Questions tagged [relative-pronouns]

Relative pronouns introduce relative clauses that clarify or specify the antecedent. For example, in "Trees, which are plants, need sunlight to grow," the word "which" is a relative pronoun.

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46 views

You who think or thinks [duplicate]

Some days ago I heard a teacher saying the sentence: I want to talk to you who thinks differently from the crowd. It sounded unnatural, but if you consider that 'who' is the relative pronoun ruling ...
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When is the omission of relative pronouns acceptable? [duplicate]

So I learned that I tend to forget and unconsciously omit relative pronouns from my sentences, because apart from the fact that the meaning of some clauses without them remain clear and obvious, I ...
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Question on relative clause [migrated]

I've been reading a online book where I saw this sentence: Even though I'm living alone, just by looking at your lifestyle which everything has to be done perfectly, personally I wouldn't follow it ...
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for which X vs. for the X of which

In each quotation beneath, what happens if I replace with for which determination? Does anything change? In Current Sailing a resultant has to be found for two simultaneous courses and distances. ...
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Use the object pronoun or the subject pronoun as the relative pronoun heading a restrictive clause that employs a transitive verb and a linking verb?

EXAMPLE: James is the man who/whom we know is who won it. I've been trying to work this out, but for the life of me, I can't work out in such a scenario as shown above if the restrictive relative ...
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I don't understand a function of phrase and a relative pronoun

I read an article today and didn't understand the structure. "Facebook has 3 billion users across its portfolio of apps, a massive number that has raised questions by some legal experts, ...
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Why can you use relative clauses with implicit complementisers or relative pronouns?

Why are these correct? The work I am doing is easy. The house he lives at. The book I am writing is about different realms. The man I was helping thanked me. The ant I was blocking the road of. ...
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Does omitting a relative pronoun change the meaning?

One of my students asked me if omitting relative pronouns like "that" changes the meaning of the sentence. Here's the issue, in the books I have read mention that in spoken English (assuming ...
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are “where” and “when” relative adverb or relative pronoun?

I am reading the Farlex grammar book and there seems to be some inconsistency in it. According to the Farlex grammar book, "where" and "when" are considered both relative pronoun ...
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relative pronoun 'which' vs 'that' [duplicate]

In this sentence, is there an error? In the name of revamping the law, investigation and trial should not be altered in a way which undermines the principles on which the judicial system was founded. ...
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What are the rules regarding one antecedent followed by many relative pronouns? [closed]

Are any of these correct? What rules are at play here? I saw the car which has five wheels and which we passed by earlier. I saw the car which has five wheels which we passed by earlier. I saw the ...
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Your notice, earlier than expected, […] ---or— Your notice, which was earlier than expected, […]?

Is the relative clause needed here? By omitting "which was", have I changed the meaning of my main clause (assuming I would have added a predicate)?
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Omitting the relative pronoun “that”

I came across this sentence while surfing on the Internet: Now I'm calculating how many pages I should do per day (that) would be reasonable. When read out loud, the sentence sounds sort of natural, ...
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What were/are the rules regarding relative pronouns from c. 1800?

I've been reading some rather old literature, often ranging from the 18th Century through to the late 19th Century, and I'm trying to increase my comprehension of the material, at least to the extent ...
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The relativized element of a relative clause?

“Wh” and non-“wh” relative clauses - Page 5: “wh” relative clauses (“The bag which he put there was stolen.”) “that” relative clauses (“The bag that he put ______ there was stolen.”) bare ...
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“She's like a cockroach what turned into a butterfly.”

This is a line from Pocketful of Miracles (1961) She's like a cockroach what turned into a butterfly. Apparently in "standard English grammar" this should be She's like a cockroach that/...
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“I am the man, who commands you” vs. “I am the man, who command you” [duplicate]

In a passage I encountered: To an inattentive reader, the expressions, “I am the man, who commands you” and “I am the man, who command you” [reformatted, EA] may appear to be precisely ...
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Is “that” a relative pronoun, a conjunction, or something else in “I know that…”? [closed]

I'm probably overthinking this, but I can't seem to be able to identify the function of the word "that" in the sentence "I know that...". For the sake of an example, let's use the ...
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Reduced Relative Clause

I have found this sentence in some of my books and I come across with this sentences below. What I am not clear is the first and second bolded part. “That carcinogenic substances are contained in many ...
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“the which” in early literature

I'd like to know what "the which" in the following passages refers to. While the "the which" in the second instance clearly refers to the large parlour, that in the first is quite ...
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Can “who” relate to animals? [duplicate]

The giraffe, who was the tallest in the zoo, towered over the other animals. Is it correct to use the relative pronoun who to relate to "the giraffe", an animal?
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Which or Who, Which should I use? [closed]

I am confused about this fill in the blank questions. What should I use, which or who? Humans are the only factors in the ecosystem _____ are responsible for the changes in the ecology.
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Who or whom in a sentence with multiple verbs

Would it be correct to use "who" or "whom" in the following sentence? Industrialization in the USSR did not provide a better life for many soviets, especially the peasants, who(m) ...
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What is the subject of the relative pronoun of that?

