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Questions tagged [subjects]

Questions about determining the subject of a sentence or clause

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Is an adjective justified in the place of the subject in a sentence? [migrated]

I am an ESL Chinese student in China. And I wonder whether it is standard to put an adjective in the place of the subject. Subject is always noun phrases including infinitives, gerunds and noun ...
fafafafa's user avatar
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37 views

"I want someone to do something." — Where are arguments here?

In an ongoing attempt to find the examples where complements and arguments don't coincide with each other, I came across these two answers of the user "BillJ". from BillJ's answer on english....
Loviii's user avatar
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1 vote
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example sentences of the verbs, "deter, enrich, and help", which have content clauses as their subject [closed]

I am interested in the question of what kind of verbs allows a content clause as a subject. I found a list of such verbs in The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (P.957). amuse bother deter ...
Aki's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
59 views

Subject placement in not only ... but also construction

This is an example taken from cambridge dictionary article not only ... but also: Not only did she forget my birthday, but she also didn’t even apologise for forgetting it. In their example, the ...
mateleco's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
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Is the word “it” needed after a comma in this situation?

Here is an example of my sentence: The physical therapy visit was not dated, did not contain the name or date of service, and therefore could not be validated. Someone is trying to correct me and ...
Annie's user avatar
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3 votes
4 answers
588 views

Here's/There's me, when I was six

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Page 1390) says this: [14] ii [viewing a photograph] H̲e̲r̲e̲’̲s̲/̲T̲h̲e̲r̲e̲’̲s̲ ̲m̲e̲, when I was six. [...] In [14ii] the personal pronoun is in the ...
JK2's user avatar
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1 answer
65 views

"Recorded on it" as a subject

I am unsure if the phrase "Recorded on it" can be used as a subject. He found a blueprint. Recorded on it was a device used by the Order. Does this sound grammatically correct?
Halcyon Mo's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
55 views

type of apple vs type of apples [duplicate]

There are 4 types of apples: sweet, sour, spicy, and tangy. Referring to the sweet type This type of apple is prevalent in northern regions. This type of apples is prevalent in northern regions. ...
tryingtobeastoic's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
54 views

Why does this sentence not mean reliable primary sources X (verb) the debate of the historians?

Why is the third "that" not implying the primary sources modify something about the historian's hot debate? It is a sad but just indictment of some high school history textbooks that they ...
Coo's user avatar
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-1 votes
1 answer
305 views

Which is correct has or have Neither of the balls has/have any air [duplicate]

Neither of the balls has/have any air. Use has or have?
user493319's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
56 views

Do I need to repeat the subject after a semicolon splitting two sentences that have the same subject in formal written English?

Do I need to repeat the subject after a semicolon splitting two sentences that have the same subject in formal written English? For example: He talked to the owners, which was understandable; paid ...
goahead97's user avatar
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-1 votes
2 answers
66 views

Subject identification in the sentence "All he does is invite random strangers on the internet to play games with him."

What is the subject of the following sentence? All he does is invite random strangers on the internet to play games with him.
Utshaw's user avatar
  • 139
2 votes
2 answers
742 views

What Is 'Given' Information according to the 'Given-before-New' Principle?

In Steven Pinker's book The Sense of Style, he talks about the 'given-before-new' principle (most notably on pages 131–138). He states, '... people learn by integrating new information into their ...
MJ Ada's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
1k views

Can I front an adverbial phrase like "high among the clouds"?

While writing a fantasy narration I created this sentence: High among the clouds a castle floated. My American friend tells me it sounds bad to a native ear. I think he sees a problem with the ...
Atom's user avatar
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0 answers
44 views

Subjective and objective case? [duplicate]

Is it correct to say I am faster than him at swimming Or I am faster than he at swimming I've heard that the first sentence is wrong because you can't compare the subjective case with the ...
Abhishek's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
104 views

Why is this that-clause unnatural as the subject in this sentence?

