Questions tagged [objects]

Questions about the part of speech governed by prepositions and active transitive verbs.

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In “He is easy to take care of,” is “He” the subject, the object, or both?

This is a passive construction, correct? I feel the missing piece of the puzzle is “He is easy to take care of (by or for babysitters/parents/etc.)” My brain is doing a bit of a loop because ...
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In "play badminton," what is the logic that makes "badminton" the object of "play"? It almost seems like an adverbial relationship

Let's take the sentence "I play badminton every day." Lexico.com has "play" here as taking an object in "badminton", with play signifying "take part in". For ...
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use of pronoun in the absence of a noun: my vs me [duplicate]

consider the following sentences: I actually find it quite difficult to remember much about "my being very young". I actually find it quite difficult to remember much about "me being ...
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"Whom" is right but I've never EVER heard anyone say "whom" out loud [closed]

For example: "Whom hit you?" "Whom should I pick?" Maybe no one has enough time to think about this in quick, everyday conversation?
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Passive voice with ditransitive verb, which is the patient?

If I were to make the following constructions, how would I label the parts of the sentence using passive voice terminology? Alice seems to be the agent in both these constructions, but which is the ...
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4 answers
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In the sentence "The cat likes to eat fish," is the object "likes to eat fish" or just "fish"?

In the sentence "The cat likes to eat fish," is the object "likes to eat fish" or just "fish"? I can see an argument for both, because the sentence "I like it" ...
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Help Fixing Yoda-like Sentence Structure? [closed]

I'm a native American English speaker and have noticed something in my speech/writing that I don't really understand. I've noticed my speech sounds "Yoda-ish" and have been trying to figure ...
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Hoodie with no hood [closed]

What is a proper term for for a hoodie like clothing but without a hood. I usually wear this under my coat
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How does "_ and I"/"_ and me" rule change when inside brackets?

This question was specifically motivated by the Youtube video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iitXhgif_lo which has the title "How one little boat (and me) held up miles of London traffic". ...
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2 answers
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Grammar rule: ONE sentence; ONE subject, ONE predicate. Is it?

I just watched a video on grammar (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Drv6jD8xWdw) that states that English sentences can only have one subject. At first, I thought it was obvious, but then I thought of ...
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Preparatory it; not possible for complements

I was reading Practical English Usage, by Michael Swan and got into something that has got me deeply confused. It basically says that preparatory it can be used as a preparatory subject or object, but ...
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Should a prepositional phrase beginning with “of” that follows a plural noun be singular or plural?

Which of these is correct? “Types of citrus fruit” or “types of citrus fruits”? I suspect it is the first example, but I would really like to know what the grammar rule governing these situations ...
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Forgot in this sentence: Transitive or Intransitive?

"Today is Friday, but Adae forgot." Hi everyone, so I encountered this sentence in a writing book . I believe "forgot" in this context is intransitive since there is no object in ...
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Usage of "of" with an implicit object

Consider this sentence from an article about a killing: “Based on repeated threats on the night of, they (Rose, Ford and Liakos) decided to go on a scouting mission that was preserved on video,” ...
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What are the subjects, objects, complements and gerunds in this sentence?

As with most great avant artists, it’s easier to describe how Arca makes you feel than what it is, exactly, she makes. Just wanted clarification on a few things. What is the first part of the ...
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Grammar of "get" [closed]

A Voice of America Learning English page contains the sentence "You get the grass the dirt." It brings so many memories and feelings and, you know, it’s earthy and natural. You get the ...
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One subject, compound object phrases - comma or no comma?

My question is about how to punctuate sentences like the following: The system allows searching for variables using their long name and cryptic variable names and filtering the data sets based on a ...
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Can I use a participial phrase in this way to modify the objects of a sentence?

I've been thinking recently about participial phrases and all the ways they can be used. I've been advised that it's good to think of them as providing a supplementary predication about the subject, ...
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More sophisticated case of "me and I"!

Which of the following is correct? "I agree that it will be just me and you managing the projects." or "I agree that it will be just I and you managing the projects."
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What word best describes a line of posts connected by a retractable belt?

I was at a building that I've never been to before, and someone directed me to follow the samtons to the other side. I am hard-of-hearing, so I wasn't able to fully hear how they pronounced it, but I ...
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3 answers
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"about me" versus "about I" [closed]

Consider the following sentence: The details in the first section are the most important ones about me. The sentence seems completely natural, and yet, by analysis it appears that "the most ...
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Was it common in Shakespeare's time for adverbial phrases and objects to precede the verb in spoken English?

I'm trying to come up with a list of differences between Shakespeare's manner of writing and modern English, and one of the big differences I've noticed is that Shakespeare often seems to put ...
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1 answer
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Hello, I need help in understanding the grammatical structure of this sentence

I need help in understanding the grammatical structure of this sentence. Could anyone break it down? Thank you very much!! "Scattered among the leaves crawl creatures called Zeepers that are ...
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Sentence structure and form

Is this sentence grammatically correct? "The great sea creature came alongside Lotty and nudged him, so he climbed on board its strong back. I don't get what sentence structure the second part ...
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What it the right choice?

Which of the following statements is correct and why? In other words, is it OK if we bring "it" or if used, it would be redundant and grammatically wrong? It is used for an action that we ...
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4 votes
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"Whomever" as both object and subject

I put together a document with my findings in order to help whomever keeps working on this. I understand that "whomever" should be used as an object, whereas "whoever" as a ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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Are the infinitives that follow catenative verbs considered object?

