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Questions tagged [formality]

This tag is for questions about formal (versus informal) words and usage. The question must identify a particular concern about the formality of the word or phrase at issue, and specify the target context or audience.

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2answers
41 views

'We are soon ready.'

I use it as a quick and very informal way to say 'We will soon to be ready.' But a colleague of mine says it is simply wrong. Is he right? I'm not a native speaker and came up with this phrase on my ...
1
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0answers
23 views

Is it rightly used the semicolon at this paragraph [migrated]

I appreciate if someone could check whether it is rightly used the semicolon and the word "thereby" at this paragraph, keeping in mind that this is formal english. If the producer have to assume more ...
0
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0answers
36 views

Help me interpret the following question, please!

"Is it possible that my name can be rectified?" Long story cut short. I will sit the FCE exam this Saturday & there's been a mistake regarding my full name. My first name and last name switched ...
0
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0answers
23 views

Ninety percent… was or were? [duplicate]

I need some help with the following sentence in order to know whether it should be WAS or WERE: a recent study revealed that the ninety percent of people who had decided to change their first job ...
0
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0answers
28 views

What's the proper way to abbreviate DBA (doing business as) in formal writing?

What's the proper way to abbreviate DBA (doing business as) in formal writing? Is it DBA, dba, d/b/a, etc.? I generally use Chicago, if that helps.
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2answers
43 views

“It is” as the beginning of paragraphs

Is it encouraged or discouraged to use "IT IS" at the very beginning of a paragraph in formal writing English?. For instance: It is often argued that study art in school should be mandatory, since ...
2
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0answers
55 views

Is “I did not breakfast today” correct? [migrated]

Is the following sentence correct? I did not breakfast today Due to breakfast coming from ‘to break your fast’.
4
votes
1answer
96 views

When was “Chronic” first used as its own antonym?

The word "Chronic" means "long lasting", or "occurring over an extended period of time". A chronic illness one that you will have for a long time (if not for your entire life), or take a long time to ...
0
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1answer
46 views

Requesting someone to perform a task without sounding pushy

In writing, I need to request that my doctor perform several tasks for me as soon as reasonably possible. I am almost completely sure they will be willing to perform all these tasks. I don't want to ...
1
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0answers
10 views

“worth” with possessive(s) in coordinated nominals

According to Garner Modern English Grammar The idiomatic possessive should be used with periods of time and statements of worth — 30 days’ notice (i.e., notice of 30 days), three days’ time, ...
1
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2answers
44 views

They are like pieces of a puzzle in that they complement one another to form the whole [closed]

Does in that make my sentence formal? If so, how can I change it to be more neutral?
0
votes
1answer
31 views

Are phrases or idioms like “state-of-the-art” appropriate for a formal technical recommendation report?

I am supposed to write a technical recommendation report for my English class. My supposed client is a banking company and I would like to write a report on which endpoint protection software is the ...
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4answers
93 views

Alternatives to the phrase 'I was like..'

In recent times I have encountered the phrase ‘I was like…’ a lot. Examples include He told me something, and I was like dude really? I was going along the street, and suddenly something ...
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2answers
132 views

How to describe Gender formally?

For a User Interface of an Information System, options for selecting the Gender is to be given: Not known Male Female Male - TransGender Female - TransGender Is Enuch can be included; as an ...
0
votes
1answer
36 views

We are reminding you.. vs We remind you

assuming I'm writing an email to remind about the scheduled activity that will start in one hour, which start for the email is correct: 1. We remind you that the scheduled activity starts in one hour. ...
0
votes
1answer
41 views

“first time” as an adverb meaning “for the first time”

Can first time be used as an adverb meaning "for the first time", e.g. when I met him first time (Confession Tapes, third episode, 02:40)
0
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1answer
42 views

The usage of Formal Words in writing - interested [closed]

I was writing a letter and I wonder whether the usage of interested in a formal letter could be considered as a formal word. Also if there are synonyms which are more appropriate to use in formal ...
0
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1answer
79 views

