Questions tagged [differences]

This tag is for questions about the differences in the meaning of two words. For us to be able to help you, please provide the sourced definitions that you are referring to, where the confusion arises, as well as an example sentence that shows the ambiguity.

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What is the difference between Vert/Verts and Vertex/Vertices? [closed]

What is the difference between Vert/Verts and Vertex/Vertices? Both forms seem to be used interchangeably in mathematics and computer graphics. Blender (3D software) uses Vert/Verts in it's User ...
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2 answers
42 views

"Lecture notes in" or "Lecture notes on"

I have seen both options used interchangeably, is there a reason why? Example with on: https://www.springer.com/series/15362 Lecture Notes on Data Engineering and Communications Technologies ...
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1 answer
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What is the difference between "impossible" and "infeasible"? [closed]

In cryptography world I usually encounter the word "infeasible", like: "It is computationally infeasible to solve elliptic curve discrete logarithm." But I rarely see the word &...
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1 answer
38 views

Issue with word 'incentives'

I am proofreading some documentation, and this sentence bothers me: This incentives users to install the app. Is the use of 'incentives' here grammatically incorrect? Are these two alternatives ...
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2 answers
44 views

Difference between "across the year" and "throughout the year"?

I have heard people saying these two phrases, do they have any difference from each other? For example I have accomplished a lot across the year. and I have accomplished a lot throughout the year. ...
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1 answer
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Negative form or "No"? [duplicate]

I have some confusion about these two forms below: - I am no Politician - I am not a Politician Same goes with: - I have no friends - I don't have friends
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2 votes
1 answer
93 views

Can a single word be an idiom or an expression?

Can a single word be considered an idiom or an expression? If so, how does one tell the difference? For instance, words like, "dope!", "lit!", "sick!". These words mean ...
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1 vote
4 answers
143 views

Why are there different words that have the same meaning? [closed]

I am trying to improve my vocabulary. I often google the meaning of a word; and in the Google definition of, say, a word x it says:- y,z. I google the definition of y, it says in the meaning:- x,z; ...
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-1 votes
2 answers
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Name of a circuit element. Switch or toggle? [closed]

What's correct name of this circuit element — switch or toggle?
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4 votes
1 answer
65 views

The origin of and the difference between primogenitor, primogeniture and progenitor

In Etymonline, the etymology of primogenitor (and primogeniture) is very similar to progenitor. The word's meaning: Ancestor or forefather. However, nowhere do I find the reason of the split from the ...
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10 votes
7 answers
2k views

Is there any difference between the idioms "pull the rug from under" and "leave in the lurch"?

Is there any distinction between "pull from under the rug" and "leave in the lurch"? What separates them? I've scoured some online dictionaries, but I fail to see the difference. ...
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-1 votes
1 answer
57 views

How do I distinguish wanting something to happen vs predicting it will happen?

This question comes from arises from cases of shipping as in (romantic) relationship - ping; The Psychology of Shipping and The Psychology of Shipping. What happened was that I saw this forum where 1 ...
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2 votes
7 answers
3k views

What does the idiomatic phrase "err on the side of" mean?

I've looked through several online dictionaries to ferret out the meaning of "err on the side of" ("err on the side of", what I mean is I'm more concerned with the underlying ...
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7 votes
3 answers
1k views

Is there any difference between "congenial" and "genial"?

As the question implies, I'm interested in only the linguistic distinction between the two words I've listed. I've looked up these two words on some online dictionaries. After some searching, I've ...
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1 vote
1 answer
180 views

What is the definition of the phrase "unto itself"?

I've looked through several online dictionaries to discover the meaning of the phrase "unto itself" ("unto itself" in the sense of the phrase having no qualifying objects, people, ...
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11 votes
4 answers
2k views

What is the difference between "hallmark" and "trappings"?

Is there a distinction between "hallmarks" and "trappings"? What separates them? I've scoured many dictionaries, but I don't see the difference. For example, Cambridge Advanced ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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What does "ever having happened" mean?

