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Questions tagged [scientific-language]

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What scientific literary English term describes a person who makes money from the misfortunes of others? [closed]

I forgot the scientific term in English that describes a person who makes money from the misfortunes/problems of other people. «Nineteen Eighty-Four» (1984) mentioned the term "prole", which ...
invzbl3's user avatar
  • 93
-1 votes
0 answers
40 views

How correct are phrases often used in technical papers like "window size" and "network parameters"? [duplicate]

Often when reading scientific papers, especially ones of the modern technology industry, I stumble upon phrases like: we have tuned the network parameters to [...] the window size was set to be [...] ...
Karol Szustakowski's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
27 views

The usage of "side" [closed]

I am currently working on scientific writing in English. I am trying to describe a plane with an elliptical hole, and this hole has two cracks. The cracks are collinear, positioned on the left and ...
Elliot's user avatar
  • 11
1 vote
4 answers
164 views

How can I describe different directions of hatching in a scientific diagram?

I am writing a scientific article and I need to describe the two hatched areas in the Figure below. How do you call these? Upward hatching and downward hatching? Or what? E.g. The upward hatching ...
Tomas's user avatar
  • 839
2 votes
3 answers
109 views

Correct adjective from “transcriptome” and other similar biological terms

In the last 20 years or so researchers have been able to study the complete set of RNA transcripts present in a single organism in a particular state. This is referred to as a transcriptome — a ...
meshuga's user avatar
  • 21
1 vote
0 answers
116 views

Looking for a word for animals that defecate anywhere

There is a word for animals like horses and cows that defecate wherever they happen to be when the need strikes them, versus animals like dogs and cats that seek out one place or another to do their ...
dev_willis's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
82 views

Can "consider" always replace "take into account" in scientific writing?

Consider these two instructions to a science problem: Calculate the velocity. Consider the effect of air resistance. Calculate the velocity. Take into account the effect of air resistance. For me, ...
Pygmalion's user avatar
  • 213
8 votes
7 answers
3k views

Verb for "Placing undue weight on a specific factor when making a decision"

As a behavioral scientist, I often write about biases in decision making, where people place too much / too little weight on a specific property of the options (relative to other factors or a certain ...
DavidP's user avatar
  • 183
9 votes
8 answers
3k views

Usage of "you" in scientific papers

According to numerous questions (e.g Is it recommended to use "we" in research papers?), one should use "we" instead of "I" while writing a scientific paper. However, it'...
Mime's user avatar
  • 201
2 votes
1 answer
60 views

Singular and Plurals in Academic Research

In academic/scientific research, should I use the names of fruits in the singular or plural? For example: There was a significant increase in the frequency of sweet potato consumption (+18.8%), eggs (...
Geovane Portiglioti's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
98 views

Adjective that explains a variable (e.g. curve in a diagram) is growing slightly exponential

I am writing some sentences describing the diagram below. From my perspective, the GDP resembles a bit like a curve (exponentially growing) rather than roughly a straight line. Is there a particular ...
Redsbefall's user avatar
4 votes
3 answers
186 views

How should we describe the largest group in a set when its share accounts for less than 50%?

General idea What is the best way to describe a group that has the largest share of something but doesn't have more than 50%? I'm tempted to use the word "most", but I mentally associate it ...
Felipe D.'s user avatar
  • 141
2 votes
1 answer
77 views

Should one avoid hyphenating prefixed words in scientific papers?

I have noticed that many papers and books (in the engineering and mathematical fields, at least) have a preference for avoiding hyphenated prefixes. For instance, they usually write: preprocessing ...
Rubem Pacelli's user avatar
1 vote
7 answers
5k views

Why a "100% chance" of rain? [closed]

A 100% chance means it is certain, so it is not really 'chance' in that case. Someone I know said that rain is always uncertain, so why not say a 99% chance then?
RudolphTheRedKnowsRainDear's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
33 views

Using "task force" in an international academic context

I am currently setting up a working group within an international scientific association. The working group gathers American, Japanese, Chinese, New Zealander, and a few European research fellows. I ...
Covich's user avatar
  • 103
1 vote
4 answers
347 views

What is a product called that everyone gets no matter what? [duplicate]

What are things/products called that everyone needs and that people keep using or find a way of using, no matter how much you restrict their use (for example legally, environmentally, culturally etc ...
Considerator's user avatar
1 vote
4 answers
163 views

Less formal term for "dimensions" for something that can be measured in units

In scientific/engineering writing and calculations we use terms that are considered "dimensions" and for each "dimension" we have to have "units" when we describe them. ...
Trashman's user avatar
  • 131
0 votes
2 answers
132 views

Is there a word stronger than "promote" but weaker than "enforce" in a technical context? Maybe "force"?

