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Questions tagged [academic-writing]

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2 votes
5 answers
415 views

Formal written form for a 2x something? [closed]

In a sentence where I want to say a title or position that has been awarded twice, how do I phrase it? For instance "He was a 2x runner-up for the Champion title", would it be "two time&...
sarahh's user avatar
  • 29
0 votes
1 answer
30 views

How to write a name of competition in an article? [duplicate]

Hi I am translating text from Polish to English. I would like to ask you about your thoughts on it: A title of a newspaper is in Polish, do I need to add quotation marks or italics? The name of ...
Milena's user avatar
  • 9
0 votes
0 answers
68 views

Present simple or future conditional

While writing a research proposal, I encountered the following issue. Consider the following two variants: Present simple: I would like to measure X. Finding evidence that X is large is helpful to ...
Notone's user avatar
  • 109
6 votes
2 answers
560 views

A good and scientific way of saying "holistic approach" or "holistic philosophy"

I am struggling to write the introduction of a scientific journal paper because it is absurdly novel. I am trying to show the community that we have approaches in different domains that need to be ...
CfourPiO's user avatar
  • 255
0 votes
2 answers
65 views

Can I use thereof to refer to a single subject? If not - what would be an alternative?

Is usage of "thereof" in a title: Confirming feasibility of attack and investigating improvements to range and reliability thereof correct? My intuition says it is not, but it would be a ...
Nikolai Savulkin's user avatar
6 votes
3 answers
611 views

Difference in logical inevitability between therefore/thus/hence

I am trying to figure out the difference in the degrees of logical inevitability that the words therefore, thus, and hence express, when used in academic scientific writing. Glenn Paquette explains in ...
Masa Sakano's user avatar
9 votes
8 answers
3k views

Usage of "you" in scientific papers

According to numerous questions (e.g Is it recommended to use "we" in research papers?), one should use "we" instead of "I" while writing a scientific paper. However, it'...
Mime's user avatar
  • 201
4 votes
7 answers
2k views

A different way of saying "rest of"

I am writing a research paper where I want to say The rest of the paper is organized as follows. in the introduction of the paper. However, the word "rest" doesn't sound good as it is ...
CfourPiO's user avatar
  • 255
0 votes
1 answer
66 views

much less + (verb)ing (gerund) agreement/concord

Do I need to make sure the gerunds match in the following sentence: There is not much attention paid to really examining what constitutes this notion, much less scrutinizing the received criteria for ...
daci's user avatar
  • 1
2 votes
1 answer
60 views

Singular and Plurals in Academic Research

In academic/scientific research, should I use the names of fruits in the singular or plural? For example: There was a significant increase in the frequency of sweet potato consumption (+18.8%), eggs (...
Geovane Portiglioti's user avatar
-1 votes
2 answers
71 views

Term for creating Terminology

I’ve been struggling to remember a word for “creating discrete terminology.” It feels like an academic word used in linguistics in the vein of “semiotics,” (but not dealing with signs, dealing with ...
Kobi's user avatar
  • 101
0 votes
2 answers
123 views

Possessive Contraction over Equations and Mathematical/Physics Laws

In my mother language, Spanish, when we refer to a famous equation, say those for electromagnetism, we say "Ecuaciones de Maxwell". This translates, literally, as "Equations of Maxwell&...
Vicente Sierra Rosas's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
72 views

Use of adjective "slack" in academic writing

(Note. I deleted the previous question as the discussion was focusing too much on the math.) I am writing a research paper in mathematical analysis and I have a situation in which I want to give a ...
Lorenzo Pompili's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
93 views

Scare quotes, regular quote and italics. Style guide advice

I understand that there is no universal rule regarding the use of single or double quotation marks or use of italics, however I wasn't sure whether scare quotes need to follow same format one has ...
Xueshe's user avatar
  • 1
2 votes
2 answers
71 views

Where do I put the name of a noun, before or after? [closed]

Which one is better: When function read returns an error, the program crashes. When read function returns an error, the program crashes. When read-function returns an error, the program crashes. I'm ...
yegor256's user avatar
  • 135
0 votes
0 answers
20 views

Usage of hypens when using two compund nouns [duplicate]

I was wondering about the correct usage of the hyphen in cases of the form: In the short- and long-run. As opposed to: In the short and long-run. Is the first case accepted?
Weierstraß Ramirez's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
7k views

What is the best way to describe a event which was well organized so much that there was no tension while event was going on?

