Questions tagged [pronouns]

A pronoun is a word that can function by itself as a noun phrase.

-4
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0answers
18 views

Changed the following sentence in to a pronoun [closed]

Abu has something in his eye I'm going to school There is a box on the table I have found a house The cat have eating the fish
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1answer
30 views

Give/insert a pronoun [closed]

I have come across a question in a book. Please explain the solution. The statement is as follows: The city_________ is very large. (Give a pronoun).
2
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1answer
43 views

Any reason Japan's Diet is not used without a definite article (vs Congress, Parliament, etc)?

Obviously, there are instances, but compare for example "member of Congress" vs. "member of Diet" The latter, according to Google Ngrams, is basically not used. Likewise, "session of Diet" is not ...
0
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1answer
20 views

Is it necessary to use “in” twice here?

In the sentence In this lecture and in the ones to come... is the second "in" necessary? Or is the sentence In this lecture and the ones to come... correct?
2
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0answers
37 views

Is “one” a pronoun in these usages?

In the question "Can you use “including” after an uncountable word?" on the SE.ELL site, forms such as He listened to all of the music, including the bad ones. are discussed. My answer there ...
1
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1answer
81 views

What is the possesive form of “ye”?

"Ye" is an archaic pronoun that is a plural form of "you". The possessive form of "you" is "your". The possessive form of "thou" is "thy" (or "thine" before an adjective). What is the possessive ...
0
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1answer
94 views

Five students visit three farmers in their village. their? [closed]

Five students visit three farmers in their village. Here, What do "their" refer to - students? or farmers?? and Why? and Why not?
1
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1answer
42 views

What part-of-speech is “all” in these sentences?

These different dictionarys don't agree about what part-of-speech "all" is when it goes between subject and verb: For Cambridge dictionary is an adverb The kids all go to school on the same bus. ...
0
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1answer
50 views

Why doesn't possessive “his” have distinct forms like “her” vs. “hers”? [closed]

I'm trying to understand why there is a difference between the possessive determiner and pronoun for the female gender (her vs hers) but not for the male gender (his is used for both). "This will be ...
3
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1answer
47 views

What's the pronoun for two uncountable nouns?

Which is correct? I bought some beef and pork. All of it looks fresh. I bought some beef and pork. All of them look fresh. Since both "beef" and "pork" are uncountable nouns, I think the we should ...
0
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0answers
32 views

Does “them” in the sentence mean “the customs”

The original text: [...] The life history of the individual is first and foremost an accommodation to the patterns and standards traditionally handed down in his community. From the moment of ...
0
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2answers
65 views

What does “both” mean in the paragraph?

The original text: Waves are the children of the struggle between ocean and atmosphere, the ongoing signatures of infinity. Rays from the sun excite and energize the atmosphere of the earth, ...
7
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2answers
157 views

“Younger Me” as subject of sentence?

The sentence, "A younger me sat outside," though colloquially acceptable appears to be contrary to the rules of English pronomial declension. However, the allegedly more correct sentence "A younger I ...
1
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1answer
53 views

“Which” or “what” or … when referring to a main clause?

There are many answered questions that address the usage of "which" and "what" on this site—many of them marked as duplicates—and there is even a specific tag for this topic. But I could ...
1
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0answers
27 views

Correct use of the pronoun reference

Is this the correct use of the pronoun reference "this". Were you able to tell what the pronoun this is referring to? Based on the feedback received, my strengths were having strong arguments as well ...
4
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1answer
53 views

Pronoun problems!

This question came up in an English second language test paper. A:Why didn't you tell me Brian broke the window? B:_____________________________________ The intended answer was - B: He begged me ...
1
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1answer
76 views

This is my wife and me [duplicate]

This sentence sounds uncomfortable but I believe it to be correct. For background I posted a simple picture with the caption "This is my wife and me" and the grammar nazi's pounced. I am having ...
1
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3answers
127 views

Does this sentence “it doesn't meet the blind's need who want to read.” make sense? [closed]

Does the following sentence make sense grammatically or practically? Can I use it as it is without any correlation? "it doesn't meet the blind's need who want to read."
0
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1answer
672 views

What time or which time?

Strictly speaking, when referring to one or more of a definite set of values, the word 'which' should be employed. When referring to one or more of an unknown or infinate set of values, the word 'what'...
-2
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1answer
34 views

“We” vs. “Us” at the beginning of an objective clause

Do I write, "For we who are getting old..." or "For us who are getting old..." I know that "us" is the objective pronoun, but which do I use when the pronoun begins a clause that is the object of a ...
0
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1answer
29 views

Is “one” in the “one of the” construction a pronoun or a determiner?

In sentences like One of the criteria is experience. It was one of the several objects that were sold at the auction. is one a pronoun or determiner? Oxford Learner’s Dictionaries cites similar ...
0
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1answer
45 views

“Our generation” - it, they or we?

My sentence is: "Our generation work (because "generation" is a collective noun and here I use it in the plural) mainly on computers, we/they/it do(es) not need...". Which pronoun should I use?
1
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2answers
65 views

Is there any such thing as noun pronoun proximity?

I have read of Concord (or noun-verb agreement) and was wondering if, is as I have been told, there is a similar grammar rule for noun-pronoun agreement/proximity. When there's a sentence where two ...
0
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2answers
50 views

Is a subject pronoun needed in the second clause?

The campaign is not only financially beneficial to that organisation but it also has a positive impact on the morale of the employees. or The campaign is not only financially beneficial to that ...
1
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0answers
27 views

What are the rules for what “they” refers to when there are two plural nouns in a sentence?

