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Questions tagged [non-standard]

The tag has no usage guidance.

4
votes
2answers
100 views

Is “you Chromebook” correct grammar in any dialect?

As a learner of English as a foreign language, I believe from what I learned that "you Chromebook" is not grammatically correct in "standard" English (as spoken in formal situations in the UK, US etc)....
0
votes
1answer
34 views

Using before the fact in multiple contexts

The terms "before the fact" and "after the fact" are usually used in a legal sense, as in, accessory before the fact, (and similarly, accessory after the fact), to indicate a person aiding or abetting ...
1
vote
0answers
25 views

When is a English dialect considered to be non-grammatical/have non-grammatical phrasing? [duplicate]

So the question is when a dialect of English is considered non-grammatical. I am aware that it can be considered non-standard, however some phrases can be to an extent not to be considered non-...
6
votes
4answers
4k views

Is “have went” gaining common currency in AmE and BrE?

In the following article from English today there is a survey about the usage of the erroneous, but apparently rather commonly used expression “have went” in place of “have gone”: ... several ...
0
votes
0answers
598 views

Templated or templatized?

I've searched for both template and templatize, while the first one only shows as a noun, and the second one is not a standard English word, but I've heard that they both can be used as verbs in some ...
0
votes
1answer
271 views

Missing definition of “night and day”

I am trying to see if the colloquial usage of night and day is non-standard and is improper register, or if it is simply an ommitted definition in the dictionaries: night and day: Describing a ...
26
votes
2answers
2k views

“It is” used as “there is”: what is the origin?

Ok, this is a somewhat nonstandard English question. In the Southern US, or at least in Central Virginia, there is an idiomatic use of the phrase it is that is equivalent to the expression there is, ...
0
votes
1answer
684 views

Is “Hi alls” used in English?

Some my friends usually use "Hi alls!" for greeting a group of people. I don't think it's right, we cannot use "all" with "s" suffix. We are from Vietnam and are not native English speakers. Is ...
-1
votes
1answer
117 views

Dialectal spelling of “rainbow” [closed]

What's a nonstandard way to spell the word "rainbow" in American or British English? I'm making subtitles for something, and someone says this specific word in a funny way in his native language.
2
votes
2answers
6k views

'Kilograms' or 'Kilogrammes' — British English [closed]

Which is correct and what is your evidence? I would normally write the word 'kilogram' without the extra 'me'. I know that 'kilogramme' has a French origin. However, as far as I can see, this version ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Expired - Non-Expired

I have to classify users, like Expired users and users who are not expired. Shall I use the term Non-Expired to indicate that a user is still valid and has a long enough validity period? Is there ...
4
votes
2answers
270 views

“An High Priest of Good Things to Come” — why “An”?

I am watching a video of one of the Apostles of the Mormon Church, Elder Holland, which is entitled: "An High Priest of Good Things to Come" The video contains this line: "Speaking of Jesus’ “...
1
vote
1answer
8k views

Is “take a bath” or “bathe” used to mean “take a shower” in some English dialects?

By analogy with Portuguese tomar banho [de chuveiro/ducha], which along with tomar uma ducha/chuveirada (Br.)/duche (Port.) means, take a shower, are there any parts of the English speaking world in ...
2
votes
0answers
60 views

Use of “what” vs “that”? [duplicate]

There is a song titled "Better Not Wake the Baby" by a band called The Decemberists. One of the lines in the song is as follows: Drown yourself in crocodile tears, Curse the god what made ...
1
vote
0answers
222 views

“hundred” and “pretty” pronounced respectively as [ˈhən-dərd] and [ˈpər-tē]

Merriam-Webster's A Pronouncing Dictionary of American English gives [ˈhən-dərd], [ˈpər-tē], [ˈtem-pə(r)-ˌchu̇r], [ˈse-kə(r)-ˌterē], etc., as alternate ways to pronounce "hundred," "pretty," "...
0
votes
1answer
3k views

“call someone/something” vs. “call someone/something up” for "make a phone call to someone/something

What's the difference between call and call up to mean make a telephone call to? Is the latter any more informal than the former, or is it mainly a regional thing? call someone or something up ...
3
votes
1answer
423 views

“vastly” for “to a [very] great degree; extremely” in contexts not involving comparison or measurement: BrEng vs. AmEng usage

Does using vastly to mean to a [very] great degree; extremely in contexts not involving measurement or comparison, now sound common and idiomatic to British ears, or is it still likely to be ...
0
votes
0answers
349 views

