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Questions tagged [nuance]

Nuance: a subtle difference or distinction in color, expression, meaning, etc.

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What does "snubbed out" mean? [duplicate]

I am confused by the meaning of the term "snubbed out." I will list some examples that I came across. I applied for the position of supervisor, but was quickly snubbed out when the HR ...
Micheal Gignac's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
94 views

What are the differences between to sweet-talk, smooth-talk- butter up, suck up to, cajole, coax, wheedle, inveigle, beguile, and get round someone? [closed]

Are there any differences between the verbs sweet-talk, smooth-talk, butter up, suck up to, cajole, coax, wheedle, inveigle, beguile, and get round someone ? I am aware that this question is very long,...
Alice's user avatar
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2 answers
221 views

". . . , but thinks by Easter he'll have grown into it"? [closed]

(From A Terrible Kindness by Jo Browning Wroe, Part II Cambridge Choir, chapter 21) (It's Christmas. William, the chorister, at home) William's present is a bike, waiting for him in the communal ...
philphil's user avatar
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Should I use "A/an + adj. + Name" or "The + adj. + Name"?

As a native English speaker, I find myself perplexed by this situation. Here are some examples of what I mean. 1.1 The worried Link went to see Impa. 1.2 A worried Link went to see Impa. 2.1 The angry ...
Micheal Gignac's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
295 views

What is the difference between "more like X than Y" and "more like X than like Y"?

There is a grammar textbook that gives the following example. (a) It looked more like a cormorant than a heron. (b) It looked more like a cormorant than like a heron. The textbook says that (b) is ...
Micheal Gignac's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
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Article 'The' when use with the name of an island [duplicate]

According standard English, we do not use 'the' with the name of a single island, for example, 'Tasmania' or 'Bermuda'. We just use 'the' when the name refers to a group of islands or is made up of ...
Lotus's user avatar
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What is the difference between "Us girls gotta stick together" and "We girls gotta stick together"?

I am looking into the difference between the "we" and "us" pronouns, and have found some very useful information here. In the context of emphasizing a particular group, you can put ...
Micheal Gignac's user avatar
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1 answer
42 views

What does this split subject phrase, "it might all have started", imply?

A well-known British writer has this: [to question] how it might all have started To my non-native English speaker ear this sounds a bit off; I'd have said [to question] how it all might have ...
mustaccio's user avatar
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2 votes
3 answers
73 views

What is the difference — honor, confer, decorate —?

I’m a Japanese college student, and in English class, I saw a sentence saying, The prime minister was formally invested with the title by Emperor. When I looked up words which mean "to give a ...
xiuxiu's user avatar
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7 votes
5 answers
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Is catechin an ingredient, a composition, or a compound of green tea?

I have a feeling that the word "ingredient" implies that it was intended to be there by human, while catechin is not an additive, but was naturally in the tea leaves. Giving another example, ...
Pascal's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
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colonial heritage vs. colonial legacy

I'm trying to find the best translation for the German phrase "koloniales Erbe" as applied to a former colonial power, e.g. as used in the title of this conference. Both "colonial ...
joriki's user avatar
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Comma usage and "for" [duplicate]

Here are three examples collected from the Internet: (1) Teslamotors.com is for many, the first introduction to Tesla and EVs. (one-comma version) (2) This last point is, for many, the most ...
nomen's user avatar
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Where are the outer limits?

When one talks about the "outer limits" of something, what, or where, does it mean exactly? (I mean, where to pinpoint?) Thinking of a limit as an outermost line, is it the area closest to ...
Peter's user avatar
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3 votes
3 answers
121 views

Nuances between 'more' and 'better' (than something) [duplicate]

For this sentence, which one is correct or more suitable, 'more' or 'better'; or are they both equally valid? Are there any nuances between them? I like baseball ______ than soccer. Please give a ...
Ron Vanden's user avatar
1 vote
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Work ON a farm, work IN a farm or work AT a farm? Which one is correct, why and the incorrect ones why not? [duplicate]

As the title says. Please help me out with this :)
user460812's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
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what does the expression "I was feathered" mean?

