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3 votes
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Use of double colon (::) as a sentence separator [closed]

I know that the double colon (::) has been used in computing languages (e.g., in Haskell, Julia, and R), though its uses are not limited to computing. However, in recent years, I have seen this more ...
Jake Ireland's user avatar
6 votes
2 answers
2k views

What does 'shyme' mean?

Reading Dracula, I found this sentence: It’s a shyme that people are allowed to top their walls with broken bottles In no dictionary was I able to find a definition; ChatGPT says that it is a ...
Pierre-olivier Gendraud's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
19 views

Object / accusative personal pronouns replacing actor in certain clauses [duplicate]

I'm a native English speaker, and I noticed that I sometimes use accusative pronouns (him, her, me) to replace actors in certain clauses. I have a feeling this is prescriptively considered incorrect ...
El Hays's user avatar
  • 11
11 votes
3 answers
2k views

"Unrelentless" to mean "relentless"?

A native speaker commended someone for investigating something thoroughly, so they said "for your relentless investigating efforts", then they corrected themselves and said "...
دولة فلسطين's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
297 views

When and where did 'irregardless' first emerge in print, how did it spread, and to what extent was it viewed as a dialectal word?

Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003) has the following entry for irregardless: irregardless adv {prob[ably a] blend of irrespective and regardless} ca. 1912) nonstand[ard] : ...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
  • 164k
4 votes
0 answers
196 views

Non-standard grammar feature in British dialect?

I moved from Worcestershire in the UK to a non-native English speaking country when I was a child, which has made me very aware of my accent. Unlike my parents, I used to have a regional accent. I ...
Daniel's user avatar
  • 41
0 votes
3 answers
144 views

What is the non-standard grammatical feature in this sentence? [duplicate]

In the following utterance: “You know all you’re getting off it then is maybe the CD-ROM which surely that’s not worth grabbing”. I’m trying to say that they use non standard grammar by using the ...
Simplex1's user avatar
  • 183
2 votes
2 answers
1k views

What accent did 'kewl' (cool) originate from

I've been hearing 'kewl' for a long time excessively on social media (mostly used by Americans). I wondered what accent it came from. I searched, but only found the following information about it: ...
Decapitated Soul's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
170 views

Is "you Chromebook" correct grammar in any dialect?

As a learner of English as a foreign language, I believe from what I learned that "you Chromebook" is not grammatically correct in "standard" English (as spoken in formal situations in the UK, US etc)....
fghzxm's user avatar
  • 143
0 votes
1 answer
227 views

Using before the fact in multiple contexts

The terms "before the fact" and "after the fact" are usually used in a legal sense, as in, accessory before the fact, (and similarly, accessory after the fact), to indicate a person aiding or abetting ...
Najeeb's user avatar
  • 215
1 vote
0 answers
29 views

When is a English dialect considered to be non-grammatical/have non-grammatical phrasing? [duplicate]

So the question is when a dialect of English is considered non-grammatical. I am aware that it can be considered non-standard, however some phrases can be to an extent not to be considered non-...
user avatar
6 votes
5 answers
13k views

Is “have went” gaining common currency in AmE and BrE?

In the following article from English today there is a survey about the usage of the erroneous, but apparently rather commonly used expression “have went” in place of “have gone”: ... several ...
user 66974's user avatar
  • 67.5k
7 votes
4 answers
13k views

Who changed the way vacumn was spelled 40 years ago?

I noticed Robin Michael, who is on this site, stated she learned to spell the word 'vacuum' as "vacumn". I was also taught the same thing in school around 40 years ago; I always scored the ...
Deb Newman's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
600 views

Missing definition of “night and day”

I am trying to see if the colloquial usage of night and day is non-standard and is improper register, or if it is simply an ommitted definition in the dictionaries: night and day: Describing a ...
ib11's user avatar
  • 744
27 votes
2 answers
2k views

"It is" used as "there is": what is the origin?

Ok, this is a somewhat nonstandard English question. In the Southern US, or at least in Central Virginia, there is an idiomatic use of the phrase it is that is equivalent to the expression there is, ...
Brian J. Fink's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
2k views

Is "Hi alls" used in English?

