Questions tagged [punctuation]

This tag is for questions about punctuation. This encompasses marks such as the period/full stop, comma, dash, and parentheses, used to separate structural units and perform other roles that clarify the meaning. USE THE 'SYMBOLS' tag for currency symbols, accents and so forth.

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1answer
42 views

Correct use of weeks'

Consider the following statement: I have four assessments due in a weeks' time. Here, the four assessments are due in one week. I am unsure if the apostrophe is placed correctly, i.e. is weeks' ...
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0answers
37 views

How should I punctuate this sentence?

The sentence is as follows: I did not know much about the Marines, but the words “The Few. The Proud. The Marines.” peaked my interest. Do I need comma after "words?" Can I leave the period after "...
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24 views

Emoji & punctuation

I'm wondering how to punctuate around emojis. Specifically at the end of sentence. I see three possibilities: 1. Emoji before the punctuation mark I like emojis 😊. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet. ...
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0answers
22 views

Full stops with initials

I am not sure that there should be a full stop after the last letter when using the initials of one's full name. For example: John Peter Smith -> J.P.S. Or should it be J.P.S only?
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1answer
14 views

Semicolon usage for question-statement combos

I have read the various postings here about how and how not to use semicolons, but I've not seen and answer anything about how to deal with end of the sentence punctuation with sentence-statement ...
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0answers
36 views

punctuation: the 20 to 30 year old age group

I'd like to know how "the 20 to 30 year old age group" is punctuated in standard English. "30-year-old" should be hyphenated. What about "20 to 30"? Any principles at work? I'd appreciate your help.
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0answers
23 views

How should the following be punctuated and capitalized?

I'm wondering how to punctuate and capitalize the following: “My stallion—” I was gasping for breath. “He’s gone!” Should it instead be as below? “My stallion—” I was gasping for breath, “—he’s ...
2
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1answer
54 views

If for any reason (,) - comma?

Dear English native speakers! Could you please tell me, if a comma is needed in this sentence: If for any reason (,) you are not 100 satisfied with the quality of our services, we will refund 100% of ...
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0answers
10 views

Correct usage of comma to join two sentences

I'm looking for the correct way to write the following description of a show that was advertised on Netflix. It has caused a heated debate about what is correct, but we all agree that the current ...
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1answer
30 views

Comma required or not

I was writing the below sentence and I'm puzzled which one would be the correct sentence. In my humble opinion, 2nd sentence looks wrong as comma is not required. Second part of the sentence "I ...
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1answer
55 views

Why the comma is used in the sentence by Jane Austen [duplicate]

I cannot understand the usage of comma after "chapel" in this sentence: Its long, damp passages, its narrow cells and ruined chapel, were to be within her daily reach, and she could not entirely ...
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0answers
36 views

How should I phrase this?

I am writing a cover letter for a resume that will be sent to a hopeful job of four years at my university. I am short on cash and would be beyond ecstatic to receive this job but this sentence or ...
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1answer
32 views

Which one is correct? With a comma or without a comma

I was writing a sentence, and I later realized that this sentence might need punctuation. Which one would be the correct sentence: with a comma or without a comma Below are the topics we will be ...
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42 views

What is the meaning of the following sentence? Is the grammar correct? What might be the tone of the speaker?

I was reading something and just struck upon this sentence: "Should they be taught a lesson in their own ways immediately!" I am unable to figure out what exactly the speaker intends to convey. Is it ...
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1answer
43 views

Punctuation marks [closed]

I have the following sentence: Please first look at our wiki space or contact your local siteops before opening a ticket, if you would like us to look into an issue, or have a change request, ...
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1answer
24 views

How to properly punctuate dialogue? [closed]

Consider the following statement; He commented that,"I have such a miserable cold, your sarcastic remarks are hardly making any effect on me." How to know the usage of 'that' here? Is 'that' ...
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0answers
26 views

How to punctuate a dialogue? [closed]

