Questions tagged [prepositional-phrases]

Questions about prepositional phrases.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
-1 votes
1 answer
33 views

What is meaning of for in "for Christmas"? [closed]

What do you buy for Christmas? We are going to buy a turkey for Christmas? What is the meaning of for?Something for Christmas means something to celebrate Christmas?
user avatar
  • 19
2 votes
1 answer
78 views

Using “including” vs. “and include”

I came across this sentence: The benefits of exercise are vast, including improved cardiovascular health.... I can tell something’s off here — I believe it should be either The benefits of exercise ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
57 views

When ‘that’ follows an 𝒳-of-𝒴 subject, which noun phrase does ‘that’ refer to: the first noun phrase 𝒳 or the second noun phrase 𝒴?

I’ve seen those two quite dif­fer­ent us­ages of that fol­low­ing an 𝒳-of-𝒴 prepo­si­tional phrase con­nect­ing two noun phrases 𝒳 and 𝒴 via the prepo­si­tion of, one in which it is used to re­fer ...
user avatar
  • 11
-1 votes
0 answers
55 views

What does "in the evening" refer to in "Read the letter that I wrote in the evening"? [migrated]

Read the letter that I wrote in the evening. Is the above sentence read as: (Read the (letter that I wrote in the evening)). or (Read the (letter that I wrote) in the evening)? And is there a ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
20 views

Is ‘when regarding’ in this sentence a preposition, meaning on the subject of/ in respect to, or a verb meaning thinking of/considering?

A recent troubling MIT study, revealed that fake news diffused significantly farther, faster, deeper and more broadly than the truth, with the effect even more pronounced when regarding political news ...
user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
0 answers
27 views

Can "in favour of" be used in the context?

Will it make sense if I say, "The shopping will probably change in favour of delivery services". I would like to say that people will be opting for delivery services rather than go to shops. ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
26 views

Identified by or Identified as

I wish to write that some variables in a scientific document can be respectively identified (as/by) some values... For instance, ...where a,b and c correspond to the energies the spinor and the ...
user avatar
  • 103
1 vote
0 answers
51 views

"Sought for" at the end of a sentence

Does anyone know if "sought for" can be used at the end of a clause, phrase, or sentence, even if "for" might be redundant? I'm not speaking of "sought for [something]", ...
user avatar
  • 41
1 vote
3 answers
106 views

"Like" as a preposition

I know that 'like' can function as a preposition, but I want your views on this statement: A collection, like old rocks or unique autos, gives a person some individuality. I think 'like' functions ...
user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
157 views

What's the difference between "in the same year" and "the same year"? [closed]

It remained constant at this level till May the same year. In this sentence, can we use 'in' before the noun phrase 'the same year'? What is the difference between 'in the same year' and 'the same ...
user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
87 views

Separating that/which clauses from their referents with prepositional phrases [duplicate]

How acceptable is it to separate a that-clause from its referent with a prepositional phrase? It's a problem I keep running into, and I'm not sure if it's too jarring. How would you rate the ...
user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
38 views

Prepostition 'as to' in poetry

So I ran accross this line in a poem of Alexander Pope: Vice is a monster of so frightful mien As to be hated needs but to be seen; Yet seen too oft, familiar with her face, We first endure, then ...
user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
81 views

Is this prepositional phrase a 'predicative adjunct'?

The class was composed of thirty students, including Jonathan and Kelly. In this sentence, the prepositional phrase 'including Jonathan and Kelly' is a non-restrictive element in the clause structure ...
user avatar
  • 279
1 vote
0 answers
42 views

Is this prepositional phrase acting as an adjective?

The example Create a referral to a specialist. The question Is that sentence grammatically correct? I think it is because the prepositional phrase is acting as an adjective (modifying "referral&...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
17 views

Non restrictive relative clase with prepositional noun phrase [duplicate]

In the sentence The partner of an old woman who is residing in the USA will help us it is clear that the person who will help us is the partner. But, I'm not clear whether the person who is residing ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
55 views

Difference between "long/hope for A to do"

The following two phrases are both perfectly correct: long for your return hope for your return but only the first of the following phrases sounds correct: long for you to return hope for you to ...
user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
46 views

How do you figure out the prepositional object with a clause final preposition? [closed]

First time asking a question, sorry for any weirdness. The best way for me to illustrate might be with some examples. I believe all 4 of the following are both grammatical and would be commonly used ...
user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
57 views

Can prepositional phrases modify copular verbs?

