Questions tagged [prepositional-phrases]

Questions about prepositional phrases.

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THAT noun clause as Object of Preposition

The farmers didn't end agitation. That became a convenient tool for the opposition. [That the farmers didn't end agitation] became a convenient tool for the opposition. In the sentence 2 above, '...
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22 views

Prepostion at vs in, which is correct, "I am at my house" or "I am in my house"? [migrated]

Prepostion "at" vs "in", which is correct, "I am at my house" or "I am in my house"? I tend to use "I am at my house" if for example I am calling a ...
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30 views

"Desperate to" or "for"? [closed]

It stands in a book: And in the faces of the kids - alternately bad-tempered, unable to listen and desperate to change - I can see my younger self. Is it correct? Why is it not desperate for a ...
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1answer
29 views

How to understand what preposition is associated with what meaning

I have difficulty in understanding what preposition, after a verb, is associated with what meaning, and how interchangeable prepositions are. For example, Merriam-Webster reports the following meaning ...
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1answer
29 views

Adverb phrase or prepositional phrase? [duplicate]

If I have the following sentence: "In mid-August, Gignac flew with Soffer on his private jet to Aspen to discuss the hotel purchase." Focusing in on the "In mid-August," part in ...
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2answers
51 views

using preposition 'of' to mean 'possess'

Is using the preposition 'of' in places where you want to say that the subject is possessing the 'something' which follows 'of' (basically an adjective) a common practice and correct? example: My ...
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20 views

Pull on/at (heave on/at)

Harry heaved on the rope. MY RESEARCH: "heave on" means "pull on" -- What is the difference between: Pull a rope, pull on a rope, pull at a rope?
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28 views

As witnessed below (as=?) [closed]

My research: Often in legal papers, above the space for the witness to sign happens to be written: As witnessed below ... Now, according to my extent of English I would expect something like "...
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2answers
25 views

Placing comma before ambiguous prepositional phrase

But when I'm not writing code, I'll be spending time with friends and family, in the pursuit of happiness. Is the comma placement before "in the pursuit of happiness" correct? Most of the ...
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1answer
24 views

What the answer of preposition in this sentence [duplicate]

The investigator asked the witness where he was __ the night of the murder Is the answer at of
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2answers
53 views

Where should "on [date]" be put in a sentence?

Which order is best, A, B, or C? I'm not sure if the date can be used in this manner. A. John was admitted into the University on 5 August 2013. B. On 5 August 2013, John was admitted into the ...
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2answers
78 views

Which part of speech is "as" in each example of mine?

I've come across something that has stumped me a bit. I think that the following usage of "as" is conjunctive. Am I correct? He is the same as the dog is. Is the following usage of "...
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1answer
41 views

"Two cars are luxury" or "Two cars is luxury" [duplicate]

Here is the sentence, I'm getting rid of one of my cars, because two cars are/is luxury I think the latter is correct, because two cars together constitutes to luxury. In case of, Cars are luxury ...
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1answer
35 views

Adverb in a prepositional phrase and what it modifies

I am with arguably the best basketball player in the nation. Would this sentence above be correct, and if so, what does “arguably” modify?
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68 views

She ended up (being??) a rich woman

Somehow they all ended up at my house. ("end up" + prepositional phrase) Well, grades ended up to be unimportant after all as my first job after graduating ended up in a private school with ...
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1answer
26 views

Meaning of 'with' [closed]

What is the meaning of 'with' in the below sentence? What relationship does it indicate? The story begins with the meeting of two businesswomen.
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35 views

Participle phrases that don't follow the main clause

The book was boring, and as stupid as the last one, punctuated by silly mistakes. Is it unambiguous? Is it grammatical? I'm asking if it's grammatical because I want to know whether you can offset a ...
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27 views

Can you ever place a comma ᴀꜰᴛᴇʀ the word "which"? [duplicate]

Is there any scenario in which a comma is used right after the word which? For example, is this sentence correctly written as is — or not? The sensitivity to material AAA, which, in fact, is ...
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1answer
80 views

what does "back up" mean in this context:

At some point, once you've established the habit and you're showing up each day, you can combine the two-minute rule with a technique we call habit shaping to scale your habit back up toward your ...
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1answer
103 views

What licenses the omission of an article in a countable or singular noun phrase?

Specifically, the term market in the following sentence is often referred to as "the market". But here the article has been omitted. What licenses such usage? The difference between prices ...
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47 views

Prepositional phrase modifying a subject at the end of a sentence

I want to express I was sitting on the couch watching TV. I heard that “I was watching TV on the couch” makes sense. I think a prepositional phrase at the end of a sentence can act as a subject ...
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1answer
73 views

The missing "to" in the phrase "subject to"

I learned that when referring one thing is subject to another thing, a "to" should always be there next to "subject" or before a which/that, etc. However, in the below language, ...
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109 views

Structure and usage of the construction - BE of

I have seen various sentences like this: The availability of two reasonably complete mammalian genomes is of great help to gene finders. - The New York Times I do my utmost to dress the actors very ...
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20 views

Using "to" as a function word to indicate the result of an action or a process

I encountered a sentence as follows: To the audience's consternation, the corpse began to speak. A bit of googling, brought about this result for the definitions of to from Merriam-Webster: b—used ...
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14 views

Prepositional phrase and main clause subject agreement

I know it would be ungrammatical to say: After standing up, his cheeks were covered in tears. Because the subject for "after standing up" should be "he", while the subject in the ...
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2answers
114 views

Multi-layer prepositional phrase

I am having trouble picturing the structure of this preposition phrase from the point of view of generative syntax (PP) My attempt to run it down goes like this: from (preposition) + the point of ...
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49 views

How can I tell if a prepositional phrase is a complement to a noun or a modifier? And how are these two different?

