Questions tagged [prepositions]

Prepositions are function words like "to", "over", "through", "in". The meaning of a sentence can be dramatically altered by choosing the wrong preposition. Questions need to include enough information for the intended meaning to be deduced.

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66 views

Reference Request on Preposition Fronting

Currently reading "A Student's Introduction to English Grammar" by Geoffrey K. Pullum and Rodney Huddleston. Consider the following contrast between the phrasal verbs ask for and come across....
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44 views

What is the difference between “suffer for” and “suffer from”?

I have a question about "I've suffered for my sins." why is used "suffered for", not "suffered from"?
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2answers
26 views

Which preposition to use with the word 'divest'? (Should it be 'divest of,' 'divest from,' or no preposition at all?)

I am wondering which preposition would best fit this usage of the word divest. In this case, the word is being used in the third subsense of the first sense found in Merriam-Webster: a : to deprive ...
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16 views

Correct usage: Summarized in or by [closed]

What is the correct sentence here? "The entire paper can be summarized in ten points" "The entire paper can be summarized by ten points" Thanks!
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2answers
40 views

Do you need to use “as” with “brand” or “rebrand”?

Do you need to use "as" with brand or rebrand? Here's an example: Company X rebranded itself as the Smart Brand. Company X rebranded itself the Smart Brand. Which is correct? Or are they ...
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1answer
43 views

Is it possible put a preposition in front of a relative pronoun what? [closed]

She believed what I was talking about. She believed about what I was talking. I believe the sentence 1 is grammatically correct, but I'm not sure about the sentence 2. Is that okay, too? Thank you.
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1answer
22 views

“Book something on a date” or “book for a date”

Do I use on or for with a single date? I would like to book annual leave on 08/08/2021 I would like to book annual leave for 08/08/2021
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5answers
87 views

What's the counter to “negate?” [closed]

"Negate" is sometimes used--perhaps less professionally--to mean something along the lines of "take the opposite." There is other usage that means something more like "deny&...
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1answer
35 views

The meaning of word “FOR” at the beginning of sentence [duplicate]

I met some odd usage of preposition "for". I guess it's old style, or high style. I give examples for better understanding: About this time legend among the Hobbits first becomes history ...
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1answer
22 views

“Covered in” or “Covered with” trash [duplicate]

The mountain is covered in trash The mountain is covered with trash I find both of them correct but I can't say for sure. Is "covered in" or "covered with" more suitable in this ...
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1answer
27 views

Reduce the number of ‘the’ while keeping the original meaning

I have below sentence that contains many "the"s. How do I reduce the number of "the"s without missing the original meaning? The sound signal generated during the movement of the ...
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0answers
20 views

Of vs For in “The Institute of/for Wildlife Research”

Is there a difference between saying: The Institute for Wildlife Research and The Institute of Wildlife Research
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2answers
39 views

Through the ocean or in the ocean [closed]

In an essay should say I swim in the ocean or through the ocean. For sailing what should we say?
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1answer
44 views

“Minister for” and “Ministry of”

In some British Commonwealth countries, e.g. Singapore, government ministries are named "Ministry of", as in "Ministry of Defence". However, the title of the minister in charge is &...
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0answers
29 views

“of the opinion” vs “at the opinion” [closed]

Can the sentence 'at the opinion' be used anywhere? I know that 'of the opinion' is heavily used. I remember someone saying the first is correct, but I could not find anything on the internet.
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39 views

Difference between “besides”, “apart from” and “except for”. Prepositions vs adverbials

I am studying discourse markers and ended up checking online (in crownacademyenglish) about the difference between these expressions. Firstly, this website affirms that they are prepositions, which I ...
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0answers
22 views

Which word does with modify here?

I have a question on whether the below is grammatically correct : "Imagine breaking the door of the man with the hand that feeds you" The intention is along the lines of "That man feeds ...
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0answers
53 views

usage of adverb “comparably” [closed]

I'm an English teacher in South Korea. I've always taught my students to use adverbs to modify verbs or adjectives and adjectives to modify nouns. So I know "They offered a number of jewels ...
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1answer
43 views

“With probability”, “with a probability”, “with the probability”?

As a mathematician, I often write and read about probabilities. In the literature, I've seen versions of all the sentences below. Which one is correct? This happens with probability (of) 30%. This ...
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0answers
24 views

Should a prepositional phrase beginning with “of” that follows a plural noun be singular or plural?

Which of these is correct? “Types of citrus fruit” or “types of citrus fruits”? I suspect it is the first example, but I would really like to know what the grammar rule governing these situations ...
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0answers
6 views

Asking for 'experience at X place' implies only timespan or also details of the experience it self?

In the application form of a internship one of the fields states Experience at (current work place) with no additional information. The field allows for a more than one-line answer and I am not pretty ...
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1answer
25 views

Is “You can invite the user to the workspace with the admin role.” grammatically correct?

The following sentence looks awkward to me: You can invite the user to the workspace with the admin role. I think a good way to put it should be: You can invite the user to the workspace and assign ...
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0answers
23 views

How is this an example of a preposition connecting a noun or a pronoun to another clause? [migrated]

In this grammar book I am working through, prepositions are defined as words that connect certain nouns and pronouns (AKA objects of prepositions) to clauses. However, in the following sentence, I am ...
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2answers
46 views

Do I include “that” or leave it out when used adjacent to “whatever, whereever, etc.” such as in the following example?

