Questions tagged [phrasal-verbs]

A phrasal verb is a combination of a verb and a preposition, a verb and an adverb, or a verb with both an adverb and a preposition.

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What is the phrasal verb for working hard?

I can't recall that phrasal verb and I'm upset. It's like a 's**** away' phrasal verb. Also, if I've got it right, it means to work hard, but it's not slave away. Anyone?
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Agent nouns and other derivatives of phrasal verbs that have their order reversed

Recently I read the word "upstander" on a counselling poster, and wondered about having prepositions/particles before the verbs in phrasal verbs' derivatives. The only other such noun I could think of ...
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Is that “log on” the website or “log onto” the website? [duplicate]

Is that "log on" the website or "log onto" the website? What is a difference?
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1answer
28 views

meaning of a phrasal verb

The passage is from IT by Stephen King. They ran down Center Street. People turned to look at them. Ben’s large stomach pogoed up and down. Beverly’s pony-tail bounced. Richie let go of Ben and ...
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2answers
32 views

Is it correct, look for + in?

Is it correct, the use of look for + in? Example: I looked for in the list of countries... If not which ones will be the alternatives? Thanks in advance.
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2answers
49 views

Translation into english [closed]

which one is the correct translation of this sentence in Portuguese? “Ela subiu a escada correndo para me trazer a carta.” None of them sound good to me. The best structure in the second one, but one ...
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46 views

“Too short a time” or “Too short of a time”? [duplicate]

What is the correct phrase to be used among these two: Too short a time Or Too short of a time Which one is correct for daily English usage?
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2answers
55 views

Carry on vs Carry out

Is it With enough light, plants carry out a normal life cycle or With enough light, plants carry on a normal life cycle I'm confused because I'm not getting the exact difference between ...
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1answer
38 views

How to identify a phrasal verb + object from a verb + prepositional phrase

In sentences with the combination “verb + preposition + noun phrase” is there a procedure to identify whether it is a phrasal verb + object or a verb + prepositional phrase? or does it solely depend ...
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1answer
172 views

“Cope with” or “cope up with” [closed]

I want to learn the difference between "cope with" and "cope up with". Is the second one wrong or in use? Thanks in advance.
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2answers
219 views

“provide X to someone” vs “provide X for someone”

I am confused by the different explanations in the following two dictionaries. Macmillan says “provide A to B”, while The Free Dictionary says it is wrong and tells us not to say “provide A to B”, ...
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3answers
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Is it ever correct to use “on” after “continue”?

Is it ever grammatically correct to use the word "on" after the word "continue"? as in: "After this break, we will continue on with the broadcast."
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1answer
20 views

meaning of 'rise to do'

What does 'rise to (do)' mean in this sentence? Something like 'come to' or 'get to'? They later went to work at regular jobs. But none rose to become a good scholar or a fine artist.
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3answers
105 views

“pay out” vs “pay off”

"pay out" vs "pay off" In my company we are selling things and expecting to get money from customers by instalments. English is my second language. But I often hear things like "pay out payments" ...
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1answer
49 views

What is the exact meaning of “bid him be of good heart”? [closed]

“He is a prophet of this people,” Waraqa assured his cousin after hearing her story. “Bid him be of good heart.” What is the exact meaning of "bid him be of good heart" here? Pls help.
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27 views

Take vs. Take over

In the context of customer support, when a support agent starts working on new ticket and marks it as hers; What would be the correct form to describe this action? Would it be correct to call it "...
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Odd sounding phrasal verb splits with specific pronouns. Are there rules? [duplicate]

Give the examples... A: Did you check it out? Did you check the book out? Did you check Netflix out? Did you check the recommendation out? Did you clean it out? Did you wipe it off? Did you log it ...
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4answers
67 views

What is/are the synonym/s for 'to move to sit closer to someone'?

I have a couple of things in mind, but I'm not sure if they can be applied to sitting position. For example, if I'm sitting on the other end of the couch, and then I move to sit closer to someone ...
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2answers
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How to say my meetings have caused cascading delay

What is another way to say to co-workers that my previous meeting took longer than expected (and hence I am late for the current meeting). and what is the business and also day to day common phrase(...
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1answer
86 views

“hold on I'll put you through” or “hang on I'll put you through”

Hello, this is Melanie Brown from Central Bank. Can I speak to Mr. Clark? Please (hold on / hang on) I'll put you through. Which one - hold on or hang on - is the more appropriate, frequently ...
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1answer
77 views

“Carry on” vs “carry on with”

Does the insertion of with here make a difference? Is one incorrect, or one more correct than the other? to carry on watching the cartoon to carry on with watching the cartoon
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1answer
196 views

Reach up / reach for / reach at / reach out / reach down

I’m trying to describe a character reaching his hands out trying to catch a frog: _He reached his hands out to catch the frog… I wasn’t sure which preposition to use with the phrasal verb. I looked ...
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2answers
155 views

What is the difference in meaning between “get back to him” and “get back at him”? [closed]

And you were afraid that if you started asking questions, it would get back to him From The Outsider by Stephen King I know that to “get back at someone” is similar to humiliate or to wreak revenge....
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Meaning of “finesse away”

I've run into the following sentence: [...] that we are building utopias in our virtualities that will finesse away the imperfections of human character. I could not find in any place the meaning ...
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3answers
109 views

What kind of verb should be used in order to say that something has increased or created inefficiency?

