Questions tagged [speech]

Questions about spoken English.

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42 views

How could people identify words by listening if they don't actually know it?

For example, someone just said "I would take you to flower house". If the listener does not know "flower" and "house", Can he find that there are two words that he does ...
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1answer
29 views

What does it mean if you are speaking like you are 'delivering a sermon'

What does it mean if you are speaking like you are 'delivering a sermon' I recently delivered a speech. When given feedback, I was told the following: You do have a tendency to fall into a rhythm ...
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39 views

From the point of view of English language, when is the answer to a question “obvious”, in general?

I am pondering over this question for a while. I was having a discussion with a friend and when she asked me a question, I responded to her that "Isn't it pretty obvious?" and she responded ...
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25 views

speech terminology

I was in a large group of friends and My friend said, "Big Bear is the best place on Earth." I responded, "to go skiing." My intention was to specify that when she said "the ...
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1answer
31 views

meaning and intention in speech [closed]

Consider that my friend says that "drinking two margaritas is an unhealthy decision," and I say "for Anna, to be, specific." If someone were listening to our conversation, would ...
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25 views

Ambiguous “it” pronoun

If I said, “losing the race..it is a tragedy...a loss.a shame...if I fell during the race.” What does the “it” pronoun refer to? Does it refer to - Losing the race? Or the event of me falling during ...
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1answer
59 views

Where is this accent from?

Where does the accent used by the actor who plays Mazikeen in the Lucifer series belong to? I can tell it is American, but I don't know what region in there. Here is a scene from the series where she ...
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1answer
73 views

Bare genitives: written vs spoken forms

Page 1595 of the CambridgeGEL reads In writing the bare genetive has the form of an apostrophe at the end of the word: dogs’. In speech it has no realisation at all [...]; an optional bare genitive ...
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1answer
35 views

What's the difference between a quarter and a district?

All I want to know about these words is their meaning difference and how they are used in sentences... (If you can give me examples it would be great :))
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25 views

Does using the words “might” and “could” consecutively in same sentence have a name or is it just improper English? (spoken English) [duplicate]

It is now more than a coincidence, but I have heard numerous people from different parts of the country use the words "might" and "could" together in a sentence as in: "This ...
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1answer
29 views

Comparative question?

I have a comparative question... As I understand it, comparatives compare two things. I bought a new popcorn maker because my old one is not heating up. So my questions are as follows: Can I say my ...
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30 views

For the context of the storytelling aspect to deliver a message, what punctuation would be best used for the flow and structure of the speech given?

Below is the body of work for the self-driven character that is declaring and establishing their agency. My question is if there should be a semicolon, comma, or period in-between "I'll keep ...
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1answer
51 views

Using two adjectives in a sentence

Is it correct to start a sentence with "Please find the attached revised invoice", with two adjectives (attached and revised) one after another?
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25 views

“When the revolution comes, you will do as you are told”

Rememeber reading this in Reader's digest or some novel. "When the revolution comes, you will do as you are told" Cannot find any references in Google. Maybe wrong spelling? The meaning seemed to be ...
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1answer
68 views

Is there a reduction when you say “is there ”or “is this”?

I feel like native english speakers drop the voiced th sound in fast speech when they say "is there.... ?" and "is this...?". Can you tell me if I'm right or wrong . Thanks for your attention. I’m ...
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2answers
231 views

All this time or All these time?

My sentence flow is something like this. "So you were lying to me all these time?" I dont know if I should use this or these.
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49 views

commas in English speech

I know commas can make a big difference in the meaning and interpretation of sentences. However, in speech, when we speak out loud, how does the listener interpret sentences if there is no punctuation....
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31 views

Which one is correct? Australia 'has' defeated India in world cup. or Australia 'have' defeated India in world cup

Here Australia means the Australian team and not just the country. I have read in a book that, 'have' to be used in case of team name of some country. But it doesn't seem promising to me. Please help.
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1answer
62 views

How will a native speaker of American English say this sentence? Will “comma' be replaced with ”and" in spoken American English?

Best Buy plans to reopen its stores on Monday in states that have loosened restrictions, joining a handful of other retailers that are limping back to life after the corona virus forced them to close.
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1answer
35 views

No article before a noun (spoken language?)

I've recently noticed that in some cases, the article before a noun is dropped. I assume this is only characteristic of spoken interaction. The first time I noticed this was while watching a gameplay ...
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39 views

“I'm Marsh Turner called.”

From the movie Cross Creek, set in 1920s' Florida. Marsh: I'm Marsh Turner called. This is my daughter Ellie. The syntax of this line (as opposed to the standard "I am called Marsh Turner") ...
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1answer
50 views

“Used to” in reported speech [closed]

She said I used to eat too much. She said I was used to eat too much. Which one is correct? If both are correct, do they mean the same thing?
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1answer
58 views

What is the correct way to say ? Let me put my point or let me put up my point

I would like to know what seems more accurate. Let me put my point. Let me put up my point. I know that "Put up" is a phrasal verb which definitely have scenarios to be used more appropriately but ...
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9 views

Can you use three quotes in a sentence by including a quote within a quote. Eg “' xxx ' xxx” [duplicate]

Can you use three quotes in a sentence by including a quote within a quote? Eg "' xxx ' xxx"
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1answer
23 views

Need help with contradictory statement

How would these 2 quotes be considered as contradictory? "The worst hell you will ever face is the hell you create with your own mind." "I’m very capable of changing to anything I want to change ...
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21 views

Equivalent of readability score for speeches/public speaking?