How to punctuate the following dialogue in a first person past tense story. "It's nice," he gave a formal sounding compliment. Should there be a comma after nice or should there be a full stop, ...
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1answer
27 views

Using a comma in this sentence? [duplicate]

I learned that the comma is used before a coordinating conjunction that links two independent clauses but in this sentence, one clause is an incomplete sentence, lacking its (obvious) subject. Is this ...
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1answer
28 views

When should a how title end in a question mark? [duplicate]

I've read up on several questions before finally deciding to post. This should be something trivial but I would like to know when it is most appropriate or if it is standard practice to end a how ...
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0answers
10 views

Adjective Phrases in Lists

Recently I came across the following sentence: He is a very good, loyal and playful and slightly smelly dog. How is the ruling concerning the order and separation of the adjectives and their ...
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0answers
27 views

“Which I don't know is possible”?

I want to say: In order to get there we would have to build a bridge over that river. But I don't know if that's possible. But I want to phrase it differently: In order to get there we would ...
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0answers
25 views

How should I correctly write the term 'get well soon card'?

My instincts tell me that the examples below may be correct; however, I could not find in corroborating sources online. She received many 'Get Well Soon' cards. He opened the mail to find yet ...
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2answers
27 views

Should there be a comma after “loose” in this sentence? [closed]

I read a sentence which was: He reiterated his plea for a loose (united), confederation with considerable autonomy for the confederating units. I don't think there should be a comma in between an ...
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1answer
25 views

How should I punctuate/capitalize the following question? [closed]

Is the following question punctuated/capitalized correctly? “What’s that, a dishrag?” Or should it be two questions? “What’s that? A dishrag?” Or would a third option be best? Thanks!
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1answer
23 views

Using the Ellipsis at the End of a Page [closed]

I am writing an Introductory page for my book. Being that it is the last sentence on the page, would it be OK to say, "Let's get on with the story... " or would I write "Let's get on with the story."? ...
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2answers
45 views

Is the use of comma in this sentence correct?

I think one of the uses of the comma is to separate independent clauses, but in this sentence, a comma is put in between the preposition phrase "from..to". The punishment ranges from reducing an ...
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1answer
39 views

What do you do with a comma that would come after a dash?

One common use of em dashes is to offset parenthetical phrases. But if a comma outside the parenthetical phrase immediately follows the parenthetical, what do you do with the comma? I realize that ...
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1answer
20 views

What is meaning of “Wrestling words into submission”? [closed]

I came across a sentence which goes "I knew I wasn't meant to spend my life locked away in a silent room alone and half-crazed, wrestling words into submission." Can some please tell me what it means?...
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0answers
26 views

Is it ok to have a semicolon after a colon or em dash? (or other variations)

I've looked all over but have not found this example. Can one use a semicolon after a colon or em-dash (or similar doubling up combinations). Is it a matter of style or is there a fast rule? e.g.: ...
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0answers
21 views

Is my use of ‘however’ as a conjunctive adverb correct here or is it an aside?

As subject says example below: I'd like to think my english skills are good enough for this; however, since I've never sent many business type emails, I'd like to be sure of my skills.
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1answer
40 views

Use of quotation marks after 'it's called X' and similar?

I've been looking at the Oxford Dictionary's page on inverted commas, and see that they use this example: He called this phenomenon "the memory of water." This seems like it would work with or ...
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0answers
29 views

Comma use in geographical locations

I'm just wondering do I need to apply a comma to this sentence? not sure if it's the same with similar sentences with a city, also not sure what sentence type this is I think it's a complex sentence. ...
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2answers
41 views

Should 'known as' be followed by quotation marks?

e..g This is how he became known as 'the ape king'. or 'from then on, he became known as 'the smartest man in Britain'. Or should this be without quotation marks?
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1answer
37 views

Commas, em dashes, or nothing at all?

