Questions tagged [prepositional-phrases]

Questions about prepositional phrases.

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Is it correct to say “A speaking task by using WhatsApp messenger”? [closed]

Can I use "by using" in a title or phrase or does it have to be a full sentence? I want to put a caption under one of my photos I took in one of my classrooms in which my students are doing a ...
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2answers
65 views

Function of object of preposition [duplicate]

Consider the sentence "What is the probability of Bob winning?" What is the function of "Bob winning"? It's certainly acting as the object of the preposition, but I don't recognize this type of ...
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1answer
102 views

“Born in a City” or “Born at a City”? Uncommon Usage by Edward FitzGerald [duplicate]

I was reading Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam, translated by Edward FitzGerald. In introduction, the translator writes: Khayyam was born at Naishapur. I always thought that we needed to use in in such a ...
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1answer
60 views

Which one is correct: The bird was standing on the table, from where/which it flew toward me all of a sudden [duplicate]

I would like to know whether I should use "from where" or "from which" in the following sentence: The bird was standing on the table, from where/from which it flew toward me.
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17 views

Constituent Structure

David is the best player [in the world]. is PP in the world an immediate constituent of the NP the best player in the world [is [the best player [in the world]]] or is it an immediate constituent ...
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1answer
52 views

Which preposition is correct with “settling”? The complete sentence is given below

This is the complete question which I came across during a competitive exam. Eager to control the South Atlantic, the British Navy had tasked Admiral Byron ________ (with/for) settling an island off ...
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1answer
35 views

The structure of “Even if China and America stop short of conflict, blabla…”

What is the structure of "stop short of conflict"? Is it "stop + short of conflict" or "stop short + of conflict"?
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1answer
84 views

Difference between turns to and turned into [closed]

What is the difference between between turns to and turns into. Are they same and can be used alternatively. For example He turns to a recluse during his exam time. Suddenly his pleasant dream ...
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1answer
70 views

Is this question ambiguous?

The following multiple-choice question was asked in an exam: Which one is the internal storage device that performs better than its predecessor with spinning disks inside? HDD SSD USB ...
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1answer
30 views

Prepositional phrase modifying multiple nouns

I am working with a client on a website and he has submitted the text below which I believe is not written correctly. Although we know that there are five boroughs in NYC, it seems the five boroughs ...
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0answers
111 views

Feel confused about the use of “seem” or “seems” in these two sentences

I saw the first sentence in a book, and I thought it was a mistake. I googled it and realized that many writers had used it on the websites. But then I googled the second sentence and found many ...
2
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1answer
205 views

“Although in poor health, she continued…” vs “No matter how poor her health, she continued…”

The following is grammar question from an English as a second language exam My girlfriend was showing me a copy of the exam she took several years ago after finishing high school. We were looking at ...
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1answer
28 views

More months in a year than days in a week

Is it right to say, There are more months in a year than days in a week. My question is how to compare between two groups of words using 'than'?
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1answer
78 views

Multiple introductory phrases and commas

I searched for answers to this on the site, but no one is asking the same thing exactly. When you have multiple introductory phrases, prepositional phrases per se, do you have to use a comma to ...
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1answer
42 views

Syntactical ambiguity in introductory phrase reference: reference to main verb vs. object

Motivated by A, we outline our proposal for B. Does "Motivated" refer to outline or proposal? It seems to me that a reader could infer one of two statements: A motivated us to create this outline, ...
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1answer
81 views

Prepositions - do I use “for” or “on” in this sentence?

This is for my resume so I want to use the right preposition here . . . "Researched and drafted judicial opinions on/for a wide variety of civil and criminal cases" I cannot tell if I should use ON ...
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53 views

Can a prepositional phrase modify a noun when there is a verb between the noun and the prepositional phrase?

For example, Forecasts have emerged of heavy rain. A structurally sound argument was presented of the characteristics and implications of economic recessions. Is the prepositional phrase ...
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1answer
429 views

Correct usage of the phrase 'if any'

What is the best position for the phrase 'if any' for the sentence below?Please explain the rationale behind your answer? What could be, if any, the benefits or disadvantages of something? ...
2
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1answer
58 views

How to tell which word a prepositional phrase is modifying?

Often it is obvious what word is being modified by a prepositional phrase, but sometimes it isn't. When it's not immediately clear, I often ask myself questions like: Does this phrase answer "where ...
2
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1answer
51 views

CaGEL equivalent to obligatory adverbial?

When I learnt grammar in school, I was taught that there are optional and obligatory adverbials. Trying to understand grammar in the form presented by Huddleston and Pullum (e.g. the Cambridge Grammar ...
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3answers
164 views

Are these PPs or non-finite clauses – or something else entirely?

I'm wondering about the construction for [NP] to [VP], as illustrated in the following examples: (1) I waited for you to come here (2) He arranged for me to go there (3) For him to do that took ...
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0answers
34 views

Can a PP be analysed as a complex adjective?

In the sentence They are more familiar with this, the predicative complement more familiar with this is an AdjP, with the adjective head familiar. But what about a sentence such as They are more at ...
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2answers
68 views

Putting adverbs such as “on Wednesday” in the beginning and at the end of sentences

What's the difference between the following two sentences: On Wednesday I went shopping I went shopping on Wednesday
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3answers
73 views

Is there a comma required in this sentence?

Consider the following. He participated in one of the most challenging swimming competitions SwimFest-X in countryname-Y, which facilitated his success in Z. or should there be a comma before ...
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1answer
32 views

What happens to an adverbial/preposition phrase such as “on monday” when you remove the proposition “on”?

