Questions tagged [subordinate-clauses]

a clause that forms part of a main clause, and is dependent on that clause

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Is my StackExchange-Description written correctly?

This is my profile-description of the StackExchange-Site: "Dösbaddel" is a (North-)German word for "Dummkopf" which probably means "fool" in English. Is it written properly or do I need to insert ...
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Transformation of sentence beginning with As soon as into sentence beginning with Hardly…when

Consider this sentence: As soon as we reached the station, the train left. Now if I transform this into a sentence beginning with Hardly, then which of the following sentences is correct and why? ...
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noun clause or adjective clause?

I think these clauses are both noun clauses but I'm not sure . I have doubts that the first one might be an adjective clause. I don't agree with the idea that money makes happiness. (I think its a ...
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subordinate clause

I'm looking for a grammatical explanation for this clause Men tend to talk about fewer subjects, the most popular being work, and sport. In other words, we could say "..., among which, work and ...
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36 views

Adverbial clause or adjectival clause?

(When they are used properly), pyrethroids have been found to pose very little risk on human. What is the grammatical name and function of the expression in the bracket?
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Need help breaking down this sentence: “I took action to make my plan come to fruition.”

So far I have "to make my plan come to fruition" as a subordinate clause, but I'm having trouble defining its components. Is "come to fruition" modifying "plan"? How is the infinitive functioning here?...
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Comma After Subordinate Clause

Do you always need a comma after a subordinate clause, or does it depend on the situation? For example, here are three variations 1. Yet, during this period, prices continued to rise 2. Yet during ...
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37 views

Comma before a subordinate clause

I was reading a book and stumbled on this sentence: It was closed, but the salesman said he would wait, if we hurried. I'm confused about the use of the comma preceding if we hurried. Why not ...
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Is it “a player who always do” or “who always does”? [migrated]

I have a doubt question or confusion about the following structure: I am a player who always do the best. or I am a player who always does the best. Which is the correct version? I think the "do" ...
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“the first time (that/when)” + Future

As I understand, the next that-clauses are relative clauses. Therefore, in accordance with rules: 1a. It will be the first time that I see her. - incorrect 1b. It will be the first time that I ...
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Is “He was arrested because he murdered his neighbour.” a simplification of “He was arrested because he had murdered his neighbour.”?

I am familiar with tense simplification in subordinate clauses: He went out after he put on his coat. instead of had put, because the conjunction after makes it clear that the action of putting on ...
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The referent of relative pronouns [grammar]

"The boss expressed his displeasure about the absence of the staff at the meeting yesterday , which had caused the delay of projects approval." Is the sentence grammatically correct ? if so , the "...
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Subordinating Clause

Given: Building these houses entails a lot of work. Does 'these houses entails a lot of work' form a subordinating clause to the verb 'building'? If so what kind of subordinating clause is it?
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How did “to wish that” come to hate the present tense in the subordinate clauses it governs, and why is it alone in this?

Inspired by this earlier question, I've realized that we have no canonical question addressing the stranglely one-of-a-kind special grammatical rules demanded by the verb wish of its subordinate ...
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21 views

Is this a dependant clause?

I was wondering if the following was a dependent clause: There weren’t enough beds, so I had to sleep on the floor.
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Using “for” in clauses

Is there any problem with this sentence? If any, how can I make it correct? "Social Security Institution is in charge of, authorized and responsible for the collection of the Fund premiums, and the ...
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Replacing a comma with a subordinate clause

Can I add more information to this sentence To achieve efficiency and tangible results, motivation of the workers is important as it can help them improve their performance and happiness. and ...
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Why does “that” sound odd to me after “said” in these sentences with “as” and “like”?

You said that he would come to the party. He came to the party, as you said that he would. He came to the party, just as you said that he would. He came to the party, just like you said that he would. ...
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Should I use a comma before “who” in this sentence, or can it be written without that comma?

Which of the following is correctly written as far as its comma (or lack of comma) is concerned? People who love their jobs can easily excel in their fields of work than those, who put salary on the ...
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Sentences starting with “Which”: Fragment or complete sentence?

I read an article in a newspaper and was wondering if what I read was a sentence fragment. The sentence/fragment in question is: Which is why we believe the proposed amendments should be passed. ...
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Type of subordinate clause in 'I am happy that you are here'

In the sentence 'I am happy that you are here', 'that you are here' acts as a subordinate clause. However, I am unsure what type of subordinate clause it is: i.e. I'm not sure if it's an adverbial, ...
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1answer
52 views

Using ‘used to’ in subordinate clauses

Is it correct to use the modal verb ‘used to’ in subordinate clauses? For example, could I say, ‘When we used to go to New Delhi, my father and I would shop for music CDs’? Or must I reserve it only ...
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Use of present tense in a subordinate clause within a sentence that uses future tense

Is the use of tenses correct in the following sentence ? "One of the key components will be the XXX that replaces the existing YYY." In particular, the use of the present tense in the subordinate ...
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Using a comma before a subordinate clause

It is very common that we don't insert a comma before a subordinate clause at end position as follows: The President was opening a new university when a bomb went off. However, I came across ...
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What I resented was [Kim mistreating my cat]. Why is [] a subordinate clause?