To separate them from others of similar age and qualifications solely because of their race generates a feeling of… Should this phrase have a comma (or an em dash) before 'solely' and after 'race' or ...
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3answers
33 views

Should I use a comma before “who” in this sentence, or can it be written without that comma?

Which of the following is correctly written as far as its comma (or lack of comma) is concerned? People who love their jobs can easily excel in their fields of work than those, who put salary on the ...
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0answers
27 views

et al. with an apostrophe [duplicate]

There are other et al. questions so I'll cut to the chase. Is it correct to have et al. with an apostrophe to indicate ownership? Bloggs et al.'s paper was good. I am going to interpret Bloggs et ...
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0answers
47 views

Punctuation for 'and therefore', 'and as a result' etc when they don't introduce an independent clause

I have seen similar questions regarding 'and therefore' when it introduces an independent clause, and the favourite seems to be '..., and, therefore, ...' to punctuate without making 'therefore' the ...
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0answers
27 views

Comma use because of subject change

I was looking at the usage of the idiom "Next thing I knew" and found that comma was/wasn't used after this idiom in idiom dictionaries. If someone could throw the light on why it so? 1st use: I ...
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1answer
36 views

Why a punctuation is used in this sentence? [duplicate]

I'm puzzled on why a comma is used in this sentence. "He showed admirable restraint, and refused to be provoked." Independent and Dependent clause logic doesn't work here. I saw this on Cambridge ...
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0answers
14 views

Is this a dialogue tag?

Lately, I've been pondering about this question. First of all, we already know that dialogue tags consist of a noun or a pronoun followed by a verb like "said," and "ask." "Like this one," I ...
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0answers
14 views

Capitalization with Question Marks

Do you need to capitalize the first word in this situation? Do you want to eat with me? with Hannah? with Bailey? or Do you want to eat with me? With Hannah? With Bailey? If that is so, why is it ...
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0answers
23 views

Can this be considered a dialogue tag?

Lately, I've been pondering about this question. First of all, we already know that dialogue tags consist of a noun or a pronoun followed by a verb like "said," and "ask." "Like this one," I ...
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0answers
19 views

bracket usage dilemma

If I include a reference at the end of a sentence where it is already included in a bracketed phrase, do you put one or two brackets to close? E.g. Goldilocks and her friend found that bears were ...
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1answer
24 views

Possessive noun and sarcasm quotes

I use sarcasm quotes like so: Let's ask the "expert". But with a possessive noun, is the following the correct way, or isn't there one? Let's ask for the "expert's" advice.
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1answer
50 views

I'm confused on the notation. Is the following justified or inconsistent?

I'm writing a bibliography with the following two entries (written so far as shown): I. Early modern authors and editors of late antique texts: a. 16th-18th century editions of late antique ...
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0answers
27 views

British quotation rules [duplicate]

If the full stop doesn't belong to the quotation, which punctuation option is preferred in British English? He said, 'I've finished.' He said, 'I've finished'.
3
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1answer
180 views

Why do some early modern English writers use an apostrophe in art (ar't)?

For example, in Verses upon the duke of Buckinghams returne from the Ile of Rees (https://www.english.cam.ac.uk/ceres/ehoc/lessons/lesson1/index.html) the poet spells "art" as "ar't" in the phrase "...
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2answers
29 views

Quotations and punctuation [duplicate]

The common usage I have been exposed to is that punctuation should only be in a quotation if it’s contained in the original source. So what if your quotation ends in a period and your quotation is ...
2
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1answer
23 views

Punctuation in lists that end mid-sentence

I know that we can introduce a list with a semicolon or an em dash, but nowhere can I find any rules on punctuation when a list ends mid-sentence. Say I have a sentence that goes like this: Lawn ...
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1answer
36 views

the 200 mile-journey or the 200-mile journey

The original sentence: Because the Moon has only an eightieth of the Earth's mass, it requires 97 per cent less energy to travel the quarter of a million miles from the Moon to Earth-orbit than ...