Questions tagged [formality]

This tag is for questions about formal (versus informal) words and usage. The question must identify a particular concern about the formality of the word or phrase at issue, and specify the target context or audience.

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What are some examples on how to acknowledge a message from your colleagues or anyone in your workplace?

There are times where I don't know exactly what to say or reply when someone informs me about something and I want to acknowledge that I've read it. What I usually say is "Noted" or "Ok,...
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11answers
3k views

Is there an antonym for “paucity” that means not scarce and not necessarily but possibly enough?

I am trying to fill in the blank in this sentence: "There is a(n) ___ of research on this topic." Using the word paucity would imply, to me, that I feel there is definitely not enough ...
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1answer
52 views

Name for “filler” words that potentially convey lack of self confidence [duplicate]

There are plenty of internet search hits for "filler" words, and how not to use them. I'm not asking about these. I would like to know if there is a name for language that people use which ...
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139 views

Is “Mr. Last Name + First Name” correct in formal writing?

I'm translating a formal letter to English. With my previous knowledge of English, I translated names from Singapore and China using the format "Mr. First name + Last Name". For example: (1) ...
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1answer
44 views

Thanking someone for their email [closed]

I run a business and answer several emails a day. I tend to interact with people in an informal way. On their first message, I always put "Thank you for messaging me" in the first line of a ...
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1answer
46 views

What's an eloquent way to say “ Please rush my request”? [closed]

I would like to ask the person from whom I am requesting service, to do so quickly. I would not like to come across as rude, nor brash. Thank you
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0answers
33 views

Can I say “someone is ample”?

My friend appoints someone to be our spokesperson in an interview. And I think this person is enough to answer all questions, thus my friend does not need to find another spokesperson. I want to reply ...
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2answers
49 views

Mrs and Mr His Full Name

My father’s name is Piyush Singh and my mother’s name is Seema Singh. My question is whether referring to them as Mrs and Mr Piyush Singh wrong.
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0answers
16 views

What does “your end” mean? [duplicate]

In my English homework, a student gets asked if she would put "Any news your end" in a formal or informal letter. My class should translate it, but in my native language it means something ...
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2answers
40 views

Alternatives for “demand”

"The job Y demands familiarity with Z." How do you say the above sentence, when the familiarity with the product Z is not necessary, but helpful as a part of job Y? Just to give a little ...
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1answer
63 views

Do I have to put ,Inc. every time I mention our company in a single article?

I write blogs for our company website, often commenting on what services our company provides, so I will usually mention our company name a few times in the article. It is a local company, but it is ...
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2answers
54 views

Can I use latter when there is only one option?

In this sentence, "latter" sounds good to me (but I am not a native English speaker). Over successive stages of the model the urban population evolves to the optimal solution. The latter is ...
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0answers
167 views

“I ain't never seen” vs “I ain't seen” which one is correct? [duplicate]

As far as i know we do not need to add "never" because ain't is already have a negative meaning.
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8answers
1k views

Opposite of “under the weather”?

British TV Shows are a good way to learn language. At the moment I'm watching Situation Comedy classic series Black Adder, Season one on DVD format. I learnt a new phrase "under the weather" ...
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0answers
34 views

How formal is “Bless [him/her]”?

I am living in the UK, and I have recently started noticing quite a lot of people saying “bless [him/her]”, in contexts similar to: — He has been doing poorly. — Oh, bless him! — She is so cute, ...
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1answer
173 views

Is 'please tell me how can I help you' grammatically correct? [duplicate]

Is it the right way to ask if someone is asking for your help?
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2answers
143 views

What function does the comma serve in the salutation of a letter, and when did it come about?

In a letter, we say "Dear Alexthecampbell," before starting the body. We then capitalize the first letter of the next sentence. Since the salutation functions like a header and isn't part ...
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1answer
78 views

Phrases to differ respectfully [duplicate]

If I were to disagree with an opinion, how should I write it in a respectful and idiomatic way? Normally I would write; "Tinged with regret, I respectfully disagree." Are there any other ...
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1answer
30 views

“It's a great thing” in a formal letter? [closed]

Is it ok to say "it's a great thing that your company does this and that because..." in a business letter or is there another way to say it ?
2
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1answer
494 views

Formal title/honorific for a lawyer

Let's say there is a lawyer named Sue Smith. She could be referred to as Ms. Smith, but is there a different formal prepended honorific specific to lawyers? Particularly when addressing one directly.
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0answers
27 views

Is it correct/preferred to use “present” as adjective instead of “this” when writing legal stuff?

Sometimes there are legal documents that, literally translated into English, contain the phrase "the present document/contract" whenever a reference to the document itself is made within the ...
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1answer
63 views

It should be used **with** in this paragraph?

Should be used with in this paragraph to indicate the contribution that she could do by studying a specific master's program? Using water is necessary but it needs to be done carefully to avoid ...
2
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1answer
33 views

Is 'excelled' appropriate here?

I am wondering whether excelled was correctly used or not in this paragraph?. I do not want to use outstanding. Despite she is from a vulnerable region in the countryside with low educational ...
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3answers
50 views

Would “temporal proximity” be an effective way to label the axis of a graph?

I have a bunch of events that vary in duration and also vary in how recently they occurred. I want to graph these events so that they look like a typical bar graph, with all the bases resting on the ...
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0answers
39 views

Use of “pull” in lieu of the phrasal verb “pull off”

Example: "pull a miracle" instead of "pull off a miracle". A quick google search shows the former being used in sports contexts, though I have heard of it in informal conversation ...
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0answers
16 views

Can the suffix -wise be considered too inadequate/colloquial for a personal statement? [duplicate]

I am writing a personal statement for the very first time and I'm worried that the suffix -wise may sound too laid-back for a text of such genre. The sentence I want to write is similar to this: ...
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1answer
39 views

Can we use “Not only, but too” instead of "Not only, but also,?

