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Questions tagged [word-order]

This tag is for questions about the correct order of words in a phrase, or a sentence.

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Using "though" instead of "but" in "Not only ... but also ..." [closed]

Is it possible to use "though" instead of "but" in the "Not only ... but also ..." construction? For example, instead of Not only is it interesting, but it can also be ...
The III World man's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
85 views

Why is the adjectival order "noble eightfold path" on the one hand yet "octadic patrician way" on the other?

I'm a native English speaker. As I understand, English grammar rules specify a particular ordering of types of adjectives. In Buddhism, there is a "noble eightfold path". That is, a path, ...
Claudiu's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
63 views

Greatest extent possible vs Greatest possible extent [adjective position]

I know the following sentences basically mean the same thing: We need to reduce pollution to the greatest extent possible. We need to reduce pollution to the greatest possible extent. so my ...
mateleco's user avatar
  • 145
0 votes
3 answers
159 views

Is it grammatically correct to say "I dislike people who don't "think important" their birthdays or anyone else's?

My main question is if "think important" is correct or if it would have to be worded differently like "think it is important" or "think of importance"
Charlie Demoncada's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
73 views

If you say "who with/who for/who by/who from," do you also say "what with/what for/what by/what from?"

I know that "Who with?", "Who for?", "Who by?", "Who from?", "Who to?", and other "Who + preposition" sentences are colloquially very common ...
Sophie's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
121 views

Which word should come first in a noun phrase, the ordinal adjective or the numeral? [duplicate]

Should one say 'the first 13 colonies on the planet Pelaton' or 'the 13 first colonies on the planet Pelaton'?
zenith3's user avatar
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-1 votes
2 answers
31 views

Is it correct to put in brackets the professional title after the proper noun instead of putting the professional role before the proper noun? [closed]

“M'hemed Housseine Fantar (Archeologist) described”, or “the archaeologist M'Hemed Housseine Fantar described”?
Valentina Felcaro's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
59 views

Subject placement in not only ... but also construction

This is an example taken from cambridge dictionary article not only ... but also: Not only did she forget my birthday, but she also didn’t even apologise for forgetting it. In their example, the ...
mateleco's user avatar
  • 145
1 vote
0 answers
42 views

Is "say they" correct? [duplicate]

English is not my first language. The text below is a translation of the Quran by Ahmed Ali : And when it is said unto them, "Follow ye what God hath sent down", say they, "Nay! Follow ...
Mike's user avatar
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3 votes
0 answers
63 views

Why does the sequence of some types of adjectives differ?

I was reading a book, and a character calls another character "a gangly, little human". Now, if I were to use another adjective instead of little, say, tiny, I would have to say "a tiny,...
Anushka Kulkarni's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
76 views

Why does "other" need a specific position in a sentence?

Take the sentence: In the background we can see other three people who are watching the film. I think it's wrong and it would be right to say: In the background we can see three other people who ...
nata gareeva's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
204 views

'I know what is freedom / freedom is'. <-- Word order in WH-questions

My understanding is that in a wh- subordinate clause, we must use statement word order (subject then verb) rather than question word order (verb then subject): Correct: I know what freedom is. Wrong:...
user182601's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
37 views

Word order for "What we can do as <noun>" [closed]

Which is better: What can we do as doctors to improve health? What can we do to improve health as doctors? I think #1 is better because it's clearer that doctors is referring to we.
onepiece's user avatar
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0 answers
35 views

Meaning of 'To Marx are due X and Y' [duplicate]

This question is about the emphasized sentence in the following paragraph from Proposed Roads to Freedom by Bertrand Russell: Socialism as a power in Europe may be said to begin with Marx. It is true ...
apadana's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
92 views

What other types of words have free word order?

What types of words allow the speaker to choose where they want to use it? I can only think of adverbs, where it is acceptable to say "we moved slowly" or "we slowly moved." Are ...
h061's user avatar
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4 votes
2 answers
634 views

theorem Isosceles Triangle

I think the sentence 1 is idiomatic: Sentence 1: The vessel Queen Elisabeth weighed anchor today at 19:00 at the port of Malta. The word vessel is a noun and "Queen Elisabeth" is the noun ...
goahead97's user avatar
  • 101
0 votes
0 answers
29 views

Order of words with verb - "there is" vs "is there" [duplicate]

I just came across two very similar phrases. They seem to me both grammatically correct and normal, but I cannot quite justify their existence. They are : 1)...where not only is there only a small ...
alex varner's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
665 views

"See also" vs. "Also see" as a heading

I was surprised to se that there consistently is an "Also see"-section on this wiki (example). The heading I would expect is "See also", which is used e.g. on Wikipedia (example). ...
Lorents's user avatar
  • 134
0 votes
0 answers
49 views

Growing calls, calls have grown

I'm wondering if 'calls have grown for X to be Y-ed' is an acceptable substitute for 'there have been growing calls for X to be Y-ed'? To clarify, these are examples of the latter from the first page ...
foolishkettle's user avatar
6 votes
4 answers
898 views

Is there an order to prepositional phrases?

