Stack Exchange Network

Stack Exchange network consists of 174 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.

Visit Stack Exchange

Prepositions are function words like "to", "over", "through", "in". The meaning of a sentence can be dramatically altered by choosing the wrong preposition. Questions need to include enough information for the intended meaning to be deduced.

0
votes
0answers
13 views

There should be no problem ___ doing the same with

There should be no problem in doing the same with... There should be no problem doing the same with... Which one is correct? Or does the sentence sound weird?
1
vote
0answers
18 views

“Far from happy” Preposition followed by an adjective?

It occurs me that in such sentences as He is far from happy. However, just as the critics are not of one mind in their criticism, so they are far from united on what to do. the preposition ...
0
votes
1answer
19 views

Is the second preposition necessary in “operated on on Jane's knee”?

I came across this construction in which the same preposition was used twice: The doctor operated on on Jane's knee last night. Is the second preposition necessary here?
0
votes
2answers
40 views

“Restricted for” or “restricted to”?

Is this sentence valid? Access to this content is restricted for our subscribers or should it be: Access to this content is restricted to our subscribers
0
votes
0answers
19 views

with all good wishes [migrated]

I wonder whether it is correct to write “with all good wishes of health and happiness”? Is it ok to use the preposition “of” here. Thanks in advance for your help.
0
votes
1answer
26 views

Threat on/to/for

As I was writing a sentence, it struck me that I am not all that quite sure about the noun 'threat', and how a sentence using the words 'threat' and 'cause' can be constructed. For instance: "...
0
votes
0answers
22 views

Word for “prove the value of/in”

I have the following sentence: Their impressively high grades showed the value of assuming this responsibility. Is there a word for "show the worth/value of [sth]"? Also, is the preposition after ...
7
votes
3answers
698 views

Is it “in” or “on” HNQ?

Stack Exchange has a special feature that displays the hottest questions from its 170 or more sites across the network, it's called Hot Network Questions or HNQ for short. Most users will see to ...
0
votes
0answers
22 views

correct word-usage

Am preparing a supposed to be pro-forma memorandum with the opening paragraph using the phrase "With reference with" (referring to a Circular issued by a competent authority). I am not comfortable ...
0
votes
1answer
13 views

through/by being a good example

I want to write: help them by/through being a good example. What is the right word, by or through?
0
votes
0answers
20 views

advice for vs. advice on (something)

Is there someone could help me to explain this, please? Is that correct to use advice for something? i.e. advice for the design of the gasification process. If both for & on are ok, what is the ...
0
votes
1answer
57 views

Why is it “tuck in” and not just “tuck”?

Is there a rule for when to use ‘in’ as in “tuck in”? Or is it a thing to remember? Example: Tuck in your shirt
0
votes
0answers
16 views

I have a question about prepositon in the sentence [migrated]

When you are in a exam,you should avoid doing noises. Is this preposition usage right?
54
votes
10answers
11k views

What does 'for' mean in 'We are done for'?

There is an English expression do for, which means to kill, to execute, to ruin, to defeat etc. and this expression seems to always be used in passive voice: e.g.) We are done for. I understand this ...
0
votes
0answers
26 views

Using “of the …” at the end of sentence for multiple items

I have following example sentence: Following function takes email address of the cluster, Cloud ID of the cluster, Minilock ID of the cluster, public key of the cluster. Since each item is related ...
-1
votes
0answers
29 views

Usage repetitions “take on on” and “many many”

In the following example: Sam took on on his bad habit again. He was smoking for many many hours in his office, while looking out of the window. Is the usage of "take on" on something ...
0
votes
0answers
13 views

Can “including” be followed by adjectives alone?

Is it correct to follow including by adjectives alone? Substance x has many properties, including anticancer and antidiabetic. I think the writer has omitted properties to avoid repetition, only ...
0
votes
1answer
45 views

Preposition used for measurements [closed]

So I've been writing [English] scientific articles for quite a while, but for years I've wondered what preposition is needed in the following sentence structure (just an example in my field of ...
1
vote
0answers
24 views

what different between the ‘at postgraduate level' and 'in postgraduate level'?

what different between the ‘at postgraduate level' and 'in postgraduate level'? which one is correct? Is that have the same meaning in two different preposition situation.
0
votes
0answers
16 views

Which is correct preposition in “nothing but poison for/to me”? [duplicate]

I'm writing lyrics. Which one is correct preposition as the word poison refers to a person? "She is nothing but poison FOR me" or "She is nothing but poison TO me" Thanks!
-1
votes
0answers
22 views

Bracket the prepositional phrases in the following passage

Bracket the prepositional phrases in the following passage. Billy was not exactly Mr. Popularity at school. (1) Like many American schools. Hoover High School was divided into cliques (groups): the ...
0
votes
1answer
17 views

Should I use “like” or “as if” before a statement containing a preposition?

Should I use "like" or "as if" before a statement containing a preposition? Such as, John and Jane went together like/as if peas in a pod. Thanks.
2
votes
1answer
34 views

How can I use prepositions differently not normally?

I have seen some complex sentences, having complex grammar of prepositions. For example: “T is the temperature to which the accumulated distillate stream, formed in previous effects, cools down to ...
0
votes
1answer
30 views

The legend tells about

The quotation from a textbook : "The legend tells about three brothers, ..." Is tell about correct here? Can an indirect object be omitted after tell?
0
votes
1answer
25 views

Prepositions for the word “placement” or “clinical placement”

Which of these is correct? I went to cardiac ward in my first clinical placement. I went to cardiac ward for my first clinical placement. I went to cardiac ward on my first clinical placement. Also,...
1
vote
0answers
29 views

Reflection from/in/off/on a mirror/lake/…?