I was listening to a Doctor Who podcast episode, and got confused by this line: She (The Doctor)’s supposed to be here. She’s supposed to fix things like this. Or stop them from ever happening. Or ...
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0 answers
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Is there a difference between "care about" one vs "care for" one?

One person says:"You don't care about me!" Another replies: "I care deeply for you." Instead of replying "I care deeply about you," the replier says "I care deeply ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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Are "adaptiveness" and "adaptability" interchangeable?

Here are the definitions for the words according to Cambridge dictionary: Adaptiveness - the quality of being able to change to suit different condition Flexibility and adaptiveness are important ...
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0 answers
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"But not more than (being) satisfied with your work": identical alternatives?

This is the original passage: It’s very hard to feel motivated when all you consider important is your salary and job security. Therefore, if you want to change your work situation, it’s important to ...
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1 vote
0 answers
59 views

What's the difference between class and category? [closed]

George Firican said the ER (entity relationship) is different for classification and categorization. The ERs according to him For classification members : classes 1:n (one to many) A futon can be in ...
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1 vote
0 answers
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Difference between “my feet” and “my two feet”

I'm trying to translate the following Prophetic tradition from Arabic to English: ألا كل شيء من أمر الجاهلية موضوع تحت قَدَمَيَّ، وربا الجاهلية موضوع كله، وأول ربا أضع ربا العباس بن عبد المطلب. A ...
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-1 votes
1 answer
40 views

What is the difference between “He complains about”and “He is complaining about”? [closed]

I learned this sentence. 1)He complains about his daughter not saying anything to him. Can we also say the following? 2)He is complaining about his daughter not saying anything to him.
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-1 votes
1 answer
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What is the difference between “not to try”and “avoid doing”?

I learned these sentences in my textbook. I try not to talk about work at home. Teachers have to avoid speaking too quickly Can we also say the following sentences? What is the difference? Teachers ...
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1 vote
1 answer
28 views

What is the difference between “mistake me” and “mistake what I say”?

In my textbook there is a sentence, “Listen to me carefully so as not to misunderstand me”. Can we also say “mistake what I say”?
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1 vote
1 answer
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Is there a meaningful difference between "abjure" and "abnegate"?

Can abjure and abnegate be used interchangeably? I see that abjure is defined as "solemnly renounce (a belief, cause, or claim)" and abnegate as "renounce or reject (something desired ...
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1 answer
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Adverb placements

I came across this sentence and had a hard time understanding it because of the adverb placement. I thought adverbs or adverb phrases usually come right after the verb when "be" is the main ...
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0 answers
23 views

Difference between: zesty and flavourful

I just came across this sentence: "Make your salad zesty and flavourful with..." Can you tell me the exact difference between these two words? I think they're 90% the same or even ...
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0 answers
26 views

entailing, entailing "the", entailing "about the" or entailing "that"?

What is the correct way to use "entailing"? "The machines are working, entailing consumption of nonreplenishable resources, such as fuel" "The machines are working, entailing ...
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3 votes
3 answers
623 views

Is there a difference between "assertion" and "assertation"?

In software development we use the word Assert frequently. While working I had to describe some of the code I was working on. I was going to write that... This function makes the assertion that x is ...
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4 votes
1 answer
321 views

Crenellated or Castellated

I read an article today. https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-60767454 It used the word "crenellated". I thought I knew the word "castellated", but I'm getting more confused. ...
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1 vote
1 answer
48 views

Does order of a conjunction also change its meaning? [closed]

Consider the following two phrases: Just a phone call away if absent vs If absent, just a phone call away Is one of them grammatically incorrect, or would the order change the meaning? Which is ...
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-1 votes
1 answer
48 views

Best Regards or Best regards [closed]

My Gmail suggests using the following Best Regards Jimmy Doe I do not understand why "Regards" is capitalized in this case. Should it not be: Best regards James Doe
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2 answers
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The difference between saying you're "from somewhere", "raised somewhere" and "grew up somewhere."

