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Questions tagged [pronouns]

A pronoun is a word that stands in for a noun or noun phrase.

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Use of generic "one" without having to revel the gender

I want to say the following: The more one knows about a subject, the more one realizes how little he knows about it. I want to make it formal and general, thus my use of "one" instead of &...
Elerium115's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
66 views

To which object in a previous sentence does "those" refer?

For example, in the sentence: The cats rarely have fleas. Those that are there are orange. Those is intended to refer to the fleas, but is that incorrect? Can those only refer to the cats?
Mary's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
82 views

Necessity of pronoun "that" or "those" when comparing two things

We usually use "that" or "those" when we repeat the noun(s) used before especially in comparative sentences. But what about in this sentence? The intellectually inferior mice ...
daenggiee's user avatar
-2 votes
0 answers
39 views

Should I use who or whom in this blank? [duplicate]

"I don't know _____ gave me this letter." The word in the blank is acting as both the object of "know" and the subject of "gave," is it not? I don't know which pronoun to ...
Corey's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
62 views

What is the origin of the "one" pronoun

There are many pages of questions on the "one" pronoun, so I apologise if this has been asked before. I would like to know the origin of the "one" pronoun. Ideally as much info as ...
Rabbi Kaii's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
46 views

What pronoun should I use, "by we who" or "by us who"? [duplicate]

He will be yelled at by we who hate him. He will be yelled at by us who hate him. After by you use us, but in this case I'm confused. Which one of these sentences is correct?
James's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
53 views

Is omitting the definite article in this case grammatically correct (and preferable)?

I had written the following sentence in a manuscript: After each transaction, the balance of the sender account equals their balance immediately before the transaction minus the amount of funds ...
bp99's user avatar
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2 votes
0 answers
99 views

When it comes to names and pronouns, what takes precedence: past, present, or future?

This answer on Chess Stack Exchange said it’s grammatically incorrect to call someone by their current pronoun in a sentence talking about a hypothetical future scenario when their pronoun would be ...
clickbait's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
116 views

How does the word "it" function in: "What is it that makes us uneasy ... ?"

What is it that makes us uneasy about accepting credit for something wonderful we have done? In this sentence, how does the word "it" function? Is it a pronoun or a dummy subject? Or is it ...
jamesyikim's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
108 views

What is the difference between "Us girls gotta stick together" and "We girls gotta stick together"?

I am looking into the difference between the "we" and "us" pronouns, and have found some very useful information here. In the context of emphasizing a particular group, you can put ...
Micheal Gignac's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
24 views

to be fair to myself or to be fair to me? [duplicate]

To be fair to myself, he could, at times, become a bona fide drone. To be fair to me, he could, at times, become a bona fide drone. Is an 'I' not required before using the reflexive pronoun 'myself'? ...
omega's user avatar
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3 answers
175 views

Why is it correct to use "me" instead of "I" in this sentence? [duplicate]

I have been blessed beyond measure in having friends far wiser and more learned than me. My gut reaction to this sentence was that "I am" should've been used in place of "me." ...
lalafresh's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
59 views

Direct vs indirect object pronoun forms

I understand that it would be trivial to ask whether or not English has object pronouns classifiable as either direct or indirect - this is a matter of grammatical structure. My question is whether ...
shea's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
0 answers
29 views

Which pronoun for a photo caption? [duplicate]

Which is the correct pronoun, if you have a title for a photo that is, for example “John and me, outside our house”. To my mind that is the correct way to write it but others think it should be “John ...
Nikeyboo's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
96 views

Is the double pronoun "it mine" correct in "You did it your way, now let me do it mine"?

I am a non-native English speaker, so I would just like to increase my knowledge of the language. I heard this phrase in a TV show: You did it your way, now let me do it mine. The let me do it mine ...
cc8's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
122 views

"I was approached by what looked like a group of priests"

Is there a name for the construction in bold in the following sentences? I was approached by what looked like a group of priests. This is the beginning of what might be a new era of science! I'm ...
chocojunkie's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
273 views

Why is "each" ungrammatical in "It’s an insult to us each"?

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Pages 427-28) has this: Universal personal pronouns of the type us all [6] i a. They’ve invited us all. b. It’s an insult to us both. ii a. She likes ...
JK2's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
83 views

The use of "one" as a pronoun

When using "one" as a pronoun, should subsequent pronouns also be "one" or variations thereof? If not, which pronoun should be used? Example: When describing oneself in a resume, ...
Kamojama's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
62 views

you vs yourself?

