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Questions tagged [subordinate-clauses]

a clause that forms part of a main clause, and is dependent on that clause

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Using a comma before a subordinate clause

It is very common that we don't insert a comma before a subordinate clause at end position as follows: The President was opening a new university when a bomb went off. However, I came across ...
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When can subject be omitted in an adverb clause?

Greenhouse gas emissions released by coal and natural gas plants when generating electricity to power those air-conditioners would nearly double, from 1.25 billion tons in 2016 to 2.28 billion tons in ...
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What I resented was [Kim mistreating my cat]. Why is [] a subordinate clause?

I intended Kim to interview both candidates. [raised object] I intended for Kim to interview both candidates. [subject] As shown above, The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language analyzes an ...
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1answer
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Understanding 5 consecutive “that”s in this sentence

(This sentence was told as an entertainment by my English teacher 8 years ago.) She presented us with the following sentence: She said that that that that that he said was wrong. I had a bit of ...
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2answers
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Noun clause as object

I know I can use a subordinate clause as an object of a sentence. I don't know who is that person. Can I put this object at the beginning of that sentence who is that person, I don't know.
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1answer
35 views

Word or phrase for a commonly-used clause at the beginning of a sentence, such as “It's almost as if”

I've been seeing a lot of tweets/comments/posts with the following structure: "It's almost as if [obvious observation]". Ignoring how terrible this trend is, what is an appropriate word or phrase for ...
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51 views

Subject Verb Agreement in a Nominative Clause

Okay, so I have two examples of a possible sentence: 1 - "The country's strategic value requires that it maintain a standing army." 2 - "The country's strategic value requires that it maintains a ...
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0answers
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Are reduced relative clauses still a subordinate clauses building a complex sentence?

Do relative clauses count as dependent clauses after reduction? Or is it different case by case? for example: The man who is in the house is my father. (complex sentence) The man in the house is my ...
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2answers
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Whereas + present participle

Is it grammatically correct to use whereas + a present participle? For example: I am disinclined to recognize my weak mathematical skills, whereas willing to admit my lack of English skills. This ...
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1answer
229 views

Identifying the main clause and subordinate clauses

I’m preparing for my exam and in one of the practice questions i have to identify the main clause, subordinate clause/s and the subject,predicate and/or adverbials. the sentence is: "The Mausoleum ...
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1answer
35 views

I'm struggling to identify the clause/subordinate clauses in this sentence

'Today, people can still see some of the marble stones that were used to build the Mausoleum.' I understand 'that' is connecting the sentence, but there is no subject after 'that' so im a bit ...
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1answer
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Ex: Can I write it this way and is it grammatically correct, as the additional phrase in the end of a question sounds weird?

Questions with subordinate (declarative) clauses at the end sound weird. For example: Can you grant me access to the document, since it is currently unavailable? Where do I submit this, as ...
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1answer
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Is it correct to add nouns to “of which”,“in which”,“of whom”, etc.?

For example, can I say Recently I bought a new computer, the price of which was very reasonable. I always considered this type of usage correct but can't find any example sentences on the internet....
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1answer
66 views

How to use Commas When an Introductory Clause Precedes a Dependent/Subordinate Clause

I think we all agree that most introductory clauses are set off by commas. E.g.: In 1982, John Smith went to battle in Spain. Moreover, the monkeys all ate bread. I think we also agree that ...
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0answers
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long sentences in English [closed]

I am translating some text to English from Russian Wikipedia, and sometimes there are quite long sentences. It is ok to have long sentences with several subordinate and participle clauses in Russian. ...
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1answer
713 views

“… who am I?” or “… who is me?”? [closed]

I have a question, but I don't know how to ask it correctly. Can you help me to choose and explain it please? I want to ask the next question: If Kate and John are students, then who [(am I) or (is ...
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0answers
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How does omitting the subject affect the sentence structure?

