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Questions tagged [comparatives]

The form of an adjective or adverb used to compare two or more things. English comparatives are formed with the suffixes -er/-est or the words more/most.

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Necessity of pronoun "that" or "those" when comparing two things

We usually use "that" or "those" when we repeat the noun(s) used before especially in comparative sentences. But what about in this sentence? The intellectually inferior mice ...
daenggiee's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
295 views

What is the difference between "more like X than Y" and "more like X than like Y"?

There is a grammar textbook that gives the following example. (a) It looked more like a cormorant than a heron. (b) It looked more like a cormorant than like a heron. The textbook says that (b) is ...
Micheal Gignac's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
122 views

I would like to understand a sentence in 'The Catcher in the Rye' [closed]

I am having trouble following correctly this part of the book as to its logic it refers to. M'boy, if I felt any better, I'd have to send for the doctor... At first, it says under condition that if ...
PROCESIONES CELESTES's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
45 views

Compare & Contrast to get deeper understanding of similarities and differences between Punchy vs Pithy

Reference : https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/pithy Pithy adjective 1 : consisting of or abounding in pith 2 : having substance and point : tersely cogent Reference : https://www.merriam-...
crazyTech's user avatar
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What are the rules of inflection in making an idiom?

Although the following expressions may sound local or unnatural to some, these are examples of idiomatic expressions I hear in New York City. Does putting plural emphasis of a noun or comparative ...
wordsalad's user avatar
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-1 votes
1 answer
49 views

be highest or be the highest? [closed]

I have these sentences: "The unemployment rate was highest in the UK" "The unemployment rate was the highest in the UK" I would think the first one is correct. Is it true? Do we ...
Trong ly's user avatar
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0 answers
139 views

Why do we use “more ADJECTIVE” and “less ADJECTIVE” with adjectives of more than one syllable? [duplicate]

I've asked this question in Quora and the answers I got were: First answer: Using "more" and "less" helps maintain clarity and consistency in comparative forms. It provides a ...
Stim Roe's user avatar
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1 answer
146 views

Spottier or more spotty? [closed]

Which is correct: "spottier" or "more spotty"? For example: The poison dart frog was _________ than the glass frog.
Ben's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
362 views

One less thing to worry about

I am not a native English speaker but I usually feel comfortable speaking or writing in English. I also have a linguistic background. But this morning I finished a task, wiped it from my whiteboard, ...
Bram Vanroy's user avatar
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1 answer
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How to use comparatives with processive nouns? [closed]

I wonder which of the following is/are correct? a. The national flag of Malaysia has more colours than Japan's. b. The national flag of Malaysia has more colours than Japan. c. Malaysia's national ...
Esther's user avatar
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Transformation of sentences from positive to comparative

The question was to transform this sentence from positive to comparative degree: She is not so young as I expected. Following the solutions of other sentences of this kind (the photo shows a similar ...
Dia's user avatar
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1 answer
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Flatter vs. comparative adjective of flat?

Flatter means to praise someone highly. But then how to express that something is more flat than something else? Well, some sources say the comparative form of flat is just "more flat", but ...
No Name's user avatar
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0 answers
33 views

Why are some adjectives noncomaparable? [duplicate]

As far as I was taught and read in various places (examples: 1, 2), some adjectives in English are not comparable, which is that they don't have comparative and superlative forms. Why is that? I think ...
matj1's user avatar
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19 votes
9 answers
4k views

Why is "at least" unnatural here? "It won't take at least 15 minutes to walk there."

(1) It won't take at least 15 minutes to walk there. (2) It won't take more than 15 minutes to walk there. Am I right in thinking (2) sounds natural but (1) doesn't? If so, what is the reason for ...
Aki's user avatar
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1 answer
366 views

Uses of definite article before comparative degree [closed]

Here are two sentences from a grammar book: "He is the stronger of the two." "Reena is smarter than any other student of her class." In the first sentence, the definite article (...
Ansh's user avatar
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2 answers
574 views

Is "I wanted to have written something more round" correct? Or do I have to use "rounder"? Or is only well-rounded is acceptable?

