Questions tagged [linguistics]

Questions relating to the scientific study of language.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0
votes
0answers
20 views

list and count the different sentences, utterances, and propositions in the extract (it's a conversation between A and B) [closed]

(a)John is getting married next month! (b)I am so happy for him! When did he announce it? (a)Yesterday. (b)Have you met his fiance? (a)I am meeting her on Sunday. I am so happy for him!
6
votes
1answer
69 views

The spelling “ui” and the pronunciation /uː/ in juice, fruit, bruise, cruise, sluice, suit, nuisance, recruit, bruit

The words juice, fruit, bruise, cruise, sluice, suit, pursuit, suitcase, lawsuit, nuisance, recruit, bruit are spelled with ui and pronounced with the IPA phoneme /uː/. Full pronunciations from OED: ...
-1
votes
2answers
40 views

Possible semantic shift for verb 'brief'?

I've always been partial to organic interpretation/operation in literature and language. Much of my personal choice of use in words and phrases comes down to an intuitive stylistic bearing that ...
2
votes
1answer
61 views

Meaning of suffix ''- ic'' in relation to ''materialist'' vs ''materialistic''

If there are any, what are the differences in meaning between the statements ''I am a materialist person'' and ''I am a materialistic person'' ? *Context: In a conversation on philosophical ...
-2
votes
1answer
44 views

“Mining” as opposed to “minting” w.r.t. Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies

I find it fascinating that nearly everyone refers to the algorithmic generation of cryptocurrencies (CC) as mining. Personally, I've never found minting in this context. In my understanding of the ...
0
votes
1answer
23 views

Eponymous adjective formation

I’m writing an essay on Homer’s Odyssey, and I was wondering whether the correct adjectival form would be Odysseian or Odyssean according to etymology, as I’ve seen both used in academic contexts. I ...
1
vote
0answers
24 views

Multiple Linguistics Questions [closed]

Do you mind asking what is the basis/principle of adding the prefix “en” and “in”, et cetera? I can render the difference of the meaning and definition clearly, for example without limitation, the ...
4
votes
2answers
63 views

Term for direct antonyms?

The word "antonyms" covers any pair of words where the meaning is opposite -- quiet and loud, cautious and foolhardy, simple and complex -- but each word in these pairs could have other partners ...
2
votes
1answer
23 views

Adjectives that describe vs. distinguish their referents

Sometimes an adjective describes its referent: “My wonderful brother” means I think my brother is wonderful. Sometimes an adjective distinguishes its referent from others like it: “My younger brother”...
3
votes
0answers
33 views

Is there a term yet for “visual onomatopoeia”? [duplicate]

Onomatopoeia is the formation of a word from a sound associated with what is named (e.g. cuckoo, sizzle). A new word (US teenagers are first on this) is uwu (said "oowoo"). The meaning is, to have ...
7
votes
2answers
168 views

Is there a linguistic term for using a common noun as a proper noun?

In some situations, a common noun in a specific scenario is treated as a proper noun because it refers to a specific entity that satisfies the common noun. Is there a special term for this ...
2
votes
0answers
91 views

The use of reflexive pronouns [closed]

I am currently doing homework for a linguistics course I am taking. The question is about creating a rule to make confirm if certain sentences are grammatical or ungrammatical. Here are some ...
2
votes
0answers
42 views

Does the change of “y” to “ies” in plural form of words have a phonological explanation?

I've been looking for phonological rules or explanation for the change that occurs in -ies ending plural form but all I found was : When we have a vowel before "y" we add "s", such as "boys". When we ...
0
votes
1answer
53 views

Meter and rhythm in Poetry [closed]

Why is poetry called a 'literature in metrical form' or 'a composition forming rhythmic lines'?
2
votes
1answer
100 views

“This looks like him” or “This looks like he”? [duplicate]

Another, easier case question: Obviously, of the two variants This looks like him and This looks like he the first seems more naturally idiomatic. However, is it grammatically correct? I ...
0
votes
1answer
46 views

Can passive reduced relative clauses precede a head noun?

