Questions tagged [latin]

Questions about the use of Latin words and phrases in English. For questions purely about Latin, visit our sister site Latin Language Stack Exchange.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
1 vote
1 answer
64 views

Why is semibreve commonly pronounced as ˈsɛm iˌbriv?

I am seeing this on some dictionary sites: / ˈsɛm iˌbriv, -ˌbrɛv / But, I've only heard it (in Anglophone musical contexts) as ˈsɛm iˌbriv. I wasn't aware about a cafe breve until yesterday. This ...
user avatar
  • 133
0 votes
1 answer
48 views

Abbreviation for 'further information can be found'

I am looking for the formal abbreviation for something like "the further information can be found", e.g.: "lorem ipsum (the further information can be found in table 2.4)". My ...
user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
77 views

The word "miracle" suggests, through common usage, a positive thing. Has it always? Or, like "awe", did it used to simply mean "momentous"?

Oxford asserts the word comes to us from Latin's miraculum, or an ‘object of wonder’, which in turn derives from mirari (‘to wonder’), itself a conjugation of mirus (‘wonderful’). Since "wonder&...
user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
117 views

Ad hominem for non persons

An ad hominem argument is typically, according to Wikipedia, "a rhetorical strategy where the speaker attacks the character, motive, or some other attribute of the person making an argument ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
46 views

Pluralization of Latin origin words

I heard that words borrowed from Latin take irregular plural form. (examples: datum/data, fungus/fungi, alga/algae) But how can we tell that whether a word (such as 'bus', 'plum', or 'idea') has Latin ...
user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
83 views

Why 'd' in 'Aeneid'?

The Latin poem Aeneis is Aeneid in English. How did the last d come about? A few suspects by quick search: /ð/ → /d/ shift in English, but there must be a shift /s/ → /ð/. It seems romance languages ...
user avatar
  • 179
-2 votes
1 answer
124 views

Does "pig" (fat animal) come from the Latin "pinguedo" (fat)?

Does "pig" (fat animal) come from the Latin pinguedo (fat)?
user avatar
  • 284
1 vote
1 answer
99 views

'Miscellaneous': must be followed by a plural count noun

Garner's fourth reads Miscellaneous must be followed by a plural count noun; it does not work with an abstract mass noun. Exceptions are set phrases such as miscellaneous shower/income. and An ...
user avatar
  • 2,187
0 votes
0 answers
23 views

Which one is more correct? "a plaintiff pro se" or "a pro se plaintiff"?

"Pro se" is Latin for "for self", or "for himself". Therefore it makes more sense to me to use it in English as in "a plaintiff pro se". However I have seen ...
user avatar
  • 137
4 votes
3 answers
1k views

Do "elision" and "ratatouille" have unmarked plural forms?

According to Microsoft® Encarta® 2009, the word elision has an unmarked plural elision (no -s suffix) as an alternative to elisions. Can "elision" be used as a plural form? If so, is it due ...
user avatar
  • 2,187
1 vote
1 answer
72 views

Is it common to use 'terminus a quo' in academic writing?

I'm writing an academic paper and I want to replace the word 'starting point' with 'terminus a quo'. I'm not sure if this Latin word is commonly used. I'm trying to make my language more interesting ...
user avatar
  • 151
2 votes
1 answer
82 views

The pronunciation of sciurine (pertaining to squirrels)

I am intrigued by the pronunciation for the adjective for squirrel, "sciurine". In Wiktionary, the pronunciation in IPA is '/ˈsaɪjʊɹaɪn/' ('/ˈsʌɪjᵿrʌɪn/' in the OED online), which strikes me ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
74 views

Correct pronunciation of "parietal lobe" from neuroanatomy [closed]

When I studied neuroanatomy at university, my tutor (who later it turns out studied Latin in school), uses a different pronunciation than other neuroscientists. I prefer his pronunciation, but which ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
355 views

Sixth from last? pro pre ante pen ult

There is a latin sequence of terms that refer to order from last: ultimate, last penultimate, second from last antepenultimate, third from last preantepenultimate, forth from last ...
user avatar
  • 346
1 vote
1 answer
122 views

Are "i.e." and "e.g." initialisms?

I was told that abbreviations consist of initialisms (FBI, a.k.a.†), acronyms (NATO, ), and shortened words (ad, bike). † Thanks to Pete Kirkham for correcting me: for most people a.k.a. is an ...
user avatar
-4 votes
1 answer
223 views

How can I keep away from latinate? [closed]

Are there resources to help me keep away from latinate when I write? Preferably, they would let me trade latinate words for older, better words. A thesaurus might help (or better, a good dictionary ...
user avatar
  • 9
1 vote
1 answer
68 views

Revisiting "ee.g." (versus "e.g.")

