Questions tagged [relative-pronouns]

Relative pronouns introduce relative clauses that clarify or specify the antecedent. For example, in "Trees, which are plants, need sunlight to grow," the word "which" is a relative pronoun.

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1answer
24 views

Repeating relative pronouns

Is it generally permissible to repeat relative pronouns regardless of the type of pronoun and regardless of the relative clause being restrictive or not? What I mean by that can be seen in the ...
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about relative pronoun

I am wondering whether the omission of the relative pronouns is correct for the following sentence: Older adults who are more socially isolated are more likely to experience depression. Older adults ...
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Does the word “that” refer to “features” or “windows 9x”?

Microsoft built a number of features into Windows 9x that allow previous users of DOS and Windows 3.x to capitalize on their investment and that allow technicians access to DOS-based troubleshooting....
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The meaning of ‘How’ in this conversation

I am not sure about meaning of “how” in the below conversation. (English is my second language so I can’t understand details) Someone: Do you remember we invited people to our house last month? Me: ...
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What’s a better preposition in this sentence?

I know the word, “where,” in this sentence isn't correct, but I'm not sure what to suggest: Spread joy this season with our exclusive holiday sweater, where 25% of all sales will benefit (charity ...
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relative pronoun at the beginning of the sentence

"To you (Right Honorable my very good Lord) of right do they belong: for to whom shall I rather present the first fruits of my learning than to your Lordship: who nourished then both me and them, when ...
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relative word choice: as or which

Yet climbing Ayers Rock, as most other Australians knew the vast red monolith until recently, has long been a favoured pastime of tourists. source - Is it better to use "which "instead of "as "in "...
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60 views

The way which you should hold them

The Cambridge Grammar of the english Language, page 224, reads Complements are most often NPs, and conversely NPs are usually complements. Some NPs can occur with adjunct function, but they tend ...
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What is the grammatical function of “which” in this sentence? [duplicate]

I am trying to understand various instances in Hansard, the documentation of proceedings in the UK parliament, wherein the word which is used in an unusual (by my modern parlance, at least) position, ...
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Omitting Relative Pronoun and verb “be” [duplicate]

Could someone please explain, why the pronoun and the verb "be" are omitted in the following sentence? "it allows communication even for people far away from each other" Shouldn't this sentence be "...
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Why 'which' and not 'who'

As a choir singer I studied Arvo Pärt's composition "Which was the Son of...", text exracted from the Bible (Luke 3,23-38). It's simply Christ's genealogy. I was surprised that the relative pronoun ...
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antecedent for “which” [duplicate]

Fridges were especially useful for storing perishable substances such as milk, which had previously been the cause of thousands of deaths every year in the big cities of the world. In the above ...
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relative pronouns: “where I'd never been before” or “to which I'd never been before”?

I did an exercise, and there was a sentence that make me confused. Can you help me with it. Yesterday we visited the City Museum, (______) I'd never been before. There are 4 answers to chose: ...
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Relative pronoun omission (be + adj)

I knew some rules about relative pronoun and how to omit. e.g. The teacher who teaches us. => The teacher teaching us. The cup which was broken by my brother. => The cup broken by my brother. ...
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Which one is correct? “A bird was on the box, from which/where it flew to the ground” [duplicate]

I would like to know whether I should use "from where" or "from which" in the following sentence: A bird was on the box, from which/where it flew to the ground
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a relative pronoun/adverb as an adverbial

He collects some cars that are antique. I know the relative pronoun “that” is the subject of “are” here. This is the letter (that) my mother sent me. I know the relative pronoun “that” is the ...
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Comma between two embedded relative clauses introduced by a verb, starting with relative pronouns, and connected with a conjunction?

Consider the following sentence: But the question of how to make sure that software is written effectively(,) and at the same time that it works correctly in all cases is bothering many software ...
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Relative pronoun What after a preposition

Is the last sentece correct? Children learn something. Children live with something. Children learn with what they live. I don't feel comfortable the preposition with which locates in ...
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Relative pronoun “that” with “the only” in the antecedent [duplicate]

I heard "That" should be used after superlative adjectives and other determiners like all, same, any, none, nothing, only, everything little, much and no. But in this sentence Those who wish to ...
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'What I have presented is the first steps' or 'What I have presented are the first steps'

Which is correct: 'What I have presented is the first steps' or 'What I have presented are the first steps'? The issues is what counts as the subject of the verb: the relative 'What' (= is), or ...
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What does the phrase “it has been” mean in the sentence?

I came across a headline on a website yesterday, saying: "Razer Huntsman Elite is the cheapest it has been in the UK, at £158." I think I can roughly understand the sentence (Razer Huntsman Elite ...
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When are interrogative pronouns (or relative pronouns) needed in this context?

Look at the dictionary meanings below. I have copied them from the New Oxford American English Dictionary (the application for the dictionary on my Macintosh laptop): pedant: (noun) a person who is ...
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“That of” usage

I want to know if we can use "that of" as a relative pronoun in following situations. 1) The percentage of male smokers always outnumbers that of females. 2) Although the proportion of male ...
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When can a subjective relative pronoun and the verb “be” not be omitted in a sentence?