Perhaps or Maybe or I Guess/Think - which one is correct in formal (office) email writing

Background: Boss: Did you get that X thing done? Me: Yes, thats done. Boss: No thats not done, I am still getting calls from people for X? Me: Oh, Perhaps/Maybe/I guess/I think you ...
0
votes
1answer
137 views

in regards to/regarding and of/from - Grammar in formal email [duplicate]

I've been waiting for an email for several days and haven't heard of the other person yet. He emailed me, I answered him but I haven't heard back yet. I wish to send a message to remind him to answer ...
2
votes
2answers
104 views

Which pronoun should be used after the word ‘like’? [closed]

For example, which of the following is considered correct?: Don't be like him Don't be like he is There are other examples I can't think of right now where people use him instead of ...
1
vote
2answers
131 views

Is the term “fleshed out” considered informal?

In my most recent essay, I had used the term "fleshed out" but my teacher had circled it. I called her over to ask why it was circled and she said that "Flushed out is the correct term to use." I ...
0
votes
1answer
76 views

How do we end a Complain letter? [closed]

Do I end a Complain letter of complaint with 'Yours sincerely' or 'Yours truly' or 'Yours faithfully'? Or something else?
1
vote
2answers
47 views

When to use mid-sentence commas when adding a formal name

Where is it appropriate to insert a comma when putting a persons name in the middle of a sentence, such as when writing an email or letter. Is it really before AND after? Examples: Thank you for ...
0
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1answer
54 views

Can “ap­pre­ci­ate” be used in this way?

(I am not a na­tive speaker.) I just got an email re­gard­ing a failed or­der that used the fol­low­ing sen­tence: I ap­pre­ci­ate that this will not be what you wanted to hear and for that I apol­...
1
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2answers
86 views

No “are” in movies sometimes?

I often hear sentences in movies like "Fight back, you coward!", "You filthy, dirty hippy", etc. And I had thought it sounded like this only to me but when I found the subtitles for those movies, I ...
2
votes
1answer
49 views

What is the correct usage of the tilde symbol with negative numbers? [closed]

The tilde symbol (~) is used in academic texts in place of about or approximately. Generally, it is placed immediately before the number (eg. AUD ~2.4 million), which works for positive numbers, ...
1
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1answer
193 views

If I am writing a formal letter, should I use “can't,” “cannot,” or “can not?”

This question is asking about school reports, letters to members of Congress, apology letters, etc.
0
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1answer
22 views

It 's nothing you do casually or natively

I have no idea what does "It 's nothing you do casually or natively" mean.Please anyone explain.What is the exact meaning of this sentence??
0
votes
1answer
36 views

What is the meaning of I wasn't living with heart at that time [closed]

Please explain the meaning of "I wasn't living with heart at that time"
0
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2answers
72 views

A formal word between 'frequently' and 'rarely'

Rarely: X rarely goes to Y Frequently: X frequently goes to Y What would be a word in between the two? A formal word for 'sometimes' maybe? Context: Atheists sometimes appeal to Nietzsche'...
1
vote
2answers
25 views

“like it like you” vs “like it, like you”

My husband and I have discussed for an hour over this and we still haven’t agreed. Please help! Do these two sentences have different meanings? (A) She doesn’t like it like you. (B) She doesn’...
0
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0answers
22 views

Is using “Sirs” when addressing a group of men incorrect? [duplicate]

When I was in the Army, I was taught that you addressed an individual officer as "Sir" or "Ma'am". You address groups of officers as "Gentlemen" or "Ladies", not "Sirs" or "Ma'ams". Example: ...
1
vote
1answer
149 views

How to include a question in a declarative sentence?

Over the years I have gotten used to the following sentences formation: I know that this is the website but how do I specify for what I am paying? Instead of: I know that this is the website ...
0
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1answer
266 views

Which is correct: “While studying, I ran my own business” or “While studying, I was running my own business”?

