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Questions tagged [speech]

Questions about spoken English.

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1answer
20 views

Need help with the sentence structure for my pitch, thanks!

Back story: I am to give a 3 minute pitch on a task i worked on. I would like to something like, "As a general knowledge, we know that smartphones are dominated by IOS and android. Which is why ...
0
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1answer
23 views

“first time” as an adverb meaning “for the first time”

Can first time be used as an adverb meaning "for the first time", e.g. when I met him first time (Confession Tapes, third episode, 02:40)
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1answer
26 views

'Thanks for.. ' or 'I thank you for…'

I was wondering if the expression "I thank you for your answer" isn't nicer than " Thank you for your answer". For comparison, saying "I thank you" in French is nicer because the person who says it ...
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3answers
677 views

What is the difference between “nearly drowned” and “nearly rescued”?

I am pondering over the meaning of the riddle: Would you rather be nearly drowned or nearly rescued? Could some one explain the meaning of the two phrases "nearly drowned" & "nearly rescued" ? ...
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1answer
79 views

“25th De­cem­ber” vs “25 De­cem­ber”: Should I use or­di­nals or car­di­nals for the day of the month?

In one of the IELTS lis­ten­ing tests, there is a fill-out-the-blank ques­tion read­ing: The mu­seum is not open on ___. My an­swer was “25th De­cem­ber”. How­ever, the of­fi­cial an­swer is “25 ...
-1
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1answer
21 views

Commas around speech

Which is correct: I told myself "I must go onward" or I told myself , "I must go onward!" I can't decide whether to include the comma or not.
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2answers
72 views

How do you quote a quotation that itself has mismatched quotes?

Suppose that Eve said (in spoken English) An apple a day keeps the doctor away, unquote. Also isn't Eve such a great person? Like my mom always said quote Eve is the best person ever, much ...
2
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1answer
94 views

What is this word spoken in this video and what does it mean?

Prior to the word/s I can't understand there was a discussion on what the historical sources of British individual civil freedoms have been. A few of the reasons given for these British values have ...
1
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1answer
51 views

Which construction is more cormmon?

I know my question may seem silly to native speakers, but l am really interested in knowing which construction is more common in everyday speech: He is married and has two sons. He is married, with ...
5
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2answers
1k views

What does camping on foods mean in American English?

I saw two guys joking around, the first one had had a Cheetos bag. Here is the conversation that took place between them: First guy: Do you wanna little snack? Second guy: Yeh, actually, it's ...
0
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1answer
26 views

Problem in formulating question [duplicate]

Consider this scenario...Sam ate 4 cookies. Now if someone asks Sam How many you had, then Sam will reply 4. But how should the question be formed so that the answer Sam gives will be 4th instead of 4?...
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2answers
61 views

reported speech + would have to

What is the correct form of switching from Direct speech to Reported speech in this example: A policeman says "You will have to turn back because the road is closed" Shall it be: 1) A policeman ...
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1answer
79 views

A: You haven't heard it? B: No, I heard it (nodding a yes)

A: You haven't heard it? B: No, I heard it (nodding a yes) I'd always expect as a positive response to a negative question Yes, I heard it / did. Why so? Link to video 22:32
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3answers
148 views

How would you say “0.4 - 1g?”

Assuming I don't want to say "zero point four grams to one gram," would it be: "zero point four to one gram" or "zero point four to one grams" or neither? I'm leaning towards the second one ...
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0answers
49 views

Vowel shift in Michigan accent?

