Questions tagged [personal-pronouns]

Questions related to personal pronoun, an independent pronoun which can have various forms according to gender, number, person, and case.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0
votes
1answer
60 views

What do you call someone who studies letters?

I recently asked a question for nouns pertaining to people who write letters. But is there a word to call someone who studies letters (academically)?
0
votes
1answer
56 views

What do you call a person who writes letters?

I found, from my search, that epistolary is an adjective which could refer to the writing of letters. But is there noun of this to call someone who writes letters?
3
votes
1answer
89 views

Suggestions to indicate the second person pronoun is singular?

Do you have any suggestions to clearly show that the second person pronoun is singular, not simply basing it on context? For example, one could use "you man" or "you one," but it ...
1
vote
0answers
50 views

Why is “he” twice as common than “she” in the English language

When you look at word frequency data in English such as the Corpus Of Contemporary American English (COCA) he appears on 16th place with 6500 occurrences per mil and she at 35th place with 3210 per ...
2
votes
3answers
219 views

True or False: “English lacks a standard gender-neutral second-person plural pronoun.”

It's news to me, but apparently Joe Pinsker (affiliated with The Atlantic?) says so in this article. The problem, for those who want to ditch [the usage of] "guys", is that their language ...
1
vote
1answer
48 views

Pronoun cases (e.g. “my,” “his”) before gerund constructions [duplicate]

Which of the following is correct? It stands in the way of my being successful. It stands in the way of me being successful. This led to his succeeding in the workplace. This led to him succeeding ...
5
votes
1answer
47 views

Gender specific pronouns [duplicate]

I noticed people using pronouns next to their names Jo (she/her). I understand the reason behind the first part (she), but I completely don't get the second part. Doesn't "she" imply "...
0
votes
3answers
89 views

Are there any old third-person singular pronouns the way “thou” is an old second-person pronoun?

Thou is an old second-person singular pronoun in English. Are there any old third-person singular pronouns?
3
votes
3answers
758 views

“We three” vs “us three”

In the sentence, "We three will go to the Express mall. You can find we/us three there, having a good time." I'm unsure whether to use we/us for the second reference. I have read about we ...
2
votes
1answer
104 views

“President Trump appreciates the outpouring of support for both he and the First Lady” - Should this be he, him or himself? [closed]

"President Trump appreciates the outpouring of support for both he and the First Lady." Should this be he, him or himself?
2
votes
0answers
56 views

Why does English only have one form of we/us?

I have tried googling this and looking here to no avail. Why does English only have one we? What I mean is, why aren't there two forms for: Me and someone else excluding you Me and someone else ...
1
vote
1answer
64 views

How to use properly such generic person pronouns as one, people, you, we, and they

When writing about a general topic in emails, essays, business correspondence or whatever, I often wonder which generic person pronoun to use. My quick Google search for sample sentences using such ...
-1
votes
2answers
61 views

She stole her best friend’s boyfriend (from her)

She stole her best friend’s boyfriend (from her) What is the reason for adding the redundant phrase from her after mentioning that it's her best friend?
0
votes
0answers
54 views

Can there be two cases of pronoun in a sentence?

"She is doing her best to do the job" The pronoun "her" is confusing me, it could be either in objective case 'cause it acts as object complement or in possessive case 'cause it ...
0
votes
0answers
33 views

these data of yours [duplicate]

"These personal data of yours will be shared with authorized public institutions and organizations." Is this sentence correct?
1
vote
0answers
68 views

“Are you she?”… is it proper English? [duplicate]

While receiving a phone call, the man on the other end of the call was looking for another woman. When finished asking for her, he said: "Are you she?" I've always heard "Are you her" and this was a ...
3
votes
1answer
92 views

Which is correct, “you and yours” or “yourself and yours”? [closed]

What is the correct phrasal construction "Protect you and yours" or "Protect yourself and yours"? Are they both acceptable? Thank you.
-1
votes
2answers
255 views

What is the politically correct way for one to refer to God? In other words, how can one eliminate gendered pronouns entirely from one's God-talk?

