Questions tagged [formality]

This tag is for questions about formal (versus informal) words and usage. The question must identify a particular concern about the formality of the word or phrase at issue, and specify the target context or audience.

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41 views

Is the usage 'formal leave of absence' correct? What does it imply? What could be possible inferences?

Came across an email saying someone was on their 'formal leave of absence' Is the phrase correctly used? That is, if it is correct in the first place. What does it imply and what could be possible ...
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0answers
51 views

Is “unironically” a valid word?

Every spell checker I have, both ones that automatically spell check and those run after finishing a document or draft, seems to consider the word unironically to be incorrect. I have heard the word ...
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1answer
51 views

word usage in academic writing - possesses, beyond, ability [closed]

Could you help me to check if this sentence is ok? Beyond having similar osmosis potential to polymer sponges, it is desirable that the covering material possesses the ability of being dispersed by ...
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0answers
25 views

“In addition to” synonyms specific to scientific writing?

I'm tired of using the same expression in scientific academic papers over and over again... But I can't find any formal equivalent synonyms to "In addition to" besides additionally to... Do you have ...
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0answers
27 views

Tool for massive clearing of archaic words from dictionary entries [closed]

I have a project with many dic­tio­nary en­tries con­tain­ing defi­ni­tions writ­ten more in a more for­mal lit­er­ary style than in a ca­sual, con­tem­po­rary, and con­ver­sa­tional style. These in­...
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0answers
39 views

How to make the sentences formal and professional? [closed]

Here is the message: If C finds something, C shall report to A and B. If A finds something, A shall report to B and inform C. If B finds something, B shall report to A and inform C. How can I ...
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0answers
11 views

Compliance “to be mandatory” [migrated]

I want to ask a question about the function of the word "compliance". I was writing a text regarding politics and wanted to mention whether if the United Kingdom left the EU whether some of the ...
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1answer
46 views

How to formally say “they didn't want to finish their work” [closed]

I'm trying to write an essay about our group, and specifically I want to write that one group of people didn't want to finish their work. What would be the most appropriate way to say this because I ...
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0answers
59 views

What's a more formal term for “van man”?

Not sure about other countries, but in England we have the term "van man" or "man with a van", to describe someone (typically a man as you might imagine,) who is self-employed, and delivers goods in ...
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0answers
47 views

I want to ask very very politley the idea of a professor about what I said, how can I do?

A professor asked me about the time I can register for a class. I want to say I can register on June, but since there is no limitation for the registration time from my side, I want to ask him "is it ...
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1answer
50 views

How to say “I am ok with NDA” formally [closed]

NDA -> Non Disclosure Agreement I am trying to write a formal sentence. Is it ok if i write "I agree to the terms and i will apply to the NDA"? Thanks in advance. Edit: I am not asking for legal ...
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1answer
37 views

“I says ” in COCA

I searched " I says "in COCA and I got 716 hits. Most of them are from spoken section, but still some are in the academic or fiction sections, the more formal sections. Are they all typos or, to ...
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1answer
74 views

Spelling of Vietnamese names in formal context

I am a professor and I have a Vietnamese student called, say, Nguyen Hoang Thang. How should I write his name in the official documents, such as his diploma or transcript? How should his name be ...
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1answer
79 views

Different words for the personal pronoun “you” in spoken AmE: who uses which?

In American English, quite informally, one will hear different words or phrases for the personal pronoun “you” in its plural form. Perhaps it’s a way of making sure the listener understands you mean ...
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1answer
135 views

Master to mister?

Why was Master weakened to Mister so as to address individual hominēs sapientēs and the English language lost the thou/you distinction while the Greek language kept both Kύριος intact and the Eσύ/...
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0answers
19 views

What is the proper way to ask about contract period in email? [duplicate]

What I have thought about, is to send below email: Hello Ms. XYZ, I was wondering if I could know about the contract period before the final technical interview. Is this formal? Should I put ...
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2answers
82 views

What are some formal alternatives to Mr./Ms., particularly in the context of job-hunting?