Some examples: The Wilsons are angry at the Smiths for the way they parked their car. The Wilsons haven't hated this Smiths this much since they moved. The South hasn't hated the North this much ...
1
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3answers
39 views

Misunderstanding the use of me/him/her/them/us

I'm aware that when the pronoun is also the object of a sentence we use these: me instead of I, them instead of they and so on. But when I say: He is a teacher, and her? Why do I say her instead ...
4
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5answers
182 views

Is it correct to use “their” when referring to a single person when the gender is known? [duplicate]

I have come accross this sentence: There is a 2.5% probability that whenever we measure a woman, their height will be less than 142 centimeters. Is the use of their correct here? Shouldn't it be ...
3
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3answers
82 views

“me's” when referring to another version of you?

Let's say I want to refer to a toy that I had when I was younger. Would it be incorrect to say "young me's toy"?
1
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0answers
29 views

“one” as a pronoun for uncountable nouns

Is it grammatically right to use one as a pronoun to substitute for the word water? I prefer plain water to sparkling one.
12
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6answers
3k views

“One can do his homework in the library”

One can do his homework in the library. One can do one's homework in the library. Nowadays, are these structures part of colloquial English? The use of one as a pronoun is still in use or is it ...
0
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1answer
38 views

They stayed that way: he/him/his playing his guitar, she/her singing her songs

I've found other threads (see example links below), but I still can't sort this one out on my own. Are these -ings gerunds or participles? And therefore should they be preceded by accusative, ...
2
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0answers
47 views

Another “and I” vs “and me” question [duplicate]

I see this a lot on Facebook. Two people doing a thing, and the picture captioned with: "John and I waiting on the bus" "Mary and I at the Beyonce show" "Sally and I with our awesome guide Sven" I ...
0
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0answers
29 views

him/his - what is the right one and why? [duplicate]

I'm not sure what is the right answer: I'm looking forward to him/his visiting me next week. Many thanks.
0
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2answers
67 views

It's + plural noun

Please consider the following sentences: 1. I want you to know that IT'S the decisions you should make. 2. I want you to know that THEY ARE the decisions you should make. which one is the more ...
2
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0answers
88 views

The use of reflexive pronouns [closed]

I am currently doing homework for a linguistics course I am taking. The question is about creating a rule to make confirm if certain sentences are grammatical or ungrammatical. Here are some ...
1
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1answer
63 views

Using 'I' with 'who' in a sentence. Is this grammatically correct?

I am not sure whether the following sentence is grammatically correct. Could someone please guide me on this? Is there a better alternative? I am the new CEO of this company who has taken over from ...
0
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1answer
63 views

The all too frequent conundrum involving “who” and “whom” [duplicate]

Sir Reginald Wingate, a British general, is said to have described the Bedouin as “an untrained rabble, most of whom have never fired a rifle.” Should it not have been "who" instead of "whom" in that ...
0
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1answer
27 views

Following (a) training: verb and pronoun

I am not a native English speaker but I work in an organisation with English as corporate language. I have set up an automatic reply because I was following a 3-day course, and I have received a ...
1
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0answers
31 views

Everybody's / anybody's [closed]

"There is enough for everybody's need, but not for anybody's greed." Is this sentence correct? Everybody's. Anybody's
0
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1answer
34 views

Them or their after despite? [duplicate]

What's the correct usage: embattled customers whose flats are in limbo despite them or their having made the payment? What's the logic?
0
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0answers
17 views

Grammar issue regarding them [duplicate]

I have a confusion regarding this sentence, " I think it's great that we are a team because if one feels low and demotivated the other can pick THEM up" Is the usage of them correct?
0
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2answers
86 views

Can “individual” be referred to as “it”? [duplicate]

Can "individual" be referred to as "it"? Or only he/she/they?
14
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5answers
2k views

“I showed the monkey himself in the mirror”. Why is this sentence grammatical?

I am asking this question for a homework assignment where we have to explain why certain uses of reflexive pronouns i.e. himself, herself, are grammatical or ungrammatical. For one of the questions, ...
1
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2answers
100 views

Beat bad vs beat badly [duplicate]

Is it correct to say that the use badly is only used when there is a negative conjugation? For example. When you beat someone at a game. Would you say you beat a person bad or badly? Because isn't ...
1
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1answer
34 views

How do you combine these sentences using proper relative pronouns?

I have this sentence: "She asked six of her employees to come to the meeting. Four of them turned up." I tried combining the sentences this way: "Six of her employees were asked to come to the ...
0
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1answer
23 views

Correct construction for “easily protected against”

What I am trying to express is that I have a problem P and a good G and it is easy to protect G from P. However, G is not the focus of the sentence and P was described in the previous sentence. So I ...
0
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1answer
30 views

Ambiguity with two possessive pronouns in a sentence

Is it clear who the first and second "their" refer to in the following sentence, or is the sentence likely to confuse the reader -- "It has been decided between the parties that party number 1 will ...
4
votes
1answer
420 views

He/Him/His VS She/Her/Her

How did her become the female equivalent of both him and his instead of only being a possessive pronoun like his? Is there a reason? For example: She likes him and his dog. He likes her and her dog.
2
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2answers
107 views

Which pronoun should be used after the word ‘like’? [closed]

For example, which of the following is considered correct?: Don't be like him Don't be like he is There are other examples I can't think of right now where people use him instead of ...
0
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2answers
34 views

Use of “the same”

Thank you for sparing your time to watch this one. I'm having a problem with this sentence - "I see the same through your glasses as I do through mine" here "the same" seems to have been used as an ...