I’ve spent a fair amount of time in Michigan because my grandparents live there. By today’s standards, they have very heavy accents, with full Canadian raising and the northern cities vowel shift. ...
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0answers
52 views

Some words in The Boy at Mugby

I'm trying to read my way through The Boy at Mugby by Charles Dickens. The story is written in an 'accented' language, and there are a few words I'm having trouble making out: (The text excerpts are ...
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2answers
312 views

which group I belong to vs to which group I belong [duplicate]

I don't know which group I belong to. I don't know to which group I belong. Which one of the sentences is true? Note: An answer was given to this question when it still read "I don't know (to) ...
4
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1answer
69 views

Young native-speaking males emphasizing deep voices

Recently a possibly new speech pattern has come to my attention and I am wondering whether it is genuine or whether I am mistaken. It is young, male native speakers emphasizing a deep, "rough" voice. ...
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2answers
166 views

Contraction “-'dn't” from formal English “would not”

Can "wouldn't" be reduced to the clitic -'dn't when attached to any other pronoun besides y'all, such as she'dn't or you'dn't? (Appearing for example in "y'all'dn't've" from formal English "you all ...
1
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2answers
65 views

What word describes this verbal slip-up?

I just overheard my officemate, while she was on a conference call, say "My muke was mited", and I've said before "We need some more print for the inker". These aren't quite spoonerisms, as far as I ...
0
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2answers
70 views

“do you have” pronounced [djuv] d'you've

I hear contraction d'you've from "do you have" quite often, broadly [djuv], yet google throws back no result for such a phonetic word. I'd like to know how it's orthographically represented. For ...
1
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1answer
46 views

What's the difference between a “main stage speech” and a “panel speech”? [closed]

So our company is intended to participate in one of the meetings and give a speech. And the host offered two different speech types, a "main stage speech" and a "panel speech" with different prices. ...
1
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1answer
508 views

How to read Figure xx.x or Section xx.x

I wonder that whether there is a special reading way pertaining to American or British. For example, Figure 12.3 shows a paused video touched on in Section 2.10 with the width, height, and ...
0
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1answer
124 views

Is it okay to say “what ja doing?” instead of “what ya doing?”

I live in the Midwest and it is very common to hear people say "what ja doing?" instead of saying "what ya doing?" or "what are you doing?". Is this okay? Is using the 'j' sound instead of the 'y' ...
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0answers
44 views

Is this slogan grammatically correct?

I've been wanting to use a slogan but I don't know if it makes sense. The slogan is: Never forget 2013, the year of great elation. It sounds okay but someone told me that I need to rewrite it as "...
12
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2answers
2k views

What's the origin of the second-person 'we'?

I've often heard the phrase what do we have here to mean what do you have. And also, recently, I've heard a teacher ask one of his students struggling with an assignment: do we have a problem?, as in ...
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1answer
36 views

can we omit the subject while talking?

ı have read a book and heard of it a lot.someone is talking and says"could not sleep last night" or "just preparing" sentences like that can we always do this or just only while speaking
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3answers
301 views

Term used when answering a question with a lowered tone?

Is there a term/phrase that can be used to describe the answering of a question with such a tone that would indicate that the answer isn't as all it seems? For example, if one person were to ask ...
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1answer
78 views

How can I improve my speaking? [closed]

When I speak I use a small vocabulary, even though I know a lot more than that. Those words tend to be vague and boring. I know other alternatives for those words, although it doesn't come out ...
0
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1answer
48 views

In/on the/ line/page

Which of the following 4 possibilities is used when? in line in the line on line on the line E.g. how do I correctly say There is a typo in line 6 of this paragraph. And I have the same question ...
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0answers
66 views

Different pronunciations of “-ead”/“-ed”/“-aid” words

I find that American/British English dialects tend to pronounce words like "bed", "red", "dead", "bred", "said", etc. with the exact same vowel sound: the IPA ɛ vowel (- and so this question may seem ...
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0answers
24 views

Is it necessary to add a comma before 'too'? [duplicate]

Copied over from the writers site. As in these two examples: They all wished to have one too. They all wished to have one, too. Perhaps what makes comma usage in these examples is that, in speech ...
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0answers
40 views

Is there a strong correlation between speech rate and beat rate in English

Can speech rate in English be reliably measured through the beat rate? Beat rate analysis is now pretty standard, and a plethora of algorithms can reliably measure beat rate — typically in beats per ...
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0answers
44 views

Usage of Negatives in Everyday Speach: Unnecessary or Incorrect

I frequently have this debate with my fiancée about whether it is as appropriate to use a negative in the following examples as it is to omit it. I am frequently found making statements using the ...
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0answers
162 views

How do I make the velar nasal /ŋ/ sound? [closed]

Can someone please explain how to pronounce the velar nasal sound (/ŋ/, as in English "ng", but that's why I'm asking). To restate the question: How do I pronounce /ŋ/? (Note: This isn't a discussion ...
-1
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2answers
113 views

How does a salesclerk in England welcome a customer and ask what they want?

