Questions tagged [relative-pronouns]

Relative pronouns introduce relative clauses that clarify or specify the antecedent. For example, in "Trees, which are plants, need sunlight to grow," the word "which" is a relative pronoun.

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11 views

Which one is correct? “A bird was on the box, from which/where it flew to the ground” [duplicate]

I would like to know whether I should use "from where" or "from which" in the following sentence: A bird was on the box, from which/where it flew to the ground
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Is there any difference in meaning between “how” and “what” when each is used to start a subordinate clause? [migrated]

Is there any difference between how and what in the following sentence? Anny was just telling Wendy how she liked to eat the ice cream at the shop. Anny was just telling Wendy what she liked to eat ...
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parse of “I'm not sure who to turn to for advice.”

I'm not sure who to turn to for advice. 1) "To turn to for advice" is not a relative clause. 2) "Who" is not a relative pronoun for the relative clause "to turn to for advice". 3) "Who to turn to ...
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a relative pronoun/adverb as an adverbial

He collects some cars that are antique. I know the relative pronoun “that” is the subject of “are” here. This is the letter (that) my mother sent me. I know the relative pronoun “that” is the ...
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Comma between two embedded relative clauses introduced by a verb, starting with relative pronouns, and connected with a conjunction?

Consider the following sentence: But the question of how to make sure that software is written effectively(,) and at the same time that it works correctly in all cases is bothering many software ...
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33 views

Relative pronoun What after a preposition

Is the last sentece correct? Children learn something. Children live with something. Children learn with what they live. I don't feel comfortable the preposition with which locates in ...
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The Usage of “in Which”?

Q: "The nuclear family was long held in esteem by society as being the ideal in which to raise children: CAN IT BE RE-WRITTEN AS: "The nuclear family was long held in esteem by society as being the ...
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23 views

Relative pronoun “that” with “the only” in the antecedent [duplicate]

I heard "That" should be used after superlative adjectives and other determiners like all, same, any, none, nothing, only, everything little, much and no. But in this sentence Those who wish to ...
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Relative pronouns for human beings [closed]

I haven't been able to find an instance of this structure with who as the relative pronoun. Only with that, if at all. Would it be correct? He's the best friend I've ever had. She's the ...
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1answer
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'What I have presented is the first steps' or 'What I have presented are the first steps'

Which is correct: 'What I have presented is the first steps' or 'What I have presented are the first steps'? The issues is what counts as the subject of the verb: the relative 'What' (= is), or ...
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42 views

What does the phrase “it has been” mean in the sentence?

I came across a headline on a website yesterday, saying: "Razer Huntsman Elite is the cheapest it has been in the UK, at £158." I think I can roughly understand the sentence (Razer Huntsman Elite ...
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When are interrogative pronouns (or relative pronouns) needed in this context?

Look at the dictionary meanings below. I have copied them from the New Oxford American English Dictionary (the application for the dictionary on my Macintosh laptop): pedant: (noun) a person who is ...
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23 views

“That of” usage

I want to know if we can use "that of" as a relative pronoun in following situations. 1) The percentage of male smokers always outnumbers that of females. 2) Although the proportion of male ...
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42 views

Omitting whose in relative clauses [closed]

I know object defining relative pronouns can be omitted. But I cannot figure out whether whose is object or subject of the sentences.
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2answers
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When can a subjective relative pronoun and the verb “be” not be omitted in a sentence?

There have always been recommendations which are made to athletes. I know "which are" can be omitted in the above sentence. Also, I learned that a subjective relative pronoun and the verb "be" cannot ...
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42 views

double negative - no one ~ who hadn't also

No one would want to be famous who hadn't also, somewhere in the past, been made to feel extremely insignificant. Is the sentence a double negative? Is "who" a relative pronoun which modifies "one"? ...
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“Of” and Relative Pronouns

I wonder whether the following sentences are correct: The two strands of economic theory, which are used in this article, are endogenous growth and spread-backwash effects. The two strands, which ...
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368 views

Is “that which” grammatical in the sentence “I have that which I should have told you summers ago”, and if so, how?

This is my first question although I have been reading you for a long time. My question is: can that which be used with the meaning of something? For me, that is a demonstrative pronoun, so you can ...
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Using which or where to refer to place

A student I have been volunteering with wrote the following in his essay: We really enjoyed the cruise and also the islands where we visited last week. To my ear the use of where doesn't sound ...
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1answer
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You are too concerned with what was and what will be

Here's a quote from the movie 'Kung Fu Panda': Quit. Don't quit. Noodles. Don't noodles. You are too concerned with what was and what will be. There's a saying: "Yesterday is history, tomorrow is a ...
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Why some prepositions are inserted before the relative noun, others are not? [closed]

For example: 1.This is the book about which I know nothing 2.this is the person who he likes.
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1answer
45 views

Can I delete the relative pronoun here? [closed]

I want to say, "For the ones who I care and who cares about you." Is this admittable to say like this? And I have one more question to ask. Can I say, "for the ones I care and who cares about you"?...
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4answers
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Can the relative word 'what' mean “the person(s) that/who”? If so, when can it and when can it not?

The fused relative word 'what' generally means "the thing(s) that/which". But there are some instances where this 'what' seems to refer to "person(s)" as in these examples: (1) From a Bustle article ...
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1answer
37 views

restrictive relative pronoun clause and antecedent

The Plaintiff claims that the Defendant, MICHAEL DOE, owed a duty to the Plaintiff, which duty was breached by the said Defendant, the particulars of which breach are as follows: (a) driving ...
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3answers
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Usage of Prepositions + Relative Pronouns

I am going crazy because of prepositions + relative pronouns. Here are some examples and please read and tell me if in the way that I have understood is right or not. (1) Do you know the date when ...
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What does “that” refer to in “Instagram is an online photo-sharing and social networking service that enables…”?

