Questions tagged [grammaticality]

This tag is for questions about whether something obeys the rules of grammar in English. The question must INCLUDE THE SPECIFIC GRAMMATICAL CONCERN. If your question is about grammar itself, please use the "grammar" tag.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0 votes
0 answers
17 views

I need to make an annoucement about additional paid leaves to employee. Plase take a look if it corrects and be natural. many thanks [closed]

DECISION Re: Additional paid leave days I. PURPOSE Through the decision to add paid leave, the Board of Directors wishes to create conditions for employees to have more ...
0 votes
0 answers
14 views

Use of "among" as subject descriptive, n "evelation of convenience" expression [closed]

This is a specific grammar question(among) and vocabulary question(elevate). Is this sentence correct? Among her and more neighbors thinks there should be more buses to elevate their convenience. It ...
  • 1
0 votes
0 answers
22 views

"As well" instead of "Either" in a specific case [migrated]

Would it be considered grammatically correct to use "as well" instead of either in this sentence? "No one was asking you either" or is it just a flow issue?
-1 votes
0 answers
61 views

Is "Me and you" grammatically wrong? Cause I can only find "you and me" all over the web [closed]

Honest question: I'm writing a song and, musically/melodically speaking, I'm using "me and you". But, researching all over the web, I simply can't find this term 'me and you', and instead of ...
  • 1
0 votes
1 answer
24 views

Can “but that” stand in for “except when/for”?

Consider “I did not scold him but that he deserved it.” To me, this is correct, though archaic. In general, can “but that” stand in for “except for (when),” “if not for the fact that,” and similar? If ...
  • 4,327
-2 votes
0 answers
24 views

"Every object in JavaScript has a built-in property, which is called its prototype". Is this phrase correct? [closed]

I just came up to this phrase in developer.mozilla.org/Object_prototypes Now " which is called its prototype " must be a typo, right? I suppose "its" should be omitted. I am native ...
2 votes
1 answer
34 views

Past perfect when the action is separated from the present by facts that are common knowledge to the speakers but not mentioned

Page 59 of Learner English: A Teacher's Guide to Interference reads: There is a tense in French which is formed like the English past perfect, and its usage corresponds generally to the English tense....
  • 2,297
-1 votes
0 answers
13 views

Which version of the following two sentences is more correctly structured? [closed]

Which version of the following two sentences is more correctly structured: Very demanding applications were developed, which require for their processing two vCPUs, 8 GB of RAM and 10 GB of storage. ...
  • 1
2 votes
2 answers
42 views

Call out or call in

When I am ill and cannot go into office to work I say "I called out sick". I now live in Texas and people like to correct me its "call in sick". Doesn't make sense to me. Is it a ...
  • 21
-1 votes
0 answers
31 views

One sentence I cannot figure it out [closed]

What is the problem with the following sentence? Do you know the adult school on this street? It was marked wrong, could somebody explain it to me please?
0 votes
1 answer
50 views

Is the word yolk used appropriately for the following sentence? [closed]

The sentence in question: Will the hunter regret tricking a lovely girl? Even if the girl is the yolk of a disgusting monster that killed her parents? I am asking this question because my mind says ...
3 votes
0 answers
77 views

Does "a goal very difficult to reach" seem weird grammatically? [closed]

It's a goal very difficult to reach. Does the above sentence seem weird to you? It was from a friend of mine. I think it should at least be "It's a goal that is very difficult to reach". ...
-1 votes
0 answers
24 views

English used in an email [closed]

Which sentence is correct? Please confirm if you have available one. Please confirm if you have an available one.
-1 votes
0 answers
13 views

Is there a faulty tense sequence here? [duplicate]

I recently read the following sentence in the blurb of a book that will soon be on sale: In August of 1844, a man named Leonard Reed takes violently ill at his home near Heathsville, Illinois, and ...
  • 29
0 votes
0 answers
13 views

When do we use haven't had, hadn't had, and didn't have? [migrated]

For example: I haven't had my breakfast. I hadn't had my breakfast. I didn't have my breakfast. Could you clarify if the abovementioned sentences are grammatically correct, and if yes, then what are ...
-1 votes
0 answers
21 views

The word "thereof" taking a plural referent

Your assertion that "thereof" can take a plural noun as a referent is clear in the example you stated. Can "thereof" also take as a referent three different physiologic actions, ...
0 votes
0 answers
34 views

Should I use 'is' or 'are' in this context? [migrated]