I have zero background in linguistics, so forgive me if this is trivial. The Wikipedia article for relative clauses claims that, with regard to the positioning of the relative clause, "English, for ...
4
votes
4answers
976 views

What is it called when one person calls another something they metaphorically resemble?

What name or word would be given for the examples below, metaphor? A mother calls her child cat, or tiger The wife calls her husband "Hey Baby". You're my moon. A very muscular person might be called ...
7
votes
4answers
3k views

Do laypersons understand medical terms? [closed]

I'm from China and I would like to ask English native speakers whether a non-medical professional understands medical terms? Examples: rhinorrhea rhinitis laryngoscopy laryngitis laryngostenosis ...
2
votes
3answers
138 views

Usage of plesionyms (i.e. slightly differing synonyms)

Plesionyms are synonymous words which have slight differences in meaning. What are the examples of it? I found: Fog v Mist Fearless v Brave When and why are they are used? What are the aspects ...
2
votes
1answer
187 views

How many morphemes in words most/worst

My intuition tells me that they are both 2 morphemes, where /t/ represents the superlative form.
0
votes
1answer
44 views

Can two nouns appear together in a sentence without a punctuation or a conjunction?

I am a new NLP engineer and totally a beginner in English linguistics. I want to know if two nouns can appear together in a sentence without a punctuation or a conjunction between both of them? Also, ...
0
votes
1answer
95 views

What do you call the revival of an obsolete word for a new meaning?

Let's say carrot for a shade of orange. Suppose carrot is not used for the color and I wanted one to describe the vegetable's color. So, I revive the displaced more for the color. What do you call ...
5
votes
2answers
101 views

'The phrase “cute puppy,”is not considered a collocation.' Is this correct?

I am a data scientist who has a question about collocations based on a book I am reading. The book is "Feature Engineering for Machine Learning: Principles and Techniques for Data Scientists" by ...
0
votes
1answer
33 views

What is the lingustic term for a language's usage conventions?

Every language has usage conventions that cannot be deducted from a basic dictionary. For example, to describe highly concentrated tea, English speakers will usually use "strong tea". Is there a ...
1
vote
1answer
72 views

What is the opposite of a loanword? [closed]

The words in a language that weren't borrowed.
3
votes
5answers
539 views

How to write Spanish Vowel sounds into English?

Background I'm writing a novel with original character names, and I want to find the way of how to correctly write their names in English to keep the same pronunciation as they had had in Spanish. ...
1
vote
0answers
100 views

Words like “no-no” and “boo-boo”

I was just thinking about these words and was curious what they might be called. After a little scrounging around on Google, the best answer I could come up with was "reduplication." This doesn't seem ...
4
votes
1answer
612 views

Removal of a repeated syllable for ease of pronunciation

What do you call the removal of a repeated syllable in words for ease of pronunciation? I read about it once. I think it has to do with alliterative sounds. Not sure if it was deliberate or not.
1
vote
2answers
147 views

Term for this type of mis-pronunciation?

When I was a kid, for years I thought nihilism was pronounced "nil-ism". I guess this is because I only ever read it, rather than being exposed to hearing it. Since "nil-ism" perfectly ...
1
vote
1answer
47 views

What do you call it when an ethnic slur has lost its offensive sense? [duplicate]

Or when the supposed target of the slur claim it as an unoffensive word and treat like something of a term of endearment among themselves.
1
vote
0answers
118 views

Can 'you' be used equally to refer to either a singular or plural audience? [closed]

I need to know if this sentence is linguistically correct and if it can be used to refer to multiple people: "you can't stay away from me" The "you" in this sentence can be used to refer to more than ...
0
votes
1answer
434 views

Why do Oppress, Suppress and Depress have the same last syllable? [closed]

I usually get confused between those words, when I want to use them while speaking. They are very close to each other, yet they have completely different meaning (at least from my mother tongue ...
6
votes
3answers
369 views

Is changing nouns to verbs indicative of the evolution of English?

I have lately noticed a tendency, at least in the US, for sports commentators to change nouns into verbs. For example many American football broadcasters will now say a player "lost contain" of ...
1
vote
3answers
93 views

Is there a formal principle which states that THIS IS LOUDER than this?