In scientific fields it is usually "reflection from a mirror". In MW it is used as in "reflection in the mirror" or "reflection ... on the lake". What sense is conveyed by each usage? My guess is that ...
0
votes
1answer
42 views

Selective with/in/about [closed]

I need to find out which preposition is more suitable for the sentence below; "Could we not just be selective with/in/about our potential themes." Is what is meant comprehensible, or should the ...
0
votes
2answers
49 views

What's the meaning of “upon doing something”

I come across the following sentence. Upon compiling his results for many thousands of plants, Mendel concluded that the characteristics could be divided into what he called dominant and ...
0
votes
2answers
81 views

Grammatical name and function of “the end of the day” [closed]

What's the grammatical name of the end of the day here, and what is its grammatical function? The sentence is this: There was always a huge quantity of food left over at the end of the day.
0
votes
0answers
13 views

How to use “of” and “from” correctly?

I'm currently translating a text and I'm struggling to figure out which word to use. "Of" or "From" Display measurement results of the automated measurement from the customer XYZ This is a headline ...
-1
votes
1answer
27 views

Repetition of preposition

Is it necessary to repeat preposition in the following sentence .the books on the table and on the desk are mine.
1
vote
0answers
21 views

When can preposition 'of' be omitted?

Sentence One: The main image, which takes up the majority of the page, is of an artist's palette. Sentence Two: These aspects are of more interest to buyers. It seems that in sentence two, we can ...
1
vote
1answer
20 views

Of (verb), of (verb), and of (verb)?

Which is correct? Example 1: We want to emphasize the importance of running, swimming, and dancing. Example 2: We want to emphasize the importance of running, of swimming, and of dancing.
0
votes
1answer
62 views

“My eyebrows raised” or “my eyebrows rose”? (Passive voice)

The day before, as I watched the dog soar over the fence, my jaw dropped, and my eyebrows raised as I tried to comprehend how the dog could jump so high. My editor says "try to avoid passive voice" ...
0
votes
0answers
30 views

What subjects did you do in year 12 or what subjects did you do for year 12? [migrated]

is it What subjects did you do in year 12 or what subjects did you do for year 12? Thanks!
1
vote
0answers
28 views

only “from” as abbreviation to indicate the origin

After reading some publications that used "from" quite squishy, I would like to know: Is it generally possible to use "from" instead of "produced using", "produced by" or as a short version of "...
0
votes
0answers
6 views

“with an ambition to help the UK [to?] meet its climate change obligations” [duplicate]

Which is correct: "with an ambition to help the UK to meet its climate change obligations" or "with an ambition to help the UK meet its climate change obligations" ? When do you help ...
1
vote
0answers
13 views

Grammar difference between “Drive Home” vs“ ”Drive to Work" [duplicate]

I was configuring my navigation recently and came across this thought and I'm not sure I understand the grammatical rules as to why it is proper to say "Drive Home" but not "Drive to Home". It seems ...
14
votes
5answers
1k views

Origin of ending a sentence with a preposition-German separable verbs?

One thing I've noticed about the usage of ending a sentence with a preposition is how similar the construction is to German separable verbs. With German separable verbs, the prefix is often a ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

It's in painting or on painting? [closed]

Which is the correct sentence. 1. I could spend hours and hours in painting. 2. I could spend hours and hours on painting.
0
votes
1answer
25 views

In/into/at What to use

So, English isn't my native language and my school teacher gave us this: Complete: Let's go.............. my office. A) at B) in C) out D) for E) into I would go for at/in/into. She said it was "...
1
vote
1answer
36 views

“From” Phrases Regarding Time (. . . “from next month”)

It's my first time posting, so let me know if I do anything wrong. I have a random question. It’s regarding #2. I told my student it’s fine, based on the primarily UK and Indian news articles I found ...
4
votes
1answer
82 views

What part of speech is “back” in “If you want it back”?

If you want it back ... I'm doing a school project and need to figure out parts of speech in my letter that I wrote, but, I dont know what "back" is, can anyone help?
0
votes
1answer
73 views

“Proceed” vs “proceed with”

Why is right to use this - This will help us proceed with the review of our boss instead of - This will help us proceed the review of our boss?
0
votes
1answer
31 views

Messing around on your phone or with your phone? [closed]

I have a lot of work to do but I'm just spending a whole day fiddling with my phone. And a friend asks me what I am doing right now. I answer: "I'm just messing around on/with my phone." Which one is ...
0
votes
3answers
142 views

“in” or “on”, which is the right preposition?

Which one is gramatically correct: 'Center for Research on/in Geopolitics of Europe'. My natural instinct says to use 'on'. Tell me if I'm wrong; and if so, why.
0
votes
1answer
37 views

What do “a week on” and “come back in” mean?

Well, maybe, a week on, people would be trying to come back in and maybe try and get back to normal, at least start that process. The context of this sentence is that after an earthquake (about a ...
2
votes
1answer
46 views

“In the police station” or “at the police station”?

Is it correct to say: 1. I filed a complaint in the police station. Or 2. I filed a complaint at the police station.
1
vote
0answers
52 views

Why is she using “for” instead of “to” after the verb “lose” in this sentence?

I'm watching the famous TV show, “Desperate Housewives”.  I have learned a plethora of words and grammar things from it, but now something caught my ears and I'm a bit stuck.  There's this sentence in ...
0
votes
1answer
39 views

Do we need “of” in this sentence?

"Toronto uses landfill for disposing of about three-quaters of its waste" Do we need to use the first "of" that is bold in this sentence. In other words, if I take out "of", will the sentence still ...