Questions tagged [quantifiers]

For questions about quantifiers, words indicating an amount or quantity. Some examples of quantifiers are: all, many, some, several and no.

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94 views

What is the quantifying determiner for durian/jackfruit?

What is the quantifying determiner for the tropical fruit 'durian'/'jackfruit'? For instance: I ate one durian It is unclear if the person is eating the entire durian by themselves or just one ...
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1answer
94 views

Romeo and Juliet “Which then most sought where most might not be found” [closed]

In the following excerpt from Romeo and Juliet, what do the words "which" and "most" refer to? Does the relative clause have a main verb at all? “I, measuring his affections by my own, which then ...
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1answer
56 views

What is the scope of the quantifier “some”?

I am writing a term paper in English and am not sure which of the two sentences below is correct: some apples and pears some apples and some pears What I mean to say is that there are some apples ...
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1answer
452 views

After “some”, plural or singular verb? [duplicate]

In these sentences: "Some (composes/compose) delightful music" "Some of them (write/writes) wonderful books" Which form of the verb should I use?
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1answer
236 views

{This/that vs. these/those} + many + plural noun

From pag 419 of Mastering English An Advanced Grammar for Non-native and Native Speakers: Elsewhere, demonstratives normally serve as determiners (as in that exact moment, this way, etc.). BUT in ...
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2answers
64 views

Difficulty with trying to describe the quantity of something

I am trying to write a word problem, and am having trouble with the wording of one part. Let's say for the sake of example that there are 10 apples and 20 oranges. Call them both items. I am trying to ...
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0answers
52 views

A comparison in two sets of quantifiers and adjectives

I learn almost every word on my own, in my productive if a bit peculiar way. I inevitably get perplexed by the ambiguity and the interchangeabilty between the words that I discover with more details. ...
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1answer
83 views

Why is it grammatically incorrect to say 'I watch much television' although it is an uncountable noun (in this context)?

In the grammatically correct sentence, 'I watch a lot of television', the noun 'television' is an uncountable noun. However, it is grammatically incorrect to say 'I watch much television' with the ...
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3answers
225 views

Is or Are? --> Every year, about 800,000 tonnes of food waste are generated

I need some help with the following sentence: Every year, about 800,000 tonnes of food waste are generated. Should it be "are" or "is"? (as bolded above)
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1answer
234 views

How is quite used here? [duplicate]

"it was ... interesting to see these (1) quite deprived areas (1) erm (.)" Is quite here being used as an quantifier and is the noun "areas" countable in this context? It sounds to me like 'quite' ...
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1answer
4k views

Should you use “it” or “they” when referencing a group of people? [duplicate]

Should you use it or they when referencing a group of people? Here is the example sentence: A group of students was walking on the road when a truck hit them/it and it/they was/were immediately ...
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1answer
798 views

“There is” or “There are”: which is appropriate before “a whole slew of academic articles”? [duplicate]

There are a whole slew of academic articles. To me, it seems that this sentence should say "There is a whole slew of academic articles," because the agreement should be with "slew." But I'm having a ...
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0answers
110 views

There “is” or “are” a wealth of opportunities? [duplicate]

Which is correct: "there ARE a wealth of opportunities" or "there IS a wealth of opportunities?"
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1answer
1k views

Is “much” used in affirmative sentences?

Is the word "much" used in affirmative sentences? Example: I want to buy much milk. I know that "much" is used in negative sentences and questions, but I am not sure if using it in affirmative ...
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3answers
694 views

“He's good police”

I'm fifteen years late, but I've been watching The Wire, recently. In it, I noticed a particularly jarring use of the word "police" as a mass noun with finite subject. I'm a British English speaker ...
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0answers
1k views

Singular or plural verb with “a minimum of”

Does the phrase "a minimum of" in conjunction with a plural term require a singular or plural verb? "A minimum of 1.6 million reads was generated per sample." vs. "A minimum of 1.6 million reads ...
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2answers
5k views

Why is a singular verb “is” used after “One-third of the population” while a plural verb “live” is used after “70 percent of the population”? [duplicate]

1) One-third of the population of sub-Saharan Africa is undernourished. 2) Nearly 70 percent of the population still live in the countryside. 3) One-third of the residents live below the ...
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0answers
282 views

there is a plethora of investigations which indicate/indicates

"There is a plethora of investigations which indicate how it works...." or "There is a plethora of investigations which indicates how it works.." Does the verb "to indicate" refer to the plethora or ...
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2answers
1k views

Plenty of time, space, and money is needed or are needed?

Plenty of time, space, and money is/are needed This was part of a question on indefinite pronouns. The textbook said are was the correct answer, but I still feel I would say is. I was wondering if ...
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1answer
240 views

Can 'Often' be categorised as quantifier(Determiner)? [closed]

Since 'Often' can also denote quantity, can it be called a quantifier?
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2answers
382 views

Each of the girls in Mark's shop spent “their” or “her” money buying cakes

Can you please tell me if we would use their or her as a possessive pronoun in this sentence? Each of the girls in Mark's shop spent their money buying cakes. Each of the girls in Mark's shop spent ...
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1answer
553 views

“doesn’t it”/“don’t they” with “every” as a determiner

Which of the two is correct: “Every cell phone does that, doesn’t it?” or “Every cell phone does that, don’t they?”
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1answer
319 views

Can you say “a lot of dog” as a meaning of “much dog”? [closed]

When you read the sentences below, is it possible to change the phrase "much dog" into "a lot of dog"? He (a dog) needed grooming. I didn't think there was very much dog inside all that fur, but he ...
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1answer
156 views

One-word quantifier which expresses “always, except by chance”

I am writing a paragraph about a mathematical condition which is "always false except by chance". This chance is very very low, almost zero, meaning the case for the condition being true will, in ...
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0answers
61 views

What is the difference between “all are created equal” and “all people are created equal” and “everybody is created equal”? [closed]

If I want to use "all" to refer to every member of a general group (such as every human being), do I need to include a name for that group or not? Basically, is "all are created equal" and "all people ...
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1answer
75 views

Quantifiers and nouns

''The least common multiple'' Why isn't ''fewest'' used since the noun is countable? And why ''many people?'' Thank you
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2answers
445 views

What is the classification of the words such as “group of”, “bundle of”, “number of” and also the right form of verb after using this words?

