Questions tagged [relative-pronouns]

Relative pronouns introduce relative clauses that clarify or specify the antecedent. For example, in "Trees, which are plants, need sunlight to grow," the word "which" is a relative pronoun.

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Which of the following three sentences is correct…? [closed]

I just want to purchase the products which I earlier told you we usually purchase from Flipkart. I just want to purchase the products which I earlier told you which we usually purchase from Flipkart. ...
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Who or whom in a sentence with multiple verbs

Would it be correct to use "who" or "whom" in the following sentence? Industrialization in the USSR did not provide a better life for many soviets, especially the peasants, who(m) ...
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What is the subject of the relative pronoun of that?

'Featuring floral patterns, religious symbols, and messages of hope, the painted henna crowns are amazing substitutes for the hats and wigs that the cancer patients would otherwise use to cover their ...
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Relative pronoun where vs which usage

The ABC hotel, ______(a relative adverb/pronoun) Felix had suggested to me, was really a nice place to stay. I wonder if both "where" and "which" are correct here. In my opinion, ...
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those who(m) he thought were guilty

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Page 466) says: a. those whom he thought were guilty b. those who he thought were guilty Here who(m) is subject of the content clause functioning as ...
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3answers
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Meaning of 'it would be hard to overstate' [closed]

What does "it would be hard to overstate" refer to in the following sentence? What is the meaning of that phrase? Plato also, of course, portrays Socrates as a dauntless man of principle who ...
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shalt: used with the pronoun thou or its relative equivalent

Shalt is used with the pronoun thou or its relative equivalent https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/shalt What does relative equivalent mean here?
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A relative pronoun acting as both object and subject?

I don't want to do anything you think might be good for me. This is something he said was good for me. In the first sentence, the relative pronoun between anything and you think is omitted as it ...
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She invited me to go with them, which I'd quite like to (do)

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language , in Chapter 17 Deixis and anaphora, says (Page 1526): Is [iv] well-formed? How about adding do after to as follows? She invited me to go with them, ...
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Why does these sentences could omit relative pronoun as a subject pronoun?

These sentences have perplexed me about leaving relative pronoun in relative clause. I learn that we can not omit relative pronoun when this pronoun is subject. So why in these two sentences, both ...
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Relative pronoun vs. relative adverb [duplicate]

[1] "That picture was taken in the park where I used to play." (Here, 'where' is an relative adverb. [2] "I remember the day when we first met." (Here, 'when' is an relative adverb.) ...
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Can “who'd” be used as a relative pronoun?

I was doing this question: 17. Although pharmaceutical companies that begun to produce the drug learned that taxol could be extracted from the bark of all species of yewr, they soon focused their ...
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which is correct?: [whom vs. who] he claimed gave him bad directions

I came across an article titled: “Man admits murdering 2 whom he claimed gave him bad directions” (https://www.google.co.kr/amp/s/www.deseret.com/platform/amp/2011/8/16/20386522/man-admits-...
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Non-restrictive vs Sentential Relative Clause

I love my father, who is a teacher. "Who is a teacher" is a non-defining or non-restrictive relative clause. He failed the test, which shocked everyone. "Which shocked everyone" is ...
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How : neither a relative pronoun nor a relative adverb

Relative pronoun : who, whom, whose, which, that Relative adverb : when, where, why Is "how" neither a relative pronoun nor a relative adverb? Is 'how' only a subordinating conjunction in a ...
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Coordinating Conjunction vs subordinating conjunction. Who, Which Vs and it/that

I have a question about conjunctions, dependent and independent clauses. The issue came up when a text book suggests that "and it" can replace "which/who". But my understanding is that subordinating ...
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that as conjunction

According to https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/that, the article introduces that as a form of conjunction. However, it seems to me that the following two sentences do not have same structures. For ...
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Why is 'which' the correct relative pronoun in this sentence, and not 'when'..?

At ten to nine, which is just before the exam begins, please make sure you assemble outside the hall. This sentence is giving me a headache. The relative pronoun refers to the time ten to nine so why ...
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Sentence starting with accusative case

"Whom the gods would destroy they first make mad" In this sentence "whom" is used at the beginning where subject is normally placed, but why is it in accusative case? It's should be in the nominative ...
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Question related to pronoun and articles

Which relative pronoun is used for anyone and someone, Who or that? In my grammar book it is written to use "that" after the words like all, same, any, none, nothing. One more question. The ...
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Are Relative pronouns or Relative adverbs Subordinating Conjunctions?

"It is a song that my mother taught me." This sentence consists of : (1) a main clause : "It is a song". (2) a subordinate/dependent clause : "that my mother taught me". (3) A relative pronoun or a ...
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92 views

Don't be trapped by dogma, which is living with the results of other people's thinking

From a speech by Steve Jobs: a. Don't be trapped by dogma, which is living with the results of other people's thinking. If the sentence is to work syntactically, dogma has to be the antecedent of ...
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Usage of the relative pronoun 'what'

In my grammar books it's written the relative pronoun 'What' is used only in singular. Does this mean It's used just with a singular nouns. For ex, "What goal you want to accomplish" is a correct ...
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there is a single person whose/whom/who being a person contains the events of his career

'And': Conjunction Reduction Redux By Barry Schein (linguist) has this passage: How natural does whose sound? Can you use who or whom instead? If this were a personal pronoun, the nominative wouldn'...
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“None so blind as they/them that will not see”

In the following sentence which pronoun to use: None so blind as ____ that will not see. (they, them) Which one and why?
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Question regarding pronoun in “Let you and I/me …”

In my grammar book the answer for the following sentence is 'me' Let you and ___ try what we can do ( I,me) Why can't I use "I"? Both subjects seems to be in nominative case.
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Have you been influenced all you can ever be influenced? [How are the preceding and the following clauses connected?]

