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Questions tagged [rhetorical-devices]

For questions about rhetoric devices (Using certain phrasings or constructions in order to elicit a certain sort of response from an audience).

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Re film title, "Kinds of Kindness" [duplicate]

Ever since I've heard the title Kinds of Kindness it's been bouncing around my head. I'm curious whether a technical term exists for linking two words with homonymic stems, as occurs here. My surface ...
FILMFAN0100's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
44 views

From-to construction [closed]

Please help me parse this sentence. I'm not asking for proofreading; I'm looking at grammatical construction concerning range. I say it's a run-on and false range (I am not including the misplaced ...
commonone's user avatar
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1 answer
83 views

Remember this CocaCola tagline? [closed]

What rhetorical device is being used in the CocaCola tagline 'Open Happiness'?
Florio's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
56 views

Is there a rhetorical device to describe the use of ", then,"?

Is there a name to describe the use of ", then," after the subject of a sentence for dramatic effect when reaching a conclusion? Education, then, beyond all other devices of human origin, ...
Curious Weevil's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
117 views

Using a sequence of synonyms for emphasis – is there a special term for that in English?

I stumbled upon the Irish term carnadh comhchiallach recently, defined as ... A stylistic trick in which words with the same meaning, or almost the same meaning, are put together in a sequence, e.g. ...
KQUB's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
45 views

What's the term for "blame disguised as a question"? [duplicate]

Is there a term for disguising blame as a question? For example, when someone is late, someone sarcastically says Wow you're early, did you wake up late?
grace's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
81 views

What's the opposite of symploce? [duplicate]

Symploce is two or more sentences / phrases sharing the same beginning and end, but a different middle, while I'm looking for two or more sentences / phrases sharing a middle but different beginnings ...
Malady's user avatar
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5 votes
2 answers
190 views

Where better to whet one's grammar?

I wonder if all interrogative pronouns can be used in structures like Where better to learn about the resilience of life? For example, Who better to repair my car? How better to cook potatoes than ...
Quirkier's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
62 views

Are implied requests for suggestions like "I don't know what else to do" considered rhetorical statements?

If someone says something such as, "I don't know what else to do," it kind of implies a request for some suggestions. In the case the person doesn't actually want ideas for what to do, would ...
user490175's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
56 views

How to characterize Machiavelli's phrase, "The ends justify the means"? [closed]

This question has been raised and thoroughly discussed: "How to characterize the phrase, 'The ends justify the means.'" I wish to add a thought. As I was writing a book for publication, I ...
Jeffsbooks's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
84 views

What is this rhetorical device called (i.e. saying "the journal" while instead referring to an article inside the journal)?

In a question on a different SE site the title is as follows Writing the introduction section of an academic journal while the question is about writing the introduction section of a paper that will ...
EarlGrey's user avatar
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1 answer
49 views

What is the rhetorical purpose of the phrase: "to be honest?"

What is the rhetorical purpose of the phrase: "to be honest?" I think it has become a way to indicate that what came before was a lie but the speaker does not want to be direct. On LinkedIn, ...
Mike B's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
57 views

Rhetoric figures in a Pratchett quote [closed]

Or at least I think it was Pratchett taking a potshot at religion (exact wording unknown either): "When you got them by the balls, you, uhm, got them by the balls." Note that both parts of ...
Hauke Reddmann's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
104 views

Is there a name for the figure of speech where parts of a name are replaced with similar words for critical or comic effect?

I'm struggling to explain it, but some examples are (mention does not imply endorsement!): Sir Keir Starmer -> Sir Kid Starver (criticism of his stance on child benefits) Benedict Cumberbatch ->...
Tom Anderson's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
73 views

What is the rhetorical effect of this usage of Anastrophe in Shakespeare's Othello? [closed]

When reading Othello, I found many expressions using anastrophe. Some of them are just for the metre, but some are truly fancinating and I am not able to analyse them quite well. For example, in 2.3, ...
J. Wu's user avatar
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-4 votes
1 answer
84 views

Is there a term to describe the use of an incorrect adverb (as an adjective-modifier)?

The phrase 'slightly dead' would be incorrect because a person can't be 'slightly' dead. Is there a term to describe phrases that incorrectly use adverbs in this way?
Jonathan's user avatar
3 votes
3 answers
116 views

Is there a term to the practice of over-inflating big words like 'edumecation' and 'philosphization'?