'Featuring floral patterns, religious symbols, and messages of hope, the painted henna crowns are amazing substitutes for the hats and wigs that the cancer patients would otherwise use to cover their ...
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Relative pronoun where vs which usage

The ABC hotel, ______(a relative adverb/pronoun) Felix had suggested to me, was really a nice place to stay. I wonder if both "where" and "which" are correct here. In my opinion, ...
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those who(m) he thought were guilty

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Page 466) says: a. those whom he thought were guilty b. those who he thought were guilty Here who(m) is subject of the content clause functioning as ...
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3answers
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Meaning of 'it would be hard to overstate' [closed]

What does "it would be hard to overstate" refer to in the following sentence? What is the meaning of that phrase? Plato also, of course, portrays Socrates as a dauntless man of principle who ...
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shalt: used with the pronoun thou or its relative equivalent

Shalt is used with the pronoun thou or its relative equivalent https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/shalt What does relative equivalent mean here?
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A relative pronoun acting as both object and subject?

I don't want to do anything you think might be good for me. This is something he said was good for me. In the first sentence, the relative pronoun between anything and you think is omitted as it ...
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2answers
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She invited me to go with them, which I'd quite like to (do)

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language , in Chapter 17 Deixis and anaphora, says (Page 1526): Is [iv] well-formed? How about adding do after to as follows? She invited me to go with them, ...
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Why does these sentences could omit relative pronoun as a subject pronoun?

These sentences have perplexed me about leaving relative pronoun in relative clause. I learn that we can not omit relative pronoun when this pronoun is subject. So why in these two sentences, both ...
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Relative pronoun vs. relative adverb [duplicate]

[1] "That picture was taken in the park where I used to play." (Here, 'where' is an relative adverb. [2] "I remember the day when we first met." (Here, 'when' is an relative adverb.) ...
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Can “who'd” be used as a relative pronoun?

I was doing this question: 17. Although pharmaceutical companies that begun to produce the drug learned that taxol could be extracted from the bark of all species of yewr, they soon focused their ...
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which is correct?: [whom vs. who] he claimed gave him bad directions

I came across an article titled: “Man admits murdering 2 whom he claimed gave him bad directions” (https://www.google.co.kr/amp/s/www.deseret.com/platform/amp/2011/8/16/20386522/man-admits-...
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Non-restrictive vs Sentential Relative Clause

I love my father, who is a teacher. "Who is a teacher" is a non-defining or non-restrictive relative clause. He failed the test, which shocked everyone. "Which shocked everyone" is ...
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How : neither a relative pronoun nor a relative adverb

Relative pronoun : who, whom, whose, which, that Relative adverb : when, where, why Is "how" neither a relative pronoun nor a relative adverb? Is 'how' only a subordinating conjunction in a ...
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Coordinating Conjunction vs subordinating conjunction. Who, Which Vs and it/that

I have a question about conjunctions, dependent and independent clauses. The issue came up when a text book suggests that "and it" can replace "which/who". But my understanding is that subordinating ...
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that as conjunction

According to https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/that, the article introduces that as a form of conjunction. However, it seems to me that the following two sentences do not have same structures. For ...
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Why is 'which' the correct relative pronoun in this sentence, and not 'when'..?

At ten to nine, which is just before the exam begins, please make sure you assemble outside the hall. This sentence is giving me a headache. The relative pronoun refers to the time ten to nine so why ...
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Sentence starting with accusative case

"Whom the gods would destroy they first make mad" In this sentence "whom" is used at the beginning where subject is normally placed, but why is it in accusative case? It's should be in the nominative ...
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Question related to pronoun and articles

Which relative pronoun is used for anyone and someone, Who or that? In my grammar book it is written to use "that" after the words like all, same, any, none, nothing. One more question. The ...
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Are Relative pronouns or Relative adverbs Subordinating Conjunctions?

"It is a song that my mother taught me." This sentence consists of : (1) a main clause : "It is a song". (2) a subordinate/dependent clause : "that my mother taught me". (3) A relative pronoun or a ...
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Don't be trapped by dogma, which is living with the results of other people's thinking

From a speech by Steve Jobs: a. Don't be trapped by dogma, which is living with the results of other people's thinking. If the sentence is to work syntactically, dogma has to be the antecedent of ...
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Usage of the relative pronoun 'what'

In my grammar books it's written the relative pronoun 'What' is used only in singular. Does this mean It's used just with a singular nouns. For ex, "What goal you want to accomplish" is a correct ...
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there is a single person whose/whom/who being a person contains the events of his career

'And': Conjunction Reduction Redux By Barry Schein (linguist) has this passage: How natural does whose sound? Can you use who or whom instead? If this were a personal pronoun, the nominative wouldn'...
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“None so blind as they/them that will not see”

In the following sentence which pronoun to use: None so blind as ____ that will not see. (they, them) Which one and why?
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Question regarding pronoun in “Let you and I/me …”

In my grammar book the answer for the following sentence is 'me' Let you and ___ try what we can do ( I,me) Why can't I use "I"? Both subjects seems to be in nominative case.
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Have you been influenced all you can ever be influenced? [How are the preceding and the following clauses connected?]

How would you rephrase 'all you can ever be influenced'? (In) all (that) or (in) all (where)? To me this 'all' seems like a relative adverb but no old school grammar book has 'all' explained as a ...
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Relative pronoun or elipsis ? : 'for those who the disease seeks to attack'

This sentence was spoken recently in the British House of Lords : It would be wrong of me to mislead the house by pretending that there was an easy way out of this epidemic for those who the disease ...
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fused relative word (whatever, whoever) + the hell/on earth

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language has presented five reasons for classifying ungoverned open exhaustive conditionals not as fused relatives but as open interrogatives, and the fourth ...

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