How would you rephrase 'all you can ever be influenced'? (In) all (that) or (in) all (where)? To me this 'all' seems like a relative adverb but no old school grammar book has 'all' explained as a ...
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Relative pronoun or elipsis ? : 'for those who the disease seeks to attack'

This sentence was spoken recently in the British House of Lords : It would be wrong of me to mislead the house by pretending that there was an easy way out of this epidemic for those who the disease ...
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fused relative word (whatever, whoever) + the hell/on earth

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language has presented five reasons for classifying ungoverned open exhaustive conditionals not as fused relatives but as open interrogatives, and the fourth ...
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Can we use 'what' as a relative pronoun in formal english?

Is the following sentence grammatically correct? A stone what rolls gathers no moss.
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can we use “which” after troops?

which of the following is correct? Rome was threatened by Hunnish troops who showed their superiority ...... Rome was threatened by Huniish troops which showed their superiority ..... Is troops a ...
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“teams which” or “teams who” [duplicate]

It is my understanding that you should use the relative pronoun "who" when addressing people. So what would be correct for a group of people? "Jessica is the head of several teams which work on ..." ...
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Repeating relative pronouns

Is it generally permissible to repeat relative pronouns regardless of the type of pronoun and regardless of the relative clause being restrictive or not? What I mean by that can be seen in the ...
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about relative pronoun

I am wondering whether the omission of the relative pronouns is correct for the following sentence: Older adults who are more socially isolated are more likely to experience depression. Older adults ...
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Does the word “that” refer to “features” or “windows 9x”?

Microsoft built a number of features into Windows 9x that allow previous users of DOS and Windows 3.x to capitalize on their investment and that allow technicians access to DOS-based troubleshooting....
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The meaning of ‘How’ in this conversation

I am not sure about meaning of “how” in the below conversation. (English is my second language so I can’t understand details) Someone: Do you remember we invited people to our house last month? Me: ...
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What’s a better preposition in this sentence?

I know the word, “where,” in this sentence isn't correct, but I'm not sure what to suggest: Spread joy this season with our exclusive holiday sweater, where 25% of all sales will benefit (charity ...
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relative pronoun at the beginning of the sentence

"To you (Right Honorable my very good Lord) of right do they belong: for to whom shall I rather present the first fruits of my learning than to your Lordship: who nourished then both me and them, when ...
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relative word choice: as or which

Yet climbing Ayers Rock, as most other Australians knew the vast red monolith until recently, has long been a favoured pastime of tourists. source - Is it better to use "which "instead of "as "in "...
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The way which you should hold them

The Cambridge Grammar of the english Language, page 224, reads Complements are most often NPs, and conversely NPs are usually complements. Some NPs can occur with adjunct function, but they tend ...
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What is the grammatical function of “which” in this sentence? [duplicate]

I am trying to understand various instances in Hansard, the documentation of proceedings in the UK parliament, wherein the word which is used in an unusual (by my modern parlance, at least) position, ...
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Omitting Relative Pronoun and verb “be” [duplicate]

Could someone please explain, why the pronoun and the verb "be" are omitted in the following sentence? "it allows communication even for people far away from each other" Shouldn't this sentence be "...
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Why 'which' and not 'who'

As a choir singer I studied Arvo Pärt's composition "Which was the Son of...", text exracted from the Bible (Luke 3,23-38). It's simply Christ's genealogy. I was surprised that the relative pronoun ...
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antecedent for “which” [duplicate]

Fridges were especially useful for storing perishable substances such as milk, which had previously been the cause of thousands of deaths every year in the big cities of the world. In the above ...
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relative pronouns: “where I'd never been before” or “to which I'd never been before”?

I did an exercise, and there was a sentence that make me confused. Can you help me with it. Yesterday we visited the City Museum, (______) I'd never been before. There are 4 answers to chose: ...
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Relative pronoun omission (be + adj)

I knew some rules about relative pronoun and how to omit. e.g. The teacher who teaches us. => The teacher teaching us. The cup which was broken by my brother. => The cup broken by my brother. ...
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a relative pronoun/adverb as an adverbial

He collects some cars that are antique. I know the relative pronoun “that” is the subject of “are” here. This is the letter (that) my mother sent me. I know the relative pronoun “that” is the ...
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Relative pronoun What after a preposition

Is the last sentece correct? Children learn something. Children live with something. Children learn with what they live. I don't feel comfortable the preposition with which locates in front of ...
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Relative pronoun “that” with “the only” in the antecedent [duplicate]

I heard "That" should be used after superlative adjectives and other determiners like all, same, any, none, nothing, only, everything little, much and no. But in this sentence Those who wish to ...
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'What I have presented is the first steps' or 'What I have presented are the first steps'

Which is correct: 'What I have presented is the first steps' or 'What I have presented are the first steps'? The issues is what counts as the subject of the verb: the relative 'What' (= is), or ...

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