Questions tagged [grammaticality]

This tag is for questions about whether something obeys the rules of grammar in English. The question must INCLUDE THE SPECIFIC GRAMMATICAL CONCERN. If your question is about grammar itself, please use the "grammar" tag.

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"..., not less so." [closed]

Here is a sentence I found in the official guide to the TOEFL iBT test. Well, I personally think that the Great Depression of the 1930s actually makes this more understandable, not less so. I found ...
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Does it make sense to say that a person is “being ironic”? [closed]

My gut tells me that irony properly refers to the idea expressed by the person, not to the person doing the expressing. But does referring to a person as ironic have a common enough usage to be ...
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Is 'to be imperative' followed by be or the conjugated form of verb be?

Which version of this sentence is correct? It's imperative that measures be taken as soon as possible. It's imperative that measures are taken as soon as possible.
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Why is the sentence "Wall-to-wall carpets in every room is their dream" acceptable?

I saw this sentence in the CoGEL(Quirk et al). 15.16 Verbless clause: Wall-to-wall carpets in every room is their dream. Question: Why is this awkward sentence acceptable? It's obvious that it ...
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5 answers
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Is starting your sentence with “Which is why...” grammatically correct?

Is starting your sentence with “Which is why...” grammatically correct? …our brain is still busy processing all the information coming from the phones. Which is why it is impossible to actually rest ...
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1 answer
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Who or Whom, which usage is grammatically correct? [closed]

Which sentence is grammatically correct? who should I tell or whom should I tell? In my head, both sound correct.
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Please pronounce Eunice's

Is there ever an exception to the rule of pronouncing the s after a singular possessive name or word? So, is Eunice's ever pronounced simply Eunice, or is the s always pronounced?
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1 vote
0 answers
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Can I use different pronouns in a sentence? [closed]

Q:Why do the monsters scare the children? A:Because they can get electricity to light up their city from their screams. Can I use different pronouns in a sentence? Thank you:)
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Referencing the parts of a function - the "sub function" level, or "sub functional" level?

Here's the sentence I'm not sure how to write: I will show you how to write code of the highest standard, in the sub-function level. What I mean by that is I will show how to write the parts of ...
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1 answer
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Is it okay to start a sentence with an appositive?

I know you can use them in the middle of a sentence, but is it okay to start sentences with them? Example: A kind of a duck, the Mallard, can be found all throughout the world.
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Please help me understand by giving explanations to your answers. I answered wrong but didn't know why [closed]

Anyone who has ever pulled weeds from a garden _____ roots firmly anchor plants to the soil. (A) is well aware of (B) is well aware that (C) well aware (D) well aware that A major concern among ...
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0 votes
0 answers
22 views

"won't rely on" or "won't be relying on" [closed]

You won't rely on the odds of getting lucky. or You won't be relying on your odds of getting lucky. They both seem to work, but I'm not sure, maybe both of them are wrong.
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-1 votes
0 answers
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Verb agreement while using singular they [duplicate]

I am on a pseudonymous online platform and wish to post the following comment referring to another user: He provides no proof to back up their arguments and mocks anyone who tries to have a civil ...
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6 votes
2 answers
138 views

Why is “learning hard” wrong yet “studying hard” is right?

Why does saying learning hard sound so terribly wrong and unnatural, given that working hard, exercising hard, listening hard, thinking hard, and even it rains hard sound perfectly natural and get ...
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-1 votes
0 answers
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Verbs in the simple present vs. perfect present [migrated]

Please help me and tell me, which one of these sentences should I use? Until they have prepared our room, we will wait in the hotel lobby. Until they prepare our room, we will wait in the hotel lobby....
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-1 votes
0 answers
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future present perfect [closed]

Is this sentence grammatically correct? By the time the newly-developed cars come on the scene, road infrastructures will have to have improved. Is “will have to have pp” correct?
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Is "all the above" a valid phrase to use in a sentence? [duplicate]

I have just discovered such a wonderful thing as determiners. I did a little digging and found out a lot about the stuff, but there is one thing that still confuses me. Is "all the above" a ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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Issue with word 'incentives'