While studying, I ran my own business for almost two years. This sounds natural to me, but my friend claims that the continuous form ("I was running") is gramatically correct. Which is it? PS. In ...
1
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0answers
23 views

using ''require'' or synonyms in a cover letter

I have a doubt about the correct use of the verb to require and its synonyms in a cover letter. My doubt is: require sounds almost like it's something that you are forced to do (therefore expresses a ...
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votes
2answers
622 views

which group I belong to vs to which group I belong [duplicate]

I don't know which group I belong to. I don't know to which group I belong. Which one of the sentences is true? Note: An answer was given to this question when it still read "I don't know (to) ...
0
votes
1answer
400 views

Synonym for “sure” and “yes please”

When somebody suggests me something (maybe offering me something, or suggesting me for a proposal/plan), and I would like to show my agreement/approval for that. Instead of just saying "sure" or "yes ...
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votes
2answers
71 views

How to say “dulcet” in verbal English (or slang)?

For example, if somebody sitting next to me hummed or sang a song and I want to tell him that his song is dulcet, in a polite but informal manner (or even slang). How can I express that? Should I ...
2
votes
2answers
150 views

How informal is “mind blowing”?

I'm writing a statement letter (SOP for graduate school), and I wanted to use "mind-blowing" in a less-formal segment of my letter. Is that too informal for a personal statement or cover letter, or is ...
1
vote
1answer
115 views

''Should you have decided'' Inversion

In an email I received from my university, the following is stated: ''Should you have decided to do the assignment, please send us an email.'' My question is whether the inversion and usage of should ...
0
votes
3answers
39 views

How to properly use gear up?

Does the following sentence seem natural to native English speakers? "I have been gearing up for a career in XXX since then." Also, does this sound formal? If not, what do you recommend instead? ...
0
votes
4answers
194 views

How to say “and more!” in a more professional sense

We are in the process of writing an ad that details our curriculum, and the ad goes something like this - "...fall prevention, medical emergencies, AND MORE!" I keep thinking there has to be a better ...
1
vote
3answers
199 views

Can the idiom “It is high time” be used in formal writing? [closed]

Recently I saw "it is hightime + subj. + past verb + ..." idiom. Like "It's high time we made some changes around here.". I want to know if it is a good phrase to start a formal writing (i.e. ielts ...
0
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1answer
61 views

Can we use the phrase “go for it” in formal essay [closed]

Good evening everybody, Can I use "go for it" as a way to express choosing something in a formal essay, a report to be more precise. Further education took the lead in the number of students ...
0
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1answer
141 views

Which one is more appropriate: To learn more about or For more information

When sending a formal email, which of the following sentences is more appropriate to use: To learn more information, please visit helloworld.com. For more information, please visit helloworld....
4
votes
2answers
110 views

Is the word “selfie” formal enough to be used in official documents?

I was asked to edit a translation and I noticed that the original English sentence is: Selfie (only) - You will only need to upload a selfie photo. The context is the process of uploading ...
1
vote
1answer
62 views

On The Formality Of The Usage Of The Word “Their”

Is using "their" in a phrase "Everyone has their reasons for doing something" informal? This reason I'm asking this is because a test book I'm using claims that using their in the situation above is ...
0
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2answers
6k views

Signing off an email with 'on behalf of'? [closed]

I am writing an email as one of the committee members of a voluntary organization. Is this an appropriate way to sign off an informal email whose audience is professionals? Regards, On behalf of <...
1
vote
1answer
96 views

Is using 'then' after 'if', considered informal English?

A colleague mentioned that while doing exams (in China) for academic English, using the word 'then' after an 'if' was marked as incorrect. For example, "If it is raining then I will need my umbrella" ...
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4answers
130 views

Archaic phrase similar to “not give a damn”

I'm looking for a phrase that would mean I don't give a damn about it but could be used by a girl in the 1930s. It needs it to be very informal but not vulgar.