Questions tagged [pronouns]

A pronoun is a word that stands in for a noun or noun phrase.

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2answers
37 views

Confusion about what the pronoun refers to

What does "it" refer to in the following sentence? Humans instinctively seek structures that will shelter and enhance their way of life. It is the work of architects to create buildings ...
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management practices AND their survival OR their associated survival

Could you please help me to choose, which of the following sentences is more correct. Nonoperative management practices have no survival, patients have. Thus, is the first sentence uncorrect or the ...
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25 views

The other (one)

Page 55 of A Practical English Grammar reads Normally, other(s) is only used alone if it refers to a noun that has been mentioned before. An exception is the common plural use of (the) others to mean ...
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Is "…your love for them” grammatical? [closed]

I'm wondering if this sentence below is grammatically correct? "Thank you for your love for them." Also, does this sound natural? If not, is there an alternative way to express the same ...
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38 views

He had a friend to say was his friend [closed]

Is it possible to insert a pronoun, He had a friend to say (that) HE was his friend? (friend and he being co-referents)
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Which pronoun (you vs. I) to use while answering word problems in mathematics? [closed]

Let us say there is a word problem like this: Question 1: I bought apples for $4 each. I spent $12 total to buy apples. How many apples did I buy? I solve this problem and find the answer to be 3 ...
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1answer
46 views

Is it she and James' or her and James'?

The sentence is— "Her and James' life shouldn't be a topic of discussion for them." I believe that it should be she and James' and not her James'. Which version of the sentence is correct? ...
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“A group that X” or “A group who X”? (American English)

I've been asked to proofread a company newsletter, and I came across this line: [Department name] is something special – an elite unit who finds opportunities where others cannot. Should it rather ...
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0answers
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Is personal pronoun followed with “verb+ing” grammatically correct? [duplicate]

Is the sentence below correct? What type of pronoun is "You" in this case? You staring won’t make me walk faster Below is the result from an online grammar check on the sentence as shown: ...
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I vs myself when talking about 3 people (including me) [duplicate]

I’m talking about something I am doing with 2 others. Would I say 1.) My sister, cousin, and I are blah blah blah. 2.) My sister, cousin, and myself are all blah blah blah. Or neither?
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1answer
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Why did “it” lose its initial 'h' but other pronouns such as “him” and “her” didn't?

The pronouns it, him, her had an initial h in the older forms of English which has been retained in her, him, but lost in it (formerly hit). Etymology of it (Wikitionary): From Middle English it, hit ...
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3answers
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Which is correct - you or your in this context? [closed]

Your staring won’t make me walk faster or You staring won’t make me walk faster Which is correct, you or your?
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2answers
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“It's raining”, vs. “I tried to make a reservation online, but it says 'no available spots today'.” [closed]

The it in "it's raining" seems to refer to no clear subjects. But I think "it's raining" and "it's getting warm" are both used. I used this sentence today in my ...
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1answer
25 views

“The partnership with Companyname” vs “Companyname's partnership”

Which of the following sentence is correct? We hope that Companyname's partnership will help us scale up faster. We hope that the partnership with Companyname will help us scale up faster.
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1answer
70 views

me and whom? vs me and who?

I'm sure some of us have heard of the Internet meme "me and who?" Strictly speaking, if no fun were allowed, shouldn't it be "me and whom" instead? I'm a little confused though, ...
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2answers
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Which is correct: “The animal within you” or “The animal within yourself”?

I'm coming up with a slogan for my DJ personal brand. I want to convey the idea that we all have a wild side in us waiting to be triggered. From similar questions, it seems that either version would ...
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1answer
33 views

Any one thing: syntactic analysis

None remembered any one thing he’d said. How should any one be analyzed here?
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0answers
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Is the form “with which” used correctly in this sentence?

Private sales, therefore, represent a way with which auction houses can operate somehow as dealers and galleries. Is the form "with which" used correctly in this sentence? If not, what is ...
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2answers
77 views

Why do some British (English) people add a pronoun to the end of a sentence?

I've noticed that in certain parts of England, U.K., people would add pronouns to the end of their sentences when speaking. I'm from the U.S. but I have a couple of friends from West Yorkshire and ...
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0answers
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Why we need two forms of preferred personal pronouns? [duplicate]

Regarding the fact that this is still somehow a hot topiс in English language-speaking communities I need to stress out that is a serious and respectful question without even a trace of intention to ...
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1answer
39 views

Is there any situation where an article could be used in front of a pronoun?

I was reading an online copy of the King James Bible and (in John 18:1) found this: When Jesus had spoken these words, he went forth with his disciples over the brook Cedron, where was a garden, into ...
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0answers
34 views

To what do the two relative pronouns “which” refer?

In the sentence: The sense that life as a whole is absurd arises when we perceive, perhaps dimly, an inflated pretension or aspiration which is inseparable from the continuation of human life and ...
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2answers
60 views

Verb conjugation for singular they [duplicate]

Ostensibly, verb conjugation is plural vs singular: "The apple is big." vs "The apples are big." But that doesn't match up with the centuries-old singular they. "They is nice.&...
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1answer
35 views

Doesn't number affect pronoun agreement? [duplicate]

I saw the sentence: "the crowd took its guns and its swords" in French the other day; now I'm wondering if it's right in English. Since the crowd is singular, why do we say "their guns ...
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0answers
27 views

In “Brown Man's Burden” is the antecedent changing?