I've always been told to refer to people by an honorific followed by their last names, especially when discussing job opportunities etc. However, I would rather not misgender anybody in doing so. I ...
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1answer
168 views

using “at your convenience” while asking a question?

I am writing an email for a professor in a university and asking some question about a program. First, I asked the questions and in the ending paragraph I wrote: I would be grateful if you answer ...
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2answers
62 views

Formal alternative to “that'll do” [closed]

I use "that'll do" in circumstances where I acknowledge that something is sufficient. What is a formal alternative for this phrase, that can take place in a formal letter or a conversation ? ...
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1answer
60 views

“Many” as a pronoun at the beginning of a sentence

I am unable to decide if I should use 'many' to express "many people" in an academic writing. It goes like: Many claim that ambiguity is a result of an inefficient parsing. Do you see any problem ...
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1answer
195 views

Is saying “X it is” too informal a response for a casual workplace environment? [closed]

When choos­ing be­tween op­tions, peo­ple of­ten say X it is. For ex­am­ple: Dick: What do you want to eat? Jane: I want pizza. Dick: Pizza it is. I am cu­ri­ous whether say­ing X it is is just ...
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1answer
45 views

Meaning of the expression 'Handsome of' [closed]

In my essays, I used to write, " ...a handsome of amount is spend...", or "..earn a handsome of money as perks..." But one of my online trainer, told me that to use 'handsome of' like this, is a ...
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0answers
39 views

The phrase “in duplicate”

What does the following statement mean ? Admit card should be submitted in DUPLICATE. a) 1 original & 1 photocopy. b) Both originals. c) Both photocopies.
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1answer
45 views

Can the word “stale” be used on data or information? [closed]

I know the word "stale" has one meaning as (of a check or legal claim) invalid because out of date. However, I need a word indicating that some information or data is invalid because out of data. ...
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1answer
118 views

“a couple of things” in a formal letter?

Is it inadequate to use "a couple of things" in a formal letter? If so, what word or phrase would work better? Example: I`m writing to inquire about a couple of things regarding my new job ...
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1answer
74 views

take so long vs taking so long [closed]

I've worked in a market. Suddenly they stopped my work for verification purpose. They requested me to provide a student ID card. I've sent a scanned copy of my Student ID card for verification. One ...
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1answer
573 views

What is the formal way to reply mail with requested attach file [closed]

Is it grammatically correct, and a formal way to reply mail with my attached ID card? If I say “I have attached my student ID card. Please check it”
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1answer
50 views

Formal way of saying “dig it out”

I am writing an academic manuscript to describe the action of "digging certain stuff out." For instance, given an image containing several pedestrians, my image analysis techniques can extract those ...
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1answer
99 views

What does “cold balls” exactly mean in American english?

I've been watching a crime TV anime show lately, and I've run into this fancy and maybe offensive too ( sorry about that, if it is like so ) and to put you guys in the scene context here is a summary: ...
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1answer
40 views

Verb “telescope” in mathematical formal use

I have recently seen the verb "telescope" applied in a mathematical context, as a synonym of "derive" or "compress". Like in the following sentence: "This expression can be telescoped as follows:..." ...
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1answer
45 views

Which of the following sentences sounds most formal? [closed]

1 - The president travels to Belo Horizonte tomorrow. 2 The president is going to travel to Belo Horizonte tomorrow. 3 The president is traveling to Belo Horizonte tomorrow. 4 The president will ...
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2answers
112 views

Phrase for saying we can only speculate

I am looking for a more formal variation of this sentence: "We can only speculate at this point." Perhaps what is taking away from the professional feel that I want is the first person "We." ...
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1answer
27 views

Is it correct to say bottlenecks are emerging on the surface of the project?

