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Questions tagged [relative-pronouns]

Relative pronouns introduce relative clauses that clarify or specify the antecedent. For example, in "Trees, which are plants, need sunlight to grow," the word "which" is a relative pronoun.

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Analysis of the following sentence: "The front door was open, which concerned me". What is the function of "which"? [duplicate]

I am trying to understand the grammatical structure of the following sentence, specifically the usage of "which": The front door was open, which concerned me. Is this a grammatically ...
PrimeNumbers's user avatar
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Should "than," "like," and "as" be followed by "who" or "whom"?

Before anyone comments that "whom" is not necessary in the English language anymore and that I can just use "who" all the time instead, I'll say that my dialect always uses "...
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What’s going on with John 7:16, “My teaching is not my own, but his who sent me”?

This seems unusual. Particularly, the odd part is “his who.” Is it correct to use a possessive and a relative pronoun in this way? If so, what similar phrases are also allowed? It seems like this is ...
Matthew Cortese's user avatar
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Relative pronoun in sentences with emphasis

This sentence sounds wrong to my ear, and I would have used "that" instead of "which". So what is it about "preventative" which had usage commenters of earlier times ...
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Grammar analysis of ‘the amount of money there is to be made’

the amount of money there is to be made Here between ‘money‘ and ‘there’ I guess that a relative pronoun is omitted but I’m not sure whether it is a subjective one or an objective one. I’d appreciate ...
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How Relative Pronouns Work [closed]

A relative pronoun is called "both a conjunction and a pronoun". There are other definitions, but the horribly superficial ones like "connects two sentences" are enough. Why doesn'...
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Adjective clause introduced by a relative pronoun "which" VS Preposition "including"

By now, the extradition bill that had sparked the protests had been withdrawn, but the movement had come up with a list of demands, which included amnesty for arrested protesters, an independent ...
rahul sehrawat's user avatar
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“If you don’t know which book you can buy, we can advise you.”

If you don’t know which book you can buy, we can advise you. In this sentence, is "which book you can buy" a defining relative clause introduced by the subordinator "which" as a ...
Lucy's user avatar
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comma + "which" meaning in a specific context

Consider the following sentence: "This paper introduces a new alternative for generating synthetic data based on images." What I want to say is that "the new alternative" is &...
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2 answers
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Correct use of 'of which'

So, I happened to be reading a grammar book in which I came across this weird looking sentence. This is the car of which parts are not available now. I think it should have been something like this: ...
L Lawliet's user avatar
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1 answer
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Relative clause with genitive and plural

I am a non-native speaker and for this very special example I can't find any explicit rules in the literature: The paths, whose lengths are equal, have been created. Is "whose" the right ...
monoceros84's user avatar
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Prepositions in Relative Clauses: Placement Rules and Exceptions (during which)

"In the form of 'preposition + relative pronoun (whom, which),' we can place the preposition at the end of the phrase. For example: I read a book in which I was interested. (✔) I read a book ...
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Is this usage of "whoever's" acceptable?

This question sparked a long conversation in the ELU chatroom and I figured the crowd might have some additional insight. Is the following sentence correct? Whoever’s car is blocking my driveway must ...
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Is “what” a relative pronoun here? [duplicate]

In the sentence, what is “what”? Relative pronoun? Relative adverb? It was a man in what can only be described as a horrible condition.
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Skipping a relative pronoun

My eyes widen, and I slowly turn toward the elderly gentleman standing at my side. In this sentence, before "standing", "who" is skipped why?
kishore kumar's user avatar
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"as" and "that" interchangeability

This is a sentence from a piece of technical writing I am reviewing, penned by a British author, and I can't help but want to change "that" to "as". That word still means the same ...
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Relative pronoun's position in non-restrictive relative clause

I'm learning the grammar of relative pronouns; I thought all relative pronouns should be at the start of a clause, and then I learned that pronouns can be put after a preposition, as in "The bed ...
Yong's user avatar
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Why is this sentence from The Great Gatsby grammatical?

