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This tag is for questions about the differences in the meaning of two words.

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0answers
10 views

Difference between verdict and opinion in terms of product review?

We have a product review website where our experts write about different types of products. There are different types of reviews by the experts i.e. just by hearing or reading about the product, by ...
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1answer
19 views

“More of” or “most”

I would like to know what is the difference between these two sentences: What do you want more of in life? what do you want most in life? Is there any difference? Thank you in advance.
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1answer
24 views

try to change his opinion or try changing his opinion [duplicate]

A powerful opponent made a long speech criticizing John. This speech was so powerful that it threatened John's political career. John decided to try to change his rival's opinion of him. To do this, ...
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1answer
39 views

“not be permitted access” vs. “not be permitted to access”

I was wondering is it right to say something this way: You will not be "permitted access" to the work you produce. Isn't it better to say it this way? You will not be permitted to access to the ...
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0answers
46 views

How do “anathema” and “hate” differ? [on hold]

Definition of anathema by Oxford Dictionary: something or someone that one vehemently dislikes—usually used as a predicate nominative Definition of hate by Oxford Dictionary: feel intense ...
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0answers
19 views

Type of clause question ?

No matter what they say about him, it's false. introductory phrase followed by comma and it's false. So is the whole sentence acting as the main clause in these constructions ? It's false can't ...
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0answers
15 views

Have a good command of sth - why some dictionary examples have no article? [migrated]

I am confused, the following examples are from the Oxford dictionary, all from the same entry (2). Why in some cases it is "a command" and in some it is treated as uncountable? ‘he had a brilliant ...
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0answers
11 views

Differences between “order”, “harmony”, “regulation” and “organisation”

Could someone explain me differences between given words ? Order Harmony Regulation Organisation
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0answers
69 views

What distinguishes the two meanings of the word “though” as a conjunction

The dictionary provides two meanings for the word "though" when used as a conjunction: to introduce a sentence that makes what you just said surprising, as in "He is a Marxist, though he has read ...
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1answer
25 views

What's the difference between “important” and “matter”? [closed]

Is there any difference between "You are important to me." and "You matter to me." ?
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1answer
41 views

What is the difference between “bill” and “political reform”?

The definitions of reform and bill from Oxford Dictionaries: Reform: the action or process of reforming an institution or practice. Bill: a draft of a proposed law presented to parliament for ...
0
votes
1answer
50 views

What is the difference between “patronize” and “infantilize”? [closed]

Are they synonymous or do they have different meanings? What would be the differences, however slight? Here are the dictionary definitions: infantilize verb (used with object) to keep in or ...
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1answer
30 views

abbreviation or not Drive vs. dr home address [closed]

I put my home address on a credit application: 266 Chateau La Salle Drive credit report has 266 Chateau La Salle dr Is there a reference source to acceptability?
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1answer
22 views

Difference between “on the both sides” and “on both sides”

I really do not have any idea about the difference between the two phrases "on the both sides" and "on both sides". They both appear a lot from Google search. I see the the first phrase in this ...
0
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1answer
71 views

Difference between 'at' and 'by' for percentages

Please confirm the difference between these two sentences: Salad is the most popular dish by 43%. Salad is the most popular dish at 43%. Is the meaning of these two sentences same or ...
0
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1answer
48 views

We're square/even/quits in formal speech

What are the differences between: be square, be even and be quits? Are they acceptable to use in formal speech? If they not, what should I use instead?
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4answers
375 views

Difference between “under”, “underneath”, “below” and “beneath”

It leads me to the confusion, when it comes to contradicting between some prepositions. Today, I want to know the distinction between the two similar senses of these prepositions: under, underneath, ...
2
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1answer
36 views

If “pending” is a preposition, why not “awaiting” and “remaining”

I have found these three examples of pending, awaiting, and remaining from Your Dictionary, all of which show that they are prepositions: Philip, who had been left in charge of Palestine pending ...
2
votes
1answer
90 views

What is the correct British way to say arbitrary?

Looking across many different dictionaries and websites, they have different pronunciations for the word arbitrary. A colleague says it is pronounced like ahr-bitri, but this seems incorrect to me. ...
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1answer
49 views

Meaning of the statement “I got my”

Does anybody know the difference between these two statements? My hands got stuck in the drain. I got my hands stuck in the drain.
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0answers
16 views

Differences between “intend to do” and “intend doing” something [duplicate]

What is the difference between "intend to do" and "intend doing" something? In this sentence could, it be used interchangeably? As biodiesels are becoming increasingly popular throughout the world, ...
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2answers
93 views

Difference between “flavourful” and “flavoursome”?

What is the difference between flavourful and flavoursome? I was reading a packet of raisins, which described the raisins as flavourful. I didn't recognise that word. Is it less common than ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

'He told her that he loved only her.' vs 'He told her that he loved her only.'

Neil Guthrie DPhil English (Oxon), LLB (Toronto). Guthrie’s Guide to Better Legal Writing (2017). p. 65 Question 1. How does 6 differ from 7? Question 2. Joanna Weselby (BA (Hons), English ...
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1answer
33 views

“I got tense” or “I got tensed”?

