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Prepositions are function words like "to", "over", "through", "in". The meaning of a sentence can be dramatically altered by choosing the wrong preposition. Questions need to include enough information for the intended meaning to be deduced.

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To indicate destination: differences between TO and FOR

According to my Longman dictionary... for: used to say where a person, vehicle etc is going: I set off for work. | the train for Manchester | A few days later she would be leaving for New York. to: ...
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Is the “that” optional in “my idea was that (…)”?

I wrote the following sentence in an essay: "My idea was that, since A is B, B might be A". However, word count matters in this essay, so I'd like to know if the "that" is optional in this sentence. ...
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Use of the preposition “for” at the end of a sentence

I'm developing web copy for a government agency, but have run into a problem with a tricky preposition at the end of a sentence. I want to avoid using "for" at the end of the sentence below, but I'm ...
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what is the meaning for “divers for crotchets”?

I'm reading Eureka by Edgar Allan Poe and he says a phrase that I've been looking for everywhere but couldn't find anything. The context is this An ocean well described by the Nubian Geographer, ...
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preposition + either… or

I came upon the following sentence: This game is suitable for either children or adults. So, Does this mean that the game is suitable for both children and adults, or only for one of the group? And ...
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Correct preposition after the word encouragement

I am writing a paper and I am not quite sure about the correct preposition that comes after the word encouragement. "Consequently, there was always encouragement towards, for, to any kind of art ...
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1answer
29 views

Slow to do and slow in doing

Is there a difference between "slow ( or quick) to do something" and slow ( or quick) in doing something? Various dictionaries list both uses but don't make any remarks as to their usages. Do they ...
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Usage of 'out of' in this context [on hold]

What is the meaning of out of in the sentence? Is there any problem if it is not used? They swindled local businesses out of thousands of pounds They swindled local businesses thousands of ...
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What are the terms of analysis for prepositions that take verbal objects?

Prepositions are always followed by objects but these are not always nouns, they often take untensed verb clauses (?) as objects, apparently in both passive and active forms. For example in the ...
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Which is the proper Preposition to be used with 'a couple of' [duplicate]

John and I have worked in a couple of projects Jonh and I have worked on a couple of projects Which sentence is grammatically correct?
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28 views

“Born in” vs “born at” with proper nouns: is this a definite vs indefinite prepositional object situation?

Please help me explain to my friend why, while there's no doubt that he was born at St James Hospital, it is incorrect for him to say he was born in St James Hospital -- despite the fact that he ...
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Why this article is used, preposition and question formation [closed]

you can fool some people all the time, but not everyone The question is why it is all the time? Please do explain to me Why it is I have another piece of work for you and not to you? I am protecting ...
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set to vs set at

When talking about odds, say in sports, should I say "Betn1 set Team A's odds at 10/1" or "Betn1 set Team A's odds to 10/1"?
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Can a preposition be followed by a V-ed?

I was taught in school that a preposition is always followed by a noun, pronoun or Gerund. But recently, I have encountered a case (Ielts writing test) in which I had to describe and write something ...
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39 views

“Ability of” or “Ability on”? [closed]

Just a quick question, do I say "I want to develop my abilities on English and mathematics" or "I want to develop my abilities of English and mathematics"? Alternatives are also welcome.
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71 views

Difference between 'at' and 'by' for percentages

Please confirm the difference between these two sentences: Salad is the most popular dish by 43%. Salad is the most popular dish at 43%. Is the meaning of these two sentences same or ...
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Usage of “OF” in relation to verb and noun such as “Depletion of minerals” vs. “Mineral depletion”

Which usage would be correct for the following examples? Depletion of minerals is associated with increased mining interest in the South America's. vs. Mineral depletion is associated with ...
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52 views

The exit to or exit from a place?

New York Times article about restuarant employees blocking patrons from leaving the building: One of the arresting officers, Anthony Sengco, wrote in his criminal complaint that he observed Dr. ...
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“although being an underdog” or “despite being an underdog”? [migrated]

Which of the answers seems most natural – although being or despite being? 4. Chen Wei Lin, or “tom60229,” was one of the participants in the 2017 Hearthstone World Championship. He wasn't as ...
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Are these sentences natural to use to you? [closed]

I'm recently studying about off. Please check the below is correct of using off or the sentences are correct (and how would you change them) The sudden pull threw George off balance. He got a ...
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Can “under” and “within” mean the same in some context?

We use "under" for the measurement of time and weight, like this: The egg was boiled under 12 minutes. The bag was just under 10 kilos, so I was able to bring it on the plane. [from here] In ...
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Is it “In New Delhi” or “at New Delhi”? [closed]

My Home India will organise "Nest Fest - 2018" on Saturday at New Delhi to create awareness and celebrate the cultural diversity of the Northeast region, where Chief Minister Biplab Kumar Deb along ...
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Is it correct to say “doing things that he is capable of and skillful at?”

Basically, I am writing a sentence, "...who is engaged in doing things that he is capable of and skillful at (what if we added to it - interested in - is it possible? What rules do work here?)" I ...
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Difference between “under”, “underneath”, “below” and “beneath”

It leads me to the confusion, when it comes to contradicting between some prepositions. Today, I want to know the distinction between the two similar senses of these prepositions: under, underneath, ...
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Practice in vs on vs at [closed]

When do we use "practice something", "practice in something" and "practice on something"?
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62 views

Is the preposition optional in “going down (to) the store”?