"Advantages of whatever THAT happens always outweigh the costs" Grammarly underlines THAT as red to leave it out. I know that when I say "whatever happens, I will be there for you" ...
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0answers
48 views

Is a man a consort of a queen, or to a queen? [closed]

Consort of, or to? Would we say "the Consort of Queen Elizabeth" or "the Consort to Queen Elizabeth"?
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1answer
42 views

With or without FOR? “The last thing I want is (FOR) anyone to…”

I am doing Proficiency exam practice and came across the following sentence transformation: As you can see, according to the answer key, my answer is wrong. However, I did some research and found out ...
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0answers
40 views

Is it “in jargon” or “on jargon”? [migrated]

I am choosing which preposition to use before jargon – "in jargon" or "on jargon"? I know that it's usually "in %language%": "in english", "in hawaiian&...
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1answer
31 views

“Within its vault are more than 4.5 million maps.” Preposition and Prepositional Phrase Confusion [closed]

Within its vault are more than 4.5 million maps. If "within" is a preposition, where is the prepositional phrase? I'm confused about this because I cannot find the prepositional phrase.
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1answer
30 views

'At a time' or 'in a time'

In the phrase The quantity of insects in/at a time t is given by i(t). What is the correct? Thank you so much!
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0answers
15 views

Preposition use: targeted on/at distinct patient populations

Should I go for on or at? To guide policymaking, high-quality systems-level research targeted on distinct patient populations is needed. To guide policymaking, high-quality systems-level research ...
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0answers
39 views

What is the correct preposition for searching items?

I am confused about prepositions for searching in [n] count of items. For example, we have 1000 items, users can search and find an item, but which preposition fits this meaning well? Search in 1000 ...
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0answers
13 views

Participation in or on? This study focuses on Castaño’s participation in/on Colombian radio broadcasting since the beginning of the 1950s [closed]

I am uncertain about this sentence: "This study focuses on Gloria Valencia de Castaño’s participation on Colombian radio broadcasting since the beginning of the 1950s and continuing into the mid-...
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0answers
34 views

Usage of “of” with an implicit object

Consider this sentence from an article about a killing: “Based on repeated threats on the night of, they (Rose, Ford and Liakos) decided to go on a scouting mission that was preserved on video,” ...
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2answers
54 views

When to use (or not use) commas in a sentence with conditions

Current Sentence: The steps in this procedure must be performed chronologically until the card has been found, or all the steps have been exhausted, and an adjustment to the system must be made. ...
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2answers
72 views

A “conjecture on” or a “conjecture about”?

As a non-English scientist, the question bothers me. Maybe the answer depends on the context? Allow me to give a few examples. These are titles of a short text: Is it better to say "A conjecture ...
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2answers
63 views

Are there any verbs that accept multiple prepositions and as a result differ in meaning?

In some languages there are particular verbs that can be used both with and without a preposition. In some of these cases, the verb also accepts multiple prepositions. Example 1: Below is an example ...
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0answers
25 views

Usage of it and them with the same noun

Here is an example situation where the noun refers to something in general- (General statement) The coconut tree is my favourite tree. It can grow up to a height of 25 meters. (1) I used to climb them ...
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19 views

Preposition to vs. into

As I'm not an ELL, I'm posting this question here. It seems that both are grammatically correct: "Please send those documents into my e-mail" "Please send those documents to my e-mail&...
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1answer
37 views

Multiple Numbers Comparison with “times in”

Dear potential resolvers, I'm currently stuck with this enigma: Distance between last two pelvic-fin rays 2.7-4.0 times in body width at pelvic-fin origin The "times in" part confuses me. ...
2
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1answer
114 views

What is the basis for calling HOME a preposition? [duplicate]

I have gone through many a post here and elsewhere that treats home in such sentences as Stay home. Go home. prepositions. Admittedly, this is a fairly new perspective of looking at the POS, thanks ...
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2answers
53 views

What is the difference in meaning when we use a gerund instead of a bare infinitive after the preposition “to”? [closed]

Example: "I devoted so much time to learning this skill." And "I devoted so much time to learn this skill."
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1answer
36 views

Came across this sentence in a newsletter and was wondering if the 'of' in it should be 'off'? [closed]

Rangers came crashing down of the Europa League and Kemar Roofe produced this...
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0answers
40 views

How do native speakers think about phrasal verbs?

I would like to ask a question about phrasal verbs. Do native english speakers think about the meaning of each individual word of the phrasal verb when they will say it or they just think about the ...
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2answers
30 views

Preposition “to” use necessary: The aims of the study were: (1) to evaluate, (2) to present

I am writing study aims. Are the "to"-s necessary or redundant in the following sentence? Article "to" use necessary: The aims of the study were: (1) to evaluate, (2) to present .....
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1answer
36 views

Why do we use “at” in the phrase “good at [doing]”

In English, why do we use "at" in phrases such as "good at [doing something]", "terrible at [doing something]", etc.? I'm trying to think of an example of how "at&...
1
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1answer
58 views

smitten with/by

Fowler's smit reads Its most frequent use is as the participle smitten, ‘infatuated, fascinated’. When the object of the fascination is a person, with is much more often used than by; when the object ...
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0answers
22 views

What should be used 'related to' or 'related with' [cell programming]? [duplicate]

Full text: Furthermore, genes related with cell reprogramming are activated and play an important role during the regeneration process after damage. My issue: I consulted my urologist friend, he ...
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1answer
69 views

Preposition for singing and guitar

If someone is playing songs on the guitar and people are singing songs related to that playing, how do you say it most naturally? We are singing songs to the guitar? We are singing songs under the ...
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1answer
109 views

Isn't “of” redundant in “out of doors”?

Not only does "out of doors" sound "rather archaic" to me, it sounds superfluous when English already uses "outdoor(s)". Am I correct? Or does "of" somehow ...
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1answer
32 views

the use of the word “of” in the sentence [closed]

Could you tell me the grammatical function of the word "of" in the sentence below? "You're just clearing it of all the filth and just putting it somewhere that's outside of you." I ...

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