Raised The Cambridge English dictionary states that to "raise" is: to take care of a person, or an animal or plant, until they are completely grown Taken literally, if you were to spend 0-...
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0 votes
0 answers
52 views

Could " we'd better .." be replaced with " we will .." in the sentence below?

" I reckon we'd better hit some water tomorrow" Or " I reckon we will hit some water tomorrow" I have two more questions . Is the word " better " adverb here and if the ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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What is the difference between annexation and accession?

In a Wikipedia discussion about the Annexation of Crimea by the Russian Federation 'User:力' says: For the record, if you ask the Russians, they would say that Accession of Crimea to the Russian ...
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1 vote
2 answers
72 views

"all/only too" vs "far/much too"

There are a lot of collocations with "too" that show different extents of something: a little too, a bit too, rather too, far too, much too, etc But there are two collocations that, as I was ...
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1 vote
1 answer
144 views

What are the differences among 'remove', 'delete', 'dismiss', and 'discard'? [closed]

I'm working for a professional application, and as I'm not a native English speaker I need your light to help me to use the best one in the best context. What is the meaning of each of them and in ...
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0 answers
15 views

Which sentences are correct or nature and why? [duplicate]

I'd like to know the difference between I started to study in 2015 and I finished in 2019. and I started studying in 2015 and I finished in 2019. Which of these sentences is/are correct?
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1 vote
1 answer
129 views

Only this way (we can)/(can we)? (Or why is negative inversion necessary?) [duplicate]

In general, we would say "Only this way can we", but I also came across many sentences in the internet which use “Only this way we can”. Is the expression "Only this way we can" ...
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0 votes
1 answer
111 views

'focus fully on' or 'fully focus on' [closed]

A student wrote '(I) focused fully on cycling'. I am quite certain about 'I fully focused on' but I think his phrasing was grammatically correct too.
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-1 votes
0 answers
90 views

Has the word individual 'outcompeted' that of person historically?

Would it be correct to say that the word individual have 'outcompeted' that of person since 17th century in everyday English, as well as in social sciences? According to etymonline.com's entry on ...
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2 answers
91 views

Difference between 'specify' and 'select'

What's the precise difference between specify and select? Can either be used in this example, or does one work better than the other? I can instinctively feel that there is a subtle difference between ...
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0 answers
80 views

What's the difference between "really have had" and "have really had"?

In a sentence, what's the difference between "he must really have had a rough day" and "he must have really had a rough day"?
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1 answer
418 views

Differences between “Approach,” "Perspective," and “Paradigm”

My question is related to this one: Differences between “methods”, “methodologies” and “paradigms” In lectures, we learned In statistical practice, there are two main schools of thought or paradigms: ...
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1 vote
0 answers
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Are the expressions "to put it mildly" and "to say the least" always interchangeable?

As we know, the expressions "to put it mildly" and "to say the least" are used to avoid describing something in the strongest way possible. But I wonder if there is a subtle ...
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Difference between "bail on" and "scrap" in oral?

In the australian context, I heard somebody said "scrap that" or "..bail on the van". Both basically mean "abandon, get rid of..", but was wondering what specific context ...
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1 vote
0 answers
681 views

What's the difference between astonishing and astounding?

They both seem very similar to me, too similar to make a distinction. astonishing Something that is astonishing is very surprising Collins Dictionary very surprising Macmillan Dictionary ​very ...
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1 vote
2 answers
288 views

"This July" vs "This past July" [closed]

Which of the two forms is correct when referring to July of 2021? What is the contribution of past, if any?
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0 votes
1 answer
54 views

Intransitive use of "to wake" vs. "to wake up" [closed]

He woke in bed. He woke up in bed. Is there a difference between the two? How does the lack/addition of "up" affect the connotation, if at all? Is one preferred over the other depending on ...
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