Questions tagged [phrasal-verbs]

A phrasal verb is a combination of a verb and a preposition, a verb and an adverb, or a verb with both an adverb and a preposition.

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27 views

“Ever” placement in between a particle and a preposition

A line in At Middleton goes: Did you read up ever on this bell tower? This sentence has "ever" inserted inside a particle-prepositional verb, before the preposition and after the particle. It's a ...
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Getting as set off by it

I'm reading an article about anxiety. The author says that when people feel anxious, they try to make themselves feel better by applying all kinds of coping techniques (e.g. deep breathing). Then it ...
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What does “put out” mean in the following context? [closed]

What does "put out" mean in the following context? I, myself, who find sundown something of a surprise every evening, have been pursued by foreign journalists asking what the pandemic will mean ...
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Difference between swot up and mug up

Well, actually, that is the question. What is the difference between these two phrasal verbs? Both of them mean to cram, to study intensively before an exam. She's at home, swotting up on her ...
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What's the meaning of “set himself to”? [closed]

“When I saw him that afternoon so enwrapped in the music at St. James's Hall I felt that an evil time might be coming upon those whom he had set himself to hunt down.” I have found these sentence in ...
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A verb phrase “[verb] up” meaning someone is easily buying whatever he sees on TV

I came across this phrase "[verb] up" twice on The Guardian Reader's comments section when readers were talking about someone tends to not raise much objection to whatever the person is told or ...
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“Have with” as a phrasal verb

Is "have with" considered a phrasal verb? As in the sentence: "I don't have my wallet with me." The only dictionary that recognizes "have with" as a phrasal verb is Merriam - Webster. https://www....
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What is the correct way to say ? Let me put my point or let me put up my point

I would like to know what seems more accurate. Let me put my point. Let me put up my point. I know that "Put up" is a phrasal verb which definitely have scenarios to be used more appropriately but ...
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When did “eke toward(s)” develop?

I went to use the phrase “eke toward” today, in the sense of “very gradually but increasingly move toward”. I thought this was cromulent, because I’ve heard & used it occasionally in the past. But ...
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1answer
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Definition of 'cut out in'

I was reading 'The Hound of the Baskervilles' for the sake of improving my English and have not found the definition of the phrasal verb in bold: ‘I don’t know much about the tariff and things of ...
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Word or phrasal verb?

Which one is less awkard to native English speakers, a phrasal verb or a word, in function or variable naming? For example: Set up tracker module or install tracker module. I already know the pros ...
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Is “replace it by x” actually correct?

I've always been under the impression that, in standard English, "replace" is only paired with "by" in the passive voice, and that "replace with" is the correct active counterpart of "be replaced by": ...
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After spacing out

What phrasal verb/phrase/expression should be used to describe someone who has regained control of themselves after spacing out?
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Difference between Pray for and pray over

What is the difference between "Pray for" and "pray over"??i found this word in a novel named "the testaments" by Margaret Atwood where it was mentioned as such:" There were rumours about the Rachel ...
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Which is correct? uploaded to or uploaded on

Attached please find all the documents that I have uploaded on my cloud so far. or Attached please find all the documents that I have uploaded to my cloud so far.
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It is a question about phrasal verbs related to perspective

Let's imagine a situation in which you have people being caught and going to jail. You can say " they are taking people into jail". Now the first question: is this sentence correct when I use the ...
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Get around (intransitive): say or do something at last

Get around (intransitive verb): finally to say or do something after delay, hesitation, or being involved with other things I wondered when you'd get around to telling me that. Microsoft® ...
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Why does “for that” change the meaning if combined with “up,” but not with “down”?

(1) I'm up for that = someone stating their own interest/availability for what "that" refers to Bob: "Hey, wanna go get coffee?" Zack: "Yeah man, I'm up for that." (2) I'm up = a) a person ...
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Slang etymology of “up” and “down” in phrasal verbs [duplicate]

In this, "to be" is the base verb, conjugated in the first, singular, present tense "am". The verb is then put in a contraction with first, singular, pronoun "I" to create "I'm". This contraction is ...
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TO HIT MILL Meaning?

I just heard it from two people trying to set a place for their first date. Boy: Where you wanna go? Girl: Steakhouse. Boy: Ok, I'm down for that. Girl: We can "Hit mill"? Boy: Sure, let's ...
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to bail out vs to back out

In computer science, I have often come across the expression to back out meaning to say that a function is returned from before performing its actual task, as in this imaginary code comment: double ...
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“accrue to”, does it have a particular meaning such as ascribed to?

The nature and scope of legally important behavior, as well as the rights and obligations that accrue to participant agents, are internally related to the point of joint action: that which our joint ...
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“Get on”: is it transitive, intransitive or both?

I'm new here (in the sense of asking a question, but I often use the site for reference.) I have a question regarding the phrasal verb "get on", or more specifically when used with "with", eg. "get ...
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You keep me hanging on - phrasal verb(s)?

What is actually the phasal verb in a sentence: You keep me hanging on "Keep on" or "hang on"? What do we have here? Double phrasal verb? I am trying to figure this out for a while today... This is ...
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Difference between TAKE UP and TAKE ON (= to begin to do something)

Could anyone please give me the answer of the english exercise below and help me tell apart take up and take on, which both mean beginning to do something? I appreciate your help with this exercise. ...
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Is “tell advice” not idiomatic over “give advice”?

