Questions tagged [grammatical-case]

The distinction between subject and object forms of pronouns. For questions about upper- and lowercase, use the tag "capitalization".

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's ending in English simple present tense

I was wondering whether someone would be able to explain the origin of the -s form as used to bind a predicate with a third person subject (he,she,it) to express a "simple " present ...
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"Give this work to whoever looks idle." or "Give this work to whomever looks idle." [duplicate]

I was under the impression that any object, compound or not, following a preposition such as "to" must take the objective case; therefore, "Give this work to whomever looks idle." ...
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When to use "whom" and "who" when the direct object is also doing an action

"I just saw that guy throw a ball." "[T]hat guy," the direct object, is now doing the action of "throw[ing]." So, could one ask, "Whom did you see throw the ball?&...
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2 answers
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What case of 'I' should be used in a Participle Clause? [duplicate]

Which of the following sentences is grammatically correct? I being not at home, my friend left a message. Me being not at home, my friend left a message. My being not at home, my friend left a ...
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are there other phrases set up like "end up ____-ing (gerund)" if so, what are they called?

I'm watching a documentary and this was said: "We believe they did intentional things that kept Gabriel in harm's way, and ultimately ended up in him dying" The "him dying" part ...
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possessive case with plural

How can I use the possessive case with many objects " s' "? 2Jane and 2Mary 2room; it is right? : girls’ books Jane and Maries’ rooms the children’s toys the workmen’s tools Peter and Helens’...
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Can there be two cases of pronoun in a sentence?

"She is doing her best to do the job" The pronoun "her" is confusing me, it could be either in objective case 'cause it acts as object complement or in possessive case 'cause it ...
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(negative to affirmative) "we could not but pocket the insult"

When we do negative to affirmative, we always use 'must' in the place of 'can not but'. I further know that we cannot use 'must' in the place of 'could not but' because 'could not but' is a past form. ...
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"Are you she?"... is it proper English? [duplicate]

While receiving a phone call, the man on the other end of the call was looking for another woman. When finished asking for her, he said: "Are you she?" I've always heard "Are you her" and this was a ...
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Question regarding grammar

I read this sentence in an article - " black people have claim upon everything as whites " . Is this sentence grammatically correct and what does it imply
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there is a single person whose/whom/who being a person contains the events of his career

'And': Conjunction Reduction Redux By Barry Schein (linguist) has this passage: How natural does whose sound? Can you use who or whom instead? If this were a personal pronoun, the nominative wouldn'...
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When do we use Verb ING at the beginning of sentences?

Could someone please explain the grammar structure of the lyrics below? Sitting here wide awake Thinking about when I last saw you Since the beginning of these lyrics starts with an "ING" ...
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Can he be an object pronoun?

I understand that a sentence can have more than one subject, but I don't understand the grammatical role of he in the question below and which verb he is performing if he is also a subject. Who is ...
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The plurality of “a few”

I know for a fact that "few" represents plurality. I also know "a" before a word represents singularity. But then why is "a few" always considered as plural? Is there any exception to this or just ...
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Is the sentence grammatically correct and is "get" or "have" correct?

I have completed the DP training program and I will be able to submit my documents for verification to Nautical Institute in UK for issuing the Unlimited DP License once I get the original letter. Is ...
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"whom...must...": is this real sentence grammatical?

I encountered this curious sentence on page 234 of the 1859 novel Natalie; or, A Gem Among the Sea-Weeds, by Emma V. Hallet writing under the pseudonym “Ferna Vale”, marked here in bold: In a few ...
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How to use upper case for plural and commonly used abbreviations in thesis title? [closed]

Suppose my PhD dissertation title is "small RNAs and gene silencing with RNAi". The university manual says I have to have uppercase title in my dissertation which then becomes "SMALL RNAS AND GENE ...
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Whoever vs. whomever where the phrase seems to serve as both indirect object of main clause and subject of subordinate clause [duplicate]

"Would you give my extra points to whoever needs them the most?" Should whoever be whomever? My "opponent" in this discussion is using grammatical terms that I find unique.
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"I'm not as good as him." versus "I'm not as good as he is." [duplicate]

Which of these sentences is more grammatical? "I'm not as good as him." "I'm not as good as he is."
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What case is B in 'Use A as a B'?

For example, what case would 'sword' be in the following sentence: He used the broom as a sword Is it simply accusative/dative? I don't think this is just synonymous to 'general' in 'He acted like ...
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Is it correct to say: I will see you at the Christmas dinner or I will see you at Christmas dinner

I am a native English speaker and was recently checking some work before it got sent out to our company. I am unsure as to whether it is grammatically correct to say: "I will see you at the Christmas ...
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Can object pronouns and possessive pronouns be used side by side without a preposition? [duplicate]

In a previous post on this site, the question was asked, "Can we use two pronouns side by side?" However, the example given (and thus answers offered) didn't quite suit the particular question that I ...
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"Dave saying that really pissed me off" 2 subjects? [duplicate]

So I was teaching and came up with a sentence like this. I'm British and it seems like something I could imagine saying but the grammar seems weird and the students didn't like. I'm NOT TALKING ...
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955 views

Who vs. whom when the he/him test is unclear

I'm not sure whether the following sentence requires who/whom: Does anyone know who/whom I can speak with about that? If a similar sentence began with who/whom, it would be "whom." Whom can I speak ...
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personal pronouns in object position but subjective case

Why is this right? Give the baton to he who is closest to you when you run by. Does the case of the restrictive clause drive the case of the sentence object?
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What's the proper grammar for "My and my roommate's home..."?