I was wondering: how does the structure of this sentence change when we use the continuous form of the verb without a subject: (standing)? "That half an hour was the peak of our social life: standing ...
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2answers
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That we know of yet

The movie 'Lady Bird' has this conversation: (Please click on it and listen to the clip starting at 2:16) Christine McPherson: What I'd really like is to be on Math Olympiad. Teacher: But math ...
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1answer
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'[…] upon which this invitation was based on' - is there an adverb redundant?

The whole sentence goes: 'Below is the list of criteria upon which this invitation was based on.' It seems to me the adverbs 'upon' and 'on' are doubled up in this sentence. And it should be changed ...
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1answer
106 views

Am I correct in describing this as both a subordinate clause and a restrictive clause?

In this sentence - Today I am starting a diet, but first I will eat all the children’s chocolate they have leftover from Easter. Is but first I will eat etc a subordinate clause that contains the ...
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0answers
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Can I substitute a main verb with an auxiliary verb in a subordinate clause if it has an object after?

There are no auxiliary verbs in my language, so I often struggle using them in English. If I want to substitute a main verb in a subordinate clause of a complex sentence, because it's the same as in ...
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2answers
578 views

Comma before a coordinating conjunction in compound-complex sentences?

As far as I know, it’s a rule that a comma is needed before a coordinating conjunction that joins two independent clauses. But the use of a comma before a coordinating conjunction that joins two ...
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1answer
830 views

How to distinguish between Principal clause and Subordinate clause in a sentence? [closed]

How can I distinguish between a principal clause and a subordinate clause in a sentence to use a subordinating conjunction? I saw him, I stopped my car. I know I have to add when before I saw him. ...
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2answers
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Terminology: Definition of the term “direct object”

In Michael Swan's "Practical English Usage", he states in section 16.1: Many verbs besides auxiliaries can be followed by forms of other verbs (or by structures including other verbs). This can ...
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1answer
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Can a noun be both a subject and an object at the same time?

John Knight, who/whom I spoke to yesterday, seemed to be rather irritable. In this sentence, John Knight is an object because I (the subject) am speaking to him; however, he is also a subject since ...
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Is the use of the present progressive in “We prefer present forms when we are talking about future events …” correct?

We prefer present forms when we are talking about future events that have some present reality. In the above sentence, is the use of the present progressive in the subordinate clause "when we are ...
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1answer
393 views

Which is more correct: “preferred that he do” or “preferred him to do”? [duplicate]

I would like to know which form of this question is “more correct” than the other: What would you have preferred (that) he do? What would you have preferred him to do?
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1answer
398 views

Sentence without a main clause?

What do you call a phrase without a main clause? For example, answering a question: Are you to blame for the increase in deaths? Of course not! The answer cannot stand alone. Is there a name for ...
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0answers
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Is “But if” a subordinating conjunction?

Take Tennyson's poem Flower In The Crannied Wall for an example. Flower in the crannied wall, I pluck you out of the crannies, I hold you here, root and all, in my hand, Little flower—but if ...
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3answers
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Which of these words comes after a city name? Which or Where [closed]

This summer, Antalya, ______ a lot of people spend their vacation in, will be more crowded due to the new music festival. a. where b. that c. when d. which I picked A but the answer key ...
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1answer
66 views

Is there a grammatical term for two “conditional” subordinate clauses being combined with “and”?

First off, sorry if my question is confusing. Or just plain wrong for what I am actually asking. But I am confused. I'm trying to figure out why there are no commas in two specific sentences. I don't ...
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1answer
84 views

“In + VERBing” vs “When + VERBing”

I think the following clauses are equivalent, and yet I guess there must be some nuances that make them different. In working with others, try to work as a team. When working with others, try to work ...
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0answers
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Are wh-words conjunctions when they begin a dependent (wh-) clause? [duplicate]

According to "A glossary of English Grammar" by Goeffrey Leech: "The wh-words are: who, whom, whose, which, what, how, when, where, why." In the paragraph where Leech defines the term conjunction ...
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1answer
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Possible error in long, complicated sentence? [closed]

I am reading a book and which contains this sentence. Industrial designers will usually take in a lightly defined scope, including the features, use cases, and target markets make sense for your ...
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1answer
351 views

How to tell if “which” refers to subject or object of main clause?

