Questions tagged [prepositions]

Prepositions are function words like "to", "over", "through", "in". The meaning of a sentence can be dramatically altered by choosing the wrong preposition. Questions need to include enough information for the intended meaning to be deduced.

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1answer
22 views

“Being with” definition

If I said, “I get happier when I am with her.” Is it clear that “when I am with her” means when I am physically with her? “With someone” can mean a lot of things in English such as being in a romantic ...
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16 views

Using “between” to introduce a set of traits or circumstances

I was wondering if this construction using "between" to introduce a set of traits/circumstances was correct. (I'm also interested in alternative phrases that may be more appropriate): ...
4
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1answer
72 views

Order of Correlative Conjunction + Preposition

Which of the following sentences is correct? Are both grammatical? 1: I hope to see you in either France or Belgium. or 2: I hope to see you either in France or [in (optional)] Belgium. I have ...
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38 views

Is 'with' a preposition or an adverb? [closed]

I am a bit confused if with is a preposition or an adverb.https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=2ahUKEwih2NX-...
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0answers
35 views

Is there a difference between “after 3 days from the date” and “3 days after the date”?

I received a message from bank regarding a transaction I made. The line was: please raise dispute after 3 working days from the date of transaction If I were to send this, I would have written: ...
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24 views

The road injuries are of major concern in Indian metro cities

In the above sentence, Is it correct if I add 'of" in front of major concern. OR Is it okay, "a major concern'
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14 views

Can 'by' be replaced with 'around', 'before' or 'in' in the sentence “japan pushes back budget surplus target by two years due to coronavirus”?

this is my sentence 'japan pushes back budget surplus target by two years due to coronavirus' why the preposition is 'by'? I looked up and understanded the usage "by + a certain time" as: ...
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0answers
12 views

with or on a flexible schedule

Which preposition is correct to use in this context: I want to say that by taking online courses, you can improve on/with a flexible schedule. Imagine it's a description of the course (one of the ...
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40 views

To me vs for me [migrated]

What's the correct sentence: You might be able to find a job for me or You might be able to find a job to me? I never understand the rules of for vs to and I just use them interchangeably. Is there a ...
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27 views

I would like to know if I use “in” or “on”

I would like to know if "in" is okay to use on the below sentence Please notify me when your service in this matter has been concluded so we may close our file.
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1answer
81 views

Is it grammatically correct to omit prepositions sometimes?

I have seen quite a few people using these sentences: I have been frequently flying Jet Airways. I believe the above sentence is wrong unless the person, saying this, is the pilot themselves. The ...
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18 views

“Between each” and Other Constructions with Fewer than Two Objects

Page 112 of Garner's fourth edition reads ✳Between each and Other Constructions with Fewer than Two Objects This phrasing is a peculiar brand of illogic, ✳between each house/speech,instead of, ...
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1answer
20 views

Maybe because the salt content in Yippee is a little less

Maybe because the salt content in Yippee is a little less. Maybe because the salt content is a little less in Yippee. Which one of these two is grammatically correct? Can you throw some light on this ...
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20 views

How to NOT end a sentence in for [duplicate]

"Uncover what people are looking for" Is there any other way to write that sentence without ending in a preposition ('for')?
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1answer
26 views

He is {off/on/in/out} to Washington? [closed]

Which one of the following is most appropriate to use? He is {off/on/in/out} to Washington?
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1answer
34 views

Is there any difference between “admit something” and “admit to something”?

"Admit to stealing the money." And "Admit stealing the money." A lot of people, including native speakers, have told me there is no difference between them. But for some reason the ...
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24 views

When asking someone to smell something, is it correct to say “smell of this” or “smell this”? [migrated]

Which is grammatically correct? Smell of these fresh coffee beans. Smell these fresh coffee beans. Is it correct to use the preposition “of”?
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29 views

Which preposition should I use (during/on the time)

Context: Teachers set their schedules in an electronic calendar by showing the time slots they can teach. And we've noticed that these time slots are very popular among students. Which preposition ...
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14 views

GPA (Grade Point Average) for/in/of

The preposition suitable for this noun is quite a headache to me. Please consider the following: I finished those programs with flying colors. The GPAs for/in/of the two programs were outstanding ...
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14 views

“Soil acidification” or “acidification of the soil”?

I'm writing an article for a scientific magazine, and this is a particular example of a general doubt that often happens to me. When should I use "X of Y" instead of "Y X"? I hope ...
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1answer
46 views

Does it make sense to say “to be cross over something” with cross meaing annoyed?

We can say someone is mad/angry/annoyed over something. Can we use the same structure for the adjective "cross"?
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2answers
54 views

What's the difference between “take over control of” and “take control over”?

I'm currently reading India after Gandhi: The History of the World's Largest Democracy written by Ramachandra Guha, and in one of the starting pages of the book, the author has written the sentence. ...
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20 views

Data were collected “by” or “with”?

I feel like by and with are both correct but they mean different things and should be used in different context. for example i would use by if data were collected by someone (a person or a company) ...
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17 views

Some useful tips for/of learning English and any other languages?