Please help me with grammaticality or acceptability of the two sentences: A) No one is better at persuading yourself than you. B) No one is better at persuading you than yourself. Which is correct?
Kim B. S.'s user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
41 views

What seems more accurate "You and your kid discover their true capability" or "You and your kid discover his/her true capability"? [duplicate]

I have been asked to look at some old admission response forms that our school mails back to applying students. This letter consists of their test scores and the programs that is offered to them. Now, ...
Ashutosh's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
40 views

Does this sentence need "me" or "I"? [duplicate]

Here is the sentence. Which one is correct? Dec. 21st from 9:30-10:30 can work for both I-SHEA and I. Dec. 21st from 9:30-10:30 can work for both I-SHEA and me. I think it should be I-SHEA and me ...
Martha's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
108 views

Why is "it" used instead of "he/she" for human being in "it becomes a wise and virtuous man…"?

Now this relaxation of the mind from work consists on playful words or deeds. Therefore it becomes a wise and virtuous man to have recourse to such things at times. —Thomas Aquinas Is the bold phrase ...
APK's user avatar
  • 19
0 votes
1 answer
146 views

The "editorial we" - pronouns and number agreement

I am wondering if the esteemed members of this forum can help me with these questions, which have bothered me for a long time and are what have brought me to this forum. One thing I struggle to ...
Elisheva7's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
190 views

Where better to whet one's grammar?

I wonder if all interrogative pronouns can be used in structures like Where better to learn about the resilience of life? For example, Who better to repair my car? How better to cook potatoes than ...
Quirkier's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
19 views

Object / accusative personal pronouns replacing actor in certain clauses [duplicate]

I'm a native English speaker, and I noticed that I sometimes use accusative pronouns (him, her, me) to replace actors in certain clauses. I have a feeling this is prescriptively considered incorrect ...
El Hays's user avatar
  • 11
0 votes
0 answers
44 views

Subjective and objective case? [duplicate]

Is it correct to say I am faster than him at swimming Or I am faster than he at swimming I've heard that the first sentence is wrong because you can't compare the subjective case with the ...
Abhishek's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
340 views

Is it normal to say "Allow myself to introduce myself"?

When Austin Powers says this phrase? Is it considered to be somewhat of an exception to normal use, like with, Myself is often used where I or me might be expected, Or was it more abnormal than that,...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
42 views

Who is your favorite singer? It is [duplicate]

A Japanese friend of mine recently asked me a question that I could not quite explain. A. Who is your favorite singer? B. It is Ed Sheeran. A. Who is the president of the United States? B. ...
Matt's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
22 views

Is it correct to say "None can stop me" without mentioning a specific group of people? [closed]

Is it correct to say "None can stop me?" I feel like "No one can stop me" is the one I've seen used most often, but I'm not sure if "none" works too? Does there have to ...
thewritergirl's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
34 views

Can the pronoun 'its' referring to a clause as a whole be placed at the beginning of the next sentence? [closed]

(1)Bill doesn't want to go and that's the problem. (2)Bill doesn't want to go and it's the problem. I understand (1) is good, but (2) is not natural, because it referring to the entire clause cannot ...
Aki's user avatar
  • 1,185
21 votes
2 answers
2k views

Can you write "... me's" (the possessive)?

Could you use me's as in something like this? The person behind me's phone keeps ringing. The person behind me's breathing sounds laboured. I've tried looking at other questions but I couldn't find ...
Jasmine's user avatar
  • 211
2 votes
1 answer
85 views

Why does emphasis of "it" allow phrasal verb syntax that would otherwise not be grammatical?

Edit: the answer cited with the closure doesn't answer the question I posed; it merely reinforces the usual placement of the pronoun. Consider the phrase dash it off. I dashed it off without thinking ...
TimR's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
32 views

Case assignment to conjoined nouns/pronouns [duplicate]

I suspect that this subject has been addressed already, but I've been unable to find this specific issue with the search terms I've used. My concern is the assignment of accusative (or objective, if ...
David Millard's user avatar
9 votes
8 answers
3k views

Usage of "you" in scientific papers

According to numerous questions (e.g Is it recommended to use "we" in research papers?), one should use "we" instead of "I" while writing a scientific paper. However, it'...
Mime's user avatar
  • 201
2 votes
0 answers
50 views

First and second person pronouns in academic writing [closed]

I've been told numerous times in high school that "first and second person pronouns in academic writing" should be avoided. This supposed wisdom is echoed in various style manuals as well. ...
Guest's user avatar
  • 21
1 vote
1 answer
334 views

Each other’s nose or each other’s noses?