I am looking for the right words to describe an event which was meticulously planned and executed. I want to stress on the fact that the managers / professors overlooking the event were relaxed as ...
Sivakami Subbu's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
826 views

dramatically increased vs increased dramatically

In a very formal writing such as IELTS writing task 1, can I use both of these? >dramatically increased >increased dramatically Example: Product prices have increased dramatically in the last ...
user462272's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
63 views

Does it feel odd for native speakers to use too many introductory phrases in academic writing? [closed]

Recently I observed that there are too many introductory phrases in papers writen by non-native spearkers. Here are some examples: Typically, it is xxxx Particularly, it is xxxx In this paper, we ...
Ming  Wang's user avatar
  • 157
0 votes
1 answer
58 views

How to say "the health of a system" in a shorter way?

Compound words keep troubling me... I am writing an academic article about detecting the health of a system or a piece of equipment. For example, if a coffee machine works correctly, it means it has a ...
Elise Le's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
95 views

"close resemblance in/on ..." OR "closely resembling ..." [closed]

I have two quite similar fracture populations and I try to emphasize this in the following sentence. But which of the prepositions/solutions is correct in British English? The baseline ...
ethan282712's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
160 views

Em dash to introduce a quote

Is it fine to introduce a direct quote with an em dash? I want to briefly summarise a quote, while still giving it in full. Something like: However, Smith (2021) argued that foo can in fact improve ...
Michal Charemza's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
162 views

Correct writing of "clinical- and policy-relevant evidence"

I'm struggling with concise writing of the following. None of the sentences "sound" nice. Could you give some guidance? A) There is a need for both clinically and policy-relevant evidence? ...
st4co4's user avatar
  • 267
1 vote
1 answer
2k views

Why is the A in "Article" capitalized in legal articles when referring to itself? [closed]

I looked at ten different law articles; when refering to itself, the letter A in Article is capitalized. For example, in the abstract it would say something like: This Article proposes modifying the ...
Law Article's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
131 views

Comma needed before "as does"? [closed]

Should I write this without a comma: The evidence from this study suggests that stroke may impose a comparable risk on the survival of older patients as do heart attack due to the close resemblance ...
ethan282712's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
327 views

Proper Grammar of Degree Abbreviations

I have seen plenty of abbreviation options to write Postgraduate Diploma. Just to mention the easiest finding on the web: "A postgraduate diploma (PgD, PgDip, PGDip, PG Dip., PGD, Dipl. PG, PDE) ...
TamasO's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
0 answers
30 views

an atom vs the atom [duplicate]

In Britannica's Atom term, some general sentences about an atom use "an atom", and others "the atom", why? Sentences with "an atom": The behaviour of an atom is strongly ...
Ben's user avatar
  • 105
1 vote
0 answers
163 views

manifests or manifests itself

The sentence (from University Physics book, the image of full text is attached): The work done by nonconservative forces manifests itself as changes in the internal energy of objects. Can we delete ...
Ben's user avatar
  • 105
-1 votes
1 answer
88 views

Let us suppose vs Suppose [closed]

When should we use "Let us suppose", and when "Suppose" in science academic articles? Example 1: Suppose the electric field lines in a region of space are straight lines. or ...
Ben's user avatar
  • 105
0 votes
1 answer
29 views

Which one is more correct for academic writing? List of X users vs X-user list [closed]

I am writing an academic paper and having hard time with language. So which one of the following is most appropriate? List of WhatsApp users WhatsApp-users list WhatsApp user list WhatsApp users' ...
Furkan Gözükara's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
73 views

Mentioning a physical unit after a series of values

I have problem deciding which one of the following sentences is correct considering the usage of second(s): Computation times of the proposed algorithms are in the orders of 10^-3 and 10^-4 seconds, ...
Iman's user avatar
  • 13
0 votes
2 answers
303 views

Comma after "perhaps" at the end of the sentence

Which one is correct? I. "This is the worst day in this month, perhaps the worst in my life." II. "This is the worst day in this month. Perhaps the worst in my life." Should we ...
user avatar
-3 votes
1 answer
89 views

Is speed a variable? [closed]

This is a legal sentence: London traffic moves at a speed of 11 mph. Why can't we remove "a" and "of"? London traffic moves at speed 11 mph. We may say that "speed" ...
Ben's user avatar
  • 105
1 vote
1 answer
161 views

Is it common to use 'terminus a quo' in academic writing?