It seems that for one to refer to God as he bothers some people --- and I can see from where they are coming as I, too, oppose referring to God in the feminine and masculine because God is neither ...
0
votes
1answer
27 views

Dealing with pronouns

“You can tell him...." "Me tell him?” Is this structure appropriate? Why / why not? “Me” is usually an object pronoun. I would say that the structure is inappropriate, because “Me” is an ...
0
votes
0answers
40 views

Email local part personal pronoun

John Smith registered domain john.smith under which he'd like to create a personal email address whose local part is a personal pronoun. English-wise, which of the following email addresses would be ...
0
votes
1answer
37 views

Regarding “ this”and “it”

"This"is used to specify objects placed closer. "It "is used for non living things I have seen sentences like This is a pen. My question is It is a pen. .. ..... is correct? Why can't we use" it" ...
0
votes
2answers
98 views

Can the gerund clause take a personal pronoun as its subject in “It’s no use (his?) crying over lost love”?

From a gram­mar book, I’ve have learned that a gerund clause can be op­tion­ally pre­ceded by a per­sonal pro­noun to show the log­i­cal sub­ject of the verb; that is, who­ever is do­ing the gerund’s ...
15
votes
12answers
5k views

Does English use the word ‘thou’ in any situations nowadays? [closed]

Does English use the word thou in situations nowadays? For example, to humiliate an opponent by being overly familiar?
0
votes
1answer
109 views

How can one omit the third-person pronoun in sentences entirely? [closed]

I have a task which involves my having to show how I can write in different ways in English. Thus far, I have shown how I can write in a multitude of ways in a reasonably successful way, but I am ...
2
votes
2answers
127 views

How to explicitly specify non-binary support when using pronouns?

My native language uses the equivalent of he/his as the default gender-less pronoun. When using English (as a second language) most people use "he/she" or "him/her" to indicate a person of unknown/...
2
votes
0answers
82 views

there is, there are with personal pronouns

I almost never see "there is/are" used with personal pronouns. Why do they not get along with each other? 1 There is me in this house. 2 There are them in this town. I think they are wrong. But ...
5
votes
1answer
108 views

Different words for the personal pronoun “you” in spoken AmE: who uses which?

In American English, quite informally, one will hear different words or phrases for the personal pronoun “you” in its plural form. Perhaps it’s a way of making sure the listener understands you mean ...
0
votes
0answers
160 views

Is “meet with X and me” (instead of “X and myself”) liable to look wrong to stupid administrators?

My natural instinct is to write, "X met with M and me in June." But I've noticed that school officials tend to use "myself" in place of "me" in this type of sentence. A related ELU question ...
1
vote
2answers
212 views

'my picture' - ownership vs. depiction

Consider the sentences: Take my picture [handing over a frame] Take my picture [handing over a camera] (Photo vs. picture being insignificant - a more contrived example could avoid it; as is the ...
1
vote
0answers
34 views

Is capitalization of the personal pronoun “I” a modern thing in English? [duplicate]

In an answer to a question I asked, the user included an extract from a text seemingly written in older English. Not Old English, but definitely older English, made evident by the fact it spelled e.g. ...
1
vote
2answers
810 views

What's the name of this grammar error: “due to him having…” [duplicate]

I know there's something wrong with the way the indirect-object pronoun "him" and the gerund "having" are being used here, but I can't put my finger on it or find it on Google. Here's another example: ...
2
votes
1answer
3k views

We three or us three

Does the subject value in the following example need to be "us" or "we". Does it follow the same principle in pluralising the subject where removing one component isolates the correct noun? Dad and ...
1
vote
1answer
10k views

Her and her husband proper grammar [duplicate]

I am editing the following sentence, and having an issue with identifying the proper pronoun. “Her and her husband’s journeys and careers have allowed them to travel extensively.” I know the rule ...
1
vote
2answers
295 views

Is there any such thing as noun pronoun proximity?