Which statement is correct? The change adds more info to the changelog about the previous commits on May xx, xxxx. Or: The change adds more info about the previous commits on May xx, xxxx to the ...
Marta's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
252 views

Word order: Can an adjective be a subject in an English sentence?

My favorite is apple pie. Is it correct? Can the adjective be a subject in an English sentence?
Olga's user avatar
  • 19
4 votes
3 answers
226 views

"when would be..." autocorrection

I have just been autocorrected as follows: I wrote: "Please let me know when would be a good time to..." Correction: "Please let me know when a good time would be to..." I suppose ...
Karl's user avatar
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1 vote
4 answers
97 views

Is verb order significant when someone is [verb1]ing and [verb2]ing?

I came across some interesting dialogue in a tense scene in a novel, Salvation Lost by Peter F Hamilton: "We'll know exactly what the other [people] are seeing and doing." "Doing and ...
piojo's user avatar
  • 291
1 vote
2 answers
92 views

position of 'ever' with a perfect gerund

The adverb 'ever' usually comes in mid-position, that is before the verb, after the auxiliary – if there is one – and after the first auxiliary if there are more than one. (Practical English Usage, ...
user58319's user avatar
  • 4,112
0 votes
1 answer
173 views

Is ‘ask them to both be there’ or ‘they both will be there’ ever grammatical?

I am trying to articulate how to position the determiner/predeterminer ‘both’ behind the nouns being modified. Every rule that I came across on a cursory search involves some unspecified exception, so ...
ryang's user avatar
  • 255
4 votes
5 answers
365 views

Does 'angle' as a noun necessarily receive a definite article?

Here is the sentence in dispute: In humans, the femoral angle shows no correlation with femoral length. The question: why would 'femoral angle' receive a definite article, but not 'femoral length'? ...
BVinNV's user avatar
  • 49
6 votes
1 answer
361 views

One less thing to worry about

I am not a native English speaker but I usually feel comfortable speaking or writing in English. I also have a linguistic background. But this morning I finished a task, wiped it from my whiteboard, ...
Bram Vanroy's user avatar
  • 1,267
3 votes
3 answers
331 views

Why is the structure interrogative-which-word – subject – verb (including question mark) being used so often? Is it grammatical?

I've noticed that more and more headlines of articles and ads (excluding those in more traditional online media) are of the structure interrogative-subject-verb instead of interrogative-verb-subject. ...
Mathieu Dhondt's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
95 views

Video Magazine or Magazine Video

Although the titular term needs no more explanation, as in the Wikipedia, Video magazines are a series of online videos that follow the print magazine format in which the reader/viewer consumes an ...
Eilia's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
79 views

Verb particle noun or verb noun particle: to leave out [duplicate]

Which sentence is grammatically correct or sounds more native-like? Politicians tend to discuss their sources of income nontransparently, leaving the discussions surrounding them out. Politicians ...
Schneider's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
98 views

Is it "on the bed in my room" or "in my room on the bed"?

She is on the bed in my room. She is in my room on the bed. Which of the above sentences is correct? Why?
Muuu Mu's user avatar
  • 55
0 votes
0 answers
31 views

Which one is better "all incurred expenses" or "all expenses incurred?" [duplicate]

I am writing this document for HR at work and wish to outline what our staff should do to get reimbursed. The sentence should be something along the lines of... All incurred expenses/expenses ...
Khouloud Khamassi's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
66 views

Which wording is correct, “how quick with me you are to anger” or “how quick to anger you are with me”?

I’m trying to figure out which wording is right, or at the very least which one sounds better. How quick to anger you are with me. or How quick with me you are to anger. This is pretty much what’s ...
Kylie Green's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
655 views

Why do we say "narrow artificial intelligence" but "artificial general intelligence"?

When discussing artificial intelligence, we often distinguish between "narrow artificial intelligence" and "artificial general intelligence". Why does the word "artificial&...
tparker's user avatar
  • 1,215
2 votes
1 answer
85 views

Why does emphasis of "it" allow phrasal verb syntax that would otherwise not be grammatical?