I'm writing a school paper on linguistics and the English language and I'm curious about whether a theory exists outlining why larger words appear louder? That is, why words either of a greater font ...
1
vote
0answers
148 views

Can copula+adjective be transitive or intransitive?

The beginning of the article What is consciousness, and could machines have it? (full text PDF is a google search away) contains the following: The word “consciousness,” like many prescientific ...
3
votes
1answer
548 views

Any English terms for ‘to change the part of speech (of a word) without applying modification’? [duplicate]

Is there any appropriate English terminology for changing the part of speech (of a word) without applying any modification? This is a concept including verbing (where the verb verb means "to use a ...
0
votes
0answers
55 views

Is there any alternative term for ‘syntactic word’?

What do you call a group of adjacent letters having punctuation except for apostrophes on either side? For example, in this sentence, the groups are Let's, see, the, fireworks: Let's see the ...
2
votes
1answer
142 views

consonant assimilation in linguistics

In Old English, the word was "leofmann" and in ME, the word is "lemman (‘lover’)" What is the change that took place to change the word? a. simplification of word-initial consonant clusters ...
1
vote
1answer
88 views

What is this verb noun association called in linguistics? [duplicate]

Not all verbs work with all nouns. It is better to say "fix errors" than "solve errors", for example. In linguistics, is there a name for semantic compatibilities between nouns and verbs that go ...
2
votes
1answer
30 views

A term for how a word is defined

Merriam-Webster Online: Faith: (1a) belief and trust in and loyalty to God; (1b) belief in the traditional doctrines of a religion; (2) firm belief in something for which there is no proof. ...
0
votes
1answer
107 views

Open-ended concepts in Chinese usually be alluded by listing specific examples. Would native English speakers find it hard to grasp the connotation?

In Chinese and Vietnamese sometimes a word is made up by listing its examples. For example, "table-chair" means furniture, "month-year" means time, "land-water" means country, "spring-summer-fall-...
3
votes
2answers
956 views

Why is it “to have sex” instead of “to sex?”

In English, there is no generally acceptable verb for someone to say the equivalent of "to sex." All our equivalents are either too vulgar ("to fuck", "to bang", "to smash") or too formal ("to ...
0
votes
1answer
44 views

What do you call the way a culture is forming their language? [closed]

suppose a culture is still starting to be develop and they are forming their "language" for communication? what do you call this process? Regards,
2
votes
1answer
1k views

How many morphemes in 'during'? [closed]

Is 'during' one morpheme or is it something like DURATION+ continuity?
4
votes
1answer
111 views

Why is “DMV” different from a language point of view in Linguistics?

What is the speaker referring to when, talking about two phrasal verbs, they say They may be equivalent as far as the DMV is concerned, but they're not equivalent from the point of view of language....
2
votes
1answer
717 views

How would you analyse the following sentence on the level of syntax?

For our linguistics course we are supposed to analyse the following sentence by breaking it down into its constituent parts. We need to analyse it in terms of Function (FU) and Form (Fo), that is, ...
1
vote
1answer
212 views

Is “Often” an Elision

I was studying for my exam and I came across something called elision. So my question is... Can "often" be considered an elision? Because of the silent t? Or am I just not getting the concept of ...
0
votes
0answers
49 views

Analysis of the Phrase "if you have questions, then I'll be available after class [duplicate]

I am looking for an analysis or explanation of the phrase "if you have questions, then I'll be available after class." Although this is structured like a conditional, it's not actually a semantically ...
1
vote
1answer
60 views

Antonym for 'structure-dependent'

Not sure if this would be more suited to the linguistics site, but wondering what the antonym would be. Example sentence would be: We find that grammars are consistently structure-dependent and ...
-3
votes
2answers
175 views

Is there a term for the “ever longer, implicitly hyphenated-like groupings” in contemporary English?

There was just a question here about a phrase which had adjective and then a long complex phrase as the noun This is a real feature of "contemporary" English usage - I guess the best way to ...