Should it be singular or plural after “each other’s” here. They touched each other’s nose. They touched each other’s noses. Are both correct? John Lawler notes in another post that each other can ...
Sasan's user avatar
  • 3,462
0 votes
1 answer
230 views

Using the word "he" twice in the same sentence - is this grammatically correct? If not, why are there published books that break this rule? [closed]

So, I was reading some books by Stephen King, S.D. Perry, and a couple authors I really love. I notice they'll use pronouns or certains words twice in the same sentence. When I read it, it's pleasant ...
M. Knepper's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
30 views

Is it necessary to insert the pronoun here? "…after which [she] looked out at the tall grasses" [closed]

Is it necessary to insert "she" after "after which" in the following sentence? Claire did not reply until she had finished cutting all the salted meat into slices, after which ...
Roberto's user avatar
  • 35
1 vote
1 answer
931 views

What does “it” refer to in this sentence?

I have two things to say. I lost my car keys after school. But it isn’t all bad news (all of it isn’t bad news). I got an A on my math test. What does “it” refer to in the second sentence? I thought “...
Greg's user avatar
  • 11
0 votes
1 answer
139 views

How to write s/he at the beginning of a sentence? [closed]

In a document I want to use the gender form of personal pronouns. But if I use "s/he" at the beginning of a sentence, are both "s" and "h" to be written in capitals? It ...
Peter Strouvelle's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
31 views

What is the corrrect form of pronoun to use for note taking? [duplicate]

I am trying to take notes on a lecture that others can access online. Should I write: To understand depression, one must understand both biology and psychology. or You must understand both ...
bobby wang's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
184 views

As (It) Was Explained to You

Is that it wrong, or is it just unnecessary but still correct? I have found some questions about that, by which I've been able to understand that it's unnecessary, but I still wonder if it must be ...
user473457's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
49 views

Subjective or Objective pronouns in dialogues?

Let's say I'm quoting a dialogue between me and my friend, should I use subjective pronouns (I / He) or objective pronouns (Me / Him)? For example: Me: What's up? Him: The sky. Or: I: What's up? He:...
Alaa M.'s user avatar
  • 147
1 vote
2 answers
898 views

Yourself vs. yourselves when speaking to individuals in a group

What you should expect from yourselves and each other This phrase is spoken to a group of people, but to each person individually. Particularly because it includes "and each other," it ...
Jenny's user avatar
  • 11
0 votes
2 answers
381 views

Whomever from the show "The Office"

So there is an infamous comedy sketch with "whomever" vs "whoever" in the show "the Office". The correct answer there is that you cannot tell which is the correct answer ...
Валерий Заподовников's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
210 views

Usage of they/them as a pronoun in confusing sentences [duplicate]

Pronouns are an integral part of the english language. However, they can also cause confusion and problems within communication, especially in the modern era, as some people choose to use ...
Joe Kerr's user avatar
  • 801
-2 votes
1 answer
67 views

What does "some" refer to in the context? [closed]

In this article from The Economist it says: As Britons took to holidaying in the actual Mediterranean, some began to decline; austerity and covid-19 finished them off. The short line " some ...
user330039's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
387 views

When referring to oneself using pronouns only, would it be appropriate to use "me" instead of "myself"?

When you refer to yourself without saying your name, (without gendered pronouns) would it be of appropriate use to say "me" instead of "myself"? for example: I would give me a big ...
eac's user avatar
  • 53
1 vote
2 answers
118 views

How should I refer to a person without identifying them? Can I use 'one'? [closed]

If I wish to refer to an individual person but without describing that person or drawing attention to the characteristics of that person or without identifying that person - how should I do it ? The ...
Nigel J's user avatar
  • 24.8k
0 votes
2 answers
44 views

*That is/those are* my rifle and the bullets

Which is correct? My research: I found a lot of questions related to using that and those, but none of those were about what I'm trying to find out. Then I found information about those in Cambridge ...
Mr realtor's user avatar

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