Morphologically speaking, I suppose this is the practice of adding meaningless affixes in order to make the word appear more grandiose. Perhaps more common in AAVE, especially the word 'edumecate'. ...
Maarten's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
120 views

What is the term for using a word to portray a particular idea outside of but close to the context of the original meaning?

What is the term for using a word to portray a particular idea outside of but close to the context of the original meaning? Here is an example of what I mean. Someone may use the word “mercenary” in a ...
lifelonglearner's user avatar
1 vote
4 answers
666 views

Is there a word for "connecting multiple disparate ideas together"?

I'm also finding it hard to describe the concept succinctly, which might mean that it's not well-formed, but I'll give it a shot anyway. The concept I'm trying to put a word to is the rhetorical ...
Glire's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
1k views

What is an English term for "an event that triggers a chain of events, ultimately to downfall"? [duplicate]

I'm trying to incorporate more technical literary terms into my Macbeth revision for my upcoming exam. I've discovered terms such as Hamartia, Catharsis, Peripeteia, etc. What would be a good word to ...
Haroon's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
78 views

An argument where a person says exactly what you told them isn’t true?

Background: Person A and Person B have been in a romantic relationship for many years. Person A gives Person B a large sum of money, specifically telling them that that Person B can use this money ...
Lana's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
30 views

A short grin was smiled into Papa’s spoon. what is going on here?

A short grin was smiled into Papa’s spoon. what is the device here? is the grin personified? is it past continuous as well?
Priya Velan's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
71 views

Is there a term for insincere prefacing?

Is there a specific term for the practice of prefacing a statement with another statement that is in contrast (in spirit) to what is being said? There is a related concept called apophasis, where you ...
Philip Mars's user avatar
12 votes
12 answers
10k views

What's another word for agreeing with another person just for the sake of it?

Let's assume two people A and B are in an argument, when A accuses B of some wrongdoing, which B denies. A while after, B, for the sake of pretending to have a moral high ground (for thinking of ...
alpheus's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
45 views

Identifying Literary devices (synecdoche, periphrasis)

Does the usage of the names of specific national dishes here represent the countries? Can we affirm that the author uses a synecdoche? Even if you’re not bold enough to try bubble and squeak, haggis ...
Tanya Shalepina's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
118 views

Name for a rhetorical device suggesting an individual fault by generalization

I am trying to find the name of the rhetorical device used in the following (deliberately absurd) example: John says that he believes in motherhood and apple pie. In my experience many people who say ...
David's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
54 views

Rhetorical phrase analysis [closed]

Is there a rhetorical device found from the following phrase? It won't cost you a thing, but it may save your life.
Jonathan's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
3k views

In the phrase: "She swallowed her words", what literary device is being used?

Words can't be swallowed, so there has to be some literary device being used here. It's not a metaphor or simile because words are not being compared to anything, and it's not personification either ...
No Name's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
81 views

Is there a term for the rhetorical technique of repeating an interlocutor's ideas while making it sound like their own?

Is there a term for the rhetorical technique of repeating, either spoken or written, the interlocutor's ideas or opinions, without acknowledgement, while making it sound like either something new or a ...
Leroy Tophet's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
173 views

What is the rhetorical term used in the sentence "When he died, all he left us was alone"? [duplicate]

From the lyrics to Papa Was a Rollin’ Stone by The Temptations: Papa was a rolling stone Wherever he laid his hat was his home And when he died all he left us was alone What is the the name of this ...
Sid's user avatar
  • 406
1 vote
2 answers
203 views

What does a "weary room" mean? [duplicate]

A Pink Floyd song titled "A Momentary Lapse of Reason" starts with this line: "A restless eye across a weary room" I started looking up the various meanings of "weary" to ...
Mhrd's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
72 views

Rhetorical device for sentence structure imitating meaning

I am trying to find the specific rhetorical device which means that the structure of the sentence I’m writing about imitates the meaning. In this particular case the writer using enjambement to convey ...
Alice's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
44 views

Replacing periods with commas

In one chapter of the book, Extremely loud and incredibly close (pages 208-216), the author uses commas instead of periods to join several sentences without listing nor using conjunctions between them....
JT2476's user avatar
  • 13
0 votes
2 answers
81 views

Which rhetorical device is this?

