Questions tagged [quantifiers]

For questions about quantifiers, words indicating an amount or quantity. Some examples of quantifiers are: all, many, some, several and no.

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Is 'at least' really a positive polarity item?

My question (also copied below) was closed because "This question already has answers here". The linked answer says that negative polarity items only appear in negative contexts and positive ...
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What are adjectives for "a group that grows fast", and "a group that is comparatively static"?

The context is: I have an app where there are entries, sorted in tables. Think "Employees" and "Sales": The "Employees" table is mostly static. It might go up or down a ...
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What does "they both can't be selected" mean? [duplicate]

The sentence "They both can't be selected", does that mean (1) None of them can be selected or (2) They both can't make it at the same time, only one of them can ? If I, for example, want to ...
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"All green apples but 1" or "All but 1 green apples"

I would like to use phrase "all but one" in the sentence like "Except for the one green apple, all the other green apples are bad." Which expression is not ambiguous? "All but ...
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quantifiers in comparatives adjectives [closed]

Good morning. I'd like to ask you something. I was confused about these words. They said " a bit, a little, slightly, a lot, and much" are all intensifiers in comparative sentences. But ...
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Is "distance" an "amount" or a "quantity"?

Distance can be measured so it would make sense for it to be a quantity. But this is where I arrive at an issue. I think it's better if you say a small amount of distance than a small quantity of ...
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Does "much of a (countable noun)" mean the same as "much (countable noun)?"

(a): The countries did not have much of a choice when it came to vaccines. (b): The countries did not have much choice when it came to vaccines. Are the sentences above semantically identical? Are ...
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Quantifiers realised by a noun?

Let's consider the following sentence: He drank [a glass of hot milk]. Here the brackated element is a Noun Phrase (NP). The head noun is glass. My question is can it be classified as a quantifier?
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Enumeration with "all"

Consider this sentence: Your self-confidence, resilience and adaptability , all will help you integrate in this new competitive environment. My question is about the comma before all. I tried to ...
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2 votes
1 answer
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The multiple meanings of "any" in different circumstances

I am confused about the different usages of the word (any* depending on the particular circumstance, and would appreciate some clarification. For instance, if I make the statement I have more ...
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Is there ambiguity in "by each" in this context?

The sentence: "Find all malls that have been visited by each student attending Wolf Secondary School" I've recently encountered a question like this on a Computer Science test and ...
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Is there an Infix phrase for "any of x are y" in the english language?

For a collection of objects x and predicate y, you can say "all of x are y". For example, "It is probably summer if all of the Tree's leaves are green". But you can also say "...
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'All my life could be described as a chain of failures'. Is this sentence grammatically correct? [closed]

I'm a non-native speaker of English. Perhaps my question would seem a little bit silly. All my life could be described as a chain of failures. It seems to me that all my life is a disaster. All my ...
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1 answer
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Meaning of Anyone [closed]

Could anyone help me? If I say : Will you stay with me if I speak to anyone? Anyone means : whatever who (sorry I can say otherwise) I mean "anyone" like : Anyone can work here, it will go! Thanks :...
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Other or Another

I have a question about Quantitative words that I don't understand. Here it is: Q: Istanbul is the biggest city in Turkey and one of the world's major cities, with around 6.7 million people in the ...
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Do you find "only belongings of somebody" a little bit wierd?

In the sentence below, do you think it is weird to say "only belongings" for "belongings" is a collective noun. The angry mob destroyed the man's only belongings.
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Using adjective as noun with "a lot of" quantifier

Why we should say “a lot of homeless people” and can’t say just “a lot of homeless” ?
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Quantifiers like few, a few, etc

I came across a question in my book of whose answer I did not find satisfactory. Please help me Q) Improve the bracketed part of the sentence. The guest stood quietly for (few moments). The answer ...
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1 answer
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Some food/dishes

Is it correct to understand "some of the side dishes" as "some of a specific amount of food in the side dishes", or literally "a dish in the side dishes"?
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“The needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few”

Think of Star Trek's quote: “The needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few” (or “the one”) In the context of Star Trek, does the many/few refer to a specific group of many/few beings or many/...
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Is it correct from a function's perspective to say "a piece of diamond"?

I'm designing a test for EFL students, basic level, and one item that refers to uncountable nouns was the following: "When I travel, I only take a piece of _______ for my security." My distractor was "...
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1 answer
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as many as as much as

Which sentence is correct: As many as 6% of US consumers say they are vegan, compared to just 1% in 2014. source As much as 6% of US consumers say they are vegan, compared to just 1% in 2014. ...
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"any of my X" vs "any X of mine"?

What's the difference between "any of my X" and "any X of mine"? My impression, as a non-native speaker of English, is that the latter sounds more formal. I searched COCA Corpus, and I found: any of ...
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1 answer
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"I hope you all/both are doing well" vs "I hope you are all/both doing well"?

Do both convey the same message, or not? I hope you all are doing well. I hope you are all doing well. It occurs to me that the same thing happens with both when I'm only addressing two people ...
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1 answer
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Why is it "less than 9" and not "fewer than 9" when we're talking about exam marks and scores?

This might sound like too elementary of a question but it suddenly popped into my head and started eating me. Why "I don't wanna be less than 90." and not "I don't wanna be fewer than 90."? Aren't ...
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1 answer
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Quantifier + comparative - so much drunk or so much drunker

I'd like to know what´s wrong in the sentence: I didn't drink any more than the guys did, but I got so much drunker. I believe it's the quantifier + the comparative that is wrong, but I'm not ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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Use of ... all are?