There have always been recommendations which are made to athletes. I know "which are" can be omitted in the above sentence. Also, I learned that a subjective relative pronoun and the verb "be" cannot ...
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double negative - no one ~ who hadn't also

No one would want to be famous who hadn't also, somewhere in the past, been made to feel extremely insignificant. Is the sentence a double negative? Is "who" a relative pronoun which modifies "one"? ...
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“Of” and Relative Pronouns

I wonder whether the following sentences are correct: The two strands of economic theory, which are used in this article, are endogenous growth and spread-backwash effects. The two strands, which ...
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Is “that which” grammatical in the sentence “I have that which I should have told you summers ago”, and if so, how?

This is my first question although I have been reading you for a long time. My question is: can that which be used with the meaning of something? For me, that is a demonstrative pronoun, so you can ...
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624 views

Using which or where to refer to place

A student I have been volunteering with wrote the following in his essay: We really enjoyed the cruise and also the islands where we visited last week. To my ear the use of where doesn't sound ...
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You are too concerned with what was and what will be

Here's a quote from the movie 'Kung Fu Panda': Quit. Don't quit. Noodles. Don't noodles. You are too concerned with what was and what will be. There's a saying: "Yesterday is history, tomorrow is a ...
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Can I delete the relative pronoun here? [closed]

I want to say, "For the ones who I care and who cares about you." Is this admittable to say like this? And I have one more question to ask. Can I say, "for the ones I care and who cares about you"?...
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Can the relative word 'what' mean “the person(s) that/who”? If so, when can it and when can it not?

The fused relative word 'what' generally means "the thing(s) that/which". But there are some instances where this 'what' seems to refer to "person(s)" as in these examples: (1) From a Bustle article ...
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restrictive relative pronoun clause and antecedent

The Plaintiff claims that the Defendant, MICHAEL DOE, owed a duty to the Plaintiff, which duty was breached by the said Defendant, the particulars of which breach are as follows: (a) driving ...
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Usage of Prepositions + Relative Pronouns

I am going crazy because of prepositions + relative pronouns. Here are some examples and please read and tell me if in the way that I have understood is right or not. (1) Do you know the date when ...
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What does “that” refer to in “Instagram is an online photo-sharing and social networking service that enables…”?

What does the word "that" in the sentence refer to? Instagram is an online photo-sharing and social networking service that enables its users to take pictures, apply digital filters to it...
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What is a relative pronoun's referent when it follows a prepositional phrase?

For example: Stella Adler trained several generations of actors who include Marlon Brando and Robert De Niro. Does who in this example refer to actors or generations? Stella Adler trained several ...
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Did prescriptivists make up pied-piping in relative infinitive constructions?

A quick Internet search suggests that pied-piping in relative clauses was a natural feature of English even though it is loved by prescriptivists; it existed in older stages of the language, and it ...
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Does a relative pronoun really combine the function of a pronoun with that of a conjunction?

Oxford Living Dictionaries defines 'relative pronoun' as follows: (Originally) a pronoun which refers to an antecedent, as a demonstrative or personal pronoun; (now) specifically a pronoun which ...
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Omitting which is?

When I was writing an essay, I thought about saying: "There is nothing that is more important than . . ." , then I googled it, but it appears the following sentence is more popular. "There is ...
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Identifying the main clause and subordinate clauses

I’m preparing for my exam and in one of the practice questions i have to identify the main clause, subordinate clause/s and the subject,predicate and/or adverbials. the sentence is: "The Mausoleum ...
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My understanding about the non-restrictive use of the relative clause in a partcular sentence

Almost every chinese who works at an iPhone manifacture in China usually uses a china-produced phone, which is way cheaper. I just want to make sure if my understanding especially about the non-...
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Subject verb agreement when “one of” used

Are these two sentences correct? One of the employees who is worker at KP is here. One of the employees who are workers at KP is here. What is the context of who in both the sentences?
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The 'what' problem

'What seems enjoyable to you seems troublesome to me' I have a problem with 'what'. I know 'what' in the sentence is a pronoun but I can't figure out what type of pronoun it's supposed to be. I do ...
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What exactly falls under the label of “complement”?

There seems to be a lot of contradicting beliefs out there regarding complements and what they cover -- or maybe I am just confusing myself. However, I cannot seem to find an answer that I understand. ...
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which or who in “the body, authority, entity or person which establishes”

... the body, authority, entity or person which establishes... Is it correct to use "which" in this case? Or should it rather be "who", since the last element of the list is a person?
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By which, to which, at which, to whom: are these relative pronouns in adjective clauses?

From experience, I know that: which, who, where, why, whom, there, that are relative pronouns but I wonder about the expressions: 'by which', 'to which', 'at which', 'to whom Are ...
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Can the relative pronoun “where” be omitted in a relative clause with the preposition “in”? [duplicate]

Can the following sentences: It's the church where the painting burned./It's the church in which the painting burned. be transformed so that they do not contain the pronoun which/where in the ...
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415 views

“whose” and “of which”

I have a question about the usage of "whose" and "of which". I have learned that a. Do you see the mountain whose top is covered with snow? and b. Do you see the mountain the top of which is ...
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Here’s the note which I think (that?) he said (that?) she wrote

Is the following sentence grammatical? "Here’s the note which I think that he said that she wrote" Otherwise, I suspect neither that should appear, am I right?
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Is “I am who(m) God made me” grammatical?

SAH asked an interesting question about case, I am [who/whom] G-d made me, but one issue that came up in the comments repeatedly is that many people said that they find the example sentence ...
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Relative pronoun, the use of comma, and subject verb agreement

Ex. There are many interesting stories attached to the drink, which exclusively belong to the brand only. Is above sentence correct? Or it should be Ex. There are many interesting stories attached ...

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