Cassandra was a natural fit for the role because of her well-refined combat skills. In the above quote (from a piece I wrote for my job), I have used the prepositional phrase 'because of her well-...
user avatar
  • 279
1 vote
1 answer
63 views

How to understand what preposition is associated with what meaning? [closed]

I have difficulty in understanding what preposition, after a verb, is associated with what meaning, and how interchangeable prepositions are. For example, Merriam-Webster reports the following meaning ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
41 views

Adverb phrase or prepositional phrase? [duplicate]

If I have the following sentence: "In mid-August, Gignac flew with Soffer on his private jet to Aspen to discuss the hotel purchase." Focusing in on the "In mid-August," part in ...
user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
58 views

using preposition 'of' to mean 'possess'

Is using the preposition 'of' in places where you want to say that the subject is possessing the 'something' which follows 'of' (basically an adjective) a common practice and correct? example: My ...
user avatar
  • 123
0 votes
0 answers
24 views

Pull on/at (heave on/at)

Harry heaved on the rope. MY RESEARCH: "heave on" means "pull on" -- What is the difference between: Pull a rope, pull on a rope, pull at a rope?
user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
32 views

As witnessed below (as=?) [closed]

My research: Often in legal papers, above the space for the witness to sign happens to be written: As witnessed below ... Now, according to my extent of English I would expect something like "...
user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
33 views

Placing comma before ambiguous prepositional phrase

But when I'm not writing code, I'll be spending time with friends and family, in the pursuit of happiness. Is the comma placement before "in the pursuit of happiness" correct? Most of the ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
27 views

What the answer of preposition in this sentence [duplicate]

The investigator asked the witness where he was __ the night of the murder Is the answer at of
user avatar
  • 1
1 vote
2 answers
58 views

Where should "on [date]" be put in a sentence?

Which order is best, A, B, or C? I'm not sure if the date can be used in this manner. A. John was admitted into the University on 5 August 2013. B. On 5 August 2013, John was admitted into the ...
user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
90 views

Which part of speech is "as" in each example of mine?

I've come across something that has stumped me a bit. I think that the following usage of "as" is conjunctive. Am I correct? He is the same as the dog is. Is the following usage of "...
user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
48 views

"Two cars are luxury" or "Two cars is luxury" [duplicate]

Here is the sentence, I'm getting rid of one of my cars, because two cars are/is luxury I think the latter is correct, because two cars together constitutes to luxury. In case of, Cars are luxury ...
user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
85 views

Adverb in a prepositional phrase and what it modifies

I am with arguably the best basketball player in the nation. Would this sentence above be correct, and if so, what does “arguably” modify?
user avatar
  • 11
1 vote
2 answers
86 views

She ended up (being??) a rich woman

Somehow they all ended up at my house. ("end up" + prepositional phrase) Well, grades ended up to be unimportant after all as my first job after graduating ended up in a private school with ...
user avatar
  • 641
0 votes
1 answer
30 views

Meaning of 'with' [closed]

What is the meaning of 'with' in the below sentence? What relationship does it indicate? The story begins with the meeting of two businesswomen.
user avatar
  • 509
0 votes
0 answers
38 views

Participle phrases that don't follow the main clause

The book was boring, and as stupid as the last one, punctuated by silly mistakes. Is it unambiguous? Is it grammatical? I'm asking if it's grammatical because I want to know whether you can offset a ...
user avatar
  • 21
0 votes
0 answers
30 views

Can you ever place a comma ᴀꜰᴛᴇʀ the word "which"? [duplicate]

Is there any scenario in which a comma is used right after the word which? For example, is this sentence correctly written as is — or not? The sensitivity to material AAA, which, in fact, is ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
84 views

what does "back up" mean in this context:

At some point, once you've established the habit and you're showing up each day, you can combine the two-minute rule with a technique we call habit shaping to scale your habit back up toward your ...
user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
106 views

What licenses the omission of an article in a countable or singular noun phrase?

