding out ...
2
votes
2answers
76 views

Analogous versus analogue: why the extra “o” after the “g”?

Why does the word analogous have an extra letter o after the g in comparison to the word analogue? How is their origin related to one another? According to The American Heritage Dictionary of the ...
5
votes
3answers
404 views

What comes after (Primary,unary),(secondary,binary),(tertiary,ternary),…?

I was curious to know what comes after: Primary, secondary, tertiary, ... This Oxford website says it is "quartenary, quinary, ..." But they are already taken! Unary, binary, ternary, ...
9
votes
2answers
662 views

The history of the English “postmeridian”

There's a question on English Language Learners that's been making the rounds recently, it's been on the Hot Network Questions list since January 5 this year and has attracted something like 36,000 ...
46
votes
1answer
4k views

What is the binary equivalent to “decimal” and “decimal point”?

I've been working with numbers in fractional form (e.g. 1/2) and written out (e.g. 0.5). However, the numbers are in binary and I do not know what to call the dot between the zero and five in the ...
1
vote
1answer
161 views

Can one use two names with `et al.`?

It is well known that "Green et al." can be used to refer to the authors of a paper. Assuming that the number of authors is greater than three, can one use "Green, Grey et al." to explicitly list two ...
0
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1answer
54 views

Pulchraphilia or Pulchriphilia?

'Pulchraphilia' or 'Pulchriphilia' or 'Pulchrophilia'? Does anybody know what the spelling of such a word would be? Should I take the cue from the spelling of pulchritude and use an i, or is an a ...
2
votes
0answers
915 views

On quadrants, quintants, sextants, octants, nonants, etc [closed]

I have searched the internet for how to form the following words, but have been unable to find an authoritative source. They are obviously formed with latinate prefixes, but if you look at the lists ...
1
vote
0answers
62 views

Why the writing and reading in English are different? [duplicate]

I do not encounter so big problems with the English language although I'm not a native English speaker. But I'm curious why some languages (like English or French) are written different from the way ...
-1
votes
1answer
234 views

Origin of “absurd”? [closed]

As far as I can tell, the word absurd means "ridiculous." However, "ab-" means "not" or "away from" in Latin, while "surd" means "irrational". Thus, "absurd" literally translates to "not irrational", ...
1
vote
1answer
111 views

Can Latin phrases be regarded as English adverbs?

A task is to reveal and mark all adverbs in a passage. The passage, which is written in English, contains a few Latin phrases, such as apriori, defacto, etc. Can this sort of Latin phrases, given ...
2
votes
2answers
134 views

Should a foreign phrase that modifies an English noun go before or after that noun in English?

I’m thinking of the placement of the Latin phrase, ad hominem as it is used in English, not as it is used in Latin. Should it precede or follow its noun? In other words, are both of these two ...
3
votes
1answer
74 views

Oh, the felinity? Felixity?

My sister sighed "Oh, the humanity!" But she was talking about her cat. What is the right word if it's a cat? Felinity? Felixity? Extra points for dogs... Caninity?
-1
votes
1answer
346 views

academic word for holding a ceremony

How to say it in academic way to hold a ceremony/wedding/workshop? I am looking for an academic (Latin-based) word for hold in this context. Arrange is a good word but it does not give the same ...
1
vote
2answers
573 views

Conventions of abbreviations of pages (pp.), for academic/journal purposes

I am asking about the conventions of abbreviations of pages, for academic/journal purposes. For example, if one submits a paper on arXiv, you will see that some renown physicist/mathematician uses the ...
4
votes
1answer
143 views

Can “et al.” be applied to one entity?

If a referenced paper has two authors X and Y, can et al. be applied in this case? For instance, is X et al. correctly used?
64
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5answers
7k views

Help, the “onus” is on me! What do you call whatever it is I'm supposed to do with it?

We all know the phrase: "The onus of proof is on you" or "The onus is on you to do some thing or the other." Ok, so the onus was put on me and I have done that thing or the other. Now, with respect ...
5
votes
1answer
463 views

how to differentiate -is from -es sound sing/plur?

Especially in the context of Latin and Latin-derived words, where the English pronunciation is often rather arbitrary, this might lead foreigners to confusion between the singular and plural forms. I ...
9
votes
2answers
859 views

Was the -s in Athens originally the plural -s?

In Greek and Latin, some cities, like Athens and Thebes, are pluralia tantum, that is, they are always plural. In English, on the other hand, both names are singular, at least in modern English. It ...
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2answers
128 views

What would be the word for “government by angels”?

Google just gives me the James Madison quote when I research this. The Federalist No. 51 says: It may be a reflection on human nature, that such devices should be necessary to control the abuses of ...
8
votes
1answer
142 views

Why is “irreparable” spelled without an “i”?

Pretty simple question, I think. Where does the "i" in "repair" go when spelling "reparable" or "irreparable" ? Is this just a "color"/"colour" type situation, or some deeper conspiracy?
0
votes
1answer
95 views

Why are some latin phrases often abbreviated in english?

Most of the common latin words are almost always used in an abbreviated form, even when the word is short, like id est -> i.e.. I can't picture anybody thinking that it would be ok to abbreviate "that ...
4
votes
1answer
230 views

How does the latin root of “egregious” relate to its English definition?

The latin root of the word egregious is grex meaning flock which is also the root of many other English words that deal with groups or "flocks" (usually of people): aggregate, congregate, segregate, ...
2
votes
1answer
180 views

Translation from Latin in epigraph [closed]

I would like to use a translated quote from Cicero as an epigraph for my thesis. However I am not sure in which language to write the name of the source: a) English: On the Nature of the Gods b) ...