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This tag is for questions about the correct order of words in a phrase, or a sentence.

2
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2answers
34 views

difference between “remains only” and “only remains”

I wrote the following in an article. It remains only to eliminate the intersections which can be proven to be empty. My proofreader corrected to the following by changing the word order. It ...
-2
votes
0answers
41 views

Embedded statement

In Longman Dictionary of American English, a sentence reads: This shows you which are the most important words to know. Why is are positioned immediately after which? The verb must be related to ...
-1
votes
0answers
24 views

Using 'Usually and Sometimes' at the beginning of a sentence

It is very common to use adverbs of frequency such as 'usually and sometimes' in medial position, but sometimes they are used initially. For example: -Usually l get up late. ...
2
votes
2answers
89 views

“British female students” or “female British students”?

Which is more correct between "British female students" and "female British students"? I have found examples of both - even the Daily Mail renders it both ways.
0
votes
2answers
65 views

Beginning a sentence with “of”

Do these two sentences have the same meaning? Of this spiritual world, our world is an imperfect image. Our world is an imperfect image of this spiritual world.
0
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0answers
26 views

“The second half of the 18th century is justly called the age of Petipa or the age of the <> in ballet” VS “The 18th century in ballet is justly…”

Where should I put "in ballet" to achieve maximum nativeness? Also, do I need quotation marks in "the age of Petipa"? Thanks.
0
votes
2answers
69 views

How do you use “which” when asking a question

I am wondering how to state this question and do not know which one is correct so is #1 correct or #2 correct or are they both grammatically fine? Ferrous metals contain which element? Which element ...
1
vote
1answer
24 views

Order of Adjectives: “quantitative reverse transcription…” vs. “reverse transcription quantitative…” [duplicate]

This is a general question with no specific sentence in mind. If a string of 2 or 3 attributive adjectives (or attributive nouns?) are used in a sentence, they generally follow a particular order (e.g....
0
votes
1answer
36 views

Usage of “even” in multiple positions

Earlier today, I read a sentence that said: This medication can even cure HIV. The context was very simple, the medication has many uses to the point it could cure a currently incurable disease, ...
1
vote
1answer
37 views

solid black line vs black dashed line [duplicate]

I am describing a chart and got confused about my intuition and Google results. So I'd usually refer to a "solid black line" and there are 1,130,000 results (with quotes) for that against 320,000 for ...
1
vote
2answers
28 views

Use of 'in pair' or 'in group' in a sentence

I am really confused about this case now since I can't find a satisfying answer with Google. It is a minor case, but still, I want to understand it better. Please tell me which of the following are ...
-2
votes
0answers
54 views

Question about WH questions [migrated]

Here are some interrogative statements which are right/wrong (both in American and British English). Right- What took you so long? Who killed my friend? What disease took away my ...
0
votes
1answer
58 views

“may even have” or “may have even”?

Is either of these 'more correct'? She may even have pre-empted us. She may have even pre-empted us. Is it purely a case of which sounds better in any case, or are there specific rules?
1
vote
1answer
90 views

“Whether or not…” vs. “whether… or not”

I'm confused with the placement of 'or not' with 'whether' in a sentence. E.g. I'm not sure whether I should go or not. I'm not sure whether or not I should go. Whether you stay or ...
1
vote
2answers
38 views

Where should I put the adverb “always” in these narrations?

Look at these two statements involving indirect (reported) speech: He advised me to speak the truth always. or He advised me to always speak the truth. Here, I am confused about setting the ...
0
votes
0answers
35 views

Why it is the most likely cause? OR Why is it most likely the cause?

Adam's left leg aches. 1, He ate too much yesterday. 2, He was bitten by a bee yesterday. 3, He fell off his bike yesterday. So the most likely cause of the pain in his leg that he had fallen of his ...
2
votes
2answers
73 views

Adjectival order: “a style appropriate for” or “an appropriate style for”

I would like to understand the correct grammatical order in the sentence, In your essay, you must use grammatically correct sentences with accurate spelling and punctuation in a style appropriate ...
2
votes
1answer
23 views

Correct location for title Director?