How is "e.g." pluralized? Responses to the above article and other critiques of "ee.g." (insisting on "e.g.") roundly dismiss it as an aberration and even vilify it. Yet ...
user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
45 views

Neolog / prefix for use with bubble+ology [closed]

I want to coin a word that means the study of financial bubbles. After learning that Bubbleology is some kind of metropolitan tea beverage, my immediate hunch of "Bubbleology" lost a great ...
user avatar
6 votes
2 answers
457 views

Why does the word ‘suffix’ have a double ‘ff’ while ‘prefix’ has a single ‘f’?

While writing the word ‘suffix’, I stopped to do a spellcheck as a result of the ‘ff’. I did not do so with the word ‘prefix’ as I was comfortable with the ‘pre’ and ‘fix’. I looked up ‘ff’ vs. ‘f’ ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
46 views

Is there an equivalent phrase to "a priori" and "a posteriori" to indicate "during"? [closed]

If a priori means "ahead of time" and a posteriori means "after the fact", is there a latin phrase to denote "during the course of the fact"? A periori, perhaps? Or am I ...
user avatar
19 votes
5 answers
3k views

Early usage of Martian meaning inhabitant of Mars

Martian as an adjective meaning "of, pertaining to, or characteristic of the planet Mars" (originally in reference to astrological influence) is from the 14th century according to Etymonline;...
user avatar
  • 1,367
0 votes
0 answers
122 views

When should Latinisms be Italicized? [duplicate]

Some Latinisms are usually italicized in English whereas some Latin loanwords are not, even in the same text. However, I cannot find any clear pattern. Are there clear rules or guidelines about it? ...
user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
726 views

When did the word "demon" (for evil spirit) come into popular usage in the English language?

The English word "demon" has been found throughout the New Testament in modern bible translations since the 19th century. However, in the 16th and 17th century and earlier (Tyndale Bible, ...
user avatar
  • 143
4 votes
2 answers
967 views

Is there a term to describe a human who has been turned into an animal by some external force or actor?

I am compiling a database of deities, mythological creatures, fairy tale or folkloric beings, and other similar entities, complete with categorisation based on various factors. In doing so, I have ...
user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
74 views

Academic / formal equivalent of : there are two sides to every story

"Every coin has two sides" or "there are two sides to every story" is often over-used and may even come off as cliche-sounding. I will of course use them still if that's what I ...
user avatar
6 votes
2 answers
167 views

When was ad hoc introduced in English?

When was ad hoc introduced in English? I found this, but it is only a vague speculation. Originally, ad hoc is a Latin phrase, and it is speculated that the term was first used in English in the mid-...
user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
49 views

Synonyms for "impact ventilation" and "cross ventilation" of (West) Germanic roots (dead / alive / old / new)

A German "end of the year" 2020 overview of absurdities and rather funny trends mentions British "Corona talk" about the German words Stoßlüften = impact ventilation, Querlüften = ...
user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
41 views

How do Latin etymons that end in English in *-tion* nearly always name a process?

I don't think the emboldening is correct, because -ing gerunds name a process. See https://english.stackexchange.com/a/444498. -tion just names a result of that process. What do you think?         In ...
user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
43 views

When shortening the title of a book, should it be prefaced by a definite article?

I am writing a research paper which is concerned with Euler's book 'Introductio in analysin infinitorum'. May I refer to it as "the 'Introductio'"? And would it be wrong to simply refer to ...
user avatar
  • 123
8 votes
4 answers
729 views

Is using the plural form (in place of the original singular) of these Latin/Greek loan words acceptable?

The following Latin/Greek singular vs. plural errors make me cringe every time: bacterium - bacteria criterion - criteria millennium - millennia phenomenon - phenomena It's extremely typical for an ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
57 views

About i.e. and e.g [closed]

I have four small questions about i.e. and e.g. How do you call them, “words” or other things? When using (writing or typing), do we usually use the italic version i.e. / e.g. or the normal version i....
user avatar
  • 49
0 votes
2 answers
51 views

What's the "single" derivation of omni?

So we know "omni" is a prefix indicating encompassing of everything. We could say, omnidirectional for example, which is "receiving signals from or transmitting in all directions." ...
user avatar
  • 103
1 vote
1 answer
306 views

Pro bono as italics?