Specifically, the term market in the following sentence is often referred to as "the market". But here the article has been omitted. What licenses such usage? The difference between prices ...
user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
52 views

Prepositional phrase modifying a subject at the end of a sentence

I want to express I was sitting on the couch watching TV. I heard that “I was watching TV on the couch” makes sense. I think a prepositional phrase at the end of a sentence can act as a subject ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
75 views

The missing "to" in the phrase "subject to"

I learned that when referring one thing is subject to another thing, a "to" should always be there next to "subject" or before a which/that, etc. However, in the below language, ...
user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
141 views

Structure and usage of the construction - BE of

I have seen various sentences like this: The availability of two reasonably complete mammalian genomes is of great help to gene finders. - The New York Times I do my utmost to dress the actors very ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
23 views

Using "to" as a function word to indicate the result of an action or a process

I encountered a sentence as follows: To the audience's consternation, the corpse began to speak. A bit of googling, brought about this result for the definitions of to from Merriam-Webster: b—used ...
user avatar
  • 127
1 vote
2 answers
122 views

Multi-layer prepositional phrase

I am having trouble picturing the structure of this preposition phrase from the point of view of generative syntax (PP) My attempt to run it down goes like this: from (preposition) + the point of ...
user avatar
  • 1,065
1 vote
0 answers
56 views

How can I tell if a prepositional phrase is a complement to a noun or a modifier? And how are these two different?

In the NP "mines in wartime", "in wartime" modifies the head "mines". that nice tall man from Canada whom you met "from Canada" modifies "man". But ...
user avatar
  • 1,065
1 vote
0 answers
54 views

What determines what can be pied-piped and what not in wh-movement?

A wh-expression without wh-movement, where the wh-word is the object of the preposition “about”: You are talking about what? A sentence that has undergone wh-movement: What are you talking about? ⸺...
user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
80 views

Is this a verb phrase or simply an adjective?

The quote is usually attributed to him. In the following sentence, does 'is...attributed' count as a verb phrase, or is 'attributed' simply a subject complement (as in '[t]he quote is usually ...
user avatar
  • 279
3 votes
2 answers
78 views

How do 'within' and 'which' form a relative pronoun clause?

Routines offer a structure within which to prepare for performance. I'm having trouble untangling the relative pronoun clause into a sentence of its own. At first glance, the two sentences combined ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
57 views

How to identify whether commas is required to separate prepositional phrases at the end of sentence? Why commas hve been used here?

Skims benefited from a well-timed introduction of pajamas and loungewear, [commas]with product lines such as the “cozy collection” bolstering sales as women have traded form-fitting styles for ...
user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
2 answers
156 views

A "conjecture on" or a "conjecture about"?

As a non-English scientist, the question bothers me. Maybe the answer depends on the context? Allow me to give a few examples. These are titles of a short text: Is it better to say "A conjecture ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
137 views

Difficulty understanding sentence in The Economist

I was reading an article in the latest issue of The Economist and was stumped by the opening of the last paragraph: That leaves two reasons for passports at home. One is to enforce vaccination when ...
user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
30 views

Problems in something vs Problems with something? [closed]

May I know what is the difference between problems in doing something and problems with doing something?
user avatar
  • 11
0 votes
0 answers
71 views

How do we tell the difference between a prepositional phrase and a particle phrase?

From the Farlex Grammar Book, their main difference is that particles cannot introduce a prepositional phrase-a preposition + its object-while a preposition always does. Please look over these ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
28 views

efficient with or in?

I wonder if the following sentences make sense or have any difference: I am more efficient with single-tasking than multi-tasking. I am more efficient in single-tasking than multi-tasking. I work ...
user avatar
  • 3

1
2 3 4 5
9