Questions tagged [phrasal-verbs]

A phrasal verb is a combination of a verb and a preposition, a verb and an adverb, or a verb with both an adverb and a preposition.

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27 views

Relative infinitive vs purpose infinitive [closed]

I bought a knife to cut bread with. I think possible interpretations of (1) would be: a) I bought a knife with which I/you/one can cut bread. (This implies that not all knives are appropriate for ...
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Is there a word for concentric circles that move outward from the centre?

I'm looking for a word, a technical term of mathematics perhaps, that describes the process of there being a centre point, and outwards from which concentric circles are added, each circle having a ...
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Rustle up, cook up, google up—what’s up with phrasal verbs?

I was reading Why is “rustle up” different from “rustle”? which I came across as I was looking for a duplicate for google up meaning on ELL, and it made me realize how little I know about phrasal verb ...
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what does “back up” mean in this context:

At some point, once you've established the habit and you're showing up each day, you can combine the two-minute rule with a technique we call habit shaping to scale your habit back up toward your ...
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68 views

Off-of Combination

Not sure how to name this correctly, but there seems to be a trend of adding an "of" to phrasal verbs that ends in "off" and I'm wondering if that is, in fact, correct English. ...
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2answers
140 views

A multi-word verb which is the opposite of 'stress out'

I ran a bunch of errands today that involved dealing with people who don't know what they are talking about, and when I got home there were six letters from the US government sitting in my mailbox, ...
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To go past something [migrated]

"To go past something" The dictionary says, it means to pass by or around something Collins says, If you pass by something, you go past it or near it on your way to another place. Now, I ...
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“lift/raise all up to” or “lift/raise up all to”

I know the rule with phrasal verbs and pronouns is that If the object is a personal pronoun (me, you, him, us, etc.), we always put the pronoun before the particle: Oh, I can’t lift you up any more. ...
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Meaning of “snatch the words from”

What is the meaning of "snatch the words from" as in this sentence: I have seen a religious who used to snatch the words from his superior’s lips, but I despaired of his obedience when I ...
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Hold phrasal verb for “waiting until something happens” [closed]

I'm looking for the "hold" phrasal verb that means that I will stop doing something until something else is ready. "John's report is input to my task so I will wait for that Would that ...
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difference between put the fire out and put out the fire [duplicate]

what is the difference between these two? put out the fire and put the fire out what are the use cases? do they mean the same or not? another example is take off take it off or take off it => here ...
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Does “rent out” only refer to when the owner offers something for others to pay to use, or also to when the user pays the owner to use something?

I'm a gen-X native Australian English speaker and am listening to a YouTube video by a millennial native Australian English speaker in which he uses "to rent out" to refer to the person ...
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Casual way of asking someone how they found or calculated a number? [closed]

I am doing some calculations for a work project, and I guess that I have made a mistake in finding Flow Rate. I want to ask a coworker in a casual manner that where he/she get the flow rate from. This ...
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1answer
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What does “come in” mean in the following context?

where does the Pro in iPad Pro come in? Microphones come in an assortment of configurations to meet a variety of uses. Does it means to function as some kind of contributor? Or does it mean to become ...
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Reference Request on Preposition Fronting

Currently reading "A Student's Introduction to English Grammar" by Geoffrey K. Pullum and Rodney Huddleston. Consider the following contrast between the phrasal verbs ask for and come across....
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“Try on some of them” or “Try some of them on”?

I’ve learnt that some phrasal verbs such as “pick up” or “try on” require us to put the object, especially when it is a pronoun, between the verb and preposition. Is it also possible to say “You ...
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“how to deal with the problem” vs “what to do with the problem” [closed]

He knows how to deal with the problem. He knows what to do with the problem. Can we switch between " how" and " what"? Why and why not?
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“Covered in” or “Covered with” trash [duplicate]

The mountain is covered in trash The mountain is covered with trash I find both of them correct but I can't say for sure. Is "covered in" or "covered with" more suitable in this ...
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How you say to take notes/information in this context?

The idea is that take notes means to store info about something, so is this context correct? I placed an order, but they didn't note well my info. When you are taking somebody's info, how do you say ...
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What does “not to look over the best scenes” mean in the following sentence?

... a detailed analysis will help them to notice the most important film elements and not to look over the best scenes. I think that means that a good review of a movie (the full text is about that) ...
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38 views

Do components of a phrasal verb still have a meaning each?

Do components of a phrasal verb still have a meaning each or have a meaning together? For example, ‘look down on’: ‘to think of or treat (someone or something) as unimportant or not worthy of respect’ ...
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How do native speakers think about phrasal verbs?

I would like to ask a question about phrasal verbs. Do native english speakers think about the meaning of each individual word of the phrasal verb when they will say it or they just think about the ...
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How would you describe a car kicking up clouds of dust as an adverb of a car heading somewhere?