I have not been able to find a satisfactory answer regarding rules about this issue. What I have heard are lots of opinions: Here is a picture of my house, which I like very much. Here is a ...
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1answer
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Subordinate Clauses and Commas

Every once in a while, I will come across a type of sentence construction in which a nested dependent clause is punctuated with a comma at the beginning but not at the end of the clause. For example: ...
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1answer
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Is “even when” a subordinating conjunction similar to “even though”?

An adverb clause is a dependent clause that answers the question why? how? where? when? Adverb clauses begin with a subordinating conjunction like when, because, even though. Ex. Even though she ...
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2answers
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whatever - Are these all noun clauses? [duplicate]

Are these all noun clauses? And what part of speech is whatever in each of them? Are they pronouns, determiners, or something else? I'll take whatever you can give. (direct object) ...
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0answers
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Possible Incorrect Comma Usage

I am trying to start off an essay with an impactful first sentence but I am a bit afraid with my comma use. I am not sure if it is the correct way to use such a comma or if it can be used this way... ...
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2answers
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How to use “that”

The following passage comes from a CNN article: Ryan's comments come as one senior House GOP member told CNN enough House Republicans are likely to agree to a push for legislation that would ban ...
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0answers
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Is “how” a subordinator between independent clauses? [duplicate]

We will look at how this is used. My question is this: Is the word how a subordinator in this sentence? If not, what is it? Are "We will look at" and "this is used" two independent clauses? Are ...
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4answers
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What is the conceptual distinction between coordinating conjunctions and subordinating conjunctions?

While it is easy enough to identify coordinating and subordinating conjunctions by memorizing lists of them, the actual distinction seems arbitrary. Coordinating conjunctions are said to join (among ...
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0answers
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How do I phrase a subordinate clause to refer to the right word in the main clause?

I often encounter situations in which I want to express a certain relation as in the example below, but I am not sure whether — as in German — ambiguity is inevitable or whether I just do not know the ...
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3answers
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Tense in “One of the requirements was that it must …”

I'm having a slight dispute with a friend who proofreads my paper on the correct tense in this sentence: One of the key requirements for the web app was that it must automatically work with any new ...
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1answer
841 views

Which word to use in this sentence, “when” or “which”?

Bolt took his first shot at success on the world stage at the 2002 World Junior Championships in Kingston, Jamaica, when/where he won the 200-meter dash. Should we use when or where in this sentence?...
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2answers
174 views

“Not sure what the contact’s full name is?” vs. “Not sure what is the contact’s full name" [duplicate]

In an application I am writing, I require the user to state a contact's full name. I have a disagreement with my marketing director regarding the correct wording for when the user doesn't know the ...
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0answers
230 views

Comma usage in multiple subordinate clauses

Consider the following sentence: If you assume that what X is is a variant of Y, then Z. Am I correct in saying that both 'that' and 'what' begin essential clauses that should not be put in commas?...
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“may” followed by a limiting clause

I would like to get a sense of the implications of a phrase that begins with "may", but is followed by a limitation or qualifier. For example: "A lawyer may, no later than 10 days after being ...
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0answers
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Can a relative pronoun be used to refer to a clause?

As an example: The dog seemed happy, which made the girl laugh. In this sentence, "which" refers to "dog seemed happy"—that is what made the girl laugh. But a relative pronoun cannot modify a ...
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0answers
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Can a subordinate conjunction join a participial phrase to an independent clause?

In the sentence, "They were thrilled after hearing about the new store," is the word "after" a subordinating conjunction joining the participial phrase "hearing about the new store" to the independent ...