Some my friends usually use "Hi alls!" for greeting a group of people. I don't think it's right, we cannot use "all" with "s" suffix. We are from Vietnam and are not native English speakers. Is ...
An Tran T.'s user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
13k views

'Kilograms' or 'Kilogrammes' -- British English [closed]

Which is correct and what is your evidence? I would normally write the word 'kilogram' without the extra 'me'. I know that 'kilogramme' has a French origin. However, as far as I can see, this version ...
S. Mitchell's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
2k views

Expired - Non-Expired [closed]

I have to classify users, like Expired users and users who are not expired. Shall I use the term Non-Expired to indicate that a user is still valid and has a long enough validity period? Is there ...
Jeya Suriya Muthumari's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
458 views

"An High Priest of Good Things to Come" -- why "An"?

I am watching a video of one of the Apostles of the Mormon Church, Elder Holland, which is entitled: "An High Priest of Good Things to Come" The video contains this line: "Speaking of Jesus’ “...
Peter David Carter's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
19k views

Is "take a bath" or "bathe" used to mean "take a shower" in some English dialects?

By analogy with Portuguese tomar banho [de chuveiro/ducha], which along with tomar uma ducha/chuveirada (Br.)/duche (Port.) means, take a shower, are there any parts of the English speaking world in ...
Elian's user avatar
  • 43k
1 vote
1 answer
370 views

"hundred" and "pretty" pronounced respectively as [ˈhən-dərd] and [ˈpər-tē]

Merriam-Webster's A Pronouncing Dictionary of American English gives [ˈhən-dərd], [ˈpər-tē], [ˈtem-pə(r)-ˌchu̇r], [ˈse-kə(r)-ˌterē], etc., as alternate ways to pronounce "hundred," "pretty," "...
Elian's user avatar
  • 43k
0 votes
1 answer
9k views

"call someone/something" vs. "call someone/something up" for "make a phone call to someone/something

What's the difference between call and call up to mean make a telephone call to? Is the latter any more informal than the former, or is it mainly a regional thing? call someone or something up To ...
Elian's user avatar
  • 43k
3 votes
1 answer
674 views

"vastly" for "to a [very] great degree; extremely" in contexts not involving comparison or measurement: BrEng vs. AmEng usage

Does using vastly to mean to a [very] great degree; extremely in contexts not involving measurement or comparison, now sound common and idiomatic to British ears, or is it still likely to be ...
Elian's user avatar
  • 43k
0 votes
0 answers
463 views

"varietal" vs. "various" vs. "varied"

Please, consider the following sourced excerpts: An ideal romantic daytime date might be to pack a blanket and take your lady to Old Town Silverdale. Settled in 1854, this beautiful little town ...
Elian's user avatar
  • 43k
6 votes
2 answers
7k views

Usage of "homework," "schoolwork," and "assignment" in AmEng for schoolwork given to students to do at home

As far as AmEng goes, is there any difference in using either homework, schoolwork, or assignment to call schoolwork given to students to be done at home? Can these be used just about interchangeably? ...
Elian's user avatar
  • 43k
6 votes
3 answers
1k views

"conclude" vs. "decide" in AmEng

Can, in some instances, conclude and decide be used just about interchangeably as far as AmEng goes? Please, consider the following examples: The committee concluded on a plan of action. The ...
Elian's user avatar
  • 43k
1 vote
2 answers
3k views

Usage of "commit [oneself] to" (=promise)

PPer Cambridge Dictionary Online, commit verb (PROMISE) [I or T] to ​promise or give ​your ​loyalty, ​time, or ​money to a ​particular ​principle, ​person, or ​plan of ​action: Like so many men, he ...
Elian's user avatar
  • 43k
7 votes
2 answers
15k views

"I had been done that" Is this correct?

I teach freshmen English in inner-city Baltimore, and I often get the following: Teacher : Did you complete the homework? Student : I had been done that! I have not been able to give a straight ...
John  Around Him's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
139 views

"flat," "stone," "dead," "dirt," "plumb," and "right" as indicators of directness, completeness, or general intensity [closed]

What's the difference between those words? Can they be used just about interchangeably as adverbs indicating completeness or totality? Please, compare: Looking back over my years of wildlife work, ...
Elian's user avatar
  • 43k
20 votes
3 answers
64k views

Can "childs" ever be the plural of "child", in standard English?