Does it simply continue to be an adverbial/preposition phrase? Or does it change its function and/or material?
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1answer
65 views

As I have want to do

Stylistically, saying "as I have want to do." is preferable to me than "as I do." Is “as I have want to do." incorrect grammatically? Example, "My friends are quite aware of my vexatious flirting with ...
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3answers
482 views

How to interpret Nancy Pelosi's statement?

https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/reading-between-the-lines-of-trumps-oval-office-tussle/2018/12/11/7c7099f4-fda1-11e8-a17e-162b712e8fc2_story.html?utm_term=.809469483529 TRUMP: I also know ...
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2answers
82 views

Where is the subject in a sentence that starts with a prepositional phrase

Where is the subject in a sentence that starts with a prepositional phrase. For example the preposition phrase beginning with after below: After breakfast the boys wandered out to the garden. Is ...
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1answer
32 views

Commas around both sides of prepositional phrase?

I'm not sure what to call this sort of prepositional phrase, but this sort seems to interrupt the thought to add clarification. I almost want to call it an interjectional prepositional phrase. Some ...
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1answer
53 views

How is this structure formed? A case of 'inverted adjective'?

Here are the structures in question: Is there a region in the United States of America that has a pronunciation similar, .... Tuscany)? compare with: ... that has a similar pronunciation, .......
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2answers
58 views

What is a relative pronoun's referent when it follows a prepositional phrase?

For example: Stella Adler trained several generations of actors who include Marlon Brando and Robert De Niro. Does who in this example refer to actors or generations? Stella Adler trained several ...
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1answer
29 views

“from which this town was created” or “from which this town was created out of”

I have a phrase "which indicates the city from which this town was created". The idea is that the town was created from, or out of (carved from) the city. I am not sure if this is grammatically ...
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1answer
33 views

In/into/at What to use

So, English isn't my native language and my school teacher gave us this: Complete: Let's go.............. my office. A) at B) in C) out D) for E) into I would go for at/in/into. She said it was "...
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1answer
74 views

“From” Phrases Regarding Time (. . . “from next month”)

It's my first time posting, so let me know if I do anything wrong. I have a random question. It’s regarding #2. I told my student it’s fine, based on the primarily UK and Indian news articles I found ...
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1answer
234 views

Correct preposition after the word encouragement

I am writing a paper and I am not quite sure about the correct preposition that comes after the word encouragement. "Consequently, there was always encouragement towards, for, to any kind of art ...
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3answers
78 views

Preposition choice. What takes precedence?

I just lighted upon this sentence in a book: Academic attention has focused in two main directions. This sentence reads slightly odd to me, because although "direction" needs the directional ...
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1answer
585 views

Is the phrase “the ease at which / the ease by which …” correct

1) ** Is it correct to follow "ease" with "at which" such as in "The **ease at which you can carry this bag depends on the angle you hold it from" 2) Does anyone have a good source recommendation ...
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1answer
196 views

Use of the preposition “by” along with “which” [duplicate]

There is a difference in the difficulty by which the two different objects can be lifted up. Is "by" correct here? Does "difficulty by which" sound natural? is there maybe a better alternative? ...
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1answer
2k views

“On the network” or “In the network”

The app obtains a list of devices "on the network" or "in the network". I imagine a network as a 3D structure, so it seems that "in the network" might be more appropriate here. However, I cannot be ...
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2answers
65 views

Is expression “It does us no harm.” grammatically correct?

I would write it with "to": "It does to us no harm." or "It does no harm to us". Similar example from https://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/british/do-to "I’ll never forgive him for ...
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0answers
127 views

Is the sentence, “What I can tell you is that, hidden within the question, lies the answer,” correct?

Here's the sentence: "What I can tell you is that, hidden within the question, lies the answer." It makes sense, but I don't really know it's it right. I figured that the "hidden within the question, ...
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0answers
208 views

Why does “zero of one qualifications” sound better than “zero of one qualification” even though you only have one qualification? [closed]

Of the two phrases: zero of one qualification zero of one qualifications Because one is singular, it should be qualification without the plural suffix ‑s. But for reasons I cannot explain, to me ...
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2answers
73 views

Which still wants vs which still want [duplicate]

Which one is correct? 1) Pick those pieces of your heart which still wants to be happy , or 2) Pick those pieces of your heart which still want to be happy.
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2answers
57 views

“To agree with someone”: is that prepositional phrase an adverbial or a nominal one?

In this sentence: I agree with you. What is the function of the prepositional phrase ”with you” there? Is it an adverb or noun? If it is an adverb, then what type of adverb is this?
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1answer
52 views

Passive + that + v3?

I've just seen a sentence like the one below and couldn't understand its grammar. Three controlled animal clinical trials were found that supported the use of decortication prior to performing GBR. ...
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1answer
41 views

The role of preposition [closed]

Hi i'm a english learner. Can you tell me what the difference is between Calm and calm down Slow and slow down Heat and heat up Cool and cool down Speed and speed up Warm and warm up I have no ...
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1answer
842 views

should I say 'a group of friends who lives close by' or 'a group of friends who live close by' [duplicate]

I'm attempting to design a worksheet for TEFL students. Here's one of the questions: 4) Your friend Tina who lives close by comes to visit you today. You want to ask her what she was doing when it ...
3
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3answers
1k views

“from A to B” or “to B from A”

Which expression is more customary? Are their situations where one would be favored over the other? Edit: Sorry for making the question unclear. My motivation for this question came from reading ...
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1answer
125 views

How to replace preposition? [duplicate]

In these sentences: “You have been riding the same bus for years, but only now have you noticed what the driver looks like!” And “It's better than the rubbish you listen to.” The prepositions “...
2
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2answers
188 views

Synonym / Alternate expression for “for fear that”?

Can anyone help me out here? It's been nagging me all afternoon, scrounging around in my head for it and plumbing the Web--I swear I've heard a more literary alternative for this one before. I'm ...