I am confused to find objects of catenative verbs , for example i was looking for the verb refuse and it's transitive and intransitive when i found some examples from oxford dictionary but still not ...
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2 votes
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Preposition+Object?

Hi saw this online and was wondering about object following a preposition. "Common verbs that are followed by at + object are: glance, look, laugh, smile, stare, rejoice etc. Ex: She smiled at me....
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Object vs adverbial

In the sentence: "The teachers in our school are nice." Is "in our school" an adverbial or part of the subject "The teachers in our school"? Wondering because it would ...
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Grammar of sentence "He helps people find happiness"? Object Complement or Indirect object?

He helps people find happiness. Is this an example of an Indirect Object (People) or an Object Complement (find happiness)?
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Dropping a first person subject pronoun in a conditional sentence

Is it possible to drop the 'I' before the verb in a sentence where the object comes before the verb? A few examples are: If my journey (I) restart, then I do waste my time. If my folders (I) delete, ...
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Appropriate pronoun for "deciding on" + pronoun + infinitive? [duplicate]

I was wondering about the grammar of sentences like this: They decided on him going to Japan and her going to China. Or should it be like this? They decided on he going to Japan and she going to ...
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Is "the computers" in "here are the computers that you requested" a subject or object?

I'm a little confused which is the subject and the object in this sentence: Here are the computers that you requested. My guess is that "the computers" is the object and "you" is the subject. Is ...
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2 answers
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Complement of the object?

I'm reading Verbs of Incomplete Prediction in my grammar. It says that certain Transitive verbs take, beside an object, a complement to complete their predication. I have understood almost everything ...
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Why objects of prepositions are called "objects"?

Textbooks of English grammar say that there are three types of objects: direct objects, indirect objects and objects of prepositions. But I cannot understand why the former two types (a major ...
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Which sentence is correct and why: agreement?

Please tell me which is correct and why: My favorite thing to smell is flowers. Or My favorite things to smell are flowers.
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"These children were abducted by a member of their own family." vs. "These children were abducted by members of their own families."

I'm having trouble figuring out which sentence is the most acceptable. The subject and object are both plural, but it sounds more natural using a singular object. Also, I can't figure out if the ...
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The object of a transitive verb

I was simply wondering if the object of a transitive verb can come before the verb? As in "Good luck," the man said to John. Is "good luck" the object of "say" here? Thank you in advance!
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Is the Latter Clause of an Action Simile Attributed to the Subject or Object Acted Upon?

In other (hopefully more graceful) words, are both of the following lines valid? "A smiling Freddy flung the slimy papaya around like a wet rag." "A smiling Freddy flung the slimy papaya around like ...
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1 vote
2 answers
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Grammar analysis: why is "Fufu" in the following sentence object complement rather than direct object

I called my pug Fufu: subject...object...object complement(Introducing English Grammar, p.93) Yet if I say: I give my pug some water. then pug would be indirect object and some water would be ...
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object pronounce "you" or "yourself" preceding primary object [closed]

We would like John and _____ (you/yourself) to come to the party Regarding the above sentence, I've done quite a fair bit of Googling and still haven't found a substantial and satisfactory ...
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Who/whom puzzle

The Blue Book of Grammar has a question: "John knows WHO/WHOM the winner is." The correct answer is: "John knows WHO the winner is." But ... The main clause is "John Knows." But WHOM is actually the ...
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I heard <Mona singing that song> <the song sung by Mona>. [parse]

(1) I heard Mona singing that song. (2) I heard the song sung by Mona. "Mona singing that song" and "the song sung by Mona" are objects, each of which can be parsed two ways: &...
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4 votes
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Should I use "her" or "she"?

In the blank below: Everyone likes you but _____. Should I use "her" or "she"? I think both of them are okay. If "her" is used, I'll perceive the sentence as "Everyone likes you, but everyone does ...
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1 vote
3 answers
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The using of the gerund in sentence

In this sentence: They did a great job orchestrating volunteers. Is the gerund orchestrating the object of the sentence? orchestrating acts as a noun in the sentence, but I don't understand why it ...
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Word that is the string of characters/phonemes that compose a 'word'?

The string "cool" represents several 'words'/linguistic meanings: [<adj.: cold, nippy>, <adj.: calm, collected>, <adj.: aloof, disapproving>, <adj.: excellent>, <verb: chill&...
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Attempt to find a synonym of word "old"

Few weeks ago, while reading some texts a new vocabulary encountred. when translated it via English to English online dictionary, one of the synonym was the word "old"? To have or to put the ...
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Is 'to resign' an object or subject complement in 'The teacher wishes to resign'?

The teacher (S) wishes (V) to resign It is no doubt that 'to resign' is a complement of something, but is it a complement of the noun The teacher or the verb wishes? Subject complement [analysis 1]:...
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Can prepositions and verbs have an indirect object(s) or is the object of a verb(s) or preposition(s) always direct? [closed]

This is something I have always wondered, but I have been struggling with the subject-object thing for too long a time now, I can still very much in English learner.
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Do I use whom or who in this sentence? [duplicate]

Family engagement is crucial to developing children’s emergent literacy skills because children who are raised in homes that promote literacy do better in school and they grow up to be better readers.
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