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Questions tagged [speech]

Questions about spoken English.

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4 votes
3 answers
252 views

Term for pronouncing every letter, like t in water

Native USA English speakers frequently skip (or elide?) certain letters, like the t in water, and modify others. What is a term for someone who (self-consciously?) pronounces every voiceable letter? P....
Richard Haven's user avatar
7 votes
5 answers
2k views

What part of speech is 'really' when it is spoken in a sentence on its own?

The word 'really' can be spoken in two ways, in a sentence on its own. Either in enthusiastic, and appreciative belief : You can run a hundred meters in 13 seconds. Really ? Or in cynical, one ...
Nigel J's user avatar
  • 24.8k
4 votes
1 answer
91 views

Are there any other out-loud-slashers here?

Native speaker (American English): I say "slash" out loud sometimes in place of "and" or "or," and an example sentence that is natural in my idiolect is "When slash ...
Sophie's user avatar
  • 212
5 votes
2 answers
678 views

How do I read aloud a range of years with a slash?

How do I read "During the 2002/2003 season" out loud? Should I say the word "slash" or replace it with “and” or "to"?
Maria 's user avatar
  • 71
0 votes
0 answers
20 views

Does this direct speech need a question mark? [duplicate]

I have this direct speech: "What's in the bag?" "Let me go!", said John. "What's in the bag, I said!" Does the last line need a question mark and if so, should it be ...
ServerBloke's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
11 views

What will be the passive voice sentences for these sentences? [closed]

How many men are there? How much milk he buys? There are books. It is a toy. Books are there.
raj rajput's user avatar
27 votes
5 answers
10k views

Is English really a non-tonal language?

The British Council Teaching English site says: English is not a tonal language – i.e. pitch changes in words do not change meanings. Patterns of pitch changes (intonation patterns) are [instead] ...
Sazzad Hissain Khan's user avatar
-1 votes
4 answers
113 views

Can I use the adjective “existing” with a noun, if there are no existing instances of that noun?

Would the following sentence make sense, if there are no existing instances the noun? I will go out and look for existing dinosaurs By using the adjective “existing”, the sentence refers to ...
Shuzheng's user avatar
  • 139
0 votes
1 answer
130 views

What is a word describing when someone pronounces a word according to how it's spelled, ignoring silent letters? [duplicate]

Phonetic spelling is when one spells a word according to how it is pronounced (e.g.; knight => nite). What word would be used to describe the pronunciation of a word based on how it is spelled, ...
QuickQuestion's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
420 views

What are the characteristics of masculine and feminine speech in English? [closed]

I imagine that people will instinctively say, "There is no masculine or feminine speech in English," but I am not so sure. For instance, the stereotype is that men speak roughly and women ...
Micheal Gignac's user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
77 views

How to parse the phrase: "attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder"

I am trying to figure out what this phrase deconstructs to. Does it imply a logical OR, like: "attention-deficit disorder" OR "hyperactivity disorder"? For additional context, ...
Swordfish's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
1k views

Among younger speakers, is 'bro' now gender-neutral?

I often hear 'bro' being used in a gender-neutral manner among younger speakers (mainly teenagers), and I'm wondering about the specifics of this trend. (Or at least it seems like a trend to me.) Here ...
Heartspring's user avatar
  • 8,620
1 vote
1 answer
44 views

Interpretation of the word "as" in this sentence [closed]

Consider the sentence "1/50 is 0.02 as a fraction." Which interpretation is correct, whether it is factually correct or incorrect? (That is, consider there to be a clear distinction between ...
Christopher Marley's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
34 views

Is there a name for the spoken emphasis like "Cuh-lean" for the word "clean" [duplicate]

At 8:15 in this video. https://youtu.be/Sly2Ik216DU?t=491 Anna says "That was cuh-lean!" as an emphasis on the word "clean". I've noticed this a few times in the past. Another ...
Fogmeister's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
32 views

Does the question "when did Alice tell you she would go?" ask about the date the plans were talked about or when she plans to go?

Here is the situation: Alice told Bob on Monday that she would go to the zoo on Friday. Now, if I ask Bob: "Hey Bob, when did Alice tell you she would go to the zoo?" Will Bob answer Monday ...
hydradon's user avatar
  • 101
5 votes
1 answer
442 views

"A hundred" treated as one word in speech (extra indefinite article)

I'm a teenager from Chicago. I've noticed some particular usages of the words "a hundred" by people around me. During a running workout, one student was 100 meters from the finish, while ...
Graham H.'s user avatar
  • 890
-1 votes
1 answer
37 views

Understanding the context of 'yes' in this sentence [duplicate]

Pretend I have the following conversation with somebody, either through internet text messaging or a verbal in person communication. The brief conversation is below. I ask: Would you like me to ...
securityauditor's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
99 views

Synonyms for "put somebody through their paces"?