I'm reading "A Day No Pigs Would Die." I’d just wound up running away from Edward Thatcher and running away from the schoolhouse. I was feathered if I was going to run away from one darn ...
Ashley Maria's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
2k views

Difference between "provocative" and "thought-provoking"

In some dictionaries, provocative has two meanings: (1) Causing annoyance, anger, or another strong reaction, especially deliberately. (2) Arousing sexual desire or interest Some other dictionaries ...
dodo's user avatar
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1 answer
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Help me with understanding the context

I'm having difficult time to understand the dialogue below. It comes from "Project Runway season 19." KRISTINA: Did you start to put your zippers? CHASITY: It's not gonna be the last moment. ...
Grace's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
392 views

‘should’ versus ‘expected to’ [closed]

I have the following piece of college regulation. Staff and students should have access to teaching rooms on the hour. Allowing time for setting up equipment and finding seats, this means that formal ...
Moonwalker's user avatar
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1 answer
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I'll be at the concert tomorrow evenif/while/if it means queuing for tickets all night [closed]

In my Cambridge English book there is a practice sentence where I have to put in a clause. The options are 'while', 'despite', 'if' and 'even if'. The context is contrast clauses. The sentence is: I'...
JesseH's user avatar
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0 answers
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How to say that you can wear a garment "by itself?"

I can't seem to realize if this sentence is okay: (I'm writing about some kind of a top) "It is a versatile piece that can be worn by itself or as an overshirt." Q1. Is versatile the right ...
サボテン's user avatar
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1 answer
63 views

Does the addition of a second “some” change the meaning of the following sentence?

I’d like know to whether the following sentence retains its nuance and meaning with the addition of “some” before the word “others”. “I’m good at some types of art and bad at others.” “I’m good at ...
user428883's user avatar
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2 answers
243 views

Asymmetry of "not good" and "not bad"

I'm not sure about this but it seems to me that "not good" always has a firm negative connotation, i.e. it is equivalent to "bad", whereas "not bad" doesn't necessarily ...
Intradiction's user avatar
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1 answer
637 views

Is there any difference between "putting on" and "faking" (an accent)?

I know they both mean "pretending to have" (a particular accent). Yet, I'm unsure if they can be used interchangeably. Are they both disapproving? For example, He was just faking a Scottish ...
BeatsMe's user avatar
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What's the difference between "subject to" and "subjected to" in contracts? [duplicate]

Applicants are subject to testing ... Applicants are subjected to testing ... When employers use "subject to" or "subjected to" in this way, does "subject to" imply they ...
Joe's user avatar
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-2 votes
2 answers
79 views

Difference between a 'condo' and a 'condominium' [closed]

They seem to be a really similar words, but I wonder that there is a difference between the two words? Location, size of the house, or facilities in the building?
Woojin Cha's user avatar
-1 votes
2 answers
364 views

What is the difference between the two sentences? (Have you been ... before? AND have you ever been...?)

Have you been to Japan before? Have you ever been to Japan? What is the difference between the two sentences? Thank you.
Huy Phan's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
70 views

What is the difference between “[I] may [be] ...” and “even though ... ”? [closed]

The above is a question that has occurred to be fairly recently. I admit that there are plenty of cases where they are not even close to equivalent, but how about the following? I may be visually ...
Micheal Gignac's user avatar
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1 answer
60 views

Is there a word that has no nuance and refers to the literal property of something being new?

Sorry for the rather confusing title. I'm writing a research paper regarding COVID-19 and am trying to write a sentence along the lines of: The main challenge of building a COVID-19 domain QA model ...
Sean's user avatar
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0 answers
34 views

"not so useful as" vs "not as useful as" [duplicate]

I do not understand whether the first or the second sentence is correct, or perhaps both? No other metal is so useful as iron. No other metal is as useful as iron. Although the latter feels ...
Agnay Srivastava's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
63 views

Looking for a Very Specific Adjective

Is there a word to describe a person who is both of the following? a) insidious - in the traditional sense...that they have a tendency to use or harm people in such a way that the victim does not ...
Boris's user avatar
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-1 votes
1 answer
1k views

Is there a difference between Lenience and Leniency? Google defines them the same way but is one the modern version and the other the older one?

The Google definition for both words is: he fact or quality of being more merciful or tolerant than expected; clemency. Which one is used most nowadays? Thank you.
marcel_pi's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
1k views

meaning of "ghetto kids" [closed]

I'm going to translate the following sentence into a language in which there may not be an exact equivalent for the word 'ghetto'. He taught ghetto kids in New York's public school system. (...
apadana's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
132 views

What is the difference between 'To study English is not easy' and 'Studying English is not easy'?

