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Questions tagged [prepositions]

Prepositions are function words like "to", "over", "through", "in". The meaning of a sentence can be dramatically altered by choosing the wrong preposition. Questions need to include enough information for the intended meaning to be deduced.

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What is the correct preposition for imagine? [migrated]

I would like to know if the following sentence is correct. It might be different from what you imagine from shaved ice. Context: I work at a restaurant that serves unusual shaved ice and I would like ...
tet's user avatar
  • 101
1 vote
3 answers
60 views

Deck as verb and the accompanying preposition

As per Cambridge dictionary and others, the word 'deck' in its verb form means to decorate or add something to something to make an effect: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/dictionary/english/deck ...
Ammu's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
65 views

Past Perfect or Simple Past When Using Since in Reported Speech? [duplicate]

While reading The Beautiful and Damned, I stumbled upon a passage that caught my attention. It stated, Only with the flow through the transmitter of his own familiar but faintly impersonal tone did ...
JY WS's user avatar
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5 votes
0 answers
1k views

Confusion regarding "since" vs "for" [migrated]

I know that we use "since" when we refer to some specific event that started at some point in the past and is still continuing and "for" when we talk about the duration of the ...
Virender Bhardwaj's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
44 views

On team, in team, or from team? [closed]

Which of the following is better? a) "You have a new message from Shelly from the Pepsi vendor team:" b) "You have a new message from Shelly on the Pepsi vendor team:" c) "You ...
user1946932's user avatar
0 votes
4 answers
88 views

anger with something (rather than someone)?

I know that anger comes with the preposition "with" while discussing anger directed at someone, (e.g. "your anger with your unbearable boss"); but should we use the same ...
stultissimus's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
7 views

Preposition and relative clause ‘in which’ [migrated]

As non-native speaker, It is hard to distinguish the collocation of a verb and preposition. In the following sentences, please figure out the grammaticality. Can you recommend the hotel in which I ...
Moon's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
14 views

Does the question 'where are you from' follow the QUASM formula? [migrated]

To recap QUASM is Question Word, Auxiliary Verb, Subject and Main verb. In the question 'where are you from?' from is in the position of the main verb. But from is not a verb. It's a preposition. So ...
Emmet's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
21 views

Correct preposition / correct verb [migrated]

Which variant is correct here : I travel in a submarine. I sail in a submarine. I sail on a submarine. If I mean I am just a traveller, I don't control the submarine. Sail means to travel on water, ...
Mia's user avatar
  • 37
1 vote
1 answer
72 views

Why do phrases "By fair means or foul" and "By hook or by crook" have such different use of preposition 'By'?

Both idioms have pretty much the same meaning. Both are centuries old idioms. However, one uses preposition 'by' twice while the other doesn't. Why? Can someone please explain what am I missing here?
EMS's user avatar
  • 339
2 votes
3 answers
166 views

Reasons after look forward to: do they require the -ing form?

I wrote a "look forward to" phrase, and after that I explained the reasons why I look forward to doing that thing. The phrase I wrote is: I look forward to learning all those different ...
robertspierre's user avatar
9 votes
1 answer
144 views

Where does "off'n" come from?

The preposition "off'n" is seen/heard in Southern and other dialects of American English. He drank so much he fell off'n the bar stool. There's nothing about it in Etymonline, and Merriam-...
Robusto's user avatar
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0 votes
3 answers
73 views

'Out the way' vs 'Out of the way'

Is there any difference between 'out the way' and 'out of the way'? I mean, for instance, shouting at someone standing in you way when you're running.
Artem's user avatar
  • 57
11 votes
13 answers
3k views

"the girl with the red dress on" — What licenses the preposition "on"? What does it function as?

an example: the girl with the red dress on Is "on" a dangling/stranded preposition? If it is, then what's its object? What licenses "on"? What does "on" function as?
Loviii's user avatar
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3 votes
3 answers
175 views

Should "than," "like," and "as" be followed by "who" or "whom"?

Before anyone comments that "whom" is not necessary in the English language anymore and that I can just use "who" all the time instead, I'll say that my dialect always uses "...
Sophie's user avatar
  • 212
0 votes
1 answer
73 views

If you say "who with/who for/who by/who from," do you also say "what with/what for/what by/what from?"

I know that "Who with?", "Who for?", "Who by?", "Who from?", "Who to?", and other "Who + preposition" sentences are colloquially very common ...
Sophie's user avatar
  • 212
0 votes
1 answer
48 views

What preposition should I use with "proficuous"?