Edit: the answer cited with the closure doesn't answer the question I posed; it merely reinforces the usual placement of the pronoun. Consider the phrase dash it off. I dashed it off without thinking ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 22.1k
-1 votes
2 answers
64 views

Is the position of "sufficient surface area" correct in "allowing large volumes of water sufficient surface area to seep back into the ground"?

I found one passage that I really cannot understand the grammar structure. The below is the problematic sentence. The crates feature voids, allowing large volumes of water sufficient surface area to ...
Gen Kurokawa's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
104 views

Who is being fed in "Did hourly feed him by" from Walden, or, Life in the Woods? [duplicate]

There was a shepherd that did live, ⁠And held his thoughts as high As were the mounts whereon his flocks ⁠Did hourly feed him by From Walden, or, Life in the Woods by Henry David Thoreau I'm confused ...
ronald christenkkson's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
58 views

'Only recently were they' and 'Only recently they were' [duplicate]

Only recently (in February 1998) women’s ice hockey was incorporated into the Olympic Winter Games, while men’s ice hockey has been a fixed event ever since the first Winter Games started in 1924. ...
user481833's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
56 views

Which of these possible multi-choice answers is correct and why? [duplicate]

A Chinese teacher of English asked me about the following, taken from an English test for Chinese people. It's quite tricky I think. I would like to know three things: Which answer or answers do you ...
Pedroski's user avatar
  • 101
0 votes
1 answer
144 views

When can compound verbs be split? [duplicate]

Is it wrong to say: He took the hat off. when you could keep the compound verb “took off” together? He took off the hat. And is the rule changed at all by more words being placed in the phrase? ...
Lonely Guy's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
50 views

The order in trio <noun>, required, to

These two possible combinations confuse me: The energy required to heat the water is... The required energy to heat the water is... I have always used the first combination, but the AI grammar ...
Pygmalion's user avatar
  • 213
0 votes
2 answers
82 views

Why do we keep using the conjugated form of the verb "to do" before other verbs? [duplicate]

This seriously has me perplexed. I feel examples would better explain my question: "What did you eat?" vs "What ate you?" * Where did you go? vs "Where went you"? using ...
Cadmus's user avatar
  • 11
0 votes
2 answers
84 views

Order of words in "...has not only been..." [closed]

What's the correct order of the words in "...has not only been..."? My original sentence: My world not only has been turned inside out, but it’s also become increasingly bizarre. One of my ...
user479249's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
107 views

Does word order matter in “…(that) we do in the same manner” vs “…in the same manner (that) we do”?

Are both these sentences grammatically accurate and can they be used interchangeably? It is dangerous for ecologists to assume other species sense the environment we do in the same manner. It is ...
nina's user avatar
  • 11
-1 votes
2 answers
157 views

soon need, or need soon?

I was reading a story when there was the following sentence fragment, "..., it was nothing like what we would need soon." I respect this author and I believe he is careful with his words and ...
CGCampbell's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
105 views

Word order: Tucker Carlson’s Exit Shows Who’s the Real Star at Fox

I saw this headline at the Politico web site: "Tucker Carlson’s Exit Shows Who’s the Real Star at Fox". Shouldn't it be "Tucker Carlson’s Exit Shows Who the Real Star at Fox Is"? I ...
eltomito's user avatar
  • 1,620
1 vote
2 answers
53 views

Does 'commonly' modify a verb in this sentence from Walden?

In the first chapter of Walden, Thoreau writes: The most interesting dwellings in this country, as the painter knows, are the most unpretending, humble log huts and cottages of the poor commonly; it ...
John Smith's user avatar
  • 1,758
0 votes
4 answers
360 views

In the Wizard of Oz, the scarecrow sings, "If I only had a brain." Doesn't he really mean, "If only I had a brain"? [duplicate]

In the Wizard of Oz, the scarecrow sings, "If I only had a brain." Doesn't he really mean, "If only I had a brain"? I think the sentence the scarecrow sings actually asks what it ...
Merle Hertzler's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
38 views

Position of the word "being"

In the following sentence: This is the setting where such a phenomenon appears, being ((example)) a first important example. Is the position of the word "being" correct? Is the following ...
user477528's user avatar
-1 votes
2 answers
92 views

Phrasal-verb word order

Cambridge Dictionary says that we must only put the particles of phrasal verbs after the object if the object is a personal pronoun. Now, I really would like you to prove my thought about it, viz.: ...
Mr realtor's user avatar

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