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Questions tagged [speech]

Questions about spoken English.

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1answer
43 views

Announcement for foreign people in a library (non English-speaking country)

This announcement is made before closure time in a library (latin country): "XYZ is closing in fifteen minutes. Those users who have to register loans or return in items are kindly requested to go to ...
1
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0answers
37 views

“Say” and “said” as transitive and intransitive verbs

I have an interesting question. Is "say" a transitive verb in the case of direct/reported speech? I understand that it can be a transitive verb in cases like "She said the phrase." or "She says the ...
6
votes
2answers
206 views

Why you're laughing vs Why are you laughing?

Recently I was talking to my friend in English. He started laughing and I asked him Why you're laughing man? Someone told me you should say Why are you laughing? and this one is totally wrong. I got ...
0
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0answers
37 views

What are the constraints on people adding 's or -es when pronouncing brand names

People sometimes add an 's (I can't be bothered with the IPA, but you know what I mean) when pronouncing brand names. Let's be even more specific and narrow it down to names of shops. Example: ...
3
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1answer
68 views

A word for a person who looks evaluates jewels for their authenticity and purity

In everyday spoken English, what do you call a person to whom you take your ornaments or jewels and he tells you whether or not the ornaments or the jewel are real, and also how pure the jewel is? It'...
2
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4answers
217 views

Does this technique that deals with syllable meters have a name?

On the poem extract below I noticed the following technique and it sounded really familiar, reminding me of punk rock songs and some strong man speeches (I know this is super vague, if I remember any ...
1
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3answers
118 views

Is “you ate?” an acceptable form to ask the question in spoken/informal English?

I've been a part of the discussion on whether it's acceptable to ask someone "You ate?" when meaning to ask "Did you eat?" or "Have you eaten?" and we can't find a definitive answer. We've found some ...
5
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1answer
63 views

Different words for the personal pronoun “you” in spoken AmE: who uses which?

In American English, quite informally, one will hear different words or phrases for the personal pronoun “you” in its plural form. Perhaps it’s a way of making sure the listener understands you mean ...
1
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0answers
85 views

Is there normally a lexicalized loss of phonemic /d/ in the coda of “depends”?

According to a blog article by Steven Norman under the title “My 100 most mispronounced words in English”, the word depends should be /dɪˈpenz/ when “correctly” pronounced. Notice he provides for no ...
0
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0answers
43 views

Which expression is more polite? Could you or can you?

If I can't find something in a grocery, which question is more polite? "Could you tell me where I can find the mouthwash?" or "Can you tell me where I can find the mouthwash?" And I'm not sure "Could ...
0
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0answers
27 views

Flapped pronunciation of / l /

I've noticed lately the flapped realization of /l/ in AmE, as in the sentence "It's solo" from the song Solo (Clean Bandit feat. Demi Lovato). What are the causes behind this pronunciation?
0
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1answer
38 views

“This is what I understand” or “This is how I understand it”, etc

Which one of the following statements is correct or do all of them make sense? System A works independently and does not affect System B. This is what I understand. System A works independently ...
1
vote
1answer
30 views

Direct speech inside another direct speech [duplicate]

Please, I'm not sure how in American English this "direct speech inside another direct speech" should be written properly. Here it is this sentence: "He was five and a half meters from her and he ...
1
vote
1answer
191 views

Is saying “X it is” too informal a response for a casual workplace environment? [closed]

When choos­ing be­tween op­tions, peo­ple of­ten say X it is. For ex­am­ple: Dick: What do you want to eat? Jane: I want pizza. Dick: Pizza it is. I am cu­ri­ous whether say­ing X it is is just ...
0
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1answer
30 views

Can I shorten this speech?

None of these are taken. Can I shorten this above speech like below: None taken. Is this process grammatically right? If it is right then what are the rules behind it?
2
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0answers
31 views

Is there a verb (or group of verbs) to describe someone saying “hmm”?