When you go to a bakery in England in the afternoon, and you are not a familiar customer, how does the salesperson greet you, and how do they ask what you would like? “Good afternoon, sir. How may I ...
4
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3answers
2k views

Is “Too Much People” possible when I want to get the feeling of uncountable people?

Of course the rule is countable = many Uncountable = much But I see in some contexts that it's possible to exist this sense when I can't count in a way that it's exaggerated. "There were too much ...
0
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1answer
58 views

How do teens in Northern England greet each other? [closed]

Do they say "hi" or "hey" or "hello", or what do they say when they meet someone they know on the street?
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0answers
43 views

Is www an abbreviation?

The initialism "www" means "world wide web". The common definition of an initialism is that it is an abbreviation, formed by using the first letter of each word. According to most definitions, an ...
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0answers
29 views

Modals in the past + reported speech

If the original sentence looks like this: You should have asked me, 'Can I take your car?' Should the 'reported speech' one look like this: You should have asked me if you could take my car. ...
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0answers
195 views

I realized now how far important this information was [closed]

Is this sentence grammatically OK? I realized now how far important this information was.
3
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1answer
574 views

Is “the way how” grammatically incorrect? [duplicate]

(I am not a native speaker so my writing probably seems to be odd. Please understand some Non-grammar...) I learned that "the way how" is grammatically wrong because 'the way' and 'how' have same ...
4
votes
1answer
185 views

What word do Americans use for dirt?

I'm aware that in America the word "dirt" is a synonym/replacement for earth/soil/peat/turf.etc whereas in the UK "dirt" would typically refer to uncleanliness, detritus, and granular rubbish (i.e. ...
2
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0answers
41 views

Is there an analysis of the construction “my friend she is nice.” [duplicate]

I am researching syntactic idiosyncrasies of verbal communication and am interested in a construction in which a noun is reiterated with a pronoun. As children, we're all taught to avoid ...
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0answers
123 views

Seeking rules about adding grammar-based pauses in spoken English

I believe the following topic is in the scope of the site: Pronunciation/phonology, more specifically: how sound is structured for conveying linguistic meaning. I am seeking rules about where to ...
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1answer
35 views

Is there a word that captures the different moods and ways a word can be pronounced in?

I am looking for a way to categorize these different ways a given word can be said to convey completely different emotions in different contexts, and I feel like there is some proper term for it that ...
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2answers
338 views

Should I use contracted forms in scientific presentations?

In a scientific paper am I right in believing that one would write “it is” instead of “it’s”? In a scientific presentation, would one use contracted forms like “it’s” instead of “it is” or is ...
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0answers
254 views

How to convert indirect speech with no subject to direct speech ?

In the ICSE Boards 2018 Examination this was asked- The delivery boy was requested to bring the parcel the next day. I wrote - Someone said to the delivery boy, " Please bring the parcel tomorrow." ...
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0answers
65 views

'We was drinking watermelon'… What is this form and to what extent is it acceptable in English? [duplicate]

I've noticed on several occasions native English speakers say: 'We was going there', 'She do' etc. and I was wondering what is the meaning of that for a native speaker; is it just a colloquialism? As ...
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0answers
30 views

What is the accepted convention for transcribing audio speech dysfluencies and repeated utterances?

If this question belongs in another topic, refer me to the correct site. I came across some transcripts in which the text says ah When the audio actually says uh. Another example is when the ...