Is the word childs ever used instead of children for the plural of child? And was it ever a part of standard English vocabulary but later neglected?
Fasiha's user avatar
  • 209
-1 votes
2 answers
2k views

"~holic" or "~aholic"? Which one could be the most appropriate?

I've heard words like bookaholic, workaholic, etc., but why the 'a' before them? On the other hand, I've also discovered Asian bands, songs or other stuff with names like Swing-Holic, Sound-Holic, etc....
Christian Læirbag's user avatar
7 votes
3 answers
6k views

What is the meaning of "Pat came the reply"

I was reading following text from a blog post and I experienced difficulty understanding the phrase - "Pat came the reply". I've searched enough (limited to internet search engine) but I didn't find ...
KV Prajapati's user avatar
  • 2,051
3 votes
2 answers
21k views

Is the expression 'of an evening', 'of a morning', 'of a Saturday', good English or dialect? [duplicate]

People will say: He usually comes round here about 8 o'clock of an evening, or 10 o'clock of a morning, or of a Saturday afternoon. Is this standard English? I tend to associate it with Londoners.
WS2's user avatar
  • 64.7k
0 votes
2 answers
861 views

The origin of "conversate"

I'm trying to explain the origin of the non-standard word "conversate" that is used in some circles. My theory is that it came out of an attempt to make the commonly used noun "conversation" into a ...
William's user avatar
  • 1,728
1 vote
1 answer
6k views

Is "Unneeded" as standard as "Unnecessary"?

The word "Unneeded" is a lot rarer than "Unnecessary", according to Google ngrams. The word "Unneeded" has also been used less in older times than current times, which would be consistent with it ...
Golden Cuy's user avatar
  • 18.2k
1 vote
1 answer
2k views

Adding website URL in reference section of report writing

I was wondering what kind of format is standard or recommended style of mentioning URL of a website in report writing. What I found in the internet after a quick search was Cameron, B (Minister ...
Nabin's user avatar
  • 157
1 vote
2 answers
5k views

Non standard english: Slang. "That sucks man." [closed]

Where does the term 'That sucks!' and putting 'man' on the end of sentences come from? "aw that sucks, man!" Thanks!
user127411's user avatar
8 votes
4 answers
6k views

Is the use of the positive "anymore" considered correct?

While the word anymore is usually a negative context, the positive anymore is a well-documented phenomenon. I found this surprising, because I had never come across the positive anymore in a ...
Newb's user avatar
  • 1,634
0 votes
0 answers
35 views

using tell me to mean 'what is it?' [duplicate]

It seems to be a common practice in India to respond to someone's call by saying tell me. It's used even in calls; the conversation goes something like this: Me: Hello Caller : Hello Me: Who's ...
shiyam's user avatar
  • 1
10 votes
3 answers
92k views

Why are names that begin with "Mc" first in order over names that begin with "Ma"?

Why is it that in lists of people’s names, surnames beginning with Mc are listed before surnames beginning with Ma? For example, if a book had a bibliography listing its references, we would see that ...
Behzad's user avatar
  • 559
5 votes
7 answers
2k views

"Would you mind and do something" in nonstandard colloquial AmEng

Does Would you mind and do something instead of Would you mind doing something sound acceptable in spoken AmEng, or is it an attempt to imitate or render colloquial speech in not so formal writing? ...
Elian's user avatar
  • 43k
8 votes
1 answer
51k views

Is "volumn" a correct word? Was it ever one?

I sometimes see the word volumn, and I'm not sure if it's simply a spelling error for volume. I am wondering if it's actually correct. Possible angles to consider: Is volumn used frequently enough ...
Yi Jin's user avatar
  • 107
71 votes
6 answers
313k views

Is 'Updation' a correct word?

I was wondering whether 'updation' is correct English or not. Sample sentence: I was involved in the updation of the website.
Devdatta Tengshe's user avatar
11 votes
3 answers
75k views

Would you use the word "swum" these days?

Would you use the word "swum" these days? I mean, grammatically, it is the past participle of the verb "to swim", but it seems to me that no one uses it anymore. If it's the case, how would You ...
brilliant's user avatar
  • 8,988