First example: A bundle of roses is the most beautiful thing one can have in the morning. A bundle of roses are the most beautiful thing ... Second example: The number of books are ...
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1answer
62 views

Individual Items Owned by “One another”

The sentence is: I don’t mind being restricted from making changes, but we cannot efficiently troubleshoot if we’re relying on one another’s schedules. Is the 's' in "schedules" correct? It ...
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1answer
341 views

“Don't satisfy both” and “Don't satisfy either”

Are these two statements equivalent? If you don't satisfy either of the conditions A and B If you don't satisfy both of the conditions A and B I interpret the "either" case as: If you fail ...
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1answer
61 views

“Round up to the nearest tertile value” wording question?

If I wanted to tell someone to round up to the nearest 1/4 value (e.g. 4.78 would become to 5.0), I would say: Round up to the nearest quarter value. Now, if I want to express rounding up to the ...
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0answers
136 views

60% of the Bahamian population “is” or “are”? [duplicate]

Which is correct? 60% of the Bahamian population are concentrated in the capital city, Nassau. 60% of the Bahamian population is concentrated in the capital city, Nassau. The first sounds awkward to ...
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0answers
1k views

'Both', 'each', or 'either', when there can only be two of something?

a) He had a gun in both hands. b) He had a gun in each hand. c) He had a gun in either hand. In a) there are two hands but only one gun. Clear. In b) there are two hands and two guns, one ...
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0answers
2k views

Can “apple” be a uncountable noun? [closed]

teachers which one is correct in the following phrases? a piece of apple a piece of apples a part of an apple a part of apple Besides, I saw apple is defined as N-VAR in Collins Dictionary. And one ...
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1answer
2k views

“A myriad of emotions 'greet/greets' me” [duplicate]

Here, "myriad" is a noun, and I suppose "myriad of emotions" is a prepositional phrase, so presumably the verb must agree with "myriad"?
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1answer
114 views

'Lots' as a noun or quantifier with ellipsis?

I'd like the opinion of the community on the status of lots when used in the following: Your tutor will be an experienced teacher from whom you can learn lots. Is lots here still a quantifier or ...
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3answers
747 views

The amount of VS The number of, etc

Is it OK to use the amount of with countable nouns? I have come across the usage of it with people, but I am confused whether to use it with countables. What about the proportion of? How different ...
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2answers
263 views

He is a little more sophisticated man.<<Complete sentence

It is ungrammatical to say "He is a little more sophisticated man" OR "He is a little more smart and sophisticated man". My reasoning as to why is as follows: The problem is that 'a little' is a ...
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0answers
52 views

Not sure if five of them

a. I don't know if five of my friends are still alive or not. b. I am not sure that five of my friends are still alive. Aren't these sentences ambiguous? I see two possibilities There are ...
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0answers
86 views

Singular or plural verb following “any” with a plural noun [duplicate]

Is it correct to say "If any of the parties are required,...."? Is it correct to say, "If any of the parties is required,...."?
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1answer
122 views

“numerous dead”

I read an article from the NYT, and it reads: Prime Minister Charles Michel of Belgium said there were "numerous" dead. I just wonder if 'numerous' can be used with dead. As I understand it, 'the ...
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2answers
98 views

Does “every” block the use of “both”?

Consider this sentence Both of my friends are blond. What it implies is that obviously I have only two friends and they are both blond. Now, if I say Every friend of mine is blond. Can I still ...
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4answers
601 views

Implied quantifiers?

When I hear someone make a statement sans quantifier, I assume a universal quantifier. For example when I hear someone say "I love dogs", I take that to mean "I love all dogs" and not "I love some ...
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2answers
1k views

Is “little of fun” correct?

I watched a class in which the teacher was explaining how to use quantifiers. One of her examples was "I had lots of fun last night". However, she used the example "I didn't have little of fun last ...
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2answers
148 views

'A / One / At least one student entered the room.' Are these the same? (truth-conditionally)

I just wonder if the two following sentences are truth-conditionally the same. Sentence 1 essentially means there existed a student who entered the room, and this situation includes two, three or more ...
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3answers
2k views

A Question About Quantifier Shift for “each of you” to “you each”

I understand from reading similar posts on this topic that if I want to write a sentence using "each of you," I should follow this with a singular verb. So, for example, "Each of you has given your ...
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5answers
4k views

“There are no shortage of applications”

I've been having an argument with a colleague about this sentence, could you please let me know which one of us is correct: There are no shortage of applications for our product in this space. ...
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2answers
2k views

A lot or Much with the word “Work”

We had a quiz yesterday and there was this question: He doesn't have ......... work to do. 1.Many 2.Much 3.A lot of Kindly answer mentioning a reference
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2answers
30k views

Does a percentage quantity take singular or plural verb agreement? [duplicate]

Does a percentage require a singular or plural verb, for example, do we say ten percent "go" or "goes"?
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2answers
518 views

Are there rules for using “any” and “some”?

In my university, in English Grammar, I learned I can use "any" for negative and interrogative sentences and "some" in positive sentences, but when I watch English movies, "any" is used in positive ...
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2answers
6k views

“There is” or “There are” a large quantity of people? [duplicate]

There is a large quantity of people. There are a large quantity of people. Are both correct?