I am trying to translate a sentence from Turkish to English. I'm almost satisfied and it is something along the lines of A black car kicking up clouds of dust was seen heading to the city from a ...
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2answers
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meaning of “Calmly and deliberately, she cut up his suits one by one.” [closed]

In the definition of "deliberately" in Cambridge English Dictionary, the second meaning which is "slowly and carefully" has an example: Calmly and deliberately, she cut up his ...
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What is the meaning of the verb “step across”? [closed]

I am quoting from The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes, The Reigate Squires by Arthur Conan Doyle :"The colonel waved his hand towards my friend and the inspector bowed.'We thought that perhaps you ...
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What's a phrasal verb that means pretending to be nice in expectation of getting something in return?

I want to find a phrasal verb that means pretending to be nice/friendly to someone because you think he/she will help you do something.
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355 views

Following on from vs Following up on

I just want to understand the difference between "Following up on & Following on from". Is it exactly the same meaning? Here you have an example: Following on from your email below ...
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“Open onto” vs. “open into”

When is one preferred over the other? This is in the context of the door to a large room. My sense is that "into" is preferred for closed spaces and "onto" for open spaces. This ...
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1answer
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Why do some verbs have “directions” as adverbs?

I recently noticed how many verbs have "directions" as adverbs: "look up", "find out", "talk down", "figure out", "walk up", "look down&...
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What to say when someone's answer is not related to our question or at least we think it's not? [duplicate]

I would say: "How's that related to my question ?" Please answer for both formal and informal cases
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Word for: Sleep until some bad situation/feeling subsides or ends

When one waits until some difficulty has passed, we say "wait something out". Is there a word/expression in English for sleeping until your hunger, pain, or negative emotions subside?
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How do we tell the difference between a prepositional phrase and a particle phrase?

From the Farlex Grammar Book, their main difference is that particles cannot introduce a prepositional phrase-a preposition + its object-while a preposition always does. Please look over these ...
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What's the difference between chip away and chip away AT something? [closed]

I've been trying to identify the difference in usage between saying chip away and chip away at something but I can't see any. The sentences in dictionaries all seem like they could accept both. So my ...
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'reflect back on' or 'reflect on' some event in the past?

As the title suggests, should I use "reflect back on" or "reflect on" when talking about something in the past? For example: I find myself reflecting on the journey that has led ...
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Why can't we say “sign in into”?

When it comes to the sentence Sign in to your account, I understand why it is more proper to say sign in to as opposed to sign into. Sign in is a phrasal verb and to is the preposition. However, I ...
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3answers
176 views

Why do we say “put out a fire”?

I came across this in an EFL text book, in an exercise that required the student to link a phrasal verb with the correct object, and it struck me as not at all obvious. The most common usage of 'out' ...
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131 views

Phrasal verbs as hyphenated adjectives

So I recently had a question of how to translate a seemingly simple phrase which gave rise to a really puzzling dilemma. The phrase itself was "the eye which had been operated on", it was ...
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Interview answer

Dears, Could you please help with the sentence below, which phrasal verb and verb to use? My goal at this point is to capitalize upon/ on new opportunities for career development, looking for/ ...
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what is the appropriate answer to this clause?

I got this question, but I'm very confused between A and D.
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Phrasal verb: Wash upon

Non-native english speaker here. The context is songwriting. Can a tide "wash upon" someone or something?
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Phrasal verb “scale out”

I received an email from my advisor and he uses the verb "scale out". Since I am not an english native speaker, I tried to find the definition on the web but didn't find anything useful. The ...
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The difference between “have got” and “have got to”?

I have been asked about the difference between Have got Have got to Are they considered as present perfect forms?
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49 views

Observation: “Take back” is used in impolite speech, while “Bring back” is used in polite speech. Is there any basis to this?

I'm an English teacher working with an advanced student. They asked me to teach them how to ask for help or support when things aren't going they way they should. I decided to teach him that it is ...
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Subject + caution; advise +object + recognize; acknowledge

I am in limbo about the syntax of a certain sentence I am formulating. To me, the following sentence (with the alternative word choice combinations) is intelligible and grammatical; however, when I ...
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3answers
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How to describe situation when two people can't meet?

How to describe situation when two people can't meet cause they're never at the same place at the same time. Example: John and Michael are friends. They both do the shopping at the local shop every ...
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1answer
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What is the difference between “out of”, “from” and “off (of)”? [closed]

I dont know when to use each of them when it comes to places I know how to use "out of" and "off" like get in the car and get off roof but in these sentence it says: the teachers ...
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840 views

Passive of “show off”

I came across this sentence in a novel: I wonder if she had been the same as me, always being showed off by that genius... Usually the phrasal verb "show off" is used in active voice, so I ...
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“to walk something” meaning “to carry something”?

This is from a book "Confess" by Colleen Hoover. "To walk something" meaning "to carry" or "to bring" - is this just a case of a missed word ("with") ...
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Are prepositional verbs a sub-classification of phrasal verbs or considered a totally separate category? [duplicate]

In researching the classification of verbs that are accompanied by other words that may be adverbs or prepositions it seems like some sources favor prepositional verbs as a sub-category and others ...
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203 views

How to describe putting on a coat [closed]

Is there a way to "he put on his coat" without actually using the verb "put on"? A friend suggested "he dressed his coat" but it sounds very strange to me.

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