I am proofreading some documentation, and this sentence bothers me: This incentives users to install the app. Is the use of 'incentives' here grammatically incorrect? Are these two alternatives ...
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0 votes
0 answers
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Grammatically correct way to restart a thought in a single sentence

There exists an oratory technique where a sentence or thought that might be highly complex, too complex even to risk maintaining the listeners' understanding throughout it, where such a complex ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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Is it possible to take a whole for some collective unit words with a verb agreement in the singular form? [duplicate]

At the beginning of English learning, a simple sentence looks like this below: There is a group of students singing and dancing.... However if it's changed to: A group of students are singing and ...
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-1 votes
0 answers
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In the context of this sentence, which verb tense would be grammatically correct and why?: "Prevails" or "Prevail" [duplicate]

Peace And Love Prevail Over evil, Throughout The Entire Universe, Multiverse, Metaverse, Omniverse, And Throughout All Realms, Always And Forever. or Peace And Love Prevails Over evil, Throughout ...
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0 answers
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How to use "if" [migrated]

(1)If his words are true is suspicious. Is this sentence grammatically correct? I learned "whether" can be used with "to ー " and "or not", but "if/that" can't ...
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0 votes
0 answers
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Issue with an expression using the -ing form [migrated]

What should I know about these two expressions? I have two expressions but I do not know which one is correct and which one should I use. Above all what is the difference? I am not the one writing ...
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0 votes
0 answers
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Should the verb after "Quantities of" be in the form of plural form when meeting a uncoutable noun? [migrated]

Which statement is right? a. Quantities of water was wasted. b. Quantities of water were wasted. As you see, in my English books it tells me that "Quantites of anything", the verb MUST BE ...
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2 votes
2 answers
205 views

Is "none" when used alone without antecedent singular or plural (for context, I'm talking about people): "None [are/is] here"?

I know that "none of [...]" can be both singular or plural, but when I use it alone in a sentence, without the "of" and without any other nouns, can it be both singular and plural ...
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1 vote
0 answers
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Grammatical correctness of "He hasn't punished one of them— not one of them— since baby is born," [duplicate]

So I was reading a story called 'Desiree's Baby' and I saw this sentence appear, when one character (Desiree) was telling her mother that her husband was so happy upon the birth of her child, that he ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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When ‘that’ follows an 𝒳-of-𝒴 subject, which noun phrase does ‘that’ refer to: the first noun phrase 𝒳 or the second noun phrase 𝒴?

I’ve seen those two quite dif­fer­ent us­ages of that fol­low­ing an 𝒳-of-𝒴 prepo­si­tional phrase con­nect­ing two noun phrases 𝒳 and 𝒴 via the prepo­si­tion of, one in which it is used to re­fer ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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Require not vs. require do not

Which one is correct? I'm confused about whether I should say "require that someone does not do something" or "require that someone not do something" The Insurance Bureau requires ...
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0 votes
0 answers
11 views

Is This Sentence Grammaticaly acceptble? [migrated]

Can I say [I insisted on that the event was a turkey]? I know that we say: sb insists on sth. But I didn't know before yesterday that we can say: sb insists that So is it common or correct to say: ...
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1 vote
0 answers
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Real Conditional Clause Plus Present Unreal Main Clause

Is it grammatical to say these four sentences? If I have studied it for four years, I should be good at it. If I had studied it for four years, I should be good at it. If I have been studying it ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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Can "is" in "is a" be omitted?

Can the "is" in the following sentence be omitted? "Those who think a cure for Alzheimer's Disease is a possibility must act now."
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-1 votes
2 answers
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What is the word to express 'remove the need for'?

