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Questions tagged [word-order]

This tag is for questions about the correct order of words in a phrase, or a sentence.

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Word order for a split verb

If I have a split verb, such as "pick up" and I am a addressing a third person, I can say either: I will pick Fred up at 11am. Or: I will pick up Fred at 11am. For the second person, we have: ...
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22 views

When should I use “Figure out the rest” vs “figure the rest out”? Does it matter?

I'm writing something where a character tells someone else vaguely something that that she did in the past and then tacks on "I'll let you figure out the rest" at the end. Then some of the notes of ...
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0answers
12 views

Is this right? Send to somone in his sister birthday?

happy birthday for her, I wish she has 100 years as beautiful as she is .. I’m sure she’s lucky and proud to be her brother OR happy birthday for her, I wish she has beautiful years as she is .. I’...
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1answer
35 views

“Used Credit” or “Credit Used” [closed]

Which one is correct: "Used Credit" or "Credit Used"? The context is that you have a specific amount of credit limit and you want to say how much of that credit amount has been used.
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1answer
26 views

Is “strictly” in the right place in this sentence? (“will strictly be dealt with”)

Those who do not reach the venue by 9 AM, will strictly be dealt with a penalty. Is the above sentence grammatically correct? Specifically the positioning of 'strictly'
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42 views

Kings & Queens or Queens & Kings? [duplicate]

I've been asked by one of my students why "queens and kings" is not correct but "kings and queens" is. Aside from saying it's a collocation, I'm wondering if anybody has any more information on this. ...
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36 views

What's the order of two equivalent adjectives (e.g. 'Short and stout')? [duplicate]

I am wondering if there is some sort of general rule on how to sort adjectives. I am aware that there is a rule (see here) on how to order adjectives, but I couldn't find a rule regarding adjectives ...
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22 views

Word order of sentences with “included”

For the participle "included", there are two options that both sound similar to me. However, one option might be preferred above the other. It might also be that there is an underlying grammatical ...
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1answer
23 views

Where to put the parentheses in the sentence?

I want to add extra information in my sentence for the sake of clarity by using parentheses. Should I put them at the end or right after the word(s) they are related to? For example, which of the ...
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0answers
39 views

What is the proper word order of propositions of time, venue, day and date in an English sentence? [closed]

Our next meeting will take place at 9am in room 200 on Monday, November 12th. What is the proper order of the above? Our next meeting will take place at [venue], [time], [day], [date] or [venue], [...
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3answers
91 views

“should always have been done”/“should have made”/ should have been always done” [closed]

So I'm doing a coffeemaker advert in English and it is not my native language. I think you have to know the idea behind this sentence so you can help me to get this grammatically and ideally right. ...
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1answer
44 views

Adjective order with dead & pregnant

I have just listened to a presentation to adjective order in my linguistics class, however, it failed to answer my question. Would an English speaker say "this is a dead pregnant cat" or "this is a ...
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2answers
78 views

“It can be really exciting” vs. “it can really be exciting”

I bumped into a question concerning the place where the "really" should be. I get confused because Google seems to have more results for "it can be really exciting", so I wonder which one is correct....
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2answers
60 views

How do you explain the usage of “it” in the sentences below? [duplicate]

Could you explain the usage of it in the following sentences? I don't like it when you speak like this. I hate it when you speak like this. I know it for certain that he is in town now. He owes it ...
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1answer
48 views

What is the difference between the questions below

Could you explain the difference between "When do you think he will come?" and "How do you think when will he come?". Why only the first one is grammatically correct and the second is wrong? Why can't ...
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0answers
22 views

Position of 'both' or 'equally' in regard to prepositions (to both reassure OR both to reassure)

1) This helps both to reassure existing users and (to) attract new users. 2) This helps to both reassure existing users and (to) attract new users. I'm pretty sure the second one is a correct ...
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4answers
98 views

“Is there” or “there is”?

Do I need to use "is there" or "there is" in the following sentence? It is natural to ask under which conditions is there a subtype relation between two given arrow types. If I change "is" to "...
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1answer
47 views

Enumerating verbs where just one is used with preposition: correct placement?

I need some advice about the proper placement of the preposition "on" in the following sentence: This is a tool used for creating, collaborating on, and presenting design prototypes. In my ...
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2answers
99 views

Which is right: “The cream cheese comes with the bagel” or “The bagel comes with the cream cheese”?

My friends and I got into an argument about which sentence is right: "The cream cheese comes with the bagel" or "The bagel comes with the cream cheese". What is the exact meaning of each of these ...
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1answer
27 views

Can adjectives be placed before gerunds?

My question relates to the possibility of placing an adjective before a gerund if a sentence begins with the gerund. For example, I'd like to prepare a list of my skills for a CV like 'Brief reading ...
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2answers
97 views

In pirate speak, do you say “be ye warned”, or “ye be warned”? [closed]

In pirate speak, do you say be ye warned or ye be warned ?
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1answer
151 views

What is the correct interpretation of “Crazy Rich Asians”?

There is more than one way to interpret the title of the hit film "Crazy Rich Asians." In the film it is suggested that "crazy rich" means "impossibly rich," but as written it could also mean crazy (...
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0answers
33 views

Why “milk and sugar”, but rarely “sugar and milk”? [duplicate]

For example "Adam and Eve" is (almost) never said as "Eve and Adam". Making tea: "milk or sugar", but rarely "sugar or milk". Elevator: "up or down" is more common than "down or up". Some groupings ...
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1answer
510 views

Using 'not only… but also'

Could someone please suggest me which one of the below two options is correct in terms of usage of 'Not only but also'. Feel free to suggest an alternative option. Not only does it justice to both, ...
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1answer
143 views

Is the phrase “the ease at which / the ease by which …” correct

1) ** Is it correct to follow "ease" with "at which" such as in "The **ease at which you can carry this bag depends on the angle you hold it from" 2) Does anyone have a good source recommendation ...
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2answers
53 views

difference between “remains only” and “only remains”

I wrote the following in an article. It remains only to eliminate the intersections which can be proven to be empty. My proofreader corrected to the following by changing the word order. It ...
2
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2answers
91 views

“British female students” or “female British students”?

