Skip to main content

Questions tagged [formality]

This tag is for questions about formal (versus informal) words and usage. The question must identify a particular concern about the formality of the word or phrase at issue, and specify the target context or audience.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
2 votes
5 answers
415 views

Formal written form for a 2x something? [closed]

In a sentence where I want to say a title or position that has been awarded twice, how do I phrase it? For instance "He was a 2x runner-up for the Champion title", would it be "two time&...
sarahh's user avatar
  • 29
4 votes
1 answer
1k views

Use of generic "one" without having to revel the gender

I want to say the following: The more one knows about a subject, the more one realizes how little he knows about it. I want to make it formal and general, thus my use of "one" instead of &...
Elerium115's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
152 views

What did Tolkien apparently have against commas?

While reading his books in English for the first time a while back, I was shocked by how ultra-concise the language was in the original language. Perhaps the most frustrating part was his extremely ...
Gollum Nicehobbit's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
94 views

What are the differences between to sweet-talk, smooth-talk- butter up, suck up to, cajole, coax, wheedle, inveigle, beguile, and get round someone? [closed]

Are there any differences between the verbs sweet-talk, smooth-talk, butter up, suck up to, cajole, coax, wheedle, inveigle, beguile, and get round someone ? I am aware that this question is very long,...
Alice's user avatar
  • 41
5 votes
2 answers
275 views

Grammatical, stylistic and vocabulary features that distinguish written dialects?

Apart from pronunciation differences in the spoken language, I'm curious what common language features are found in the prestige dialects of English in different countries. Prestige language is ...
Sophie's user avatar
  • 212
6 votes
3 answers
779 views

Correct Choice of First Vowel in Words Such as "Regret" and "Return"

Is it acceptable in formal American English to pronounce the first vowel in regret, realize, and return with /ɛ/ as in DRESS¹, as opposed to with /i/ as in FLEECE²? DRESS /ɛ/: the open-mid front ...
Hannah's user avatar
  • 61
0 votes
2 answers
94 views

Question about the semantic usage of "let" in more formal language [duplicate]

I wanted to ask about the word "let" and it's usage in more formal language like in mathematics.I understand the implied meaning "let x be a human" is intended to declare x to be a ...
Zihao Wang's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
23 views

Is it proper for a former State Senator to use the title "Senator" when acting in a voluntary Community Association capacity in a different State? [duplicate]

Protocol for use of the title "Senator"
Dennis Spurgeon's user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
354 views

Do the words 'Where' and 'Wherever' mean the same in this sentence?

I'm reading a sentence of Intellectual Property law and I've found this: [Where] other Acts related to intellectual property are enacted or amended, they shall satisfy the objectives and basic ...
Subin Kim's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
43 views

Is the phrase: "...obtained bipartisan political support for the project" redundant?

It appears that bipartisan does not solely refer to political parties, rather just support by two parties. However, would adding political after the phrase be redundant in nature, or more descriptive?
David Prendergast's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
173 views

Differences in meaning and formality of "when/if + verb(ing)" and "when/if + one + verb(s)"

I searched but couldn't find an answer because I don't know the relevant grammatical terms, unfortunately. Sorry if it has already been answered. I am wondering about the difference between the two ...
Johnny Silverhand's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
40 views

When is a genus name without an initial capital letter acceptable in formal (but not necessarily in a scientific context) English? [duplicate]

In biology, the scientific name of a species (known as the "binomial name" or just the "binomial" or sometimes even just the "binomen") is written as a pair of words in ...
Matthew Christopher Bartsh's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
432 views

Mother tongue vs vernacular

Having been a non- native speaker, several times I had been asked to write my name IN VERNACULAR or IN MOTHER TONGUE during my college days. I couldn't tell apart the subtle difference and thought of ...
Selfie groufie's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
44 views

"Don't have a second email address?" VS "Do you not have a second email address?" [closed]

As a section heading we can have either: OPTION 1: Tip: Don't have a second email address? That's OK, you can create a new one here. OPTION 2: Tip: Do you not have a second email address? That's OK, ...
user1946932's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
187 views

Can I use "quickly" to politely ask for preliminary information?

When, e.g., I receive a job opportunity which might or might not match my requirements, I often find myself responding with "... Thank you for bringing this role to my attention. Before we ...
Zsolt Szilagy's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
119 views

What denotational or connotational differences distinguish ‘thence’ from ‘therefrom’? [closed]

Thence vs. Therefrom When is it better to use each of these two words, thence and therefrom? Are they completely identical, or do they differ in denotations or connotations? If so, how? I’ve looked up ...
TylerDurden's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
77 views

Should one avoid hyphenating prefixed words in scientific papers?