I was told by some users @Shoe and @Greybeard that “tell [...] advice” is not a collocation used by native speakers at all, “give advice” is the only expression used. So I investigated to see whether ...
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What english verb is used in the most phrasal verbs

This is just for fun. I've recently learned about phrasal verbs. I'm interested in a total count of actual phrasal verbs for a given base verb. For example, "throw" is used in the formation of "throw ...
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Do trees “fall down” or “fall over”? [closed]

Is there any difference between saying "Trees can fall down in strong wind" and "Trees can fall over in strong wind"? And in general, what is the different between "fall down" and "fall over"?
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Word that means a “slow and painful transformation”

I'd like to describe a process of change that is both slow and painful for those involved using a verb or phrasal verb (heck, throw me an adjective if you have one, no complaints). Is there a word ...
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86 views

How does tick off come to mean reprimand, scold.etc., where does it comes from? [closed]

I read "his father ticked him off in his birthday."
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What is “move for”?

In the entry of the word "move" in the Oxford dictionary (https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/move_1?q=move", I came across the phrasal verb "move for" and I don't know what ...
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Is “avail to” ever acceptable?

My instructor put this in his course materials: Although this is an online class where you can avail yourself to your textbook etc. Is there any circumstance in which "avail to [object]" would be ...
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Is it wrong to say ''get out your book''

1) When we are in class, is it wrong to say ''get out your books'' to the students? Should it be ''get your books out''? Is there a difference? Or is it ''take out your books / take your books out''?...
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Verb for describing the act of someone who seemingly speak confidently on a subject he/she does not know well

I am looking for a verb (or phrasal verbs) for describing the act of someone who seemingly speaks confidently on a topic he/she isn't actually sure of (he/she knows it inside). It is not like "...
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Why isn’t “running late” a phrasal verb?

Can someone tell me why 'running late' is not a phrasal verb? Running is a verb and late is an adjective, so wouldn't they together make a phrasal verb? Thank you.
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In “stick something on”, is “on” an adverb or a preoposition?

Basically what title says. I've been trying to find this on google but I have not found anything. I just know that on is an adverb when it "modifies a verb", but in this scenario I am not really sure. ...
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786 views

apologise for or apologise about

Recently I found out some forums asking if "apologise about" is or not correct, but none of them have clear response. Can someone explain if there is any difference between those two terms? It is ...
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4answers
108 views

call on - trans or intransitive verb

Merriam-Webster gives: call - intransitive verb: to make a brief visit called on a friend Whereas Macmillan has: call on - transitive verb [call on someone] to visit someone, usually for a ...
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Why isn't the preposition “from” used to form self-sufficient phrasal verbs?

Let's define a self-sufficient phrasal verb as a phrasal verb that does not require a complement. For example, "come in" is a self-sufficient phrasal verb because you can say, "Come in!" Analogously, "...
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3answers
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Building sits or building stands?

Is the sentence correct " We don't need a parliament.Build a temple where the building stands." or will it be " We don't need a parliament.Build a temple where the building sits." Will it depend ...
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410 views

Attend you or attend to you?

An Amazon delivery guy rang me and told that he was waiting for me at my place and I replied by saying that "I won't be able to attend you before 12 pm" but I am a bit confused about whether I was ...
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What is the origin of the phrasal verb “rope into”?

e.g. “I was roped into doing it” From what I can find on the web, “know the ropes” originates either from sailing or theatre. “On the ropes” may originate from boxing. The one article I found ...
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Baldur's Gate: EE What does this sentence mean? [closed]

I'm playing a PC game 'Baldur's Gate:EE' and I can't understand this sentence. It is from a character in the game. "I bet those rank-ridin' bandits are hired by the Amnian. It'd be like those ...
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fall behind with or on

When we use "fall behind with" and "fall behind on"? I mean when we use that verb with "with" and when we use with "on"? He was ill for six weeks and fell behind with his schoolwork. I've fallen ...
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Phrasal prepositional verbs with objects and adverbs?

"We fixed Tom up quickly with new tools" Hi guys, here's a doubt I have. Although I would more than likely place the adverb "quickly" between the subject "We" and verb "fixed" in this sentence to ...
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273 views

Is the verb for this gesture “wave off?”

Here is the definition: to wave off To dismiss or refuse by waving the hand or arm: waved off his invitation to join the group. But can "wave off" also be used for this gesture, ...
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what does it mean to say “it is on London to find an approvable Brexit deal”

This sentence is odd to me: Ms May's position that it is on London to find an approvable Brexit deal and not on Brussels, has been replaced by a new doctrine. "it is on" / "not on" - is this a ...
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206 views

How to stress Phrasal verb?

Many people told me that the particle is stressed when it comes to Intransitive Phrasal Verb. (like "warm up" in this video https://youtu.be/9I1DBOJERns?t=3) (Text: Winter's over, the weather's ...
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What is the difference of “speak at” and “speak of”?

I am looking for the exact meaning of the verb “to speak at”. When we use speak at something instead of speak of something? For example what is the meaning of this sentence: They allow him to ...
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29 views

Is “there are” a phrasal verb? [duplicate]

The English verb "there be" in its various forms "there were," "there is," "there are," "there will be," etc. are equivalent to the Spanish verb "haber" in its forms "hubo," "hay," "habrá," etc. ...

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