Instead of using "I got tense", can I use "I got tensed"? On a similar note, instead of using "The angrier you get, the tenser your body gets", can I use "The angier you get, the more tensed your ...
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0answers
20 views

Difference between “transform into” and “turn into”

It's a fact (by my research) that both verbs can be used to indicate the same meaning of change, as in: The Prime Minister has the ability to transform his vision into reality. The Prime ...
2
votes
1answer
52 views

Real v.s. in reality

Yesterday, I talked with Emma. I said: ‘‘Those indulging in the social media often live up to the needs of their followers on the social media but neglect their real families.’’ However, Emma ...
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1answer
45 views

Difference between “show the ropes” and “learn the ropes”

When should I use "learn the ropes" and "show the ropes"? Are both of these expressions interchangeable? Thanks
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2answers
57 views

'The origin of the problem' vs. 'The root of the problem'

If I want to say To prevent such a thing from happening again, we should solve this issue from the root of the problem. Can I say from the origin of the problem instead of from the root of ...
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0answers
15 views

how is “aberrant” different from “anomalous”?

both the words are adjectives, I am looking forward to difference based on context and tone that the word put in their usage.
1
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1answer
54 views

Difference between ''moreover'' and ''furthermore''

What is the difference between the words ‘‘moreover’’ and ‘‘furthermore’’? The exemplary sentences on Merriam-Webster are ‘‘Swimming alone is against the rules and, moreover, it's dangerous.’’ and ...
0
votes
1answer
32 views

What's the difference between have/has been and was? [duplicate]

English is my second language and I have always been confused with 'have been/has been' and the idea that it could be replaced with 'was' in some contexts. For instance, this is a part of an urgent ...
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0answers
25 views

Difference between “…, which is the case with” vs. “…, which is the case at/for”

I am wondering which of the following phrases are correct - and if multiple are - what kind of difference there is between them: "..., which is the case with..." vs. "..., which is the case at/for..."...
1
vote
1answer
28 views

Use 'and' or a comma in this sentence? [closed]

The sentence is 'The rabbit led the lion to a deep, wide river.' Can I say 'deep and wide' here instead? Any difference in meaning? I have been always taught that linking 2 things should use the ...
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2answers
96 views

Differences between ABIDE and OBEY

So I learned from a dictionary that ABIDE is when you bear something but still do it. Like you don't want to do what your employer tells you but still do. OBEY is to follow a command. But ...
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2answers
203 views

Shakespeare's “say sooth” vs. “tell truth”

The noun sooth, pronounced /suːθ/, is now archaic and means ‘fact’,‘reality’ and ‘truth’. Its legacy persists in the words soothe /suːð/, and soothsayer meaning someone who sees the truth, a synonym ...
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0answers
3 views

What’s the difference between “here we are “ & “ here we go “ [migrated]

I need to know the difference between “here we go “and “ here we are “ ?
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1answer
48 views

Given that: a preposition or conjunction

The Oxford Living Dictionaries defines given that as a conjunction. when you consider something However the dictionary defines the preposition given in the following way: taking into ...
0
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1answer
59 views

Affect vs impact

I read some advice at vocabulary.com which said that since sometimes people mix up "affect" and "effect" (for example, me), then some people tend to use "impact" rather than "affect". Don't be ...
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2answers
54 views

Difference between the two similar senses of about as a preposition

Oxford Living Dictionaries defines the preposition about in sense 2 and 3 that are quite similar; their similarity disabled me contradict between such senses. Sense 2. [British] Used to indicate ...
2
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1answer
41 views

Does the phrase “not nearly as many as” imply some level of similarity?

If a sentence would say: X has nearly as many Ys as Z. I think it would be understood that it means that X has fewer Ys than Z has, but it is not that much fewer. I.e. X has almost as many as Z. ...
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5answers
516 views

Difference between “touching”, “about” and “concerning” as a preposition

The Macmillan Dictionary regard touching as a formal preposition, and other dictionaries nearly related the prepositions concerning, about, touching as synonyms. So is it fine to use all of three ...
0
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1answer
21 views

Cloudy pillar or pillar of cloud [closed]

Could someone help me understand the difference between a cloudy pillar and a pillar of cloud? I know they could be used synonymously, but I want to know if there is any discrapancy between the two in ...
0
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0answers
51 views

How to tell gerund from participle?

For me it's sometimes quite difficult to tell gerunds from present participles. While in the following sentences things are pretty clear: Reading the book, he was getting increasingly bored. (...
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2answers
98 views

What is the difference between swing by, drop by, and stop by?

Do drop by, swing by, and stop by all have the same meaning? Is there a difference in usage?
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2answers
106 views

Difference between “vulgar”, “offensive” and “derogatory” [closed]

Why do we use the words "vulgar", "offensive" and "derogatory"? What are the differences between them? For example, on Wiktionary, if we look up "nigger". now offensive, ethnic slur, vulgar, see ...
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0answers
30 views

Difference between contraction of and contraction in

What is difference between contraction of and contraction in? 1. There is a contraction of economic output 2. There is a contraction in economic output Which one is correct?
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0answers
12 views

Pronunciation of Beloved [duplicate]

I have a question. Why do you pronounce the word "beloved" with /ɪd/ ending? According to rules which I know it should be /d/ sound after voiced consonant like it is in "loved". It is very confusing ...
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0answers
39 views

Difference between “label”, “categorize” and “arrange”

Can the verbs, like label, categorize, and arrange, be used to mean the same, as in: The states are labeled with their U.S. postal abbreviations, their founding date and capitals. The states ...
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2answers
59 views

(When) should I use the countable or uncountable Life?

The problem came up when I wanted to make some corrections to one’s paper. … when someone is successful in their lives, … Which I thought it should be life. Here are some examples from ...
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4answers
2k views

Is it a finished basement or a furnished basement? [closed]

When one buys a house with a fully done basement, is it known as a furnished basement or a finished basement? I’ve heard both used, but I was always under the impression that the right usage is a ...