I have noticed that many papers and books (in the engineering and mathematical fields, at least) have a preference for avoiding hyphenated prefixes. For instance, they usually write: preprocessing ...
Rubem Pacelli's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
72 views

Use of adjective "slack" in academic writing

(Note. I deleted the previous question as the discussion was focusing too much on the math.) I am writing a research paper in mathematical analysis and I have a situation in which I want to give a ...
Lorenzo Pompili's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
170 views

Using "so" in formal writing to introduce questions, and its possible alternatives

Context: Suppose that in a formal academic writing we have talked about a problem and now we want to talk about its solutions. Is the following sentence appropriate for opening a paragraph? So what ...
alireza's user avatar
  • 109
0 votes
0 answers
29 views

"Yours sincerely" or "faithfully" if I address the name of a company? [duplicate]

When I write a formal letter to a company or so, I usually go with "Dear Company Name" instead of "Dear Sir/Madam". In these cases should I end my letter with "Yours sincerely&...
littlemoss's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
18 views

What is a formal way to write takes money away from consumers?

The context is that of a macroeconomic report speaking about contractionary fiscal policy: This in turn takes money away from consumers therefore, forcing consumers to demand less from businesses.
Noah's user avatar
  • 1
1 vote
1 answer
102 views

Why do we take things personally with an adverb but take them easy with an adjective? How can this be justified? [closed]

Why do we write take it personally or take it seriously with adverbs but we also write take it easy with an adjective, not take it easily with an adverb? How is this switching off between adjectives ...
Elvis's user avatar
  • 19
0 votes
0 answers
14 views

"these which" vs "the ones that" [duplicate]

I'm writing a research grant proposal and it was suggested to me that I replace words "these which" by "the ones that" in reference to scientific journals. Here is the full ...
Blazej's user avatar
  • 101
0 votes
2 answers
42 views

Can I use "to propel sb towards their demise" as a synonym of " to kill"? [closed]

Context: I created this phrase in an attempt to paraphrase the word "kill" while doing a writing task. I searched it up on Google and found that no one use it, therefore I do not know if its ...
nguyenhogiabao's user avatar
1 vote
4 answers
164 views

Less formal term for "dimensions" for something that can be measured in units

In scientific/engineering writing and calculations we use terms that are considered "dimensions" and for each "dimension" we have to have "units" when we describe them. ...
Trashman's user avatar
  • 131
0 votes
2 answers
65 views

To clutch in a gear changing context

I'm a portuguese speaker and we have a slang verb, "debrear", which means to step, all the way to the floor, on the clutch pedal, or, motorcycle-wise, to pull the clutch lever all the way in....
Gabriel Santos's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
59 views

What's a proper greeting to use when writing a formal e-mail to a university? [duplicate]

I think the preferred option is to use "Dear Professor XYZ", but what should one use when the identity of the recipient is unknown?
Untitled's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
234 views

Placeholder word for object whose name is unknown to the speaker that is appropriate in any situation [duplicate]

I'm looking for a word that can substitute an object, whose name is unknown to the speaker. I'm aware that there are words like "whatsamacallit", "thingamabob", etc., but they seem ...
Villem's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
1 answer
30 views

How to use formal adjectives correctly? [duplicate]

My alma mater is officially called "Financial University", but periodically when I translate the text into google translate, it offers me the spelling "University of Finance" (The ...
RoyalGoose's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
838 views

What is the difference between "as tall as" and "just as tall as"?

What is the difference between I'm as tall as my father and I'm just as tall as my father? I know they are similar, But they make sense to be a little bit different. What is that difference?
sadegh yeganeh zadeh's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
3k views

Is there an abbreviation for "Professors" plural, in a greeting at the top of a formal letter?

I am writing a letter to two professors. Normally I abbreviate "Professor" to "Prof." in the greeting. Is there a way to do that when I need the plural? Or do I have to write ...
aparente001's user avatar
  • 21.6k
0 votes
1 answer
83 views

Word/expression for the inherent ambiguity or difficulty of defining what constitutes a good outcome

TL;DR: I am in a need of a good, precise word or an expression capturing the notion that a computer science problem P remains open (just) because it is virtually impossible to specify/define what a ...
user35443's user avatar
  • 141
0 votes
1 answer
32 views

In formal writing such as a reference, can an initial subject defining sentence imply the subject to several sentences thereafter? [closed]

I am writing a personal reference for a family member and trying to list several ways in which they have helped me without the sentence running on. I do not believe a colon would work in this case as ...
Kairi's user avatar
  • 3
-1 votes
1 answer
3k views

What is a more formal synonym for "getting the job"?