Is "I wanted to have written something more round" correct? Or do I have to use "rounder"? I think that I hear more people saying "This should be more round", than "...
Homero Esmeraldo's user avatar
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0 answers
21 views

What is the correct sentence [duplicate]

Which one is correct? Two thirds of the crop is destroyed. or: Two thirds of the crop are destroyed.
Istiak Ahmed's user avatar
34 votes
3 answers
4k views

When did double superlatives go out of fashion in English?

Today I learned that the correct/recommended form of English, only a few centuries ago, required using "more" and "most" together with adjectives that were already in (respectively)...
Rand al'Thor's user avatar
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1 answer
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Is there a rule distinguishing what kind of verbs can only take more/most?

My theory is that dynamic verbs can take either more/most or better/best but the meaning will change. I sleep more than him. This means I sleep longer hours (quantity) than him. I sleep better than ...
Hayli's user avatar
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1 answer
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Use of 'Happiest' in wishing birthday?

Recently, I have seen some people writing: 'Happiest birthday, John' What exactly does this mean? Happiest implies a comparison with something, but the phrase is usually used without any context that ...
Free Palestine's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
144 views

Is "different than" ungrammatical? [closed]

THIS IS NOT A DUPLICATE QUESTION. This question does not duplicate that question that is cited that this question is a duplicate of, as was already fully explored and explained in the body of this ...
Benjamin Harman's user avatar
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2 answers
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Julie's guests arrived slightly earlier/ more early

The task is 'Complete the sentences by changing the words in brackets into comparative adverbs'. The sentence is 'Julie's guests arrived slightly ... (early) than she expected'. Finally, the answer is ...
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3 votes
3 answers
121 views

Nuances between 'more' and 'better' (than something) [duplicate]

For this sentence, which one is correct or more suitable, 'more' or 'better'; or are they both equally valid? Are there any nuances between them? I like baseball ______ than soccer. Please give a ...
Ron Vanden's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
168 views

What is the usage of "considerably" outside of comparative constructs?

I have noticed that all the examples for "considerably" in Lexico (which is based on the OED, I believe?) are comparatives: considerably [adverb]: By a notably large amount or to a notably ...
Matt S.'s user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
152 views

Is using "complete" as a gradable adjective ok in some situations?

So in writing, I want to express various degrees of completion. Originally, I used "in a more complete implementation". A reviewer remarked that this was wrong, as complete is not gradable. ...
step21's user avatar
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-2 votes
2 answers
51 views

You know me best X You know me better [closed]

What's the difference between "best" and "better" in these sentences: "You know me BEST as Ash Ketchum on Pokemon" "If you want to know me BETTER professionally, ask ...
Dr.G's user avatar
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0 answers
26 views

"X is less effective than y in treating the disease" or "X is less effective in treating the disease than y"?

Should it be, "PT with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs)is less effective than CT in treating anxiety" or, "PT with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) is less ...
Jay's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
445 views

When can you form the comparative of 'sorry'? [closed]

Is sorry in the phrase “I’m sorry” an adverb or an adjective? In other, more practical words, is a comparative response to that, such as “Sure, but I’m even sorrier!”, considered grammatically correct?...
Crissov's user avatar
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2 answers
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I know more than you do about X

I think these mean the same thing: (1) I know more about X than you do. (3) I know more than you do about X. In (1), the preposition phrase (PP) about X is part of the main clause, and the ...
JK2's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
72 views

"biggest failure" versus "greatest failure" [closed]

Which one is the correct way to say it? "War is and always remains one of the biggest human failures." or "War is and always remains one of the greatest human failures." Or are ...
danicotra's user avatar
  • 115
0 votes
2 answers
102 views

up by 6% over ANY previous year?

What does this "up by 6% over any previous year"? Since 2019, Clarksville-Montgomery County has added over 6,000 new jobs and, even with the decline in travel from the pandemic, in the last ...
Kosuke's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
45 views

"as each other" as used to compare two things

I've nevr come across such comparative pattern as in this sentence (it's taken out of an English text book): But Lucy and Sam are as forgetful as each other. What's the meaning of the structure? Is it ...
dilek22's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
118 views

What one-syllable adjectives can take "more" as comparative?