I am writing a paper and my editor indicates this sentence as having wrong grammar: Thus, it is no surprise that forecasting bond returns is a major topic in financial literature. It suggests using: ...
0 votes
1 answer
27 views

Why does the sentence use "doing this" instead of "doing it"

I have two sentences that I was unsure if I needed to use "doing it" or "doing this". Now I know that the correct one is the one with "doing this" but I don't understand ...
  • 1
2 votes
4 answers
245 views

Preferred conjunction for integrated clause (e.g. "and one that" versus "and one which")

Consider the following two sentences: Today I ate a very tasty lunch, and one that was also quite healthy. Today I ate a very tasty lunch, and one which was also quite healthy. The subordinate ...
1 vote
0 answers
16 views

Is it correct to place "the" before a group of words, but not before each separate word? [migrated]

Disclaimer: English is not my native language. A sentence like the following might appear in an instruction manual for a device: "Press the "Start" and "Stop" keys at the same ...
0 votes
0 answers
8 views

Should I use "wish" or "wishes" in a sentence regarding two people? [migrated]

While I am writing an assignment for class, some of my classmates and I got into a disagreement of the use of the words "wish" and "wishes". The sentence (with substitutes for the ...
  • 1
4 votes
1 answer
535 views

Is it grammatical to leave out the "and" in "try and do"? [closed]

The motivational example sentence for this question turns out to be a typo. Nonetheless I think it triggered valuable discussions. I came across this sentence from NYT today: ... Mr. Xi met with ...
  • 55
-1 votes
0 answers
25 views

"Notes by Ajay" is grammatically correct? [migrated]

I am little confused on usage of by, so below sentence is grammatically correct ? Notes by Ajay. I am going to start a blog, the website name I came up as notesbyajay.com, I want to make sure it is ...
1 vote
1 answer
42 views

Grammaticality and register of: 'In my pencil case there are scissors/a pair of scissors' versus 'There is a scissors' [closed]

I am trying to understand how to use the word scissors, I have read this question and I would like to ask if this information is correct. Am I right about these sentences? In my pencil case there are ...
  • 111
0 votes
0 answers
21 views

When can I use "no" instead of don't or doesn't? [migrated]

When can I use "no" instead of don't or doesn't? Example: I have no idea = I don't have any idea.
-1 votes
0 answers
15 views

Is "Clients who ordered online should have a tracking number in their order summary" correct? [migrated]

Every client who ordered online should have a tracking number in their order summary probably works better. But I am wondering if the question in the title is grammatically incorrect. My curiosity ...
  • 1
-2 votes
0 answers
25 views

"Gestures them to follow", is this gramatically correct? [migrated]

"Come, let us talk elsewhere" - she gestured them to follow. I've read that "gesture to", "gesture for" and "gesture prep." are correct in different contexts, ...
  • 1
0 votes
3 answers
71 views

Unusual sentence construction in meditation app

I'm using a meditation app called "Headspace" and I recently started to notice a rather unusual construction that the teachers use in their guided meditations, and I'm wondering whether it's ...
  • 797
0 votes
3 answers
56 views

Is "at the beginning" possible without of?

Dictionaries state that "at the beginning" is often used with of. For example, at the beginning of the month/book/movie and so on. But I assume of isn't obligatory, right? Cambridge ...
0 votes
0 answers
22 views

"What I want is that X do(es) something" vs. "What I want is for X to do something"

Example Alice: What do you want? Bob: Do you know what I want? What I want is ... that Peter makes the phone call (that + present simple) that Peter make the phone call (that + present subjunctive) ...
0 votes
2 answers
39 views

"Failed to do" vs "failed doing"

I work in software development, and today I got into a discussion with a coworker about how to write an error message. Which would be better? Failed to store the value in the database. Or Failed ...
2 votes
0 answers
35 views

Why should the past simple tense be used in this case?