There's a bird on the lawn that I think must be a nightingale come over on the Cunard or White Star Line. According to my very limited knowledge, shouldn’t it be "which came over" in place ...
rain soupreme's user avatar
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No relative pronoun [duplicate]

I've just come across these 2 examples of no relative pronoun: and They say you cannot leave out relative pronouns in these 2 examples, but I feel like even if the relative pronouns are left out ...
Andrew Fletcher's user avatar
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Relative pronoun THAT and its omission

I recently encountered a grammar problem as follows: "I hope it'll rain tomorrow." "From ( ) you've just said, maybe you don't want to go on the picnic." i. that ii. what iii. ...
user470698's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
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'that' vs. 'which'/'who' when multiple noun phrases are involved

The sentences at issue are: "The company required a way to showcase their product line and its benefits that can not be typically highlighted in a traditional TV commercial." "He ...
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Which part of the first sentence is referenced here with the "which"?

I have the following text: The role of the IS internal audit function should be established by an audit charter approved by the board of directors and the audit committee. Professionals should have a ...
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Why is this use of the relative pronoun incorrect? [duplicate]

A student asked me if they can say: "The crabs are still alive which we caught yesterday." Instead of: "The crabs which we caught yesterday are still alive." The student's example ...
Stacy Liddell's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
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"Way" vs "Ways" in a specific sentence

I'm not sure if "way" or "ways" is correct in this sentence: The ways power is used in factories varies by X, Y, and Z. With X, Y, and Z describing different features of ...
cr0's user avatar
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Relative pronoun qualifies one or more pronouns?

In the sentence "I have a cat and dogs who are dumb", does "who are dumb" qualify only the dogs or does it qualify of the dogs and the cat? Or is it ambiguous? Depending on the ...
Eren8hisfather's user avatar
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Why "am" is used in the sentence "It is useless to me who ___ ill"? [duplicate]

(First let me clearly mention that I am from a non–English-speaking country, so I may be wrong with my question.) My brother encountered a question on his English test: It is useless to me who ___ ...
Rahul Mishra's user avatar
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6 answers
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Is this natural? "There's somebody wants to see you." [duplicate]

I have learned the following sentence is grammatically correct because it is possible to omit the nominative relative pronoun in a sentence like "there is ...". I'm not sure if it is natural ...
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When ‘that’ follows an 𝒳-of-𝒴 subject, which noun phrase does ‘that’ refer to: the first noun phrase 𝒳 or the second noun phrase 𝒴?

I’ve seen those two quite dif­fer­ent us­ages of that fol­low­ing an 𝒳-of-𝒴 prepo­si­tional phrase con­nect­ing two noun phrases 𝒳 and 𝒴 via the prepo­si­tion of, one in which it is used to re­fer ...
Akari's user avatar
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"of whom" vs. "of which" when referring to people AND things

In the following sentence, partners includes both people (such as subject matter experts) and organizations (such as schools): "These courses are taught by our partners, all of [whom/which] are ...
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Is “whose” a true relative pronoun? (and request for the full list of relative pronouns)

The internet is indeed a tangled web, and since anyone can write anything, there is a lot of conflicting information about what is and isn’t a relative pronoun. We all agree that who, whom, that, and ...
Relatively curious's user avatar
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What to do when a relative pronoun seems to be both object and subject? [duplicate]

Consider the following: I congratulate him. He won the race. I congratulate him who won the race. I think these are straight-forward. The object of the main clause becomes the subject of the ...
Marcus's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
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Why is there no relative pronoun in Bronte's sentence?

I have a question for which I hope to get an answer from a professional. My question is: why is there no pronoun in the following sentence in Charolotte Bronte's Jane Eyre, Chapter XXIV? Here is a ...
jerlx's user avatar
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1 answer
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Could someone tell me how to use ‘that which’ together in a sentence? [closed]

I’ve read various sentences in which ‘that which’ is used together.
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Is "the hole where the tooth had been" acceptable [closed]

The hole where the tooth had been was now filled with cotton ( a dentist had just extracted the tooth.) I wrote the sentence, but I hesitated using the relative clause, because I suddenly realized it ...
Robby zhu's user avatar
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1 answer
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Can I use "for which" here?