I was reading the "The Brown Man's Burden" by Henry Labouchère. I was a little confused because the antecedent for "you," seemed to be changing from the White men to the Brown men (...
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0answers
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“Handsome is as handsome does,” and the puzzling use of “as”

When I saw the film Forrest Gump, I first heard the expression “Stupid is as stupid does,” and inferred that (to Forrest, at least) it meant something like “Don’t judge me stupid because of my words, ...
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4answers
103 views

Use of the pronoun “which”

I have a few silly questions about the use of the pronoun which: In the sentence "A statistical model is a family of probability distributions of a random variable which is smoothly parametrized ...
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2answers
71 views

American English: Must I always use a singular pronoun with a collective noun?

Here's the stretch of text that I'm struggling with: The [company] team and the [client] team will formally introduce themselves and explain their roles to one another. The [company] team will share ...
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1answer
49 views

Glad to hear it / this / that - are all of these correct?

In most cases, I have seen "Glad to hear it" or "Glad to hear that", which expresses your feelings about smth you have heard or read. Is it ok to write "Glad to hear THIS"...
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Which pronoun is appropriate when the subject of a dependent clause is implied?

The context is: The point always is to remember what it was to be [me/myself]. Joan Didion The writer is addressing herself here, so that the subject of remembering is implied. The original text ...
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Does a pronoun usually refer to the nearest preceding person(s)?

See the following paragraph: Then Judah said to his brothers, “What profit is it if we kill our brother and conceal his blood? Come, let us sell him to the Ishmaelites, and let not our hand be upon ...
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Is this a typo in The Call of the Wild?

Here is the scene of the final fight between Buck and Spitz at the end of chapter 3 in The Call of the Wild by Jack London: Spitz was untouched, while Buck was streaming with blood and panting hard. ...
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What does “they” refer to in this sentence?

I don't understand the pronoun "they" and the subject of "are" in the following sentence. Silver prices yesterday jumped 13% to an eight-year high after some online investors ...
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1answer
88 views

Is the pronoun 'it' used correctly in this sentence?

I have come across a sentence in which the pronoun 'it' occurs but seems to have no antecedent, and I think it should be omitted: A controlling idea: what the writer is going to focus on it in the ...
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1answer
21 views

Pronoun referring to noun [duplicate]

In an article that gives general work advice, I've seen the following sentence Don’t take your complaint to your boss when she’s running between meetings ... There is no context that states the ...
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2answers
48 views

Using possessive pronouns for an academic degree (e.g. my masters degree) [closed]

One of my pet peeves...people using the possessive pronoun to refer to a graduate degree. For instance, people saying I'm going to get "my doctorate" or writing "while working on my ...
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1answer
48 views

Pronoun cases (e.g. “my,” “his”) before gerund constructions [duplicate]

Which of the following is correct? It stands in the way of my being successful. It stands in the way of me being successful. This led to his succeeding in the workplace. This led to him succeeding ...
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25 views

it of them in the sentence

I had to saw off the lower limbs of the tree to keep my young kids from climbing it. or I had to saw off the lower limbs of the tree to keep my young kids from climbing them. Does the pronoun ...
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2answers
50 views

Can a pronoun be dropped in a list?

Towing insurance provides protection against collision damage to your automobile while you are attaching (it) to, towing (it) by, or detaching it from a covered rental truck or while it is loaded onto,...
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2answers
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Demonstrative Pronouns

I understand that a demonstrative pronoun is a word that replaces a noun as if pointing to it. For example, "I want to buy a car. This one is cheap. Those are expensive." This and those are ...
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0answers
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Pronouns and nouns [duplicate]

I am trying to understand why the provided sentence makes sense. I understand a grammar rule: the pronoun in the sentence should match the noun in the sentence. However, how can we use "they"...
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3answers
88 views

Are there any old third-person singular pronouns the way “thou” is an old second-person pronoun?

Thou is an old second-person singular pronoun in English. Are there any old third-person singular pronouns?
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1answer
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Correct use of 'whatsoever'

Which is the correct usage: 'for whatsoever reason' or 'for any reason whatsoever'? Example (taken from here): A governor may give a pardon or commute a sentence any day of the week, for any reason ...
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2answers
34 views

Is the possessive “its” or “their” after “all of the country's states and territories”?

Which statement is correct? All of the country's states and territories imposed travel restrictions on its residents. All of the country's states and territories imposed travel restrictions on their ...
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0answers
37 views

The right possessive pronoun for “one”? [duplicate]

Is it ok to use "their" as a general reference to the pronoun "one"? For example in a sentence as follows: One should be aware of the differences between spreadsheets and ...
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1answer
57 views

Are reflexive pronouns typically used in compound objects?

We can all agree that the reflexive pronoun in this sentence is necessary:I bought drinks for myself. However, I cannot seem to find a definitive answer regarding the following sentence:I bought ...
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1answer
27 views

That creates or which creates? [duplicate]

"let's make a robot ___ creates a copy of itself" What would be the right word to use here? That or which?
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0answers
27 views

Complex sentences, confusing pronouns [closed]

To a ESL student like me, below sentence is very difficult to understand. I've read this sentence like 20 times and I still don't get it 100%. "Investors in the past have expressed to us that ...
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1answer
45 views

Which reflexive or intensive pronoun should I use for an unknown person (himself, herself or itself)?

I want to reffer to a person whose gender I don't know. Should I say a person himself/herself or a person itself? Two examples below: Reflexive: If someone wants to kill somebody else, then do it him/...
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0answers
26 views

[Subject pronoun], not [Subject pronoun or Object Pronoun] + predicate

I know first pronoun is Subject, but what about second pronoun after "not"? Is it subject too like these two quotations? In first, not "he, not her"? In second, not "he, not ...

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