In the following sentences, the past simple tense is used after the present perfect tense. Both sentences are connected with each other: I have been hit by a baseball bat in the past. It felt awful! ...
  • 21
1 vote
0 answers
23 views

Can we say "Readers will have little trouble to keep track of them"? [migrated]

Is keeping track a gerund in the sentence? Readers will have little trouble keeping track of them. If keeping track is a gerund, does that mean that we could also use an infinitive instead with no ...
-1 votes
0 answers
6 views

Grammatically correct alternative for 'Awaiting your confirmation'? [migrated]

While typing a confirmation email, I use 'Awaiting your confirmation', which is an incomplete sentence. What's the grammatically correct alternative? P.S: I don't want to use the subject, so 'We are ...
  • 1
-1 votes
0 answers
19 views

Can I use "thing" to refer to a plural group? [duplicate]

For example in the following sentences: The only thing missing are the refrigerators. The thing they're missing are the signatures. Since refrigerators and signatures are plural, is it acceptable ...
0 votes
0 answers
17 views

Is this sentence grammatically correct and punctuations are used correctly? [migrated]

Is this sentence grammatically correct and coherent? Based on the availability of my examining committee and committee chair, Tuesday, January 17th, 1 PM - 3PM works for everyone for my candidacy ...
  • 101
11 votes
4 answers
1k views

How to distinguish it-cleft and extraposition? 'It was Ben that found it' v 'It was clear that Ben found it'

I have a question about it-cleft and extraposition. For example the two sentences: It was in the apartment that Ben found something interesting -- a mouse eating cheese. It was obvious that whenever ...
  • 155
21 votes
1 answer
2k views

Special usage of the word 'now'

The representation of Agamemnon in the epic as a whole is complex and variable, emphasizing now his generic royal qualities, now his genuine difficulties as commander of such a diverse and ...
  • 213
1 vote
2 answers
87 views

"I doing sth", "me doing sth", "my doing sth" as an object [closed]

Consider the following four sentences: She doesn't like that I talked rudely to her. She doesn't like I talking rudely to her. She doesn't like my talking rudely to her. She doesn't like me talking ...
  • 111
-1 votes
1 answer
21 views

"Anyone of" v/s "Anybody from"

I know that the following sentence is grammatically correct: Is anyone of you guys in the library? But the following sentence seems wrong: Is anybody of you guys in the library? I think with "...
  • 99
1 vote
0 answers
38 views

Open somebody a whole new world [closed]

Context: our software aims at helping graphic designers to better design. So I think it is grammatically correct to say "Our software will open a whole new world for graphic designers". But ...
  • 103
-2 votes
1 answer
132 views

Is the ‘riddle’ “Nothing starts with an N and an ends with G” incorrect? [closed]

I have seen these 'riddles' so frequently that they get on my nerves now. I'm not sure, but aren't they grammatically incorrect? The riddle is as follows: "Nothing starts with an N and ends with ...
0 votes
1 answer
42 views

Treating the word "grammar" in proper grammar

Driving down the road I saw a state sign that was written poorly. I said, “That’s a bad grammar.’ My wife was offended I said “a” grammar. I can’t find an answer to see if what I said is acceptable. ...
0 votes
1 answer
21 views

"From which" vs "of which" vs "by which"

I came across this sentence while reading an article: Four people were killed after a BMW from which they were traveling rammed into a truck. My questions are: Is "from which" correct in ...
5 votes
2 answers
192 views

What stops demonyms like "British" or "Portuguese" being regular count nouns like "German" or "Armenian"?

In English there is a very notable asymmetry between demonyms ending in -ese and -ish and other demonyms. The latter can be used as a regular count noun, but the former are almost always restricted to ...
  • 5,022
0 votes
0 answers
22 views

What's the proper way to use the word "depth"? Is it "at 15 feet depth" or should it be "at a depth of 15 feet"? [duplicate]

For example: The phreatic surface is encountered at 15 feet depth. or The phreatic surface is encountered at a depth of 15 feet. The first sentence seems to be easier to read.
1 vote
0 answers
37 views

Need help with "is fond of when" [closed]

Is this a correct sentence ? "She is fond of when her cat plays with her scarf", if not why ? Thanks
  • 11
0 votes
0 answers
44 views

What's the meaning of the phrase"while the fit is on us"?

I went up to the accountant's wicket and poked the ball of money at him with a quick convulsive movement as if I were doing a conjuring trick. My face was ghastly pale. "Here," I said, "...
  • 105
0 votes
1 answer
41 views

You're - can it be past and present tense? [duplicate]

The contraction for you are is you're, which is present tense. Can it also be past tense, as in you were? Take this sentence, for example, "you're awfully late getting home." I assume (...
0 votes
0 answers
11 views

Using "agreed" correctly in a sentence

I need to make a statement that certain character has been agreed by two parties as a replacement for another thing: Slash character has been agreed as a replacement character for backslash. This ...

1
2 3 4 5
122