I'm writing a post, but none of below sentences sounds good to me. This post is a record of the first five weeks that I've exercised in a gym. or This post is a record of the first five weeks for ...
Andy Junghyun Kim's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
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Relative pronoun "that" for plural antecedent? [closed]

Can the relative pronoun "that" be used for a plural antecedent? For example, I would like to know whether the following sentences are gramartically correct or not. I have two cars that are ...
Light Yagmi's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
454 views

The use of What as a relative pronoun

I was doing a TOEFL exercise and I stumbled on this particular error-analysis question: In the Indus Valley, what is now Pakistan and western India, most dwellings had drains for waste disposal. The ...
andrego's user avatar
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1 answer
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Can wh- pronouns function as objects in a wh- clause? [closed]

I've recently become interested in relative pronouns and wh- clauses. During my research, I found out about using relative pronouns as objects. For example ('that' is an object of 'my father'): 'This ...
MJ Ada's user avatar
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2 answers
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Is there a single word that means "each of which"?

I usually use each of which like as follows: One big problem is decomposed into a number of subproblems, each of which implies that blah blah blah. One day, I came across a word in a book that ...
Danny_Kim's user avatar
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Which/ That/ Present Participle

I'm working on the translation of a product packaging. Uses: Boosting liver function which helps cleanse blood plasma, the liquid portion of blood which/that accounts for 55% of its volume. Would it ...
Lala's user avatar
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0 answers
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'Who' and 'That' are not always interchangeable

When using relative clauses, we encounter two types: defining and non-defining. We use commas with the former and not with the latter. We know a lot of people who live in London. John, who speaks ...
Nameless's user avatar
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A simple question about relative clauses

I just don't have a good reserve of names of parts of speech, so the question may be quite soft-ball. I mean to say, "I am the only idiot in this world." Now I want to convey the same ...
ShifuWuzu's user avatar
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Is this a correct usage of "what is"?

A philologist I know constructed a sentence like this: The choice of language was determined by the need of integration of the module in the system, and by the fact that [language] has a large number ...
Kiran97's user avatar
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Do verbs following relative pronouns need to be in the past tense if the sentence begins in the subjunctive?

"I would prefer someone who was a bit more sincere about their beliefs." vs. "I would prefer someone who's a bit more sincere about their beliefs." The second sounds more correct ...
liz's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
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Word class / part of speech of 'whoever' [closed]

I know that the word 'whoever' is a pronoun , but is it a. an indefinite pronounce , b. a relative pronoun , or c. An indefinite relative pronoun- and does such a classification actually exist? Would ...
elstiv's user avatar
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3 answers
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Is "where" the only relative pronoun that cannot be omitted from an adjective clause?

When using adjective clauses, the relative pronoun can be omitted when it is not the subject of the sentence. For example: "She is the person I ran into." In the above example, being the ...
Askeladd's user avatar
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2 answers
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How do 'within' and 'which' form a relative pronoun clause?

Routines offer a structure within which to prepare for performance. I'm having trouble untangling the relative pronoun clause into a sentence of its own. At first glance, the two sentences combined ...
Nate Rivers's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
210 views

How to identify the form and function of the word "that"?

I understand that "that" can be either a relative pronoun or a subordinating conjunction, I just don't understand when. I know that both of these create dependent clauses, and I am pretty ...
TheeGrammarStallion's user avatar
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in a way that everyone will understand

There are a few general principles that apply to all the kinds of teaching. The first principle is that the teacher should be clear. Whatever you are teaching, teach clearly. Discover what your ...
Exp's user avatar
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4 answers
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Use of the pronoun "which"

I have a few silly questions about the use of the pronoun which: In the sentence "A statistical model is a family of probability distributions of a random variable which is smoothly parametrized ...
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