I have read of Concord (or noun-verb agreement) and was wondering if, is as I have been told, there is a similar grammar rule for noun-pronoun agreement/proximity. When there's a sentence where two ...
4
votes
5answers
3k views

Is it correct to use “their” when referring to a single person when the gender is known? [duplicate]

I have come accross this sentence: There is a 2.5% probability that whenever we measure a woman, their height will be less than 142 centimeters. Is the use of their correct here? Shouldn't it be ...
9
votes
1answer
494 views

Analyzing 'genitive/accusative + V-ing phrase (gerund-participle phrase)' as different constructions

(1) I regretted [his leaving the firm]. (2) I regretted [him leaving the firm]. (3) I regretted [leaving the firm]. (4) He didn’t bother [giving me a copy]. Regarding the above sentences The ...
0
votes
2answers
337 views

Using “he” or “she” for an animal not a person?

Is it possible to use the personal pronoun subject he or she for a nonhuman animal according to their sex? One of my friends said that there is a possibility of using it for animals. My concern is ...
0
votes
1answer
55 views

Subject & Object Pronoun Question [duplicate]

What is the rule in use here that allows me to use I do in place of me in the second sentence? An Olympic sprinter on a bad day runs faster than me on a good day. An Olympic sprinter on a bad day ...
5
votes
2answers
787 views

What is the possessive case and the objective case of “ye?”

I know very well that archaically, "thou" is the nominative case for the modern day "you" while "thee" is the accusative case and that there is no distinction between the nominative and accusative ...
1
vote
1answer
205 views

Is the sentence “we are playing with my friend” correct if the “we” only means my friend and me?

My friend says it should be "My friend and I are playing", but I think "We are playing with my friend" is correct too. Is it?
2
votes
1answer
86 views

Am I right in thinking modern usage of the word “me” is drifting to “I”; Is there an increasing trend?

In reply to suggested duplicate question: It may be that I can find some useful guidance from the earlier Answer (for which thanks), but I'm really asking whether there's a general trend, particularly ...
1
vote
2answers
278 views

Is it okay to use “he” when the subject of the sentence is “his wife”? [closed]

This is the sentence in question: While Dev’s wife is in India for a few weeks, he and Miranda spend almost every day together. The subject of the sentence is "Dev's wife", and I'm pretty sure that "...
1
vote
2answers
63 views

Usage of 'I' and 'Me' [duplicate]

Is there any rule as to what is used in the beginning of a sentence, 'I' or 'Me'? Example: 1) I and x are good friends. 2) Me and x are good friends. Which is correct? Or are both of these ...
15
votes
2answers
1k views

Is the signature of a letter a subject or an object?

I want to sign a letter jokingly not by name, but by a personal pronoun. Is the signature a subject or an object? I feel like using object pronoun (me) sounds better, but why? The signature looks more ...
4
votes
2answers
694 views

Which are right choices in: “Can you imagine him/his forgetting his own birthday?”

Which one of the following is correct? Can you imagine his forgetting his own birthday? Can you imagine him forgetting his own birthday? The question was asked in SNAP 2009 and I can't understand ...
2
votes
1answer
431 views

“He” refers to whom? [closed]

"Tom said to Sam that he should go to the shop." In the above sentence, 'he' refers to whom? There is ambiguity here,right?. It can mean either tom or sam. So is the sentence above correct? If not, ...
0
votes
1answer
169 views

Numerical agreement with “Many a” [duplicate]

Does 'many a' take a singular pronoun or a plural one? Many a is followed by a singular noun. So also does it follow a singular pronoun?
1
vote
1answer
122 views

A particular occasion for the use of objective forms of personal pronouns

Everybody learns in school that in conventional spoken English one uses "objective" forms of personal pronouns (me, us, him, her, them) for "predicate nominatives" where some conventional formal rules ...
4
votes
1answer
429 views

What is the correct way to say “It was this week that Justin and my lives changed forever”?

What is the correct way to indicate "Justin and I" as being possessive of our individual lives in this sentence? Is there a way to do this without restructuring the sentence? A friend of mine posted ...
0
votes
1answer
68 views

Duplicate but Still cannot understand the concept? [duplicate]

Personal pronouns are confusing. Which one is correct? She went with him and I. Or She went with him and me. - Susan went with Don and "I" to the office. Or Susan went with Don and "...

1
2 3 4 5 6