Questions tagged [comparatives]

The form of an adjective or adverb used to compare two or more things. English comparatives are formed with the suffixes -er/-est or the words more/most.

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Double comparatives: “more preferable”

Fowler reads Sometimes the double comparative form more preferable is used. The word more is of course unnecessary, since preferable by itself means ‘more desirable (than)’. Like other comparatives,...
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Does “than” introduce a potential ambiguity? [closed]

source: an FT news article (paywalled, but searchable) Chief among these [obstacles] is Europe’s reluctance to view China with the same existential concern as America does. The continent does more ...
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Morphological comparison of adjectives ending in “-ic”

Page 267 of Fowler's Dictionary of Modern English Usage reads Adjectives ending in -ic (comic, rustic, etc.), -ive (active, restive, etc.), and -ous (famous, odious, virtuous, etc.) do not have -er ...
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'Less good' vs 'worse'

Garner's fourth , page 263, reads Depend typically takes on (or, less good, upon). When a clausal complement follows the verb, to omit the on is a casualism— Is good here an adverb? Why not use ...
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More fair/rational point

In an essay for the IELTS test, I tried to say "The second group's opinion is better" and I wrote, "The second group makes a more rational point". Is it correct to say it this way? ...
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Comparative adverb vs. comparative adjective

I am a little torn on which usage is correct here, the comparative adjective "easier" or the comparative adverb "more easily." Every other day this year will begin easier than ...
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The disaster we worried about “most” or “the most”?

I heard a Ted talk say When I was a kid, the disaster we worried about most was a nuclear war. I wonder why it was not "the disaster we worried about THE most"?
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Comparative adverb

I was taught that object of a preposition is always a noun, but I have often seen that a comparison adverb comes immediately after a preposition, then a noun phrase preceded by an adverb comes, which ...
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“as” or “than” in comparative constructions

Is it usually as or than that is used in such constructions as the following? Twice as many men said they liked action movies as/than comedies. Twice as many customers ordered pizza as/than Caesar ...
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The number is smaller, fewer or less than?

I always make confusion about the correct usage of the comparative for "irregular" adjectives (I don't know if this is the correct term). Recently I had to write "the number of X is ...
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Correct article with comparative, not for normal comparisson

Should the following contain a definite or indefinite article? Between Kevin and Andy, Kevin is a bigger hero. or Between Kevin and Andy, Kevin is the bigger hero.
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Can I say 'This transmitter extends three times signal range than the other one'? [closed]

I'm not sure if I should use 'than' or 'from' in this sentence > "This transmitter extends three times signal range than the other one". Please advise. Thanks.
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Are “compared to” and “with respect to” interchangeable?

For example: The results showed higher stability for the first enzyme compared to the second one. Would this sentence have the same meaning if I changed compared to with with respect to?
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I seek grammatical justification for “I did more than finish the job”

I see people say such examples as "I did more than finish the job", "He did more than win the game". In such cases, "finish the job", which is a bare infinitival, occurs ...
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Is “Our creamiest coffee, now creamier” correct?

Kopiko's tagline here in the Philippines became a hot topic. Others had been saying that it is grammatically wrong but others said that it is correct.
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Is there a linguistic term for the phrases, which describe a noun, with subjective value (below)

a pitted excuse for a road a big bear of a man a gigantic furious beast of a man a wisp of a boy/girl
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Writing a comparative sentence with two comparative parameters [closed]

Consider two aqueous solutions: Solution 1 Solution 2 Then note that: The temperature of the solution 1 is higher than that of the solution 2. The pressure of the solution 1 is lower than that of ...
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'quickest': adverb

Page 442 of Collins Cobuild English Usage reads Quick is an adjective. You do not usually use it as an adverb. Instead you use quickly. In writing, you usually use more quickly. He began to speak ...
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Can we use adverbs with Comparative adjectives?

He is much taller than me. Vs He is incredibly taller than me. Can we use incredibly here, with a comparative adjective(taller) ?
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Is the usage of “more frequently” or “more often” correct in this scenario?

If I think that an event does not take place at all but the event does take place once, is the other person correct in saying that the event takes place more often / more frequently than I think?
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“Faster than” using with Future Simple

I'm just wondering if it is right to say that I'll learn English faster than they will translate this book =or I'll learn English earlier than they will translate this book I'm confused about ...
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Action of comparatives on connected clauses

Consider the sentence Though somewhat less (i) _____than previous chapters and suffering from a minor rash of academic jargon, the final chapter of the book is nonetheless (ii) ______laypeople. How ...
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The usage of “to be” in double comparatives?

I read when "be" is used in double comparative, it is sometimes omitted in the book of "Top Notch", like: The better the quality of health care (is), the higher the life ...
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Tireder (comparative form)

According to the CambridgeGEL, page 1583, Participial adjectives take only analytic comparative forms (A marginal exception is tired) What are the reasons leading to this exception?
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what is the implicit meaning of “It's generally easier to think”?