Proficuous: useful or profitable. But how to use? Cash proved proficuous for/in/at securing the deal.
Ray Woodcock's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
65 views

'By', 'according to' or 'following' when speaking of following regulations, protocols, etc

I have a blank spot regarding the use of the preposition by in the meaning of according to and following. Since by is the shortest option of the three, I would be happy to use it in place of according ...
Евгений Шумилин's user avatar
7 votes
3 answers
643 views

Prepositions after, before etc. as temporal determiners

Huddleston and Pullum's CGEL (2002, pg. 356 footnotes) identifies last and next as (potential) members of the determinative category when used in temporal deictic expressions such as last week, next ...
Kyle F. Hartzenberg's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
96 views

range without the preposition "to"

I wonder how or why it is possible to use the verb "range" with the preposition "from" but without "to". This is one of the examples that I have encountered: this ranges ...
stavrogin82's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
54 views

Is the construction "to try and [verb]" now considered standard, as in "to try and explain......"? [duplicate]

This question is about a construction that I find mildly (only mildly) irritating, but baffling. See example below. I know what the phrase means when it is used, but why do people use it? Has it ...
ab2's user avatar
  • 26.3k
1 vote
0 answers
38 views

The car is parked by/on/along? [closed]

Which of the following are correct? The car is parked along the side of the Eleventh Avenue. The car is parked along the Eleventh Avenue. The car is parked on the Eleventh Avenue. The car is parked ...
sam's user avatar
  • 11
2 votes
0 answers
55 views

Usage of the preposition On [closed]

I have a question about using the preposition 'on'. For a few times, I have noticed it used in the following context: Oh, the language on you! - (from the Sopranos). Luck on that Silvio (from the ...
Beqa's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
66 views

What is the difference between "oriented for" and "oriented towards"?

I found conflicting advice online. Some say that "oriented towards" pertains to directional senses and "oriented for" describes purpose. Others say only "oriented towards"...
T R's user avatar
  • 21
1 vote
2 answers
41 views

Usage of In and Within difference

This has been asked before but I didn't understand. I am no English student, but can someone explain how these two statements could mean different things? Xylem and Phloem within a vascular bundle ...
Hdje's user avatar
  • 13
2 votes
0 answers
20 views

Can there be the usage of "of" instead of "from"? [duplicate]

These ‘near-Earth objects’, or NEOs, are the size of mountains and include anything within 50 million kilometers of Earth’s orbit. The previous extract comes from a scientific divulgation article. ...
PROCESIONES CELESTES's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
35 views

Preposition after 'student assistant' in CV

What preposition would I use on my CV, for example, when I want to state that I am a student assistant with/at/of/_ the XYZ-Project (University of XYZ)? Thanks in advance!
GuestNumberInfinity's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
61 views

How did we come to use at, on, in for time as we do now?

Contact me at 5 o'clock on a Monday in the new year There are many resources which explain the rules about which preposition to use for time phrases to English learners, e.g. We use at with: with ...
minseong's user avatar
  • 3,526
4 votes
2 answers
311 views

forbidden from or forbidden to

In this sentence: We are forbidden a) to smoke in the classroom or b) from smoking in the classroom. Which sounds better? I know that these two options are correct, however I’m thinking which one is ...
Dominik d's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
74 views

The meaning of "get away with a light sentence" [closed]

I have a question with the meaning of "get away with a light sentence". Does "get away with a light sentence" mean that "the person escaped a light sentence" or mean that ...
Larry 's user avatar
  • 21
0 votes
1 answer
68 views

What is the difference between two cases of "impact", with and without "on/upon"?

I see Oxford Learner's Dictionary offers two examples for entry of "Impact". The meaning is "to have an effect on somebody/something". One example is with proposition of "on/...
Jiancheng Zou's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
96 views

In what cases is best to use "to" or "for" after the words "stimulus" and "impetus"?

In what cases is best to use "to" or "for" after the words "stimulus" and "impetus"? Is there any difference in the use of the prepositions with each of the ...
Rodolfo Oviedo's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
441 views

Term for Foreign Speakers of a language using the prepositions etc. of their mother tongue

One of the things I notice when conversing with people who have largely achieved full conversational English, is that they have the correct noun, verb and adjective vocabulary, but they frequently (...
Brondahl's user avatar
  • 334
4 votes
1 answer
189 views

What's the difference in usage between "to" and "unto" in 17th century English?