I teach ESL. My job is to stop people saying "more big" instead of "bigger". "Fun", as noted on this site, is an exception, I think because the noun, meaning "...
donfromconn's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
129 views

quantifiers in comparatives adjectives [closed]

Good morning. I'd like to ask you something. I was confused about these words. They said " a bit, a little, slightly, a lot, and much" are all intensifiers in comparative sentences. But ...
minmin's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
2k views

What are the comparative/superlative forms of the adjective "well," meaning "in good health"?

If I can say, "He is well," meaning, "He is in good health," how do I express that he's in better health, or that he's in the best health ever? "He's weller"? "He's ...
zunojeef's user avatar
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4 votes
2 answers
283 views

Why are comparative adjectives used here, with the definite article? "...a hatred, the deeper for being concealed..."

In this sentence, the article 'the' precedes several comparative adjectives: 'deeper', 'bitter', 'greater', and 'stronger'. Now, for context, this sentence is the beginning of a text, and the ...
Eric's user avatar
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0 answers
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Comparative Construction - She can get through more work in an hour than I can get through in a day

I was reading the Comparative Construction Chapter from The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language by Pullum and Huddlestone. There on page 1109, I came across one sentence: He is more afraid of ...
Man_From_India's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
1k views

Is using “to a less extent” rather than “to a lesser extent” grammatically wrong today?

The expression to a lesser extent meaning “less strongly or not so much” is commonly found with the comparative form of less. Curiously, Google Books shows that “to a less extent” was initially, ...
Gio's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
434 views

"Fairly" can't be used with comparatives or negatives

Don't use ‘fairly’ in front of a comparative form, *the train is fairly quicker than the bus; in more formal writing, you use rather or somewhat. https://www.wordreference.com/EnglishUsage/fairly ...
GJC's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
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NEGATIVES WITH COMPARATIVES [closed]

This listening question is confusing me (woman): Have you gotten over your cold yet? (man): I couldn’t be feeling any better today. (narrator): What does the man mean? a. He’s feeling terrific. b. He ...
mohamed's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
393 views

"Hair no more streaked with grey than was becoming" – meaning & grammar [closed]

I was reading Jeffrey Archer's Kane and Abel, where on page 191 I found this line: William began to be aware of his housemaster's wife during his last two terms at St. Paul's. She was a good-looking ...
Man_From_India's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
523 views

Double comparatives: "more preferable"

Fowler reads Sometimes the double comparative form more preferable is used. The word more is of course unnecessary, since preferable by itself means ‘more desirable (than)’. Like other comparatives,...
GJC's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
61 views

Does "than" introduce a potential ambiguity? [closed]

source: an FT news article (paywalled, but searchable) Chief among these [obstacles] is Europe’s reluctance to view China with the same existential concern as America does. The continent does more ...
jxhyc's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
119 views

Morphological comparison of adjectives ending in "-ic"

Page 267 of Fowler's Dictionary of Modern English Usage reads Adjectives ending in -ic (comic, rustic, etc.), -ive (active, restive, etc.), and -ous (famous, odious, virtuous, etc.) do not have -er ...
GJC's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
712 views

'Less good' vs 'worse'

Garner's fourth , page 263, reads Depend typically takes on (or, less good, upon). When a clausal complement follows the verb, to omit the on is a casualism— Is good here an adverb? Why not use ...
GJC's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
92 views

Comparative adverb vs. comparative adjective

I am a little torn on which usage is correct here, the comparative adjective "easier" or the comparative adverb "more easily." Every other day this year will begin easier than ...
Michael's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
41 views

The disaster we worried about "most" or "the most"?

I heard a Ted talk say When I was a kid, the disaster we worried about most was a nuclear war. I wonder why it was not "the disaster we worried about THE most"?
zell's user avatar
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0 answers
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Comparative adverb

I was taught that object of a preposition is always a noun, but I have often seen that a comparison adverb comes immediately after a preposition, then a noun phrase preceded by an adverb comes, which ...
Saad Khan's user avatar
11 votes
3 answers
2k views

"as" or "than" in comparative constructions

Is it usually as or than that is used in such constructions as the following? Twice as many men said they liked action movies as/than comedies. Twice as many customers ordered pizza as/than Caesar ...
anna299's user avatar
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2 votes
0 answers
3k views

The number is smaller, fewer or less than?

I always make confusion about the correct usage of the comparative for "irregular" adjectives (I don't know if this is the correct term). Recently I had to write "the number of X is ...
robertspierre's user avatar

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