“varietal” vs. “various” vs. “varied”

Please, consider the following sourced excerpts: An ideal romantic daytime date might be to pack a blanket and take your lady to Old Town Silverdale. Settled in 1854, this beautiful little town ...
6
votes
2answers
4k views

Usage of “homework,” “schoolwork,” and “assignment” in AmEng for schoolwork given to students to do at home

As far as AmEng goes, is there any difference in using either homework, schoolwork, or assignment to call schoolwork given to students to be done at home? Can these be used just about interchangeably? ...
6
votes
3answers
712 views

“conclude” vs. “decide” in AmEng

Can, in some instances, conclude and decide be used just about interchangeably as far as AmEng goes? Please, consider the following examples: The committee concluded on a plan of action. The ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

Usage of “commit [oneself] to” (=promise)

PPer Cambridge Dictionary Online, commit verb (PROMISE) [I or T] to ​promise or give ​your ​loyalty, ​time, or ​money to a ​particular ​principle, ​person, or ​plan of ​action: Like so ...
7
votes
2answers
8k views

“I had been done that” Is this correct?

I teach freshmen English in inner-city Baltimore, and I often get the following: Teacher : Did you complete the homework? Student : I had been done that! I have not been able to give a ...
1
vote
2answers
116 views

“flat,” “stone,” “dead,” “dirt,” “plumb,” and “right” as indicators of directness, completeness, or general intensity [closed]

What's the difference between those words? Can they be used just about interchangeably as adverbs indicating completeness or totality? Please, compare: Looking back over my years of wildlife work, ...
16
votes
3answers
42k views

Can “childs” ever be the plural of “child”, in standard English?

Is the word childs ever used instead of children for the plural of child? And was it ever a part of standard English vocabulary but later neglected?
-1
votes
2answers
1k views

“~holic” or “~aholic”? Which one could be the most appropriate?

I've heard words like bookaholic, workaholic, etc., but why the 'a' before them? On the other hand, I've also discovered Asian bands, songs or other stuff with names like Swing-Holic, Sound-Holic, etc....
7
votes
3answers
3k views

What is the meaning of “Pat came the reply”

I was reading following text from a blog post and I experienced difficulty understanding the phrase - "Pat came the reply". I've searched enough (limited to internet search engine) but I didn't find ...
2
votes
3answers
8k views

Is the expression 'of an evening', 'of a morning', 'of a Saturday', good English or dialect?

People will say: He usually comes round here about 8 o'clock of an evening, or 10 o'clock of a morning, or of a Saturday afternoon. Is this standard English? I tend to associate it with Londoners.
0
votes
2answers
602 views

The origin of “conversate”

I'm trying to explain the origin of the non-standard word "conversate" that is used in some circles. My theory is that it came out of an attempt to make the commonly used noun "conversation" into a ...
1
vote
1answer
3k views

Is “Unneeded” as standard as “Unnecessary”?

The word "Unneeded" is a lot rarer than "Unnecessary", according to Google ngrams. The word "Unneeded" has also been used less in older times than current times, which would be consistent with it ...
1
vote
1answer
149 views

Adding website URL in reference section of report writing

I was wondering what kind of format is standard or recommended style of mentioning URL of a website in report writing. What I found in the internet after a quick search was Cameron, B (Minister ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

Non standard english: Slang. “That sucks man.” [closed]

Where does the term 'That sucks!' and putting 'man' on the end of sentences come from? "aw that sucks, man!" Thanks!
7
votes
4answers
2k views

Is the use of the positive “anymore” considered correct?

While the word anymore is usually a negative context, the positive anymore is a well-documented phenomenon. I found this surprising, because I had never come across the positive anymore in a ...
0
votes
0answers
31 views

using tell me to mean 'what is it?' [duplicate]

It seems to be a common practice in India to respond to someone's call by saying tell me. It's used even in calls; the conversation goes something like this: Me: Hello Caller : Hello Me: Who's ...
5
votes
7answers
1k views

“Would you mind and do something” in nonstandard colloquial AmEng

Does Would you mind and do something instead of Would you mind doing something sound acceptable in spoken AmEng, or is it an attempt to imitate or render colloquial speech in not so formal writing? ...
11
votes
4answers
69k views

Would you use the word “swum” these days?

Would you use the word "swum" these days? I mean, grammatically, it is the past participle of the verb "to swim", but it seems to me that no one uses it anymore. If it's the case, how would You ...