I'm writing an academic paper and I want to replace the word 'starting point' with 'terminus a quo'. I'm not sure if this Latin word is commonly used. I'm trying to make my language more interesting ...
Zhengrong's user avatar
  • 151
0 votes
2 answers
93 views

A first or the first after mentioning general categories

In the following passage: Recent works have tackled the explainability shortcomings with different approaches. A first approach investigates to which extent an input feature is responsible for a ...
lenhhoxung's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
67 views

breakage vs breaking in "X denotes the spontaneous breakage/breaking of rotational symmetry"

In the sentence " X denotes the spontaneous breakage/breaking of rotational symmetry.", which is the best word to use in its context?
evening silver fox's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
39 views

Preposition needed: did not survive a certain timepoint [closed]

I have a sentence as follows. This should say that the patients who died during the observation period were excluded from analyses. Should I use a preposition after "survive"? I did a ...
qw45ty's user avatar
  • 65
0 votes
1 answer
53 views

Is it correct to use a comma before naming a list of items in a sentence? [closed]

The question is about the first comma use in the sentences below. I have not seen such comma-punctuation in a sentence that continues with naming several listed items. Is the first comma in these ...
qw45ty's user avatar
  • 65
0 votes
0 answers
17 views

Single word request: of/at that phase/time/period/care/management [duplicate]

I am writing a study aim and needs to be really concise. For background, "post-acute care" is the next/second step care in these patients' management. In other words, their care/management ...
qw45ty's user avatar
  • 65
0 votes
1 answer
70 views

Dissertation: correct writing of a numbered list [closed]

Are there any grammatical rules for numbered lists (my university does not have a guideline for this)? Which format would be correct for the given example of numbered objectives? Two things that I ...
qw45ty's user avatar
  • 65
0 votes
1 answer
51 views

Compact writing of "1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 24 and 36-month survival was analysed"

I have an academic paper abstract to write and it has very limited word count (150 words). I have to say that we analysed 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 24 and 36-month survival of the included patients in this ...
qw45ty's user avatar
  • 65
0 votes
0 answers
25 views

Should we not use abbreviations at all in academic writing? [duplicate]

I submitted a paper to a computer science conference, and the reviewer mentioned that I should correct grammar/writing issues throughout the paper. Some of the things he/she mentioned: don't -> do ...
LGDGODV's user avatar
  • 103
-1 votes
2 answers
157 views

More formal way of saying "taking almost all"

I am trying to revise the following statement: A takes almost all the rewards which are usually given to clients contributing important attributes. The takes almost all seems not very formal and ...
lllllllllllll's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
44 views

How to say these words in academic writing? [closed]

grab attention the talk of the town fly in the ointment How to transfer these words in an academic way?
KFK's user avatar
  • 13
1 vote
1 answer
114 views

Should I say "a LSM-tree" or "an LSM-tree"? [duplicate]

The "LSM-tree" is an acronym term for "Log-Structured Merge Tree". I wrote "a LSM-tree", but Grammarly keeps reminding me it should be "an LSM-tree". What is ...
Harper's user avatar
  • 123
0 votes
1 answer
34 views

Single word request: something does not disconfirm the superiority of the most widely used practice [duplicate]

I analysed different nonoperative management practices and all of them showed worse outcomes than surgery. The sentence I am writing: None of the nonoperative management practices disconfirms the ...
st4co4's user avatar
  • 267
0 votes
1 answer
35 views

Single word request: practice based on non-strict criteria

Context: Clinical decision making is highly varying, as there are no strict criteria between operative and nonoperative management. How to say this with one academically suitable word? Clinical ...
st4co4's user avatar
  • 267
0 votes
2 answers
44 views

Missing data: not registered vs not available

I have a scientific paper table that has a few missing values. Values are missing as they were not recorded (written by a doctor) on patients' medical records. Should I address these values as "...
st4co4's user avatar
  • 267
7 votes
6 answers
2k views

Tentativeness vs Hedging

I am currently studying for an exam about academic writing and I have some issues grasping the difference between hedging and tentativeness. I know for a fact that there must be a difference because ...
Troy's user avatar
  • 87
0 votes
0 answers
29 views

Is "disputable exceptions" apt in this sentence?

With some disputable exceptions, he did not understand that .... Could I use "disputable exceptions" in this context? This extract is from an academic text I am editing. The phrase feels ...
Hugh Doyle's user avatar