Questions tagged [differences]

This tag is for questions about the differences in the meaning of two words. For us to be able to help you, please provide the sourced definitions that you are referring to, where the confusion arises, as well as an example sentence that shows the ambiguity.

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23 views

difference between Waste Management company and Garbage Collection company [closed]

In USA, when referring to companies who trash collection, any difference between "Garbage Collection" and "Waste Management"?
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Has the word individual 'outcompeted' that of person historically?

Would it be correct to say that the word individual have 'outcompeted' that of person since 17th century in everyday English, as well as in social sciences? According to etymonline.com's entry on ...
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20 views

What's the difference between category synonyms (set, class, group, category, type, kind, branch, bracket, division, etc.)? [closed]

George Firican said the ER (entity relationship) is different for classification and categorization. The ERs according to him For classification members : classes 1:n (one to many) A futon can be in ...
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22 views

Prepostion at vs in, which is correct, "I am at my house" or "I am in my house"? [migrated]

Prepostion "at" vs "in", which is correct, "I am at my house" or "I am in my house"? I tend to use "I am at my house" if for example I am calling a ...
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2answers
55 views

Difference between 'specify' and 'select'

What's the precise difference between specify and select? Can either be used in this example, or does one work better than the other? I can instinctively feel that there is a subtle difference between ...
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0answers
15 views

There aren't many vs. there aren't a lot of [migrated]

I have field practice in a school now, and I had an argument with a teacher of English there. She says 'there aren't a lot of [...]' is incorrect, and 'there aren't many' should be used instead. I ...
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43 views

What's the difference between "really have had" and "have really had"?

In a sentence, what's the difference between "he must really have had a rough day" and "he must have really had a rough day"?
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1answer
67 views

Differences between “Approach,” "Perspective," and “Paradigm”

My question is related to this one: Differences between “methods”, “methodologies” and “paradigms” In lectures, we learned In statistical practice, there are two main schools of thought or paradigms: ...
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0answers
27 views

Are the expressions "to put it mildly" and "to say the least" always interchangeable?

As we know, the expressions "to put it mildly" and "to say the least" are used to avoid describing something in the strongest way possible. But I wonder if there is a subtle ...
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0answers
23 views

Difference between "bail on" and "scrap" in oral?

In the australian context, I heard somebody said "scrap that" or "..bail on the van". Both basically mean "abandon, get rid of..", but was wondering what specific context ...
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37 views

What's the difference between astonishing and astounding?

They both seem very similar to me, too similar to make a distinction. astonishing Something that is astonishing is very surprising Collins Dictionary very surprising Macmillan Dictionary ​very ...
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2answers
194 views

"This July" vs "This past July" [closed]

Which of the two forms is correct when referring to July of 2021? What is the contribution of past, if any?
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1answer
49 views

Intransitive use of "to wake" vs. "to wake up" [closed]

He woke in bed. He woke up in bed. Is there a difference between the two? How does the lack/addition of "up" affect the connotation, if at all? Is one preferred over the other depending on ...
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2answers
87 views

"Watch" vs. "Watch as"

He watched them run. He watched as they ran. What's the exact difference, in terms of the information/scene conveyed? He was watching the runners in both cases. Do they have different connotations? ...
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0answers
30 views

Difference of meaning between the two sentences

Whenever I see "to be", I don't get the whole meaning, so please help me with other scenarios which could help me get rid of my fear with "to be". I'm going to be hanging out ...
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2answers
53 views

The difference between "gonna be doing it" and "gonna do it"?

I got a question when one of my Australian friends said "I'm gonna be working on this[the project] tomorrow". What's the difference between "gonna be doing" vesus "gonna do&...
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51 views

What's the difference between cahoots and collude

They seem similar to me. Collins Dictionary in cahoots If you say that one person is in cahoots with another, you do not trust the first person because you think that they are planning something ...
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4answers
267 views

Is Merriam-Webster wrong about sympathy and empathy?

According to Merriam-Webster: In general, 'sympathy' is when you share the feelings of another; 'empathy' is when you understand the feelings of another but do not necessarily share them. This seems ...
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1answer
42 views

What's the difference between "synonym for" and "synonym of"?

For instance, if I need to assert that "a is a synonym for|of b", which preposition may be relevant here - 'of' or 'for'? Also, which usage is grammatically correct?
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1answer
67 views

I am taking the bus tomorrow vs I am going to take [duplicate]

In your interviews for an ESL teacher, you are asked a question of this sort: What is the difference between: a. I am taking the bus tomorrow. b. I am going to take the bus tomorrow. Or a. I lived in ...
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0answers
64 views

Corpus vs. corpse

I found this definition on Wikidiff: "The difference between corpus and corpse is that corpus is the body while corpse is a dead body" While in Collins and Merriam Webster I found this ...
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1answer
40 views

The machine is (worked-made ) by wind power? [closed]

I am not sure but i think that correct is to say that the machine is worked by wind power, what is your opinion ?
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1answer
79 views

What is the difference between "Make" and "Get" when they come with an adjective?

I see that people use both of them, but are there any differences between them? what do they mean exactly? For instance: I got him upset. I made him upset.
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2answers
207 views

Downright lying or Outright lying? [closed]

I'd like to describe that someone is lying explicitly without any shame.  Someone who lies and knows that they are lying and knows that others know but they don't care.  Should I say downright or ...
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1answer
53 views

"So to speak" vs "As it were" [closed]

As the title says, what is the difference between "so to speak" and "as it were"? Personally, I use them interchangeably but I was wondering if there was a proper way, so to speak (...
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2answers
111 views

What is the difference between "on a cold winter morning" and "in a cold winter morning"? [closed]

What is the difference between "on a cold winter morning" and "in a cold winter morning"? Which is correct or which sounds more natural?
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0answers
111 views

"Comprehend" vs "Interpret" vs "Understand"

What is the difference between "Comprehend", "Interpret", and "Understand"? Here are the definitions that I referred to, from Cambridge Dictionary- Comprehend- to ...
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1answer
36 views

Do “because so-and-so claims that” and “claiming that” have the same meaning?