(1)After the surprising Algiers Agreement between Iran and Iraq is reached, the United States stops its support for the Kurdish rebels, which causes the fragmentation of the opposition and an ...
Aki's user avatar
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0 answers
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Participial phrase with a subject unomitted [duplicate]

I wonder this sentence is both grammatically and idiomatically correct. "That movie having a pretty big budget, filmmakers did not need to have one in order to succeed."
runner's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
229 views

Figuring out the subject in a sentence with two verbs

Maybe this question is too simple but I just can't figure it out. In these sentences which part is the subject? Did you think I would be sad if you left? or I believe you're making a gross and ...
Sandra's user avatar
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0 answers
102 views

Can there be a subject in a sentence without a verb?

Can there be a subject in a sentence without a verb, e.g. in sentences with an attributive adjective such as the following: "All these poor tragic people", "A sad day" or "...
Sandra's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
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Omitting the Subject from the first clause, mentioning it in the second

I am working on teaching an English grammar point to a group of students in an ESL course. However, I am not aware of the grammar points that structure and allow this particular usage. In the example ...
princejacobtremblay's user avatar
3 votes
3 answers
97 views

What is the subject of the verb following the comma?

This quote is from Gone with the Wind, where Scarlett met Rhett Butler at a function to collect for the Confederacy: Hot words bubbled to her lips and it was with difficulty that she checked them. ...
wowo878787's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
702 views

Can preposterousness stifle giggles? Is "preposterousness" part of an adjunct?

The preposterousness of the situation was simply too strange, too unreal, too funny to stifle the uncontrollable giggles. This sentence is from a book by a New York Times and USA Today bestselling ...
desmo's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
71 views

What’s the need for the comma

I’m puzzling over this comma at the beginning of the quote below. Is it another way to make it clear that the author is speaking about two different people - SOME musician and SOME OTHER artist? Doesn’...
Мария Волкова's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
53 views

Was/were when listing individually [closed]

I recently wrote something saying: Present at the meeting was the mayor, the chief of police, and city council members. My coworker flagged this, as moving the clause to the end of the sentence ...
Christina's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
68 views

How to use a past event as the subject of a sentence?

I am not a native speaker. My question in the title arise from an actual sentence I wanted to write. "Phone rang interrupted." Imagine this timeline for context: Employee was talking to ...
alpersunter's user avatar
3 votes
4 answers
111 views

Does this sentence have a subject?

The following is a paragraph from an online article: I don’t know whether Closca will succeed in this: although its foldable bike helmet is available in some outlets in New York, including the Museum ...
user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
535 views

“a small number of” as an adjective

The official Australian government page https://www.nationalsecurity.gov.au/national-threat-level/current-national-terrorism-threat-level features the following quote. This is because there are a ...
Post Self's user avatar
  • 237
7 votes
1 answer
2k views

Why can't "any" be used as subject in negative sentences, while "no" can?

Why is it that any cannot be used as subject in negative sentences, while no can? An example pair of sentences might be: No children came. Any children didn't come. Please note that the following ...
Matěj Vais's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
99 views

What is the grammar term for "John" in "I John want to eat." [duplicate]

Take this sentence, where John is clarifying himself. I John do hereby declare that I am hungry. I is the subject. What is John? John takes the place of an intensive reflexive pronoun, if the ...
Jesse's user avatar
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5 votes
4 answers
2k views

Can an imperative sentence have a subject?

Can an imperative sentence have a subject? This is a followup to this comment. User Schmuddi asserted that: English imperative sentences are subjectless. but did not cite any source or authority. I ...
David Siegel's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
74 views

Subject followed by infinitive — what is the grammatical name for this structure?

Example sentence: "Germany to raise prices ...", which usually can be used as "Germany (is) set to raise prices ..." but the first example is also correct. Can you help me with ...
romand's user avatar
  • 133
0 votes
1 answer
49 views

Subject-modifier-verb agreement [duplicate]

In the following sentence, is the verb 'have' appropriate? Is it not supposed to be 'has' ? The British council, in partnership with Microsoft philanthropies, have designed a course for young ...
Armstrong Musa's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
97 views

Passive voice with ditransitive verb, which is the patient?

If I were to make the following constructions, how would I label the parts of the sentence using passive voice terminology? Alice seems to be the agent in both these constructions, but which is the ...
Patrick O'Brien's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
31 views

Is this sentence wrong: "write a letter for me to teach in the university" and if so, why? [closed]

Suppose I'm applying for a teaching position and asking someone for a reference letter. Then is it correct to say: Can you write a reference letter for me to teach in the university? to mean "...
musiphil's user avatar
  • 111
1 vote
2 answers
54 views

What is the subject in this quoted sentence?