Correct usage of department director? Example: Director of Human Resources Human Resources Director
0
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0answers
20 views

You need to write method followed by elements - what is the correct order here? [duplicate]

This is my first post so pardon me if I'm not posting at the right place, still navigating around. English being my second language, the "followed by" term has always confused me and I could never ...
2
votes
2answers
39 views

Is it better to write “the affected people” or “the people affected”? [closed]

Which (if any) is better: We have spoken with the affected people. We have spoken with the people affected. Thanks in advance.
0
votes
1answer
32 views

Who is referred to whom?

In my business, sometimes clients I have done work for will provide my name and contact information to other, potential clients. I send a Thank You card to the referring (original) client. What ...
1
vote
3answers
57 views

“Won't everyone be amazed” [closed]

I wonder why the word order of this phrase is reversed in the sentence below: won't everyone be amazed. But if he somehow can pull off this trick, boy oh boy, won’t everyone be amazed. This is ...
1
vote
2answers
85 views

“In only the city” or “Only in the city”

I am a foreign English student and have a question regarding the placement of only in a sentence. I wrote You can do all these things in only that city in an exam, which is apparently wrong. But ...
0
votes
0answers
37 views

Multi-national compound adjectives: why Anglo-French and not Franco-English?

When referring to events or situations that involve two countries (wars, treaties, alliances etc) what determines the order of the countries in the compound adjective? I'm thinking here of examples ...
1
vote
0answers
45 views

How many “of” is allowed? How to reposition nouns correctly?

Facing this, I am not sure that I know the right answer. At the university, I was taught that only 2 prepositions "of" are allowed to be sounding natural. If it comes to translation from Russian into ...
0
votes
1answer
34 views

Putting “to do..” at the beginning?

There are some sentences 1-) I see no reason to do these stupid things. 2-) I can find no sensible explanation for you to leave your master program. An English professor from Canada at the ...
0
votes
0answers
45 views

Where to put the adverb “automatically”

Which of the following two sentences is better English and why? (1) "This email has been sent automatically." or: (2) "This email has been automatically sent." I would prefer (1) because it ...
1
vote
0answers
53 views

Proper Usage of Nicknames?

I’m already aware that nicknames are usually incorporated into the larger name between the first and last names — John “Jack” Doe, for example — and that this is essentially standard usage. When you ...
0
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0answers
36 views

“Can you show a useful book for anyone who is interested in astronomy?”

-"Can you show a useful book for anyone who is interested in astronomy?" (This question has been considered to be asked in a library or a bookshop) What does this sentence mean? I think the ...
0
votes
0answers
31 views

Should have/Would have - simple problem

I understand that should have/would have etc. are used to refer to something unrealistic or contrary to what has really happened. I do, however, have several questions. I know that this form is most ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

Can we use the preposition “to” in the middle when they refer to a noun?

The question is "Can we use "to" in the middle of a sentence?". Sometimes, infinitives can refer to nouns and in that case, they should be next to nouns they refer to. If there is another object in ...
0
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0answers
15 views

Correct word order with “however” [duplicate]

Which of the following three is correct? When parents relate to a child, they do a lot of the work, figuring out what the child needs and then accommodating those needs. This is not, however, ...
0
votes
1answer
39 views

Cigarette Smoking or Smoking Cigarette

From the following sentence, Cigarette smoking harms nearly every organ of the body, causes many diseases, and reduces the health of smokers in general. Can we replace the bolded phrases with ...
1
vote
1answer
52 views

Which order is right: “a ugly huge scar” or “a huge ugly scar”? [duplicate]

Which of the following is right? Why? He has an ugly huge scar on his face. He has a huge ugly scar on his face. I would choose the second one, but I don't know why.
0
votes
1answer
57 views

How can I phrase this sentence so that it doesn't end in a preposition?