Context: Scientific paper targeting at computer scientists, engineers and mathematicians I am searching for a word similar to "promote", "push", "force", "enforce&...
Jakob's user avatar
  • 101
2 votes
1 answer
73 views

Is "that of" used here correctly?

I wonder if "that of" used in the following question doesn't create grammatical error. If it does, then I also wonder the corrected form or alternatives. The statement: The running time ...
seyed sepehr mousavi's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
66 views

Single medical term for "taking a pulse"

I have been searching for a technical/medical term to use in place of "taking a pulse". I see some texts use "palpatory measurements" in place of the colloquial "taking a ...
r2d2's user avatar
  • 5
0 votes
0 answers
20 views

Articles usage and human organs [duplicate]

As far as I know, usage of general concepts allows the usage of a zero article. But what about the organs, such as liver, lungs, or brain? Is it acceptable to use them without an article in academic ...
Boddha's user avatar
  • 9
1 vote
1 answer
185 views

Opposite of invariant

I look for the opposite of "invariant" in the context of scientific language. If you look at this example sentence: [...] Although it is translationally and rotationally invariant, it is ...
mcocdawc's user avatar
  • 113
0 votes
0 answers
30 views

Gauss vs Gauss' vs Gauss's? [duplicate]

Which of the three should be used? Gauss law vs Gauss' law vs Gauss's law? The middle one seems most correct but does that make the others incorrect? Or is it a matter of preference. Also, how do the ...
Some Student's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
851 views

Use of "paper" / "study" / ... in scientific publications

In my research paper I used the phrase "this paper" to refer to the one I am writing and sometimes I write "the [other] paper" to refer to some other paper. The editor replaced &...
Make42's user avatar
  • 331
0 votes
1 answer
96 views

Is "we contribute ..." bad style in scientific writing?

In my paper I am writing a couple of times We contribute ... for example First, we contribute a new definition for the problem and then a formula for xy. My editor has removed all the "...
Make42's user avatar
  • 331
0 votes
1 answer
101 views

Is there a "more formal" (or ideally, actual medical/research term?) for being "clucky" / "broody"?

It's a phenomenon that if a woman, A, spends time around a woman, B, who is either pregnant or has a young baby (B is perhaps a sister, friend), sometimes woman A finds herself with "a desire to ...
Fattie's user avatar
  • 10.7k
0 votes
0 answers
36 views

How to quote a list (for a scientific thesis)?

I would like to quote a list verbatim. Let's say this is the list, and it's originally from a book: Mathematics is essential in many fields, including natural science, engineering, medicine, finance, ...
Anna_B's user avatar
  • 101
-1 votes
1 answer
88 views

Let us suppose vs Suppose [closed]

When should we use "Let us suppose", and when "Suppose" in science academic articles? Example 1: Suppose the electric field lines in a region of space are straight lines. or ...
Ben's user avatar
  • 105
1 vote
4 answers
329 views

The use of the term "agreeability" when comparing two results

I'm writing a scientific paper about two obtained results: an experimental result and a numerical one. Because the two agree well with each other, I may use the term "agreeability" to ...
Élio Pereira's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
470 views

What is the true etymology of "algebra"?

This is more of a question for Arabic stack exchange if there was such a thing, but anyways: The OED suggests as the etymology of the term "algebra" Etymology: < post-classical Latin ...
Colin's user avatar
  • 1,063
0 votes
1 answer
57 views

how to avoid repetition in comparing two things in a line graph

I have a problem with repetition for describing this graph. This graph represents the strong ground motion acceleration (vertical axes) over the period (the horizontal axes) for different return ...
Sonia Bazargan's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
59 views

using article "the" before three scientific methods

I dove into similar questions but didn't find the exact question. I am writing my paper and I know that "the" should be used before methods, but how could it be when there are 3 methods ...
Sonia Bazargan's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
46 views

For X a Y, something is true

Often in mathematical writing I read (and write) constructions such as For G a finite group, the character algebra is defined as ... For X and Y sets, a function from X to Y is ... The general ...
Jo Mo's user avatar
  • 121
2 votes
1 answer
470 views