Should I use "for" or "of" for the sentence in the title? It feels right in both cases. I did some research on the internet but still I am having trouble deciding which one is ...
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33 views

“For X, use Y” vs. “To represent X, use Y”

Is it grammatically correct and idiomatic to use "For X, use Y" in the meaning of "To represent X, use Y"? The target document is a programming style guide. I like the brevity of ...
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1answer
47 views

“drive by” = “drive near”? [closed]

Is it correct to say "drive by London", "drive by the beach" in the meaning of "near London", "near the beach"?
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2answers
59 views

Use of preposition “of” after “ask,” “inquire,” and “inquiry”

I’m mystified about the use of the preposition “of” after the verb “ask” and “inquire” and the noun “inquiry.” Would someone help me, please? First, do these two sentences mean the same thing? I ...
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1answer
29 views

“A ten minute interview” vs “An interview of ten minutes” [duplicate]

I remember my English professor saying that these two sentences are quite different in meaning, but after four months, I cannot recall the exact difference. Can somebody explain to me what's the ...
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50 views

IN/ON with Nouns

I read in an article that IN preposition expresses a conditional state of being for example- • I am in love • This is the best option,in fact • Call me in case you need my help tomorrow And ON ...
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2answers
67 views

usage of 'more common'

We all know that tigers are found only in Asia and not in Africa. So is it correct to say that tigers are "more common" in Asia than Africa?
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76 views

What is the correct preposition for “ask”? [closed]

While the verb "ask" is usually followed by an indirect object and therefore doesn't take a preposition, it is sometimes the case that we want to emphasize the person who is supposed to ...
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2answers
21 views

Using of/for with need

When using "need" is it of or for For example: no need for extra money or no need of extra money Which one is correct and why?
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1answer
45 views

in the system vs. of the system

Is there any difference in the meaning and usage of in the system and of the system. For instance: Organs in the respiratory system and Organs of the respiratory system Components in a system and ...
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1answer
59 views

Succeed at vs succeed in [American English]

There is a similar question but it’s not completely answered. For example, Ludwig shows that The New York Times and others use both. Merriam-Webster also contains both. Is it a difference between AE ...
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23 views

Choosing the right preposition when there are multiple adjectives modifying the noun

When we want to be specific, we can have two separate prepositions following two different adjectives. Such as: ... can be either supportive of or perilous for a noun. But, can we choose to only have ...
3
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1answer
48 views

Prepositions with verbs in the end of sentences through 'and' or 'or'

Can we use verbs and prepositions in the end of sentences through 'and' or 'or'? And if we can't, how should we rephrase it? For example: I have someone to talk to and play with.
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11 views

The usage of “from” and “for” in “from the scarcity of other markets for the surplus…”

I read this sentence from Thomas De Qincey's Confessions of an English Opium-Eater (p. 10): Here I might have stayed with great comfort for many weeks, for provisions were cheap at B---, from the ...
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1answer
75 views

Four-line copywriting [closed]

Children usually practise handwriting in four-line copybooks. They practise it on each page. And they write each letter touching the top and bottom lines. We usually convey this idea using either '...
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2answers
68 views

Omitting “by” preposition and the resulted phrase

Consider the following examples: I paid for it by using my credit card. I was in contact with my friends by sending letters. I learned how to dance by watching online videos if I remove the ...
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1answer
61 views

All (*of) the students/contracts [duplicate]

According to the Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English Although some object to the inclusion of of in such phrases as all of the students and all of the contracts and prefer to omit ...
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3answers
41 views

Distributor of or Distributor for

Another person who greatly influenced my boyhood was my first cousin, Samsuddin. He was the sole distributor for newspapers in Rameshvaram. [WINGS OF FIRE] I don't understand why "for" is ...
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2answers
30 views

Scheduled FOR or IN the next days

Which preposition should be used in this sentence: "She has 5 sessions scheduled for/in the next 7 days." For context: I want to say that she has booked this number of sessions with the ...
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2answers
46 views

Does any of the following sound metaphorically correct?

"This data has been sitting on my hard drive for years." OR "This data has been sitting in my hard drive for years."
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2answers
41 views

Facet of/facet to [closed]

She has many facets to her personality She has many facets of her personality The only redeeming facet of the group was a boy Why is it so? How 'to and of' prepositions are used in these sentences?
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19 views

adjective + “issue of whether”

According to Garner's fourth edition, Question whether; ✳question of whether; ✳question as to whether. The first has a long literary lineage: it properly uses the noun clause beginning with whether ...
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1answer
21 views

“great for the chase” vs “expert in the chase”

"Great for the chase" vs "Expert in the chase" I found these two clauses on the same page of The Iliad: Then Menelaus son of Atreus caught the brilliant hunter Scamandrius with ...
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1answer
27 views

“Pull in to” or “pull into”? “Head in to”, “Head into”, “head to”, or “head for”?

My question may sound weird, but what which of these is correct? “She pulled in to the parking lot” “She pulled into the parking lot” “I was heading for school.” “I was heading to school.” “I was ...
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2answers
56 views

what does X mean vs what does it mean X

Once upon I time I asked the following question during a class for the CAE certification: What does it mean to [verb and something else]? and I was told that that's not English, as I should say ...
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1answer
29 views

What is real time indicator? [closed]

Does 'real time indicator' mean collecting data: -over time at specific period, for example of the year/month etc, or -as it happens, for example, in very short intervals, like a month, week, day or ...
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0answers
29 views

Do we still use “for” like “because”? [duplicate]

I was wondering if the use of “for” like “because” was current use. For example: “I haven’t come to the party, for I was tired.” Is this used nowadays? Or shall we say “I haven’t come to the party ...

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