Is the all in "John, Bob, and Sue all are hungry" redundant? Does it mean anything beyond "John, Bob, and Sue are hungry"?
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2 votes
2 answers
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Do native speakers actually "feel" the difference between the following sentences?

[A] Haven’t they sold many tickets? [B] Haven’t they sold a lot of tickets? According to the Cambridge dictionary, there's a difference in meaning here. When we use much and many in negative ...
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1 vote
4 answers
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Single-word quantifiers for "zero or more"-like cardinalities

I'm on a trip to map different cardinalities to single-word quantifiers. In that context, I'm wondering if there is a word to say "zero or more", e.g. the same as what once is to "one and only one". ...
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3 votes
1 answer
2k views

Is “the most amount of {countable things}” ever an acceptable replacement for “the greatest amount of {countable things}”?

A recent BBC article reads in part, Yellowstone officials say bison can run up to 30mph (50km/h) and are the animal responsible for the most amount of injuries within the park. The phrase “the ...
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1 vote
2 answers
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What is the quantifying determiner for durian/jackfruit?

What is the quantifying determiner for the tropical fruit 'durian'/'jackfruit'? For instance: I ate one durian It is unclear if the person is eating the entire durian by themselves or just one ...
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2 votes
1 answer
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Romeo and Juliet "Which then most sought where most might not be found" [closed]

In the following excerpt from Romeo and Juliet, what do the words "which" and "most" refer to? Does the relative clause have a main verb at all? “I, measuring his affections by my own, which then ...
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What is the scope of the quantifier "some"?

I am writing a term paper in English and am not sure which of the two sentences below is correct: some apples and pears some apples and some pears What I mean to say is that there are some apples ...
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After "some", plural or singular verb? [duplicate]

In these sentences: "Some (composes/compose) delightful music" "Some of them (write/writes) wonderful books" Which form of the verb should I use?
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1 answer
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{This/that vs. these/those} + many + plural noun

From pag 419 of Mastering English An Advanced Grammar for Non-native and Native Speakers: Elsewhere, demonstratives normally serve as determiners (as in that exact moment, this way, etc.). BUT in ...
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1 vote
3 answers
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Difficulty with trying to describe the quantity of something

I am trying to write a word problem, and am having trouble with the wording of one part. Let's say for the sake of example that there are 10 apples and 20 oranges. Call them both items. I am trying to ...
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1 vote
0 answers
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A comparison in two sets of quantifiers and adjectives

I learn almost every word on my own, in my productive if a bit peculiar way. I inevitably get perplexed by the ambiguity and the interchangeabilty between the words that I discover with more details. ...
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Why is it grammatically incorrect to say 'I watch much television' although it is an uncountable noun (in this context)?

In the grammatically correct sentence, 'I watch a lot of television', the noun 'television' is an uncountable noun. However, it is grammatically incorrect to say 'I watch much television' with the ...
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5 votes
3 answers
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Is or Are? --> Every year, about 800,000 tonnes of food waste are generated

I need some help with the following sentence: Every year, about 800,000 tonnes of food waste are generated. Should it be "are" or "is"? (as bolded above)
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How is quite used here? [duplicate]

"it was ... interesting to see these (1) quite deprived areas (1) erm (.)" Is quite here being used as an quantifier and is the noun "areas" countable in this context? It sounds to me like 'quite' ...
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Should you use “it” or “they” when referencing a group of people? [duplicate]

Should you use it or they when referencing a group of people? Here is the example sentence: A group of students was walking on the road when a truck hit them/it and it/they was/were immediately ...
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"There is" or "There are": which is appropriate before "a whole slew of academic articles"? [duplicate]

There are a whole slew of academic articles. To me, it seems that this sentence should say "There is a whole slew of academic articles," because the agreement should be with "slew." But I'm having a ...
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3 votes
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There "is" or "are" a wealth of opportunities? [duplicate]

Which is correct: "there ARE a wealth of opportunities" or "there IS a wealth of opportunities?"
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2 votes
1 answer
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Is "much" used in affirmative sentences?

Is the word "much" used in affirmative sentences? Example: I want to buy much milk. I know that "much" is used in negative sentences and questions, but I am not sure if using it in affirmative ...
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7 votes
3 answers
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"He's good police"

I'm fifteen years late, but I've been watching The Wire, recently. In it, I noticed a particularly jarring use of the word "police" as a mass noun with finite subject. I'm a British English speaker ...
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1 vote
0 answers
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Singular or plural verb with "a minimum of"

Does the phrase "a minimum of" in conjunction with a plural term require a singular or plural verb? "A minimum of 1.6 million reads was generated per sample." vs. "A minimum of 1.6 million reads ...
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2 votes
2 answers
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Why is a singular verb "is" used after "One-third of the population" while a plural verb "live" is used after "70 percent of the population"? [duplicate]

1) One-third of the population of sub-Saharan Africa is undernourished. 2) Nearly 70 percent of the population still live in the countryside. 3) One-third of the residents live below the ...
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there is a plethora of investigations which indicate/indicates

"There is a plethora of investigations which indicate how it works...." or "There is a plethora of investigations which indicates how it works.." Does the verb "to indicate" refer to the plethora or ...
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7 votes
2 answers
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Plenty of time, space, and money is needed or are needed?

Plenty of time, space, and money is/are needed This was part of a question on indefinite pronouns. The textbook said are was the correct answer, but I still feel I would say is. I was wondering if ...
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1 vote
1 answer
422 views

Can 'Often' be categorised as quantifier(Determiner)? [closed]

Since 'Often' can also denote quantity, can it be called a quantifier?
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