This is a campaign from 2016 (The Guardian). When the politicians defy belief, you need a newspaper that defies politicians. What is this an example of (rhetorical device)? Or is it just wordplay ...
user414739's user avatar
3 votes
6 answers
127 views

Term for allowing implausible scenario in argument

What is the term for allowing an implausible scenario in order to be as generous as possible to the claim one is about to knock down? Example: Acme Acres recorded 2,000 births last year, but the town ...
bongbang's user avatar
  • 263
2 votes
1 answer
539 views

What do you call it when someone says they’re not going to mention a thing? [duplicate]

Is there a name for the sort of expression where someone would say something like... “I’m not going to mention the ridiculous hat they’re wearing.” Or “I could make a joke about footballers diving ...
Fogmeister's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
408 views

Word for stating something as fact when narrator and audience knows it is untrue?

I am looking for a literary term that is similar to irony. Basically, the narrator say something in an almost sarcastic way by stating something that everyone knows is untrue. The quote I am going off ...
Julia Washburn's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
187 views

definition and usage for whipsaw?

My understanding of the whipsaw term is that can, according to Wiktionary, be used rhetorically as in these examples: verb (transitive) To defeat someone in two different ways at once. 2014 November ...
Nicholas Saunders's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
89 views

Is there a word or phrase for using overspecific, incorrect language intentionally?

A comedian I like calls vampires "Draculas", with the specificity as well as the incorrectness (there is only one Dracula, but many vampires) being a source of humor. Is there a word for ...
Andrew's user avatar
  • 115
0 votes
1 answer
33 views

Rhetorical strategy by collecting many agreeing individual perspectives to prove something right/wrong

I believe there is a specific rhetorical strategy by using large number of agreeing perspectives to prove the author's point (e.g. Person A said...Person B also stated...Company C explained) The ...
Nathan Gong's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
441 views

What is the name of the rhetoric device for the use of a one word sentence?

I'm doing a study of the collector, how would I describe the use of this quote... "Power. Its become so real." The use of power as a one-word sentence for emphasis, what technique or device ...
Hannah Jenaya Jackson's user avatar
4 votes
3 answers
12k views

The difference between "only one" and "one and only one"

A teacher announces, "There is only one student who failed the course." Does the teacher’s statement mean anything different from the following version? "There is one and only one student who ...
R004's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
42 views

Types of Questions

Are questions such as "Will they like me?" and "Will I fit in?" said in a diary, for example, with an emotional tone, rhetorical questions? If not, what type are they?
Charlie's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
546 views

Is there a word to describe a plausible but incorrect explanation? [duplicate]

I'm thinking of something where somebody (with no malicious intention) offers a very plausible and scientific-sounding explanation (not a theory but something presented as a series of facts) such that ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
511 views

Ending a sentence with "has it" or "did it" in a sarcastic statement, what's this called?

E.g. 1: "Oh, that joke about a pandemic has aged like fine wine, hasn't it?" E.g. 2: "Yes, I suppose we did, didn't we?" I've noticed alot of people from the UK tend to speak in a ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
113 views

'She looked incredible. Then she looked at me'

Am I correct in saying that the verb 'looked' is intransitive in the first phrase, transitive in the second phrase? Is there a name for this type of rhetorical technique playing on the two senses of ...
cunning linguist's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
38 views

What linguistic feature would I draw upon to explain this?

If i was writing an informative piece on a random topic and I wrote for instance "Ok, but how does CO2 get released? By burning fossil fuels." By asking a question to my intended audience and then ...
Tyrone's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
226 views

What's the name for a non-question posing as a question?

A rhetorical question is a question that doesn't require an answer. What's the name for a rhetorical device that's a non-question that requires an answer ? Eg, in the following convo what role does "...
nqzero's user avatar
  • 61
0 votes
0 answers
115 views

Inversion with phrase "handy for"

The following example sentence from Collins Dictionary seems to me perfectly natural and in line with the given definition of handy: 3. A thing or place that is handy is nearby and therefore easy ...
user_163417's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
632 views

Is "When since" correct? [closed]

A friend of mine recently used an expression "When since" to start a question that could just as well start with "since when". I feel like it's incorrect, but a google search doesn't bring up any ...
DigitalData's user avatar