Which is more correct between "British female students" and "female British students"? I have found examples of both - even the Daily Mail renders it both ways.
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2answers
70 views

Beginning a sentence with “of”

Do these two sentences have the same meaning? Of this spiritual world, our world is an imperfect image. Our world is an imperfect image of this spiritual world.
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2answers
75 views

How do you use “which” when asking a question

I am wondering how to state this question and do not know which one is correct so is #1 correct or #2 correct or are they both grammatically fine? Ferrous metals contain which element? Which element ...
1
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1answer
26 views

Order of Adjectives: “quantitative reverse transcription…” vs. “reverse transcription quantitative…” [duplicate]

This is a general question with no specific sentence in mind. If a string of 2 or 3 attributive adjectives (or attributive nouns?) are used in a sentence, they generally follow a particular order (e.g....
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1answer
38 views

Usage of “even” in multiple positions

Earlier today, I read a sentence that said: This medication can even cure HIV. The context was very simple, the medication has many uses to the point it could cure a currently incurable disease, ...
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1answer
185 views

solid black line vs black dashed line [duplicate]

I am describing a chart and got confused about my intuition and Google results. So I'd usually refer to a "solid black line" and there are 1,130,000 results (with quotes) for that against 320,000 for ...
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2answers
46 views

Use of 'in pair' or 'in group' in a sentence

I am really confused about this case now since I can't find a satisfying answer with Google. It is a minor case, but still, I want to understand it better. Please tell me which of the following are ...
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1answer
325 views

“may even have” or “may have even”?

Is either of these 'more correct'? She may even have pre-empted us. She may have even pre-empted us. Is it purely a case of which sounds better in any case, or are there specific rules?
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1answer
573 views

“Whether or not…” vs. “whether… or not”

I'm confused with the placement of 'or not' with 'whether' in a sentence. E.g. I'm not sure whether I should go or not. I'm not sure whether or not I should go. Whether you stay or ...
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2answers
43 views

Where should I put the adverb “always” in these narrations?

Look at these two statements involving indirect (reported) speech: He advised me to speak the truth always. or He advised me to always speak the truth. Here, I am confused about setting the ...
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2answers
86 views

Adjectival order: “a style appropriate for” or “an appropriate style for”

I would like to understand the correct grammatical order in the sentence, In your essay, you must use grammatically correct sentences with accurate spelling and punctuation in a style appropriate ...
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1answer
39 views

Correct location for title Director?

Correct usage of department director? Example: Director of Human Resources Human Resources Director
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23 views

You need to write method followed by elements - what is the correct order here? [duplicate]

This is my first post so pardon me if I'm not posting at the right place, still navigating around. English being my second language, the "followed by" term has always confused me and I could never ...
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2answers
61 views

Is it better to write “the affected people” or “the people affected”? [closed]

Which (if any) is better: We have spoken with the affected people. We have spoken with the people affected. Thanks in advance.
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1answer
88 views

Who is referred to whom?

In my business, sometimes clients I have done work for will provide my name and contact information to other, potential clients. I send a Thank You card to the referring (original) client. What ...
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3answers
58 views

“Won't everyone be amazed” [closed]

I wonder why the word order of this phrase is reversed in the sentence below: won't everyone be amazed. But if he somehow can pull off this trick, boy oh boy, won’t everyone be amazed. This is ...
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2answers
124 views

“In only the city” or “Only in the city”

I am a foreign English student and have a question regarding the placement of only in a sentence. I wrote You can do all these things in only that city in an exam, which is apparently wrong. But ...
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0answers
48 views

How many “of” is allowed? How to reposition nouns correctly?

Facing this, I am not sure that I know the right answer. At the university, I was taught that only 2 prepositions "of" are allowed to be sounding natural. If it comes to translation from Russian into ...
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1answer
51 views

Putting “to do..” at the beginning?

There are some sentences 1-) I see no reason to do these stupid things. 2-) I can find no sensible explanation for you to leave your master program. An English professor from Canada at the ...
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0answers
57 views

Where to put the adverb “automatically”

Which of the following two sentences is better English and why? (1) "This email has been sent automatically." or: (2) "This email has been automatically sent." I would prefer (1) because it ...
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0answers
166 views

Proper Usage of Nicknames?

I’m already aware that nicknames are usually incorporated into the larger name between the first and last names — John “Jack” Doe, for example — and that this is essentially standard usage. When you ...
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77 views

“Can you show a useful book for anyone who is interested in astronomy?”

-"Can you show a useful book for anyone who is interested in astronomy?" (This question has been considered to be asked in a library or a bookshop) What does this sentence mean? I think the ...
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33 views

Should have/Would have - simple problem

I understand that should have/would have etc. are used to refer to something unrealistic or contrary to what has really happened. I do, however, have several questions. I know that this form is most ...
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0answers
25 views

Can we use the preposition “to” in the middle when they refer to a noun?

The question is "Can we use "to" in the middle of a sentence?". Sometimes, infinitives can refer to nouns and in that case, they should be next to nouns they refer to. If there is another object in ...