What's the proper grammar for "My and my roommate's home..." The rule I learned is it should still be grammatically correct after removing the second part. E.g. after removing "and my roommate's", "...
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Whether the word 'me'or 'myself' is correct?

Should I use me or myself in this: Happy teachers day to all of us … and a special mention to those previously/ currently in the teaching profession…. Fattubhen, nishrin Bhen, ...
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1 vote
2 answers
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'my picture' - ownership vs. depiction

Consider the sentences: Take my picture [handing over a frame] Take my picture [handing over a camera] (Photo vs. picture being insignificant - a more contrived example could avoid it; as is the ...
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Usage of 'Both'

" Innocence is courage and clarity both." I heard this sentence. Is it correct?
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What's the difference between "the seat in front of you" and "the seat in front of yours"? [duplicate]

I came across an airline announcement and the following question arose. Which would you say it is THE correct sentence, and why? For your comfort and safety, please stow the luggage labelled with the ...
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1 answer
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Usage of We and Us, which is correct in this context?

Which sentence is correct and why? The good thing is us being together again in all situations. The good thing is that we are together again in all situations. Also, if #1 is the correct one, would ...
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Whom, who or that?

Which is the correct sentence? Match me only with people I kissed or people that I am following or Match me only with people I kissed or people who I am following or Match me only with ...
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We three or us three

Does the subject value in the following example need to be "us" or "we". Does it follow the same principle in pluralising the subject where removing one component isolates the correct noun? Dad and ...
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"With my/their/our V-ing..." as supplement to main clause

Here are some news article examples containing 'with my/their etc. being...' as supplement to a main clause: (1) Since the opposing counsel would be the U.S. Department of Justice, and with my being ...
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Them or their after despite? [duplicate]

What's the correct usage: embattled customers whose flats are in limbo despite them or their having made the payment? What's the logic?
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3 votes
1 answer
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Is there a name other than "absolute" for this kind of construction?

In some languages there are absolute constructions like the Genitive Absolute in Greek: Καὶ ἤδη ὥρας πολλῆς γενομένης προσελθόντες αὐτῷ οἱ μαθηταὶ αὐτοῦ ἔλεγον ὅτι ἔρημός ἐστιν ὁ τόπος καὶ ἤδη ὥρα ...
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4 votes
1 answer
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He/Him/His VS She/Her/Her

How did her become the female equivalent of both him and his instead of only being a possessive pronoun like his? Is there a reason? For example: She likes him and his dog. He likes her and her dog.
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2 votes
2 answers
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Whom should I say is calling?

Note, originally my question was "should I ask" instead of what I meant, which is "should I say". Sorry for the confusion. If I do an internet search about: Whom should/shall I say is calling. I ...
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5 votes
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What is the possessive case and the objective case of "ye?"

I know very well that archaically, "thou" is the nominative case for the modern day "you" while "thee" is the accusative case and that there is no distinction between the nominative and accusative ...
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2 votes
1 answer
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"This looks like him" or "This looks like he"? [duplicate]

Another, easier case question: Obviously, of the two variants This looks like him and This looks like he the first seems more naturally idiomatic. However, is it grammatically correct? I ...
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2 votes
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He looked the same “as she” or “as her”? [duplicate]

"He looked the same as her" or is it "He looked the same as she" I thought the rule was to complete the clause to figure this out such as "He looked the same as she looked" in which case the answer ...
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You and Ted's dinner conversation tonight

This was addressed to a family regarding what they should talk about at dinner that night. Should "you" be "your"? What is the rule?
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3 votes
2 answers
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Noun case and case usage for "of you" in the clause "that was kind of you"

The clause or sentence, "That was kind of you," uses what seems like a genitive case "of you", but I'm not sure what type of genitive it should be considered. The form of the answer I'm looking for ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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"It was he/him who/whom I voted for."

I'm not particularly a grammar pedant, but I thought of this sentence this morning and it has defied my searching skills. It was he/him who/whom I voted for. The question here covers something ...
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2 votes
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New Yorker "Who"/"Whom"

Has The New Yorker changed its "who"/"whom" policy? Recently, I noticed--for the first time in fifteen years of more or less consistent readership---two occasions I considered non-standard, both from ...
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5 answers
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What’s the un­der­ly­ing gram­mar be­hind start­ing off a ɢᴇʀᴜɴᴅ clause with an ᴏʙ­ᴊᴇᴄᴛ pro­noun?

Yes­ter­day I en­coun­tered this sen­tence (I’ll re­fer to the num­bered words in my ques­tion be­low): This is be­cause many stu­dents think that all of their sen­tences need to be ‘com­plex’ (...
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3 answers
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Can you start a sentence with “her”? [closed]

Can someone please answer this burning question? Is the following sentence correct? Her and her voice were truly a gift.
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-1 votes
2 answers
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Whoever vs whomever in "you could become whomever and whatever you wanted to be" [duplicate]

I think I noticed a mistake in Ready Player One: In the OASIS, you could become whomever and whatever you wanted to be, without ever revealing your true identity, because your anonymity was ...
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On the principle governing pronoun forms with verbs and after prepositions

As I understand it, the following is a principle (or "rule" if you wish) of English grammar: Finite verbs take subject pronouns: I sing. Non-finite verbs take object/possessive pronouns: That's me ...
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2 votes
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What case follows "fond of"? [closed]

What case is "I am fond of her"? Dative or possessive? My thought is that this form comes from the Anglo-Saxon, which is still heard in German, for example "ich bin derren bewusst" (I am hers aware) ...
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