What is the difference (nuance) between these two sentences? 'To study English is not easy.' 'Studying English is not easy.'
BigSilver's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
838 views

The difference between '' It is ... '' and '' Is does be ... ''

1 John: Does the fax machine be used any more ? Mary: Yes, it does be used on occasion. 2 John: Is the fax machine used any more? Mary: Yes, it is used on occasion. . Are these different tenses ...
Kantura's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
137 views

Present Unreal Conditional and speaking about present

I would like to ask, if the sentence below is grammatical and how can we understand this sentence: If the car was sold in the last week, you wouldn't see this in the public database yet. Also, can ...
Richard's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
1k views

What are the differences in nuance/meaning between I hope you will spend some time with me, and I want to spend some time with you [closed]

Could anyone help me understand differences in nuance/meaning between 'I hope you will spend some time with me', and 'I want to spend some time with you'.
Sunflower's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
178 views

Difficult construction with Past Perfect + have to

I'm a little bit confused with grammatic construction which includes Past Perfect + "have to". The first question which appears here is: if this construction is grammatic or not? The law changed ...
Richard's user avatar
  • 111
0 votes
4 answers
5k views

Draw my attention (from something) to something

"A beautiful woman always draws my attention". "While I was chatting at Laura's party, a beautiful guy suddenly drew my attention". «Now I wish to draw your attention to what has attracted my ...
Silvio Roberto Vinceti's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
276 views

Future Simple vs. Future Perfect in difficult sentence

I would like to ask three questions: 1.) If the sentence mentioned below is gramatically correct. Everything will be spotless by the time they get here. 2.) Is it correct to use Future Simple ...
Richard's user avatar
  • 111
0 votes
2 answers
245 views

Tenses - Differences in meaning of two sentences

I would like to understand the difference between two sentences and ask if they are gramatically correct. 1.) Sam gained weight because he had been overeating. So, he ate much in the past and gained ...
Richard's user avatar
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7 votes
3 answers
2k views

Allegedly vs. apparently - Differences in connotation?

I am a non-native speaker trying to find the right expression for my sentence. There is a study that reports a 55% decline in the number of trades, however, I cannot examine the data or the study ...
00schneider's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
2k views

kicking off or kicked off

Collins Dictionary: If an event, game, series, or discussion kicks off, or is kicked off, it begins. The shows kick off on October 24th. [VERB PARTICLE] The Mayor kicked off the party. [VERB ...
Suwon Kim's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
816 views

Meaning of "dismay"

What is the exact meaning of dismay? Is it close to shock and surprise? Or is it closer to disappointment and unhappiness? Or does it mean embarrassment? When I looked the word up in the ...
Rabbit's user avatar
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2 votes
0 answers
117 views

Use of an indefinite article associated with a particular person's name [duplicate]

Indefinite (and definite) articles are sometimes associated with a person's name. This answer by Jon Hanna is the best summary of the uses I have found. Also, another question addresses the issue ...
Masa Sakano's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
59 views

"Extreme" consequences of argument

I am trying to say that an argument (a philosophical reasoning for what it's worth) is not taken to its extreme consequences, in the sense that it is not brought and explored to its logical deepest ...
Silvio Roberto Vinceti's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
182 views

Nuances of "I move to speak"? [closed]

I heard a lawyer say "I move to speak" in a sitcom and I wonder what its nuances are. Searching for the phrase doesn't give many results, so it seems like it's not a common phrase. Is it only used ...
user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
14k views

could get vs could've gotten

Is there any difference between could get and could've gotten? Obviously, "could get" can be used for future, hypothetical situations, but I can't see what the difference is, if any, between the two ...
Daniel's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
75 views

A comparison in two sets of quantifiers and adjectives

I learn almost every word on my own, in my productive if a bit peculiar way. I inevitably get perplexed by the ambiguity and the interchangeabilty between the words that I discover with more details. ...
Kismet's user avatar
  • 39
-4 votes
2 answers
5k views

What is the difference between "fate" and "fait accompli"? [closed]

Is there a qualitative difference, or in the sense of finality, or irreversibility or changeability, some negative connotation, e.g. fate may be affected by future actions, but fait accompli is not? ...
Jardine's user avatar
  • 143