I need to say that some problems are appearing on the project, for that I wanted to say bottlenecks are emerging. Is this term correct? If not, how can I say a similar formal sentence?
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1answer
2k views

Is it correct to write: “I would appreciate it if you could inform me when you could contact my manager” in a formal email? [closed]

I want to know if someone has eventually contacted my manager. I therefore want to send him a formal email to ask him very politely. Is it correct to write as follow ? "I would appreciate it if you ...
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1answer
21 views

Title for a list of disclaimers, prerequisites, FYIs

I'm about to start a workshop and I'd like to have a "before we start" slide in which I'll communicate: several prerequisites for attendees to better understand the content, set several boundaries in ...
1
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1answer
63 views

Correct form when talking about intersection of few roads

First if all thank you for your time, I'm in proces of writing a thesis (in diffrent language). I was wondering if it is a correct form to say that there are 3 roads that intersect and I am planning ...
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1answer
177 views

How to address one male and one female in an informal email? [duplicate]

In an inter-company (informal) email, when the addressees are one male and one female, I usually use Hi Guys. However, guy has a distinct male flavour. Could you suggest a more gender-neutral ...
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2answers
470 views

To make a long story short, formal or informal

I know from here a couple of good alternatives for "to cut/make the long story short", I'm just curious if it is formal to use it or not.
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2answers
319 views

'We are soon ready.'

I use it as a quick and very informal way to say 'We will soon to be ready.' But a colleague of mine says it is simply wrong. Is he right? I'm not a native speaker and came up with this phrase on my ...
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0answers
45 views

Ninety percent… was or were? [duplicate]

I need some help with the following sentence in order to know whether it should be WAS or WERE: a recent study revealed that the ninety percent of people who had decided to change their first job ...
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2answers
63 views

“It is” as the beginning of paragraphs

Is it encouraged or discouraged to use "IT IS" at the very beginning of a paragraph in formal writing English?. For instance: It is often argued that study art in school should be mandatory, since ...
4
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1answer
135 views

When was “Chronic” first used as its own antonym?

The word "Chronic" means "long lasting", or "occurring over an extended period of time". A chronic illness one that you will have for a long time (if not for your entire life), or take a long time to ...
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1answer
767 views

Requesting someone to perform a task without sounding pushy

In writing, I need to request that my doctor perform several tasks for me as soon as reasonably possible. I am almost completely sure they will be willing to perform all these tasks. I don't want to ...
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0answers
16 views

“worth” with possessive(s) in coordinated nominals

According to Garner Modern English Grammar The idiomatic possessive should be used with periods of time and statements of worth — 30 days’ notice (i.e., notice of 30 days), three days’ time, ...
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2answers
65 views

They are like pieces of a puzzle in that they complement one another to form the whole [closed]

Does in that make my sentence formal? If so, how can I change it to be more neutral?
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1answer
45 views

Are phrases or idioms like “state-of-the-art” appropriate for a formal technical recommendation report?

I am supposed to write a technical recommendation report for my English class. My supposed client is a banking company and I would like to write a report on which endpoint protection software is the ...
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4answers
702 views

Alternatives to the phrase 'I was like..'

In recent times I have encountered the phrase ‘I was like…’ a lot. Examples include He told me something, and I was like dude really? I was going along the street, and suddenly something ...
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2answers
201 views

How to describe Gender formally?

For a User Interface of an Information System, options for selecting the Gender is to be given: Not known Male Female Male - TransGender Female - TransGender Is Enuch can be included; as an ...
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1answer
471 views

We are reminding you.. vs We remind you

assuming I'm writing an email to remind about the scheduled activity that will start in one hour, which start for the email is correct: We remind you that the scheduled activity starts in one hour. ...
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2answers
138 views

“first time” as an adverb meaning “for the first time”

Can first time be used as an adverb meaning "for the first time", e.g. when I met him first time (Confession Tapes, third episode, 02:40)

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