What does the word "that" in the sentence refer to? Instagram is an online photo-sharing and social networking service that enables its users to take pictures, apply digital filters to it...
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What is a relative pronoun's referent when it follows a prepositional phrase?

For example: Stella Adler trained several generations of actors who include Marlon Brando and Robert De Niro. Does who in this example refer to actors or generations? Stella Adler trained several ...
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Did prescriptivists make up pied-piping in relative infinitive constructions?

A quick Internet search suggests that pied-piping in relative clauses was a natural feature of English even though it is loved by prescriptivists; it existed in older stages of the language, and it ...
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Does a relative pronoun really combine the function of a pronoun with that of a conjunction?

Oxford Living Dictionaries defines 'relative pronoun' as follows: (Originally) a pronoun which refers to an antecedent, as a demonstrative or personal pronoun; (now) specifically a pronoun which ...
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107 views

Omitting which is?

When I was writing an essay, I thought about saying: "There is nothing that is more important than . . ." , then I googled it, but it appears the following sentence is more popular. "There is ...
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1answer
360 views

Identifying the main clause and subordinate clauses

I’m preparing for my exam and in one of the practice questions i have to identify the main clause, subordinate clause/s and the subject,predicate and/or adverbials. the sentence is: "The Mausoleum ...
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45 views

My understanding about the non-restrictive use of the relative clause in a partcular sentence

Almost every chinese who works at an iPhone manifacture in China usually uses a china-produced phone, which is way cheaper. I just want to make sure if my understanding especially about the non-...
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Subject verb agreement when “one of” used

Are these two sentences correct? One of the employees who is worker at KP is here. One of the employees who are workers at KP is here. What is the context of who in both the sentences?
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2answers
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The 'what' problem

'What seems enjoyable to you seems troublesome to me' I have a problem with 'what'. I know 'what' in the sentence is a pronoun but I can't figure out what type of pronoun it's supposed to be. I do ...
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3answers
181 views

What exactly falls under the label of “complement”?

There seems to be a lot of contradicting beliefs out there regarding complements and what they cover -- or maybe I am just confusing myself. However, I cannot seem to find an answer that I understand. ...
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which or who in “the body, authority, entity or person which establishes”

... the body, authority, entity or person which establishes... Is it correct to use "which" in this case? Or should it rather be "who", since the last element of the list is a person?
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313 views

Can the relative pronoun “where” be omitted in a relative clause with the preposition “in”? [duplicate]

Can the following sentences: It's the church where the painting burned./It's the church in which the painting burned. be transformed so that they do not contain the pronoun which/where in the ...
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1answer
275 views

“whose” and “of which”

I have a question about the usage of "whose" and "of which". I have learned that a. Do you see the mountain whose top is covered with snow? and b. Do you see the mountain the top of which is ...
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Here’s the note which I think (that?) he said (that?) she wrote

Is the following sentence grammatical? "Here’s the note which I think that he said that she wrote" Otherwise, I suspect neither that should appear, am I right?
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Is “I am who(m) God made me” grammatical?

SAH asked an interesting question about case, I am [who/whom] G-d made me, but one issue that came up in the comments repeatedly is that many people said that they find the example sentence ...
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Relative pronoun, the use of comma, and subject verb agreement

Ex. There are many interesting stories attached to the drink, which exclusively belong to the brand only. Is above sentence correct? Or it should be Ex. There are many interesting stories attached ...
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dislocation with 'whoever' or 'whatever'

CaGEL* has this section on 'dislocation' (Page 1411): Can the dislocated NP be in the form of a fused relative construction headed by 'whoever' or 'whatever'? Specifically, in the following set of ...
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What vs. which as relative pronouns in relative clauses

When are you supposed to use "what" vs. "which" as a relative pronoun in a relative clause? According to Purdue's Online Writing Lab: The most common relative pronouns are who/whom, whoever/...
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Syntax of fused relative construction with 'what'

I really liked what she wrote. According to CaGEL* (Page 1073), what she wrote is not a clause but a noun phrase (NP). The reason I believe is that the head of what she wrote is not the clause she ...
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Can a word function as a relative adverb and a relative pronoun simultaneously?

For example in a sentence like "This is the place where he was murdered", is where functioning as both a relative adverb and a relative pronoun? Here where acts as pronoun as it refers back to its ...
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Can a noun be both a subject and an object at the same time?

John Knight, who/whom I spoke to yesterday, seemed to be rather irritable. In this sentence, John Knight is an object because I (the subject) am speaking to him; however, he is also a subject since ...
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Preposition + relative clause - “This is the house about which I told you.”

This is the house about which I told you. In the above sentence, the relative pronoun "which" is considered to be the prepositional complement of the preposition "about". 1.) If the relative pronoun ...
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Is it “That's the family that is moving in…” or “That's (they're?) the family who is (are?) moving in…”?

I know that 'who' refers to people and 'that' refers to things. But what about when the thing IS people, such as a family? Would I say, "That's the family that is moving in next door soon.", or "That'...
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Help with punctuation in non-restrictive clauses

Would someone be kind enough to tell me whether the sentence below is OK, considering that 'fashioned' is a past tense verb, 'believe' is a present tense verb, and refuse' is also a present tense verb....
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Using 'that' to refer to a clause

I was studying about the uses of that where I stumbled upon this common mistake pertinent to the use of 'that'. For e.g: The goalkeeper blocked two penalty kicks in the second half, and that ...