I intended Kim to interview both candidates. [raised object] I intended for Kim to interview both candidates. [subject] As shown above, The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language analyzes an ...
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Understanding 5 consecutive “that”s in this sentence

(This sentence was told as an entertainment by my English teacher 8 years ago.) She presented us with the following sentence: She said that that that that that he said was wrong. I had a bit of ...
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Noun clause as object

I know I can use a subordinate clause as an object of a sentence. I don't know who is that person. Can I put this object at the beginning of that sentence who is that person, I don't know.
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Word or phrase for a commonly-used clause at the beginning of a sentence, such as “It's almost as if”

I've been seeing a lot of tweets/comments/posts with the following structure: "It's almost as if [obvious observation]". Ignoring how terrible this trend is, what is an appropriate word or phrase for ...
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Subject Verb Agreement in a Nominative Clause

Okay, so I have two examples of a possible sentence: 1 - "The country's strategic value requires that it maintain a standing army." 2 - "The country's strategic value requires that it maintains a ...
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Are reduced relative clauses still a subordinate clauses building a complex sentence?

Do relative clauses count as dependent clauses after reduction? Or is it different case by case? for example: The man who is in the house is my father. (complex sentence) The man in the house is my ...
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2answers
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Whereas + present participle

Is it grammatically correct to use whereas + a present participle? For example: I am disinclined to recognize my weak mathematical skills, whereas willing to admit my lack of English skills. This ...
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469 views

Identifying the main clause and subordinate clauses

I’m preparing for my exam and in one of the practice questions i have to identify the main clause, subordinate clause/s and the subject,predicate and/or adverbials. the sentence is: "The Mausoleum ...
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I'm struggling to identify the clause/subordinate clauses in this sentence

'Today, people can still see some of the marble stones that were used to build the Mausoleum.' I understand 'that' is connecting the sentence, but there is no subject after 'that' so im a bit ...
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Ex: Can I write it this way and is it grammatically correct, as the additional phrase in the end of a question sounds weird?

Questions with subordinate (declarative) clauses at the end sound weird. For example: Can you grant me access to the document, since it is currently unavailable? Where do I submit this, as ...
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Is it correct to add nouns to “of which”,“in which”,“of whom”, etc.?

For example, can I say Recently I bought a new computer, the price of which was very reasonable. I always considered this type of usage correct but can't find any example sentences on the internet....
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How to use Commas When an Introductory Clause Precedes a Dependent/Subordinate Clause

I think we all agree that most introductory clauses are set off by commas. E.g.: In 1982, John Smith went to battle in Spain. Moreover, the monkeys all ate bread. I think we also agree that ...
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long sentences in English [closed]

I am translating some text to English from Russian Wikipedia, and sometimes there are quite long sentences. It is ok to have long sentences with several subordinate and participle clauses in Russian. ...
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“… who am I?” or “… who is me?”? [closed]

I have a question, but I don't know how to ask it correctly. Can you help me to choose and explain it please? I want to ask the next question: If Kate and John are students, then who [(am I) or (is ...
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How does omitting the subject affect the sentence structure?

I was wondering: how does the structure of this sentence change when we use the continuous form of the verb without a subject: (standing)? "That half an hour was the peak of our social life: standing ...
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That we know of yet

The movie 'Lady Bird' has this conversation: (Please click on it and listen to the clip starting at 2:16) Christine McPherson: What I'd really like is to be on Math Olympiad. Teacher: But math ...
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'[…] upon which this invitation was based on' - is there an adverb redundant?

The whole sentence goes: 'Below is the list of criteria upon which this invitation was based on.' It seems to me the adverbs 'upon' and 'on' are doubled up in this sentence. And it should be changed ...
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Am I correct in describing this as both a subordinate clause and a restrictive clause?

In this sentence - Today I am starting a diet, but first I will eat all the children’s chocolate they have leftover from Easter. Is but first I will eat etc a subordinate clause that contains the ...
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Can I substitute a main verb with an auxiliary verb in a subordinate clause if it has an object after?

There are no auxiliary verbs in my language, so I often struggle using them in English. If I want to substitute a main verb in a subordinate clause of a complex sentence, because it's the same as in ...
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Comma before a coordinating conjunction in compound-complex sentences?

As far as I know, it’s a rule that a comma is needed before a coordinating conjunction that joins two independent clauses. But the use of a comma before a coordinating conjunction that joins two ...
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2k views

How to distinguish between Principal clause and Subordinate clause in a sentence? [closed]

How can I distinguish between a principal clause and a subordinate clause in a sentence to use a subordinating conjunction? I saw him, I stopped my car. I know I have to add when before I saw him. ...
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Terminology: Definition of the term “direct object”

In Michael Swan's "Practical English Usage", he states in section 16.1: Many verbs besides auxiliaries can be followed by forms of other verbs (or by structures including other verbs). This can ...
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Can a noun be both a subject and an object at the same time?

John Knight, who/whom I spoke to yesterday, seemed to be rather irritable. In this sentence, John Knight is an object because I (the subject) am speaking to him; however, he is also a subject since ...
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Which is more correct: “preferred that he do” or “preferred him to do”? [duplicate]

I would like to know which form of this question is “more correct” than the other: What would you have preferred (that) he do? What would you have preferred him to do?
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628 views

Sentence without a main clause?

What do you call a phrase without a main clause? For example, answering a question: Are you to blame for the increase in deaths? Of course not! The answer cannot stand alone. Is there a name for ...
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Is “But if” a subordinating conjunction?

Take Tennyson's poem Flower In The Crannied Wall for an example. Flower in the crannied wall, I pluck you out of the crannies, I hold you here, root and all, in my hand, Little flower—but if ...