What are some verbs and phrases to describe testing someone to see what they are capable of? I already know "put somebody through their paces".
AndrewHales's user avatar
3 votes
3 answers
461 views

"These ones... Those ones..."-Are those phrases correct? [duplicate]

I was at my house and my mom asked me to get chips. I got the chips and said These ones? Then my mom said "yes" and then my dad said "It's best to just say these". Was my ...
Bob's user avatar
  • 71
0 votes
1 answer
779 views

is "where's that' correct?

I was at school and my teacher asked us to look for something in our book. Then a lot of people started asking "Where's that at?", but I heard one person say "Where's that?", and ...
Bob's user avatar
  • 71
1 vote
2 answers
125 views

Is there a term for when people speak words with sounds connected together?

For example, "I must take control like Kevin" can be said like "I mus-tay-control-I-Kevin" in some dialects because it flows significantly more easily than if you enunciate every ...
Ness's user avatar
  • 113
-1 votes
1 answer
459 views

Does Mia Khalifa speak English with an accent?

She immigrated to America at age 7 (other sources say ten) she seems quite fluent to me. From Wikipedia Khalifa attended a French-language private school in Beirut, where she also learned to speak ...
ingaualbanian乚's user avatar
-3 votes
1 answer
89 views

What is the meaning of "Neanderthals on a day pass"? [closed]

Said as some sort of an insult I guess.
khatara's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
61 views

The word said by a student to denote the end of countdown in a PE class [duplicate]

‎What does the last student in the line say( in a PE class at school) when the class has lined up and counted off? At the beginning of a PE class, the teacher always asks students to line up in one ...
Marie Mit's user avatar
  • 301
-2 votes
1 answer
94 views

The proper word to denote the end of a count-off in the line in a PE class [closed]

‎What does the last student in the line say( in a PE class at school) when the class has lined up and counted off? At the beginning of a PE class, the teacher always asks students to line up in one ...
Marie Mit's user avatar
  • 301
0 votes
2 answers
831 views

What is the difference between "as tall as" and "just as tall as"?

What is the difference between I'm as tall as my father and I'm just as tall as my father? I know they are similar, But they make sense to be a little bit different. What is that difference?
sadegh yeganeh zadeh's user avatar
19 votes
7 answers
3k views

Word for heavily foreign-influenced speech?

Is there a word for when someone uses words wrongly, or uses outright nonexistent words, due to influence from foreign languages? Examples: I thought she loved me, but she bedragged me. (<- bedra(...
x22's user avatar
  • 193
0 votes
3 answers
105 views

Example word that is a homograph and preposition

My research involves the study of word frequency in American English and the importance of context when connecting text representations to different speech representations. I would like to know if ...
Joseph's user avatar
  • 103
0 votes
0 answers
322 views

Is there a name for how some people pronounce their s slightly differently?

I've noticed how some people pronounce the s sound in words using their upper teeth teeth and lower lip (instead of the conventional mostly internal way). This makes it sound almost lispy. I don't ...
Victor's user avatar
  • 1
5 votes
5 answers
251 views

Is this a gennel or just an alley?

This is a follow-on from a question I asked on Movies.SE, about the following shot from a TV show: I've always called this a gennel (probably more popularly known as a ginnel throughout the rest of ...
Prometheus's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
1k views

Rewriting in an indirect tone: B: "Peer pressure has its benefits as well. Our peers also motivate and inspire us to do better and work hard." [duplicate]

A: "It is difficult to fight against peer pressure." B: "Peer pressure has its benefits as well." So shouldn't this be: A said that it is difficult to fight against peer pressure. ...
ray's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
1 answer
149 views

Schwa in Webster dictionary [closed]

Why there are too many sounds marked by schwa in Webster's dictionary and how to recognize the correct pronunciation? E.g.: Cup /kʌp/ in Oxford and \ˈkəp\ in Webster Notice /ˈnəʊtɪs/ in Oxford and \...
Masked Man's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
39 views

Goodly/godly, loose/lose - name of the rhetorical device? [closed]

What is the name of the following rhetorical device? loose - lose goodly - godly (not in the sense that both words are used in a text but that one is used while implicitly implying the other, e.g. ...
Guest_04's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
775 views

Cardinal numbers in dates when speaking

I understand that in speaking (if we are talking strictly about formal rules) it is more common to use ordinal numbers and not cardinal numbers. However, it has come to my attention that people these ...
meepyer's user avatar
  • 708
2 votes
0 answers
163 views

When is the "t" pronounced in won’t, don’t, can’t?