"But perhaps most importantly, UF simply should not be looking to Governor DeSantis to decide which speech activities it will permit its employees and students to engage in,” the ACLU’s Daniel ...
user438472's user avatar
5 votes
4 answers
3k views

Help Fixing Yoda-like Sentence Structure? [closed]

I'm a native American English speaker and have noticed something in my speech/writing that I don't really understand. I've noticed my speech sounds "Yoda-ish" and have been trying to figure ...
nessefi's user avatar
  • 89
0 votes
1 answer
45 views

What is the proper way to say "14 Registered Students"? [closed]

Which should it be? "14 Registered Students" or "14 Students Registered"
chuck's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
30 views

What is subject of the second sentence joined by "and"? [duplicate]

In some logical reasoning questions, I get stuck in the following type of sentences. Car A is parked somewhere in the left of Car B and is parked somewhere in the right of Car C. Jack is at the ...
Supriyo Halder's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
178 views

Use of pronoun for objects in the preceding sentence [duplicate]

I am having some doubts regarding the use of pronouns.  Please have a look at the following sentences. I picked a pen from the dustbin yesterday.  It writes very smoothly. I picked a pen from the ...
M. Noraiz's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
105 views

"Enough" can't appear in the subject of a negative sentence

Don't use enough (with or without a noun) as the subject of a negative sentence, ✳‘Enough people didn’t come', but ‘Not enough did’. https://www.wordreference.com/EnglishUsage/enough Why is it so? ...
GJC's user avatar
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1 vote
3 answers
221 views

How does "_ and I"/"_ and me" rule change when inside brackets?

This question was specifically motivated by the Youtube video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iitXhgif_lo which has the title "How one little boat (and me) held up miles of London traffic". ...
LordQuaggan's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
315 views

What is the grammatical explanation for an 'It looks like ...' clause? (dummy subjects)

Recently, I have been trying to understand the nuances of language to turn myself into a better writer. This has led me to the 'dummy subject' or 'dummy pronoun.' I am clear on the function of 'there,'...
MJ Ada's user avatar
  • 353
0 votes
0 answers
36 views

cotton-top tamarins also spend most of their lives in the trees. My question is about why not most of their live ? why lives? [duplicate]

I don't understand (most of their lives) is singular or plural ? what make this sentence singular for what reason ?
Nafiz Shikder's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
257 views

Can 'nowhere' be used as a subject?

I am utterly confused... The thing is I was helping a friend do an exercise in which she needed to put some words in the correct order to form a grammatical English sentence. The words in question ...
Harry's user avatar
  • 21
-1 votes
3 answers
76 views

What is the subjective of this sentence? [closed]

Dong,2019 said that A firm that colludes with other firms in a foreign product market is subject to that country’s antitrustlaws. Foreign leniency law passage is thus likely to affect firms that operate ...
Phil Nguyen's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
2k views

These children's favorite indoor game is chess- what is the subject here

Identify the subject and predicate in the sentence These children's favorite indoor game is chess
Sonali Bhowmik 's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
740 views

Grammar rule: ONE sentence; ONE subject, ONE predicate. Is it?

I just watched a video on grammar (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Drv6jD8xWdw) that states that English sentences can only have one subject. At first, I thought it was obvious, but then I thought of ...
Pablo GM's user avatar
  • 135
-1 votes
1 answer
52 views

Can you omit the "it"

Can the "it" be omitted in this sentence? It looks like quite the mess. Looks like quite the mess.
FiguringOutGrammar's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
149 views

Should a prepositional phrase beginning with “of” that follows a plural noun be singular or plural?

Which of these is correct? “Types of citrus fruit” or “types of citrus fruits”? I suspect it is the first example, but I would really like to know what the grammar rule governing these situations ...
jbebout1295's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
61 views

Do 'it' and 'there' refer to the correct parts of this sentence?

In the following sentence, the 'it' in the bold part should refer to Acid Grassland and the 'there' should refer to the 'roughs' (rough areas on a golf course). "Frighteningly, some of the ...
William Morris's user avatar

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