Example sentence: [X] has become a standard threshold in the industry that [Y] has to cross to "get the job". I would also not mind to get some other suggestions, since the overall ...
Domi's user avatar
  • 101
2 votes
2 answers
409 views

Usage of "Please see"

English is not my native language and I need some help understanding the following sentence: Please see that the due date has been postponed. What should be understood from such a sentence? Is it ...
Dwight's user avatar
  • 23
1 vote
1 answer
47 views

Single noun/phrase to denote transfer across levels of formality of language

Question: What is the name of the quality denoting the formality/colloquialism of and/or amount of jargon in language? Context: I am writing a review for a paper in which authors developed a model ...
user35443's user avatar
  • 141
1 vote
1 answer
79 views

What is the exact meaning of 'give me a pair of'? [closed]

Does a pair always means '2 of something' or can it be used more generically to indicate 'a few of something'? What is the exact amount indicated by 'a pair'? Is there a different meaning whether a ...
cerv21's user avatar
  • 111
1 vote
0 answers
20 views

Is it wrong to skip the pronoun when writing in the first person? [duplicate]

When writing short texts, usually detailing something I have done, I tend to not use the "I" pronoun in front of verbs, usually in front of past-tense constructions. Have seen it in emails ...
conopizda2's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
948 views

Using 'WhatsApp' as a verb [closed]

Oxford Learner's Dictionaries presents 'WhatsApp' as a verb and noun. WhatsApp™ verb /ˈwɒtsæp/, /ˌwɒtsˈæp/ /ˈwʌtsæp/, /ˌwʌtsˈæp/ [transitive, intransitive] WhatsApp (somebody) to send a message, ...
mahmud k pukayoor's user avatar
4 votes
5 answers
2k views

Formal variant of 'under the hood'

I am working on my Bachelor thesis and I need to use the formal way of saying 'under the hood'. The context is similar to: The agent accepts the message, performs processing and relays it to DUA. ...
obolen_an's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
1k views

Is the expression "As it goes without saying" technically sound and formal?

I am a non-native junior researcher, and in one of my academic reports, I want to write the following sentence to begin my paragraph. As it goes without saying, not all customers are the same. My ...
user15402571's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
201 views

"In this regard" vs "in regards to this"

I am not a native English speaker but have had English as the medium of instruction throughout my education. While writing an email application, I wrote this line as a concluding statement. "Let ...
Josh Bilinger's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
67 views

Remove duplicate use of "and" with different strengths? [closed]

I wrote the following sentence in English: Part of a development group responsible for releasing security solutions for Google’s Security product and investigating devices while understanding their ...
Algo's user avatar
  • 1
1 vote
0 answers
588 views

Is "You're not" or "You aren't" better for contraction usage of "You are not"? [duplicate]

Basically the title; is it better to use "You're not" or "You aren't" in place of "You are not" in formal writing?
Peter Nielsen's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
47 views

A first line of a business email when you don't know the name nor gender of a person you write to (and time-agnostic too) [duplicate]

"Greetings," and "hello there" are not businessy enough, are they? "Dear Sir or Madam," sounds a bit too pompous. "Good time of a day" sounds strange. Are there ...
Foreigner's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
349 views

Formal word for overhyped?

Is there a formal word for overhyped? (using the definition: make exaggerated claims about (a product, idea, or event); publicize or promote excessively.)
TPrime's user avatar
  • 3
1 vote
0 answers
179 views

Difference between 'do so' and 'do' without the 'so' [closed]

I understand that when I wish to repeat an infinitive form of the verb, it's correct to use 'to do so'. For example, He wished to leave the house party, and I wanted to (do so) as well. Here simply ...
Paramjit Das's user avatar
5 votes
4 answers
4k views

Using 'Signed' as a Closing

When writing letters, there are closings that people usually use like "sincerely" or "best" or "thanks", etc. I have sometimes heard people (when reading letters) say &...
R. Modi's user avatar
  • 123
0 votes
0 answers
30 views

an atom vs the atom [duplicate]

In Britannica's Atom term, some general sentences about an atom use "an atom", and others "the atom", why? Sentences with "an atom": The behaviour of an atom is strongly ...
Ben's user avatar
  • 105
0 votes
1 answer
101 views

Is there a "more formal" (or ideally, actual medical/research term?) for being "clucky" / "broody"?

It's a phenomenon that if a woman, A, spends time around a woman, B, who is either pregnant or has a young baby (B is perhaps a sister, friend), sometimes woman A finds herself with "a desire to ...
Fattie's user avatar
  • 10.7k

1
2 3 4 5
19