In the NP "mines in wartime", "in wartime" modifies the head "mines". that nice tall man from Canada whom you met "from Canada" modifies "man". But ...
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48 views

What determines what can be pied-piped and what not in wh-movement?

A wh-expression without wh-movement, where the wh-word is the object of the preposition “about”: You are talking about what? A sentence that has undergone wh-movement: What are you talking about? ⸺...
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2answers
58 views

Is this a verb phrase or simply an adjective?

The quote is usually attributed to him. In the following sentence, does 'is...attributed' count as a verb phrase, or is 'attributed' simply a subject complement (as in '[t]he quote is usually ...
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65 views

How do 'within' and 'which' form a relative pronoun clause?

Routines offer a structure within which to prepare for performance. I'm having trouble untangling the relative pronoun clause into a sentence of its own. At first glance, the two sentences combined ...
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46 views

How to identify whether commas is required to separate prepositional phrases at the end of sentence? Why commas hve been used here?

Skims benefited from a well-timed introduction of pajamas and loungewear, [commas]with product lines such as the “cozy collection” bolstering sales as women have traded form-fitting styles for ...
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97 views

A "conjecture on" or a "conjecture about"?

As a non-English scientist, the question bothers me. Maybe the answer depends on the context? Allow me to give a few examples. These are titles of a short text: Is it better to say "A conjecture ...
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1answer
131 views

Difficulty understanding sentence in The Economist

I was reading an article in the latest issue of The Economist and was stumped by the opening of the last paragraph: That leaves two reasons for passports at home. One is to enforce vaccination when ...
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24 views

Problems in something vs Problems with something? [closed]

May I know what is the difference between problems in doing something and problems with doing something?
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45 views

How do we tell the difference between a prepositional phrase and a particle phrase?

From the Farlex Grammar Book, their main difference is that particles cannot introduce a prepositional phrase-a preposition + its object-while a preposition always does. Please look over these ...
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18 views

efficient with or in?

I wonder if the following sentences make sense or have any difference: I am more efficient with single-tasking than multi-tasking. I am more efficient in single-tasking than multi-tasking. I work ...
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182 views

Sentence beginning with "Between [year] and [year] "

I’ve just been told it is wrong to put a comma after an “introductory time period”, for example: “Between 1990 and 2003, diligent seekers found hundreds of incorrectly placed commas in all manner of ...
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30 views

a + adjective + "many" + of the + plural noun

(Countable noun) [a + adjective + ~ + of the + plural noun] a large number of persons or things: A good many of the beggars were blind. https://www.wordreference.com/definition/many Is the plural ...
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396 views

Have difficulty/difficulties (in) doing something

What is syntactically the -ing-phrase in both the versions with and without the preposition? For example in He has trouble [in] keeping things in perspective right now. Secondly, does the latter ...
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34 views

Can I say that "unremarkable transverse peculiar velocity" is "vernacularly dissonant"? Is there a better description?

In the Astronomy SE question What does “unremarkable transverse peculiar velocity” mean exactly, and how is it calculated here? I made the following comment: The peculiar phrase "unremarkable ...
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26 views

Using the gerund to express causation [duplicate]

Is the following phrase grammatically correct: Suffering from anxiety and depression, life has been a tremendous challenge for him ever since he was a young boy.
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2k views

On a mission vs in a mission

I know the correct term is "man on a mission", but in any instance "man in a mission" is correct? Thanks in advance Best regards
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2answers
70 views

Of anyone I know

The American Heritage Dictionary reads Anyone is often used in place of the more logical everyone in sentences like She is the most intelligent person of anyone I know. In our 2017 ballot, the ...
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107 views

Agree with/on/about/to the book - In what scenarios are these correct?

Is my current use of these correct: We agreed on that book. - Eg.: When in a book club you are choosing the book for the next session. We agreed about that book. -Eg.: When two friends discussed a ...
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58 views

Why do I need two commas around the "however" in the following sentence?

In this following sentence, I'm particularly confused with why you would need to have the comma between "out" and "however". "He found out, however, that the public preferred ...
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66 views

She stole her best friend’s boyfriend (from her)

She stole her best friend’s boyfriend (from her) What is the reason for adding the redundant phrase from her after mentioning that it's her best friend?
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235 views

Do I need a comma to separate multiple prepositional phrases?

The mother shall have visitation for 2 consecutive weeks during the summer in Texas. Do I need any commas for the multiple prepositional phrases?
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82 views

I graduated in the top or as a top [closed]

what is the right way to say I graduated in the top 10 percent of my class with a cum laude honor or I graduated as a top 10 percent of my class with a cum laude honor Thanks
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77 views

"Series" – a noun of multitude similar to "lot", "majority", "percentage", "proportion"– verb agreement

According to Garner's fourth edition Though serving as a plural when the need arises, series is ordinarily a singular noun. But it is also a noun of multitude, so that phrases such as a series of ...
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136 views

"No one of" + plural noun phrase

The Collins English Usage reads Don't use ‘of’ after ‘no one’ or ‘nobody’; Say ‘None of the children could speak French’. However in the Cambridge Grammar of the English Language on can find : No ...

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