A word that includes plants and fungi, but not animals

I am working on a project which includes information about plants and fungi. It would be very helpful for me if there a word that means plants-and-fungi, but I'm not sure there is. "Flora" ...
Joaquim d'Souza's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
584 views

Term for describing auditory memory similar to 'eidetic' (for visual memory)

Is there a similar term for eidetic memory, but for sound? An eidetic memory is the ability to remember things in exact detail, as if you can see them in your mind: Cambridge The measure of eidetic ...
Cascabel_StandWithUkraine_'s user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
55 views

how to describe a set of strings with various types of format [closed]

In my scientific experiment, the measurement of equipment may appear as follows 1’’-2’’, 3”:4”, [1”, 2”], or (1”:2”), etc. I would like to describe this fact in an article. What is the best way to ...
user288609's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
71 views

Terminology for an "optical RGB image" in relation to more complex imagery like hyperspectral imagery?

I am currently writing the literature review portion of my dissertation and I find that I am being quite wordy when attempting to describe what a layman would conceptualize as an "image". ...
KDecker's user avatar
  • 705
4 votes
1 answer
111 views

What is the correct way to write out the scientific symbol µeV, microelectronvolts or microelectron-volts?

How should µeV be written out? Is it microelectronvolts? or microelectron-volts?
Timothy's user avatar
  • 41
1 vote
1 answer
216 views

To what extent should figure legends within scientific literature describe trends in their figures?

How far should figure legends go in describing the trends within the figure (within a biology paper)? I've seen some conflicting information on this and I'm unsure if legends need to fully describe ...
blammo69's user avatar
0 votes
4 answers
1k views

"yields" vs "yields that" in math context

I have learned that a commonly mistake in math papers is the phrase by ... we have that ... instead it would be correct to just leave the that. Now I am wondering how to correctly use yield. In ...
Nathanael Skrepek's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
520 views

Number vs. no. vs. # in scientific papers?

This is kinda an extension to: this question. I am writing a scientific paper and have a numbered list. Now, when I want to refer to that list I want to say something like: "This issue is closely ...
user395429's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
32 views

Noun + Past Participle Usage

DCR(Dark Current Rate) represents the base noise level of a SPAD caused by parasitic avalanches happening in the dark due to thermal noise and band-to-band tunnelling effects. I don't understand why ...
Bharath Reddy's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
43 views

Is the usage "multiple logistic regression analysis" correct?

I encountered a manuscript where the author writes: Risk associations for metabolic syndrome and diabetes were analyzed using multiple logistic regression analyses..." In this case, is the ...
sciencejedi's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
188 views

Can the word 'slab' be used to mean 'range'? For example, distance slab and weight slab (in technical specifications), income tax slab

In Merriam-Webster dictionary, none of the meaning of 'slab' is 'range'. But slab is also used to mean range in India. For example, limit X1 for weight slab 10-20kg, limit X2 for slab 20-30 kg.
Amrit Upadhyay's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
80 views

'Such' in place of a demonstrative pronoun. Such a configuration or such configuration?

I read some explanations about the use of 'such' as a determiner, but I still could not figure this out. If, in scientific/formal writing, I want to use 'such' instead of 'this' to specify a ...
Wagner Correr's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
3k views

Convention of writing percentage range

I am writing to inquire the convention of writing the following percentage range in academic writing: We reduce the extra cost from 99.9% to 12%--24% (depending on different configuration schemes). ...
lllllllllllll's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
278 views

Is "get stuck" a proper term in academic writing?

I am writing to inquire the usage of "get stuck" in academic writing. Here is my draft: this design could get stuck in a bad local minima and therefore is not desired. I use Google Scholar to ...
lllllllllllll's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
36 views

Taxonomy - how to describe something as plantlike?

So I'm writing a story that features Chimeras or hybrid creatures, and I'm wondering what I would call a plant based creature. For other things like a spider creature or bird creature I would call it ...
Gus's user avatar
  • 13
0 votes
1 answer
31 views

Phrases for qualitative comparison

Suppose we have find a relation between two quantities X and Y. When we say "The more Y, the more X" is it implied that the relation between Y and X is linear?
ado sar's user avatar
  • 151
0 votes
1 answer
135 views

"As we want to" in scientific writing

I am writing a scientific journal article at the moment (biophysics). I am using the phrase "As we want to" in a sentence: "As we want to focus on the assembly process, we implicitly average over all ...
newandlost's user avatar