Creating a spare disk will remove the need for more disk space. What is the replacement for 'remove the need for'?
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0 votes
1 answer
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Is it correct to say “things are looking up for my travel plans” [closed]

Is it correct to say “things are looking up for my travel plans” to indicate that I am ready to start planning my travel after so many problems.
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0 votes
0 answers
24 views

"Past" as a Verb [duplicate]

I have come across a sentence in a financial media website Investopedia, which reads, "Time-barred debt is typically debt that has past the statute of limitations and cannot be collected." ...
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0 votes
0 answers
29 views

Why there is a comma before “and” in a simple sentence of two clauses? [duplicate]

Loretta studied very hard for the test, and she felt confident that she would pass. This is a simple sentence connected with a coordinating conjunction. There should not be a comma because we add a ...
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2 answers
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Allowed to use “they’ve” in a new paragraph? [closed]

Option A: “Great! Your new account request has been sent to ABC company. You'll be emailed a notification as soon as they've got your account ready for you to use.” Option B: “Great! Your new account ...
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2 votes
1 answer
30 views

Sentence grammar usage "as"

He was exposed as lacking in intelligence. I'm writing this sentence but I feel there is something amiss with the grammar, but I can't tell exactly why or where. Something to do with "as" I ...
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2 votes
0 answers
34 views

A Specific Instance of Me (object) vs. I (subject)

I was just crafting an email. The sentence was similar to this: You are hereby invited to the Pristine Medal Ceremony, an event which will result in Anthony and me becoming knighted, and receiving ...
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2 votes
0 answers
41 views

Possessive 'it' : Pronoun vs Adjective [duplicate]

I was working on some grammar schoolwork, some pronoun revisions and it states that the pronoun 'it' has no possessive, it has an adjective possessive, but not as a possessive pronoun. I'm confused. ...
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0 votes
1 answer
77 views

Is it correct to use "source codes" to mean the source code of more programs? [duplicate]

According to the Cambridge Dictionary, the word source code is countable, even if usually used in its singular form. I would like to know if it is correct to use the plural to mean the source code of ...
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Can "in front of" be used as a time adverbial?

At my workplace, which is a large multinational corporation with a non-English speaking headquarter, I often hear "in front of" being used in the meaning "before". Some examples: &...
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0 votes
1 answer
36 views

Is "This is my family" an acceptable response to "Who are they?"? [duplicate]

Context: suppose that I am looking at a family picture in an album in my friend’s house. Who are they? It’s my family. (correct) That’s my family. (correct) This is my family. (wrong) They are my ...
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-1 votes
1 answer
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'Team's interaction' or 'team interaction'?

I'm not sure which one is correct here: It has influenced our (team/team's) interaction and coordination skills. Is it team's since the interaction is possessive? Or team?
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1 vote
0 answers
33 views

Position of relative clauses after verb

I myself consider the sentence offset below to be correct; however, some of my associates regard it as being wrong. I would like your advice on it. The sentence is Jane Austen published 4 novels, who ...
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4 votes
3 answers
105 views

Answering "I don't have a criminal background"

There is this request for information in a form, given as a (negative) statement rather than a question, but requiring a response of 'Yes' or 'No': I don't have a criminal background (Y / N) To my ...
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1 vote
2 answers
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Unnecessary use of 'and': 'A few seconds later and...'

In several books I've read recently I've noticed what seems to me to be the unnecessary use of the word 'and'. For example: A few seconds later and the phone rang. Is it even grammatically correct?
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0 votes
2 answers
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Is this "upspeak" or something else?

I am reviewing a book (fiction) where the following type of sentence occurs frequently: That dumb suggestion? That just made me angry. [That dumb suggestion just made me angry.] You and I? We’re in ...
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0 votes
0 answers
37 views

Comparative Correlatives without the verb?

When using comparative correlatives in the context of something "being", can the verb be omitted? A classic example of this is "The more, the merrier.", where we refrain are are &...
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0 votes
1 answer
37 views

Should I separate multiple "ands" in a series with commas? [closed]

I enjoy eating apples and cherries and pears and bananas. OR I enjoy eating apples, and cherries, and pears, and bananas. I apologize if this question was listed somewhere else, but I can't find a ...
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0 votes
0 answers
27 views

"of which" with a number – is this grammatically correct? [duplicate]

Consider this sentence; I found 6 coins, 5 of which were rare Is this grammatically correct? I've been using it for years but I recently realised it may not be "correct". I put the term ...
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