What kind of verb should be used in order to say that something has increased or created inefficiency? Maybe generate or produce? Edit: I'm asking this because created or increased inefficiency ...
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0answers
60 views

How to use phrasal verbs with prepositions without thinking which i have to use

I am frustrated about unawareness how to use up/down/with etc. with phrasal verbs properly.Being from Ukraine can't really understand if it means something or it is just a combination of words. So, my ...
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3answers
101 views

The difference in meaning between go in and go into

Q: Is there a difference in meaning between those two sentences? I went in knowing that no matter what happened... I went into this knowing that no matter what happened... (my ...
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2answers
62 views

Cheer her on or cheer on her?

Which of these sentences is correct? Becky's parents cheer her on during her matches. Becky's parents cheer on during her matches. Becky's parents cheer on her during her matches. The last ...
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1answer
233 views

Aim at verb+ING vs Aim to verb

In a book about the philosopher Collingwood, I have found the following statement about logic. At first glance, it seems to me that the change from aim to to aim at is merely stylistic, but I think ...
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1answer
51 views

What is the grammatical function of “open” in “break open”?

In a sentence like the following, what part of speech is open. The students broke open the hostel gate. The M-W dictionary states "break open" is a phrasal verb. And the dictionary defines a ...
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1answer
44 views

Is the second preposition necessary in “operated on on Jane's knee”?

I came across this construction in which the same preposition was used twice: The doctor operated on on Jane's knee last night. Is the second preposition necessary here?
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1answer
72 views

Why is it “tuck in” and not just “tuck”?

Is there a rule for when to use ‘in’ as in “tuck in”? Or is it a thing to remember? Example: Tuck in your shirt
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2answers
27 views

Is “track adequately down” a correct phrasing?

According to Collins Dictionary: If you track down someone or something, you find them, or find information about them, after a difficult or long search. Now, I want to put some more emphasis in ...
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What does 'for' mean in 'We are done for'?

There is an English expression do for, which means to kill, to execute, to ruin, to defeat etc. and this expression seems to always be used in passive voice: e.g.) We are done for. I understand this ...
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1answer
341 views

Difference between out and off

Is it possible to define the main difference between ”out” and ”off” as particles when they are part of a phrasal verb? I have read the definitions given in the Collins dictionary. And they are many ...
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1answer
31 views

Possessive usage “ours”

I often hear that in the English language one of the ways to avoid repetition is to use possessive pronouns when possible. I'd like to know if the usage in the sentence below ("ours" as a pronoun for "...
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1answer
57 views

Change to vs Change with?

I have looked on the internet regarding this issue and could not find a definitive answer so I posted the question here. Which one do I use if I want to change something to something else? Example ...
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4answers
938 views

what's the word for when you don't resist doing something you don't want to do?

What's it called when you unenthusiastically do something that you have reservations about. You might consciously resist participating in something because you're ethically opposed to it or because it ...
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1answer
471 views

Is there a phrasal verb with the meaning of 'substitute'?

I know there's the phrasal fill in / fill in for, which means substitute or replace someone for what I know. Though, what I am looking for is a phrasal to use in a phrase where something is being ...
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1answer
600 views

set to vs set at

When talking about odds, say in sports, should I say "Betn1 set Team A's odds at 10/1" or "Betn1 set Team A's odds to 10/1"?
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1answer
116 views

click vs click on vs click through

How does "click" in the context of the sentences below differ from click on and click through? Click the link to subscribe. Click on the link to subscribe. Click through the link to ...
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4answers
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Looking for a phrasal verb to say the hidden reason behind of several issues

I'm not even sure whether there is existence of such phrasal verb in English or not. But probably native speakers can help me out with this. All of your friend's problems are due to his recent ...
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2answers
2k views

Recommended to vs recommended for [closed]

Should I write "This is recommended to people who like cheap but highly useful stuff" or "This is recommended for people who like cheap but highly useful stuff"?
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1answer
915 views

What's the difference between sign up with and sign up for?

Is it right to write "Sign up with the organization"? How about "Sign up for the program"?
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2k views

What is the difference between swing by, drop by, and stop by?

Do drop by, swing by, and stop by all have the same meaning? Is there a difference in usage?
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run out usage with timeframes

If I'm waiting for something happen and I know that it will happen in 3 months. Can I say "When 3 months run out I'll do it". Is that grammatically correct?
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2answers
122 views

How did “dial back” come to mean “to reduce pressure on sth”

In a recent article from CNBC they say: ”Trump will dial back his trade pressure if markets tank.” Dial back/down is defined by Longman Dictionary as an AmE phrasal verb meaning: to reduce ...
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2answers
71 views

Meaning of “obtain to”

What is the meaning of the English phrase "obtain to"? I came across this in newspapers today. From the extradition hearing kicked off for last December, and has focused largely on a series of ...
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6answers
1k views

What phrasal verb or expression is used to say “make a short stop”?

So what I’m trying to say is “I made a short stop to buy coffee”, but in a more colloquial way. Is it okay to say “I stopped by to buy coffee? Or Like what would the correct expression be?
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1k views

Correct usage of “consists of”

I found a confusing usage of "consist of" in Belles Make Up site: Water consists of 70% of our whole body. I think that above sentence is wrong because water is within our body, not the body ...