I am using the words pro bono in a letter addressed to my line manager using MS Word. My query is: does pro bono needs to be typed using italics format?
user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
57 views

What is the Latin term for forward from a page?

In English scholarly references there is an expression meaning from this page forward, but I can't remember what it is.
user avatar
  • 1,756
0 votes
1 answer
98 views

What is the accepted typography for latin phrases? [duplicate]

In an academic article, i'm using a lot of latin phrases both abbreviated (i.e., e.g., etc.) and spelt out (de facto, in situ...). I know that in certain languages, the most commonly accepted form is ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
31 views

My family's heritage is french Canadian [closed]

I know that French is a romance language and my family's culture is Latin, When my grandmother was alive and younger she was able to choose Latin American in the United States census, My question is ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
27 views

Taxonomy - how to describe something as plantlike?

So I'm writing a story that features Chimeras or hybrid creatures, and I'm wondering what I would call a plant based creature. For other things like a spider creature or bird creature I would call it ...
user avatar
  • 13
2 votes
0 answers
76 views

Latin/Greek morpheme meaning 'fundamental'?

Is there a Latin or Greek prefix or suffix out there that can be added to a word to make it mean the fundamental from which everything is derived? Here's an example. You've got linguistics, that is ...
user avatar
  • 2,107
36 votes
3 answers
6k views

Has the verb "to import me" ever been commonly used in English the way "to concern me" is in the phrase "It does not concern me"?

In various Euro­pean lan­guages, most es­pe­cially in the Ro­mance ones, their own re­spec­tive cog­nates for our Latin-de­rived word im­port can be used as a verb in much the way as the verb con­cern ...
user avatar
  • 2,967
1 vote
0 answers
83 views

Numeral prefixes of tidal constituents [closed]

If tidal constituents with frequencies of one, two, three, and four cycles per day (respectively, periods of one, a half, a third, and a fourth of a day) were to be termed systematically based on ...
user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
37 views

Use of 'e pluribus' as an adjective and meaning? [closed]

I came across a sentence that uses 'e pluribus' as an adjective. I can't give the exact sentence, but it's something like 'They have many e pluribus quizzes'. Is this commonplace, and what is its ...
user avatar
  • 111
1 vote
2 answers
241 views

Why is the word cervix "relating to the neck", not anywhere near the neck?

The human cervix is long, like a human neck, but it seems like an overgeneralization to apply the latin root cer to something so geographically far from the neck. Adam Aleksic has an interesting post ...
user avatar
  • 91
0 votes
1 answer
128 views

Latin phrase for "at the moment" or "immediate", temporal equivalent for in situ?

I know phrases like "in situ" which means in the current place/position, is there another phrase for the temporal equivalent which means "at the moment"?
user avatar
  • 147
0 votes
2 answers
773 views

Do sparse and Spartan have the same root?

So, I had a random realization that sparse and Spartan can mean fairly similar things. E.g a sparse apartment could equally be described as a Spartan apartment. I tried looking into this, but my ...
user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
337 views

Etymology of "to trade"?

Concerning "to trade", I saw on Etymonline: https://www.etymonline.com/word/trade late 14c., "path, track, course of action," introduced by the Hanse merchants, from Middle Dutch or Middle Low ...
user avatar
  • 463
7 votes
3 answers
3k views

Origin of the word "delete"

What is the history of the word "delete". It's from Latin "deletus", but I wonder how and why this word was borrowed in English. Usually, words directly borrowed in English are from religious, ...
user avatar
  • 463
6 votes
1 answer
290 views

Origin of old English word "offrian"

I know that Latin and old French are implicated, but where does the old English "offrian" come from? I mean: what is the word evolution from the root? Which root exactly: why this "ian" ending? ...
user avatar
  • 463
1 vote
1 answer
680 views

Should I use a hyphen with a latin phrase that modifies an adjective that modifies a noun?

I understand that Latin phrases are not normally hyphenated. I also understand that adjective-modifying adverbs normally do receive a hyphen (despite this parenthetically invoked exception). So, which ...
user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
485 views

Is there a latin phrase, used in English, to mean after something was created?

Is there a Latin phrase, used in English, to mean after something was created? Of course, there's the phrase creatio ex nihilo Meaning something was created from nothing. But what about 'after ...
user avatar
26 votes
2 answers
13k views

Why is "-ber" the suffix of the last four months of the year?

September October November December Presumably something Latin, but my (admittedly brief) search sees only mention of the number-based root words. More specifically, what does "-ber" mean?
user avatar
  • 613

1
2 3 4 5
9