Whenever possible, I like to avoid ending sentences with prepositions because some people can be very picky about it. However, I am struggling with this one sentence in particular: "The hypothesis ...
1
vote
1answer
88 views

Using “easily” at the beginning or middle of a sentence

Grammatically, is there a difference between how things are worded in the following two sentences? Easily create your own games with GameMaker 2000. or Create your own games easily with GameMaker ...
1
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0answers
35 views

Yesterday, I met Susan at the grocer's. - Is the comma here incorrect? [duplicate]

Revising to the exam again... In a chapter dedicated to something else, in the answers to an exercise, there was such a sentence: Yesterday I met Susan at the grocer's. / I met Susan at the grocer'...
0
votes
1answer
33 views

“Was it your father who made these bookshelves?” - Is it a correct / best way to ask if the bookshelves were made by someone's father?

"Was it your father who made these bookshelves?" vs "Were these bookshelves made by your father?" I've been constructing questions (and statements) in the former way quite a lot. But, I'm having ...
1
vote
1answer
28 views

Which one is in good order? [closed]

I would like ask Native English person. Which one is natural? Welcome Guide JAPAN JAPAN Welcome Guide Welcome JAPAN Guide
2
votes
1answer
44 views

In which order should I use these words: rescue, female, tabby - when describing a cat? [closed]

I'm writing a description of my cat and I want to say that she's a rescue cat, a female, and that she has a tabby patern, all in one sentence that would look like this: Leia is a tabby female rescue ...
1
vote
1answer
69 views

Is “I make my hot pizza” the correct way to write “I make my pizza hot”? [closed]

I make my pizza hot. I make my hot pizza. Which sentence is correct? The first sentence was written by a 7 year old learning English. The second was the "corrected" sentenced written by the teacher. ...
2
votes
2answers
74 views

“Would have assuredly been” or “Would assuredly have been?”

Where does the adverb go in a sentence like the following? Which is correct? I would have assuredly been stranded. I would assuredly have been stranded.
1
vote
2answers
55 views

“Direction opposite of” or “opposite direction of?”

Is one of these sentences wrong, or are they all correct, and why? Which is easiest to parse? The man signaled with a tilt of his head in the opposite direction of the club. The man signaled ...
0
votes
0answers
28 views

Can the object be moved to the front like this?

I have found this sentence and am wondering whether it is correct: “What you don’t like, I don’t like either.” I think it is an alternative way of writing the sentence “I don’t like what you don’t ...
0
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0answers
63 views

What does the expression “so [adjective] a [noun]” mean? [duplicate]

I recently read the sentence "they built so strong a relationship" but this sentence seems a bit weird for me. I would have said "they built a so strong relationship" ; is that correct, and if so, ...
1
vote
2answers
84 views

What do you call a person who is regionally unbiased?

What do you call a person who is regionally unbiased and has reasonable love/like for all people from other regions and countries/world? Something like someone who loves all people, not just of his ...
0
votes
1answer
73 views

Fronting of helping verbs for impossible probabilities

This is from 'Landour Days' by Ruskin Bond where he dwells at length on writings by hand. " A few years earlier, when Dickens and Balzac had submitted their hefty manuscripts in longhand, no one had ...
1
vote
1answer
59 views

Where is it best to put the “when” of a sentence?

John yesterday went to the store to buy eggs. John went to the store yesterday to buy eggs. John went to the store to buy eggs yesterday.
0
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1answer
288 views

We say “person responsible”, so would we also say “site responsible”? [closed]

A responsible person is someone who acts in a responsible manner, and the person responsible is the person whose job it is to deal with something. What if I want to say that a particular company site ...
1
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0answers
29 views

Word Order and Comparative

Consider the different locations of the subject, adjective, and conjunction in the following sentences. A boy as trim as Bob should be a fast runner. As trim a boy as Bob should be a fast ...