I'm looking for a verb to replace someone uttering "hmm" or "mmh" or any of its variations. I found this related question (The origin of 'hmm') that hints that "hum" might be a good choice, ...
1
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1answer
87 views

Terminology of speaking mannerism

A female relative speaks in a way in which I'm sure there exists a terminology for that particular mannerism. All follow a similar format, with typical examples below Examples: "That's not the way ...
0
votes
1answer
119 views

Changing of phrasal verbs by tenses [closed]

Probably that is extremely strange question , but can I change pharasal verbs by tenses ? There is no something else information at the most popular resources . For example , break down Past ...
1
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0answers
58 views

Short phrase for “… for the first time in five years.”

When I did something for the first time in five (or ten, several, etc...) years, is there any phrase to describe the same situation shortly? Sometimes I feel "... for the first time in five years" ...
3
votes
4answers
153 views

How did 'phat' come to be used in music as slang?

most prominently things like ''phat bass line'', meaning a bassline rich in texture ie has a full sound. Appears to have originated in African American use?
3
votes
1answer
47 views

Origin of the phrase ''Respect,man/bro. ''?

Respect bro!! , you never hear anything like ''Fear, man'' or ''honesty, man.'' used in the same sense, its interesting.
0
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0answers
32 views

Pronunciation of the word antisemitic [duplicate]

There seems to be two ways to pronounce antisemitic. I have always pronounced the syllable "sem" to rhyme with "them". I notice that many Americans make it rhyme with "him" and the following syllable "...
3
votes
1answer
208 views

Origin of 'cuz' as shortening for cousin?

Detailed answer please and thank you. I see this used a lot among youth. I'm interested to know whether it originated in the Southern US or not?
2
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2answers
114 views

Do I have to use “I” or “we” when orally presenting my scientific thesis written by a single author? [closed]

I know that in a scientific paper or thesis made by a single author, it is common to use we. (This is also recommended at our university.) But what about when you alone are presenting a thesis work ...
3
votes
1answer
223 views

Origin of the phrase “What's crackin'?”

My web search turns up accounts of it being Southern, Black American or/and Aussie slang. Would like some clarification on this.
1
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1answer
60 views

From where does it look like a “frog” to you? [closed]

Our teacher (she teaches psychology), was telling us about the ink-blot test (used to tell a person's personality). She was asking a girl (who volunteered) a few questions. She said that "it looked ...
-2
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1answer
382 views

Right a wrong & wrong a right [closed]

You can say "right a wrong" & "righting wrongs" But can you say "wrong a right or "wronging rights"
1
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1answer
97 views

Should there be a comma after 'I thought' if this phrase is followed by an italicised thought?

For example, if writing: I thought, she may miss him, but tonight you can't tell. should there be a comma after 'I thought', or any other punctuation for that matter? I know commas are often used ...
0
votes
1answer
17 views

Should I use 'on' or 'for' in these sentences?

If I called the ER about a patient of whom a doctor is taking care, should I say, 'may I speak to the doctor on the patient name John? I have a result on this patient?" or should I use for, "may i ...
1
vote
1answer
209 views

Another term for “controlled like a puppet”? [closed]

What's another word or phrase for "being controlled like a puppet". eg., "to be manipulated by a more powerful force" . . . what the puppet is enduring?
3
votes
2answers
365 views

Is “three point ish” an acceptable use of ish?

I recently overheard someone estimating a number as three point ish million when discussing the maximum damages in a law suit. Do native speakers use "ish" in this way? (My gut tells me no.)
0
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2answers
132 views

Understanding a short speech by the Speaker of the House of Commons from the mid-1600s

Can someone please explain to me the meaning of the middle paragraph here, the direct quote from the Speaker of the House of Commons. I really don't understand what is being meant by it. On 9 ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

“My Mom” vs “Mom” Usage

Context My brother and I when having a conversation that refers to our mother usually use "my mom" to refer to her. For example "Have you talked to my mom today?" is a common question we ask. Now the ...
0
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2answers
76 views

when I held the assembly that women are fun I were just lying

"when I held the assembly that women are fun I were just lying" The speaker had previously said so to an assembly of workmates. What does the sentence mean? The sentence can be heard (with the ...
6
votes
8answers
6k views

How do you say “powers of ten”?