Cambridge Dictionary says: In informal situations, we can use down to talk about a quick trip to a destination which we consider to be less central than where we are. In this meaning, we can use it ...
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“Bent 90 degrees” or “at 90 degrees”?

The metal bar was straight. But I bent it to make a right (90 degrees) angle. Can I say it as below? The metal bar was bent 90 degrees. (90 degree / at 90 degree / to 90 degree) 90 degree / degrees ...
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If “pending” is a preposition, why not “awaiting” and “remaining”

I have found these three examples of pending, awaiting, and remaining from Your Dictionary, all of which show that they are prepositions: Philip, who had been left in charge of Palestine pending ...
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Is it correct to say they helped people suffering the earthquake?

if I want to talk about an earthquake, Is it correct to say they helped people suffering the earthquake? or should I say people suffering from the earthquake? or even in the earthquake? which one is ...
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Why is 'immune' used with 'to'?

A recent news item reported : ... they are also concerned about his argument in a 2009 legal article that a sitting president should be immune to prosecution. The OED states that the adjective '...
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Rent your house “for the long term” or “in the long term” or “for/in long term”?

what would be the correct as a tagline? I am talking to the house owner Rent your house for the long term Rent your house in the long term Rent your house for long term Rent your house in long term ...
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1answer
62 views

Looking for a phrasal verb interchangeable with “due to”?

I'm not even sure whether there is existence of such phrasal verb in English or not. But probably native speakers can help me out with this. All of your friend's problems are due to his recent ...
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What's the difference between “aspects of” and “aspects to”?

I just wrote There are two strange aspects of this situation. Then I decided that There are two strange aspects to this situation. sounded better, but I don't know why. There are certainly ...
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Preposition choice. What takes precedence?

I just lighted upon this sentence in a book: Academic attention has focused in two main directions. This sentence reads slightly odd to me, because although "direction" needs the directional ...
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Is the phrase “the ease at which / the ease by which …” correct

1) ** Is it correct to follow "ease" with "at which" such as in "The **ease at which you can carry this bag depends on the angle you hold it from" 2) Does anyone have a good source recommendation ...
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“Market for …” or “Market of …”?

Consider the oil market. The two options are: The market for oil or The market of oil The former seems to be the most popular, giving the most hits in google. There is also the very famous ...
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Is “up which to pass” correct grammar?

First of all, let me just say that I know that ending sentences with prepositions is perfectly fine. This is more of a theoretical question about trying to avoid doing so. I came up with the following ...
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Use of the preposition “by” along with “which” [duplicate]

There is a difference in the difficulty by which the two different objects can be lifted up. Is "by" correct here? Does "difficulty by which" sound natural? is there maybe a better alternative? ...
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use of “to” and “for” after “it is better” [migrated]

is it (under any circumstance) grammatically correct to say: It is better "to" students to focus on one major if it is, what's the difference in meaning with the following structure: It is ...
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meaning of “for each of” [migrated]

I am reading this euler project question and found this sentences. 70 colored balls are placed in an urn, 10 for each of the seven rainbow colors. My understanding about this sentences is ...
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Recommended to vs recommended for [closed]

Should I write "This is recommended to people who like cheap but highly useful stuff" or "This is recommended for people who like cheap but highly useful stuff"?
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Difference between “…, which is the case with” vs. “…, which is the case at/for”

I am wondering which of the following phrases are correct - and if multiple are - what kind of difference there is between them: "..., which is the case with..." vs. "..., which is the case at/for..."...
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What's the difference between sign up with and sign up for?

Is it right to write "Sign up with the organization"? How about "Sign up for the program"?
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Function of “up” in verb phrases functioning as a noun?

What part of speech is the word "up" playing in these verb phrases that function as nouns? Mix-up Smash up Meet up Pop up Pin up Hold up Stick up These never seem ...
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86 views

“On the network” or “In the network”

The app obtains a list of devices "on the network" or "in the network". I imagine a network as a 3D structure, so it seems that "in the network" might be more appropriate here. However, I cannot be ...
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Given that: a preposition or conjunction

The Oxford Living Dictionaries defines given that as a conjunction. when you consider something However the dictionary defines the preposition given in the following way: taking into ...
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381 views

“In” (the works of) a poet

I came across this sentence: In Ovid, he is a sculptor and citizen of Cyprus. We know Ovid is a poet, and the current author discusses the works of Ovid. Can the preposition in (“in Ovid”) be used ...
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Difference between the two similar senses of about as a preposition

Oxford Living Dictionaries defines the preposition about in sense 2 and 3 that are quite similar; their similarity disabled me contradict between such senses. Sense 2. [British] Used to indicate ...
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from [time]-[time]

I see people using expressions such as "join us from 10am-2pm on January 3" or "we are going from January-May." Should "from" be there since there is no "until" or "to"?
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Usage of Noun or gerund

Generally when using “personnel” as an adjective, it is often used before a noun. Is the following usage correct? Should it be motivation and drive or motivating and driving? Gerund or noun? I ...