I'm reading some material(git pro), then I encountered this context, I want to know what is the meaning of "It’s generally easier to think" as far as I know, easier is comparative word, ...
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Dispute over interpretation of “Less smaller”

I know that the correct form of "less smaller" is "less small" but that is the original phrase we went to a dispute over. This is the exact phrase. Someone: Most of the sites I ...
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Comparative question?

I have a comparative question... As I understand it, comparatives compare two things. I bought a new popcorn maker because my old one is not heating up. So my questions are as follows: Can I say my ...
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Adverbs in comparative clauses

I saw an anecdotal "rule" in a magazine stating that, if an adverb is used in a comparative clause, the '-ly' form of the adverb is preferable to a comparative form. Apparently however, if the adverb ...
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The usage of “most” instead of “more”

Regarding the following sentence, The study noted that pregnant women need to have healthy diets to reduce risk of developing gestational diabetes, a form of diabetes that is most common among ...
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How interchangeable are the adjectives in the comparative “the closer/nearer, the …”?

In an allusion to Dave Starr’s magnificent¹ cover art, I had the opportunity to use its title idiomatically, and said: “The closer the bone, the sweeter the meat.” … and was promptly corrected: “...
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Is it grammatically correct to say “A is more pregnant than B”?

Since one is either pregnant or not, I am wondering if it is grammatically correct to say "A is more pregnant than B". For example, in one of the following two scenarios, can one correctly say "A is ...
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“more massive”?

I stumbled upon this sentence in Wikipedia: Titan is 50% larger than Earth's moon and 80% more massive. I struggle with the "more massive" part. I find some books do use that phrase. Is it ...
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Comparative Adjectives without Than or Object

I am writing a scientific paper which concerns itself with "short" texts, like the ones we encounter on social media platforms and so. Other literature uses the same term "short texts" to refer to ...
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Omission of subject in tensed clause

I know the subject can be omitted in untensed clauses. But I've encountered with the following: You spent more money than was intended to be spent. Here, 'than' seems to be functioning like a ...
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Comparative/superlative forms and types of comparisons

I should complete the sentence with two to five words, including the word in bold. The mall isn't usually so busy. THAN The mall ............. today. - The mall is usually less busy than today....
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Early vs Earlier usage

Which of the following sentences are correct. Early vs earlier. Can I use both sentences? I went on my lunch break late. Next time I will try to take my break earlier. I went on my lunch break late. ...
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Usage of Comparative adjectives

I find myself using Comparative adjectives a lot more than just adjectives is there a rule of thumb? Here is an example...As I understand it, comparatives compare with something. It was not busy ...
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Why is fickler a word?

I just tried to instinctively write "more fickle" because fickle is polysyllabic and would, by tradition, get the "more" comparative form vs the "er" comparative form. But MS Word dinged me as wrong. ...
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A question about Comparatives

As I understand it, comparatives compare with something. But which of the following sentences is correct. It wasn't busy tonight at the club? can you say next week will be busier? It wasn't ...
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when can i omit the subject in comparative sentences

I recently encountered two sentences - Cars made in Japan are better than those made in Korea. here, "those" cannot be omitted Prices of mangos in Thailand are much lower than (those) in England. ...
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More badly and most badly

According to Collins English Usage, Badly has another different meaning. If you need or want something badly, you need or want it very much: I am badly in need of advice; I want this job so ...
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superlative or comparison

I have a question about some sentences. John is better than Sarah and Mary. or John is the best. If I'm comparing three things (John, Sarah, Mary), why am I using a comparative adjective? I ...
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Comparing adverbs in comparative and superlative forms

Comparing with adverbs in comparative or superlative form: When would us louder / loudest and when would you use more loudly / most loudly
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Is it grammatically incorrect to use comparative forms without an explicit object of comparison and without progression over time?

In colloquial English, comparative forms can be used ungrammatically. However, suppose I want to write in a strictly grammatical fashion. I know that some comparative forms can be used with an ...
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Comparative for Sky Directions [closed]

Can you say that something is more souther or more easter than a specific place? How do you give the comparative and superlative forms for North, East, South and West. I am writing a book, and to ...
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Is “far further” correct?

"Between his support for packing the Supreme Court and legalizing abortion up until the point of birth, there's no question that Buttigieg was far further to the Left of former President Barack Obama."...
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“Far slower” versus “Far more slowly” [duplicate]

Are both of these statements grammatically correct? Do they have different connotations? Or are they interchangeable? Alice grew far slower than Bob Alice grew far more slowly than Bob
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Interpreting “not as bad as”

If someone says “smoking marijuana is not as bad as drinking alcohol” do you interpret this as them implying marijuana is bad? Or do you take it as them defending one thing by comparing it to ...
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How to describe the reverse order which in some contexts is the natural order on things?

In writing a paper my team and I need to explain that in a sublist L of, say, [1,2,3,...,100] (for instance L = [3,5,43,70]) the item with the lowest number has highest priority. How would one best ...
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How to parse 'do more harm than good'?

This Oxford dictionary defines "do more harm than good" as: Inadvertently make a situation worse rather than better. ‘hasty legislation does more harm than good’ So I think this example ...

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