I am a speaker of Canadian English. I have noticed that when people pronounce won’t, don’t, and can’t, often when speaking normally, they don’t release the “t”, as in connected speech. The standard ...
meepyer's user avatar
  • 708
5 votes
3 answers
513 views

We decided that if they do not leave the place in one day, we would surely force them out. To use 'do not' or 'did not' in this sentence?

We decided that if they do not leave the place in one day, we would surely force them out. We decided that if they did not leave the place in one day, we would surely force them out. Difference ...
Ammamon's user avatar
  • 201
0 votes
1 answer
61 views

What signifies a reporting clause?

I know reporting clauses are punctuated thus: (1) She said, 'We are about to close you know?' but what if the phrase prior to the speech is not a speech tag. For example, is it: (2) She looked ...
schoon's user avatar
  • 131
1 vote
1 answer
193 views

Is this a case of free indirect speech?

I would like to know if Rowling uses the technique of free indirect speech in this piece of Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, particularly in the italicized part. Harry was silent. Judging by ...
user445251's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
43 views

Sorkin's "Your imagination, like a child, will explode with unrestrained possibilities for adventure." Works so well despite feeling problematic; why? [closed]

I'm going to somewhat but not completely premise my question on the following: the line is likely written or edited by Aaron Sorkin rather than Kevin Falls (Galileo West Wing Season 2 Episode 9 ...
uhoh's user avatar
  • 879
0 votes
2 answers
58 views

Meaning of the Verses [closed]

Genesis 23:15-16 15 My master, hear me; the land is worth four hundred shekels of silver; what is that between me and you? and bury your dead. 16 And Abraham listened to Ephron, and Abraham weighed to ...
alyssaeliyah's user avatar
1 vote
4 answers
92 views

Talking without doing the act [duplicate]

What’s the word when you mention something without actually doing something about it. Like talking about climate change but not actually doing anything to mitigate it
Cara Durant's user avatar
3 votes
6 answers
166 views

Word for explaining something cruelly

I'm looking for something to describe speech that is something along the lines of cruel, menacing, tormenting, and dripping with malicious meaning. But not quite outright threatening, i.e. not "I'...
Raymo111's user avatar
  • 135
5 votes
4 answers
3k views

Help Fixing Yoda-like Sentence Structure? [closed]

I'm a native American English speaker and have noticed something in my speech/writing that I don't really understand. I've noticed my speech sounds "Yoda-ish" and have been trying to figure ...
nessefi's user avatar
  • 89
0 votes
1 answer
801 views

Why women are not called gentle? [duplicate]

Avoj friends I have a question - When the host say "Ladies and gentlemen" why they don't put gentle before Ladies? I think ladies are more gentle than men. Why not it be "men and gentle-...
Obascaevvoi's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
36 views

"It is!" I squealed at the same time she cried, "It's not!" - Is this sentence correct? [closed]

Is this sentence apt? - "It is!" I squealed at the same time she cried, "It's not!"
vidushi's user avatar
  • 19
0 votes
0 answers
214 views

Past Continuous in reported speech

Let's imagine someone has told me: Last month while we were traveling in Cyprus, my mother was packing her bags for her first ever foreign trip. I was wondering whether I could paraphrase it, and ...
Alexander Svetochev's user avatar
12 votes
5 answers
4k views

Do "cook the" and "cooked the" get pronounced differently?

How are they different in pronunciation? In other words, how can one recognise the difference purely by sound?
Worldclassics's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
341 views

Is the double "do" in the expression "If I do do it" more acceptable in spoken vs. written English? [closed]

I'm a native English speaker from the Midwestern United States. While writing a description to a colleague of some work that I recently did, I found myself typing a sentence to the effect of "I'...
M. Justin's user avatar
  • 973
0 votes
1 answer
56 views

Pronunciation of numbers in address [closed]

When I say the name of a street with “at”, like “at 12 Oxford St”, should I pronounce the number as cardinal or ordinal? And if it is ordinal, do I get it right that it still must always be written ...
qwerty456's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
107 views

Possessive apostrophes with names in speech marks [duplicate]

I'm translating a text that refers to a person who goes by a nickname, so in the text this nickname is always shown in speech marks - "El Cuco". How do I use a possessive apostrophe ...
Mark's user avatar
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