I am wondering about the use of "Not only, but too" instead of "Not only, but also.? For example: The candidates campaigned not only in Perth but in Darwin too. and is it formal to ...
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0answers
137 views

“Thank you in each case” usage [closed]

I was wondering is the phrase "Thank you in each case" appropriate to say at the end of question asking someone for some help, in formal or informal situations. I very often use it, and was ...
0
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1answer
48 views

Can I say this “your … is impressive” to my professor? [closed]

I am writing an email request for a reference letter to one of my professors. I would like to address her kindness in my email because she was always very patient when I asked her questions. My ...
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1answer
37 views

Is it correct to say “the reality between which he is torn sympathizing and vilifying” [closed]

what is the correct to write the reality between which he is torn sympathizing and vilifying or the reality which he is torn between sympathizing and vilifying
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2answers
58 views

Of anyone I know

The American Heritage Dictionary reads Anyone is often used in place of the more logical everyone in sentences like She is the most intelligent person of anyone I know. In our 2017 ballot, the ...
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1answer
155 views

Formal writing: replace “in fact” in a sentence

I am writing my PhD thesis, and I have a sentence that begins: We will, in fact, prove a stronger condition: Is there a more formal way to begin this sentence? Specifically, I am looking to remove &...
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0answers
29 views

Is there a formal way of stating “to be appointed”?

I am currently writing the annual report for a charity. There are trustees which will be appointed, but not at the date of the report. Is there a formal way of stating Trustee "to be appointed&...
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1answer
58 views

“a couple”: adverbial phrase

Page 229 of Garner's fourth edition reads When couple is used with comparison words such as more, fewer, and too many, the of is omitted <have a couple more shrimp>. In the predicate of the ...
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1answer
512 views

Is the sentence “It is hoped that the Coronavirus would disappear soon” correct formal speech?

Today I had my English finals, 12th grade high-school. I live in a third-world country, and so the quality of the questions/answers is not always guaranteed. One of the questions was: Which of the ...
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1answer
110 views

“No one of” + plural noun phrase

The Collins English Usage reads Don't use ‘of’ after ‘no one’ or ‘nobody’; Say ‘None of the children could speak French’. However in the Cambridge Grammar of the English Language on can find : No ...
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3answers
118 views

Proper formal synonyms for “blessed”

I am currently using the word "blessed" in writing a STEM paper (to be published). The usage would be something like "Devices of this type are often blessed with more reliability", ...
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5answers
3k views

Naturalness of expressions like “Me and Adam have discovered …” in conversational English [duplicate]

I heard an American radio personality, university graduate, was saying below. "Me and Adam have discovered a lot of weird things since we came to Japan." My question here is not about ...
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0answers
3k views

Usage of “For your information” in a formal email

I am writing an Email to a professor and want to assure him I will refer to his publication in the future. I am just curious whether using "For your information" in the following sentence is ...
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0answers
15 views

Comma after to verb [duplicate]

Should be a comma here? I read this sentence in a book, and it seems to be a little strange without a comma. Or is it only a style? And is the place of now right, considering the word order? Is this ...
0
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1answer
347 views

would like to have done

According to Garner's fourth edition, 'd have liked to should be followed by a present-tense infinitive, so 'd have liked to (٭have done) is wrong; nor is correct 'd like to have done because the ...
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1answer
102 views

“Pull in to” or “pull into”? “Head in to”, “Head into”, “head to”, or “head for”?

My question may sound weird, but what which of these is correct? “She pulled in to the parking lot” “She pulled into the parking lot” “I was heading for school.” “I was heading to school.” “I was ...
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2answers
116 views

How do we order food in English?

So I was wondering how we order food in English. Let’s say I want a tea, is this sentence okay? : “Hi, I’d like a takeout tea please.” Or do native speakers say it differently? (I want to sound like a ...
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0answers
33 views

Do we still use “for” like “because”? [duplicate]

I was wondering if the use of “for” like “because” was current use. For example: “I haven’t come to the party, for I was tired.” Is this used nowadays? Or shall we say “I haven’t come to the party ...
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1answer
36 views

Which of these is correct? I or me? [closed]

“Do you want to come with Lucy and I?” “Do you want to come with Lucy and me?” When do we say “I” instead of “me” and “me” instead of “I”? Thank you 😊
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2answers
322 views

these are the people or this is the people?

In the following paragraph, it is correct to write: ...that this is the people who I want to learn from? or instead it should be.... that these are the people who I want to learn from? The high level ...
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0answers
92 views

What’s a matter-of-fact tone?

I was wondering if a matter-of-fact tone was the same as a straightforward tone, and if these terms all mean “simple” or “without emotions”. (I am not a native speaker for that matter). If I speak or ...
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3answers
118 views

Is “in no way” informal?

Once in an undergraduate course on English academic writing, I wrote something like "This is in no way representative of ..." in an assignment, and the teacher marked it down for being non-...
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0answers
77 views

Is the use of the singular “they” formal English or not?

so I have to write an academic essay for school, and I was wondering if the use of the singular “they/them/their” would be accepted. Which of these would be “formal” and “accepted” by teachers. A) ...
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6answers
85 views

Formal word/phrase for “in one big move”

I'm working with the sentence: The company raised over $1 billion, __________ placing it in the top band. I initially considered "in one fell swoop" but this seems to be a stretch, typically the ...

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