First, I would like to give an example. She filed a complaint to the committee because she claims that her personal information was leaked. She filed a complaint to the committee claiming that her ...
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1answer
47 views

The difference between Hollow and Copse [closed]

What is the difference between a hollow and copse in the sense of a hollow as a feature of woodland? Wikipedia gives this definition: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hollow 'Hollow, a low, wooded area, ...
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0answers
42 views

"Taiwan" as an adjective versus "Taiwanese"

I hope this question is not too simplistic for the "linguists ..." forum, but I couldn’t seem to find an answer elsewhere. I am helping a non-native speaker proofread his Ph.D. dissertation ...
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1answer
164 views

Take advice vs follow advice

To take advice is usually defined as: obtain information and guidance, typically from an expert. Lexico By this definition, there is no implication that the advice is actually followed. But can take ...
2
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1answer
62 views

Unexpectedly or Unanticipatedly [closed]

Is there any difference in usage between the adverb 'unexpectedly' and 'unanticipatedly' For Example : We met each other unexpectedly/unanticipatedly She approached me unanticipatedly/unexpectedly. ...
2
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1answer
714 views

What is the difference between strategy and technique?

At first glance both words seem to mean different things, but when looking at how people use the word in society today and their lexicon, both words appear to be the same. Kelsey had a good technique/...
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1answer
60 views

What's the difference between envy and resent? [closed]

What's the difference between envy and resent? envy painful or resentful awareness of an advantage enjoyed by another joined with a desire to possess the same advantage Envy is the feeling you have ...
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2answers
859 views

Adjective usage of 'mystic' vs 'mystical'

I have been checking the differences in dictionaries and forums and I cannot find any final conclusion. I get that: Mystic/Mystical are both valid adjectives Mystic is the only one that can be used ...
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0answers
75 views

Dialect differences between "should", "ought", and "ought to"

As I travel around England, Southern Wales, and Southern Scotland, I hear the rural and working-class people in some areas use "should" (and never "ought"), in other areas "...
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0answers
36 views

Can I exchange 'not better' and 'no better'? [duplicate]

You are not better than me, or You are no better than me. Do they mean the same? If yes, what is their difference?
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1answer
40 views

Difference between may and might [duplicate]

What is the difference between these sentences? You may regret it. You might regret it.
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1answer
137 views

When is an accusation synonymous with asking a question?

Can an accusation be considered (implicitly) as asking a question? As an example: Accusation: “You’re pretending to be a police officer” Question: “Are you pretending to be a policy officer?” Can one ...
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1answer
54 views

Have I paraphrased a sentence without changing the meaning? [closed]

This is what I read: "Neuroimaging of frequent internet users shows twice as much activity in the prefrontal cortex as sporadic Internet users during online tasks." And this is how I ...
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1answer
39 views

Which sentence sounds better? Grammatical question about sentences

I seriously can't tell which sounds natural in English. Need some help.                                    a) From tomorrow on, she'll be coming to our place to work with us. b) She'll be coming to ...
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1answer
100 views

Gun terminology: is cylinder or chamber correct in this sentence?

We looked at each other like we had each just rolled a chamber in Russian roulette and now had the guns in our mouths. If the chambers are what's inside of the actual cylinder, which is what you spin, ...
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1answer
2k views

How to differentiate "slow" VS "slowly" both as adverbs

I understand the 2 words are very simple words in English until I came across this sentence below: "Please drive slow". I know it should be an adverb here, and I checked it up to find &...
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1answer
123 views

What is the difference between "obdurate" and "obstinate"? [closed]

I saw the former for the first time today, but I noticed its definition seems exactly like the latter. Is there something I'm missing or are the two just pure synonyms?
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0answers
36 views

What does it mean to say "Someone won't know I'm there"?

In one of the video clips of SNL(https://is.gd/WVr1OQ), the man said the thing that drives his mom crazy is "when he sometimes wake up earlier than his mom, he gets out of their bed so that his ...
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0answers
29 views

Difference between “getting rich” and “becoming rich”

Is there any difference between becoming rich and getting rich? If there is, what would it be?
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1answer
53 views

Meaning of the verb to change when it is used in a properly intransitive way and not simply omitting the reflexive pronoun

What does the verb to change mean when there is no object (not even implicit) as opposed to simply omitting the reflexive pronoun? For example: Do you want to change? vs Do you want to change yourself?...
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0answers
39 views

What is the difference between an "uncountable noun" and an "adjective" [duplicate]

In the word "afternoon tea"(the tea that is served in afternoon) the word 'afternoon' is an uncountable noun as OALD shows. In the word "English countryside"(the countryside that ...
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2answers
52 views

What is the difference in usage between " and" and " or " in the parallel structure?

Students at school were told not to drink, not to smoke and not to fight. Students at school were told not to drink, smoke or fight. Are they ungrammatical? I'm quite confused about the usage of ...
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2answers
122 views

Which is correct in using "consider as" of Cambridge and Oxford dictionary?

I get a bit confused when counterchecking the dictionaries of Cambridge and Oxford against one another. In the Cambridge dictionary, it is written that "We don’t use 'as' with 'consider'" ...

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