I am writing a script in which all the characters speak early Modern English. I have learned a bit about Old English, but I am not an expert so I am also consulting multiple artificial intelligences, ...
Dylan Lozano's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
181 views

During vs. Throughout

Physics vocabulary - Which one is the most natural? (a) During the approximation process (b) Throughout the approximation process (c) During the approximation procedure (d) Throughout the ...
Sylvia's user avatar
  • 143
0 votes
1 answer
63 views

Are prepositions relative to one another?

Take an instance with some of the most common English prepositions: in, on, at, below, and above. The noun "aircraft" goes with "on", but is the sentence "Parachuters jump ...
Darren Anthonius's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
72 views

Fluctuation in vs of

What is the difference between "fluctuation in" and "fluctuation of"? For instance, There is no fluctuation of the singularity location. and There is no fluctuation in the ...
Vlad's user avatar
  • 9
1 vote
0 answers
30 views

The usage of 'of' to specify an amount and value [closed]

As a non-native speaker of English, I think we use the "of" term in an interesting way when we define the amount of something. I know that "The rock has a mass of 50 kg" is a ...
adba's user avatar
  • 121
1 vote
1 answer
77 views

Difference between noun+to do+preposition VS noun+for doing (+preposition)

Through English grammar books, I understand that a proper preposition is always necessary when the verb in a to-infinitive before a noun is an intransitive verb, such as: There is no place to play in....
tasira's user avatar
  • 175
0 votes
3 answers
65 views

Use of the preposition "of" after "modelling"

Consider two sentences: Modelling of the dynamo proved to be resource-consuming. See an account of the latest developments in modelling of the dynamo elsewhere. Do I use "of" after "...
Vlad's user avatar
  • 9
-1 votes
1 answer
213 views

Minus vs less (in math)

We used to talk about subtractions employing the word minus as a preposition like "10 minus 5 is 5... "what is 5 minus 3?" .... Is it OK to replace the word minus by "less" ...
Selfie geoupie's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
70 views

Extend by/for - Correct Usage [closed]

Do the below sentences convey the same meaning? If this petition is approved, you can extend your legal status by (additional/up to) 2 years. If this petition is approved, you can extend your legal ...
user493261's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
34 views

What is the difference between "in" and "at" in "Take Spanish at/in school!"? [duplicate]

What is the difference between the two statements "You wanna be cool? Take Spanish at school!" and "You wanna be cool? Take Spanish in school!"
Tom's user avatar
  • 1
5 votes
3 answers
1k views

What is this usage - "to stay home of an evening"? [duplicate]

I've been reading a selection of short stories by Kafka (translation by Michael Hoffmann). In one of stories The Sudden Walk, I encountered this phrase When it seems we have finally decided to stay ...
mewl 's user avatar
  • 67
1 vote
1 answer
39 views

Adjective clause introduced by a relative pronoun "which" VS Preposition "including"

By now, the extradition bill that had sparked the protests had been withdrawn, but the movement had come up with a list of demands, which included amnesty for arrested protesters, an independent ...
rahul sehrawat's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
63 views

Do I use by, for or to in this sentence?

The sentence is I shared the resource link with my colleagues so that this link would be accessible for all members of our team. The word I am asking about is highlighted. Should it be by, for or to?...
Yasmine BZ's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
95 views

Is it grammatical to omit "it was" after "for" after a proper noun?

Given the following sentence: "Will, so-called for it was short for William, drank his tea." Is it grammatical to omit 'it was' so that the sentence becomes: "Will, so-called for ...
Michael Williamson's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
53 views

"feeling nostalgic {for/of/about} summer sunsets”?

Which preposition is needed in the gap; is it for, of or about? I am feeling nostalgic _____ summer sunsets. Merriam-Webster and aging hippies nostalgic for their youth. Cambridge Dictionary She ...
Martina Mirci's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
43 views

Preposition on, in & against, on

Which of these statements is correct? On/In a. Lying in the bed or b. Lying on the bed Against/On a. Leaning against the wall or b. Leaning on the wall
Orlu Uche's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
287 views

Difference between "Intrigued With" and "Intrigued By"

What exactly is the difference between the usage of "intrigued with" and "intrigued by" in sentences?
Schrödinger's Cat's user avatar

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