I was wondering if there was any similar scoring to the common readability scores (Flesch-Kincaid, Gunning Fox index, etc.) which can establish approximately what level of reader would be required to ...
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48 views

Can I say that sentence makes you special?

When someone comes from other country and they pronounce "good morning" in my local language (when that pronunciation is unique)... Then can I say: "that sentence makes you special" Or "that ...
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19 views

Complex reported speech conversion

How to change these into indirect speech? Player 1 says to Player 2 "We would be lifting the trophy and confetti would be raining on us by now if you hadn't done that stupid mistake" 2) Guy 1 says ...
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47 views

Why don't you [tʃʊ]

What phonological processes take place in the pronunciation of Why don't you as as just [tʃʊ]?
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37 views

Direct and Indirect speech

What would be the indirect speech for this sentence: Mina said, "Let's go for a walk". In my opinion it should be 'Mina suggested that they should go for a walk' but according to my book it is 'Mina ...
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1answer
51 views

How to structure the speech of one character when it consists of two linked but independent phrases

If you were writing a quote structured like this... 'You were right Izzy!', said Ted, 'there is something we can do.' … would be correct to have a fullstop after 'Ted' and a capital letter for 'there'...
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7answers
3k views

Is there a term for “non-words” like “ha”, “ugh”, “huh”, etc? [closed]

What would these words be called, and are there any related rules on how to use them and what they each mean?
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1answer
75 views

How to distinguish the spoken language and written language?

Today I was confused about the word, 'via' I have seen this word in many texts, but I have not heard in oral communication. I tried to search the word 'via' is used in spoken language, but I am not ...
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2answers
104 views

Is it “bad” to try and learn southern American English? [closed]

I have always been really interested in south American life style, culture, and specially language, a while back, I asked a professional American English teacher, about if it was OK to try and learn ...
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15 views

Why does the 'only' move? [duplicate]

In conversational and spoken English, it's common to hear statements like I only answer phone calls from people I know. The "correct" form of this would be I answer phone calls only from people ...
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1answer
228 views

Is “trollopsing” a word, and if so, how is it used?

Searches of "trollopsing" brings up a result in Poems and Plays of John Masefield where he uses the word. I also found it used on a Key and Peele sketch. Otherwise, I can't seem to find any ...
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1answer
59 views

Announcement for foreign people in a library (non English-speaking country)

This announcement is made before closure time in a library (latin country): "XYZ is closing in fifteen minutes. Those users who have to register loans or return in items are kindly requested to go to ...
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296 views

“Say” and “said” as transitive and intransitive verbs

I have an interesting question. Is "say" a transitive verb in the case of direct/reported speech? I understand that it can be a transitive verb in cases like "She said the phrase." or "She says the ...
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2answers
2k views

Why you're laughing vs Why are you laughing? [closed]

Recently I was talking to my friend in English. He started laughing and I asked him Why you're laughing man? Someone told me you should say Why are you laughing? and this one is totally wrong. I got ...
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1answer
74 views

A word for a person who looks evaluates jewels for their authenticity and purity

In everyday spoken English, what do you call a person to whom you take your ornaments or jewels and he tells you whether or not the ornaments or the jewel are real, and also how pure the jewel is? It'...
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4answers
224 views

Does this technique that deals with syllable meters have a name?

On the poem extract below I noticed the following technique and it sounded really familiar, reminding me of punk rock songs and some strong man speeches (I know this is super vague, if I remember any ...
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3answers
137 views

Is “you ate?” an acceptable form to ask the question in spoken/informal English?

I've been a part of the discussion on whether it's acceptable to ask someone "You ate?" when meaning to ask "Did you eat?" or "Have you eaten?" and we can't find a definitive answer. We've found some ...
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1answer
87 views

Different words for the personal pronoun “you” in spoken AmE: who uses which?

In American English, quite informally, one will hear different words or phrases for the personal pronoun “you” in its plural form. Perhaps it’s a way of making sure the listener understands you mean ...
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107 views

Is there normally a lexicalized loss of phonemic /d/ in the coda of “depends”?

According to a blog article by Steven Norman under the title “My 100 most mispronounced words in English”, the word depends should be /dɪˈpenz/ when “correctly” pronounced. Notice he provides for no ...
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49 views

Which expression is more polite? Could you or can you?

If I can't find something in a grocery, which question is more polite? "Could you tell me where I can find the mouthwash?" or "Can you tell me where I can find the mouthwash?" And I'm not sure "Could ...
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31 views

Flapped pronunciation of / l /

I've noticed lately the flapped realization of /l/ in AmE, as in the sentence "It's solo" from the song Solo (Clean Bandit feat. Demi Lovato). What are the causes behind this pronunciation?
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1answer
550 views

“This is what I understand” or “This is how I understand it”, etc

Which one of the following statements is correct or do all of them make sense? System A works independently and does not affect System B. This is what I understand. System A works independently ...
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1answer
53 views

Direct speech inside another direct speech [duplicate]

Please, I'm not sure how in American English this "direct speech inside another direct speech" should be written properly. Here it is this sentence: "He was five and a half meters from her and he ...
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1answer
201 views

Is saying “X it is” too informal a response for a casual workplace environment? [closed]

When choos­ing be­tween op­tions, peo­ple of­ten say X it is. For ex­am­ple: Dick: What do you want to eat? Jane: I want pizza. Dick: Pizza it is. I am cu­ri­ous whether say­ing X it is is just ...
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1answer
38 views

Can I shorten this speech?

None of these are taken. Can I shorten this above speech like below: None taken. Is this process grammatically right? If it is right then what are the rules behind it?

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