When you have powers of 10, e.g. 102, the base is 10, so when the exponent is 2 you should not say power of 2. I believe "power of" refer to the base not to the exponent.
0
votes
3answers
2k views

Which one is correct “I have a lot of free time.” OR “I have much free time.” [closed]

Which one is correct and should be used I have a lot of free time. OR I have much free time.
1
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0answers
110 views

Connected speech resources

I am very interested in British pronunciation, so I am looking for resources about connected speech and IPA in general. The ideal would be a book with the transcription of dialogues or just ...
0
votes
1answer
28 views

Need help with the sentence structure for my pitch, thanks!

Back story: I am to give a 3 minute pitch on a task i worked on. I would like to something like, "As a general knowledge, we know that smartphones are dominated by IOS and android. Which is why ...
0
votes
2answers
89 views

“first time” as an adverb meaning “for the first time”

Can first time be used as an adverb meaning "for the first time", e.g. when I met him first time (Confession Tapes, third episode, 02:40)
0
votes
1answer
1k views

'Thanks for.. ' or 'I thank you for…'

I was wondering if the expression "I thank you for your answer" isn't nicer than " Thank you for your answer". For comparison, saying "I thank you" in French is nicer because the person who says it ...
-1
votes
3answers
698 views

What is the difference between “nearly drowned” and “nearly rescued”?

I am pondering over the meaning of the riddle: Would you rather be nearly drowned or nearly rescued? Could some one explain the meaning of the two phrases "nearly drowned" & "nearly rescued" ? ...
0
votes
1answer
297 views

“25th De­cem­ber” vs “25 De­cem­ber”: Should I use or­di­nals or car­di­nals for the day of the month?

In one of the IELTS lis­ten­ing tests, there is a fill-out-the-blank ques­tion read­ing: The mu­seum is not open on ___. My an­swer was “25th De­cem­ber”. How­ever, the of­fi­cial an­swer is “25 ...
0
votes
2answers
207 views

How do you quote a quotation that itself has mismatched quotes?

Suppose that Eve said (in spoken English) An apple a day keeps the doctor away, unquote. Also isn't Eve such a great person? Like my mom always said quote Eve is the best person ever, much ...
2
votes
1answer
114 views

What is this word spoken in this video and what does it mean?

Prior to the word/s I can't understand there was a discussion on what the historical sources of British individual civil freedoms have been. A few of the reasons given for these British values have ...
1
vote
1answer
53 views

Which construction is more cormmon?

I know my question may seem silly to native speakers, but l am really interested in knowing which construction is more common in everyday speech: He is married and has two sons. He is married, with ...
5
votes
2answers
1k views

What does camping on foods mean in American English?

I saw two guys joking around, the first one had had a Cheetos bag. Here is the conversation that took place between them: First guy: Do you wanna little snack? Second guy: Yeh, actually, it's ...
0
votes
1answer
30 views

Problem in formulating question [duplicate]

Consider this scenario...Sam ate 4 cookies. Now if someone asks Sam How many you had, then Sam will reply 4. But how should the question be formed so that the answer Sam gives will be 4th instead of 4?...
0
votes
2answers
146 views

reported speech + would have to

What is the correct form of switching from Direct speech to Reported speech in this example: A policeman says "You will have to turn back because the road is closed" Shall it be: 1) A policeman ...
0
votes
1answer
313 views

A: You haven't heard it? B: No, I heard it (nodding a yes)

A: You haven't heard it? B: No, I heard it (nodding a yes) I'd always expect as a positive response to a negative question Yes, I heard it / did. Why so? Link to video 22:32
3
votes
3answers
248 views

How would you say “0.4 - 1g?”

Assuming I don't want to say "zero point four grams to one gram," would it be: "zero point four to one gram" or "zero point four to one grams" or neither? I'm leaning towards the second one ...