Questions tagged [subordinate-clauses]

a clause that forms part of a main clause, and is dependent on that clause

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1answer
21 views

Changing clause of condition to absolute phrase and participle w

1a. When I have money I will buy a car. 2a. If my parents allow I'll go abroad. Can these sentence be changed into a absolute participle phrase? For example 1b. Having money, I'll buy a car. 2b. ...
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36 views

Finding a verb analogous to 'analyse' (US 'analyze') requiring complementiser

I'm proofreading an academic paper and have come across the following: "This process, as Smith analyses, is a way to reflect on..." Intuitively I'd prefer "This process, as Smith ...
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47 views

asyndeton in speech

If I said, "This business deal will be a success a victory a triumph if we are able to secure the contract." Is it clear that the "if" clause applies to "This business deal ...
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63 views

Is a non-restrictive relative clause a subordinate clause?

a. The mayor, who lives in this house, has not been seen for days. This is a non-restrictive relative clause, since it provides supplementary information about the mayor, but is not essential to the ...
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Movement of participle clauses

Consider this sentence of mine, please: John is an American dancer and choreographer, specializing in contemporary dance. Are 2) and 3) below grammatical? Specializing in contemporary dance, John ...
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75 views

identifying the type of clause

Consider this sentence, please: That was my first time driving a car. What type of clause is "driving a car"? Is it a reduced relative clause, gerund clause, or an adverbial participle ...
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43 views

Use of 'would' for evidentiality in American English

In American English, "would" is used more often than in British English. It seems that one reason is using 'would' for evidential use in American English. especially for indirect ...
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44 views

Tense Inconsistency (Past Simple and Present Perfect) or wrong Sequence of Tenses (Present tense follows Past tense)?

In the following sentence, the Present Perfect in the second clause sounds a little off to me, yet I cannot put my finger on WHY that is. During this time (Subord. Clause 1), I was able to gain/ I ...
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23 views

use of “for which”

is the use of "for which" correct in the following sentence? Thanks One day the sales team informed us that they are going to send 10 input files for which we will use to run some ...
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1answer
41 views

adverbial clause acting as adjective

Consider these sentences, please: 1) Imagine Robert Redford when he was a child - that's what John looks like. 2) Imagine Robert Redford as a child - that's what John looks like. Question 1: Can I say ...
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33 views

Difference between dependent clause, comma splice, adverbial clause?

For example in this sentence: Brett reads a massive textbook, scribbling notes at his desk. The second park, scribbling notes at his desk, has to be some sort of dependent clause because it can't ...
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How do you decide which clause is “independent” and which clause is “dependent”/“subordinate”?

Consider the following sentence: "My bother felt sick because he ate too many chocolates" Feel free to correct me if I'm wrong, but the word "because" is a conjunction. I have read that the ...
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28 views

“For all that” as subordinating conjunction?

In the sentence, “For all that they complain, they do nothing,” is the phrase “for all that” a subordinating conjunction akin to “notwithstanding”? Also, can “that” be omitted with no loss in meaning ...
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33 views

Is conjunction reduction possible within an if's compound apodosis?

I have the following sentence: If the researcher knew the mechanism, any feature of the population would be known, any (causal) relationships in the population would be completely traceable, and ...
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Is the Latter Clause of an Action Simile Attributed to the Subject or Object Acted Upon?

In other (hopefully more graceful) words, are both of the following lines valid? "A smiling Freddy flung the slimy papaya around like a wet rag." "A smiling Freddy flung the slimy papaya around like ...
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Interjection between subordinate and main clauses

I have a question about this modest sentence for which I have no context except that it came to me. Then I wondered about its grammaticality. Because it wasn’t my job—I didn’t work there—I left. ...
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Noun clause (as an object )

In this sentence Do you know if she's coming ? We ve 2 subjects (you and she ) 2 verbs ( know and coming ) And noun clause (as an object ) ( if she's is coming ) What is the second object in the ...
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How : neither a relative pronoun nor a relative adverb

Relative pronoun : who, whom, whose, which, that Relative adverb : when, where, why Is "how" neither a relative pronoun nor a relative adverb? Is 'how' only a subordinating conjunction in a ...
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Is it informal to omit the word “that” when it's optional?

I know there have been many questions about omitting "that" or not, but none of them addressed formality. I am writing a thesis in Romania and my supervisor gave me some feedback in which, among other ...
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1answer
31 views

Omission of subject in tensed clause

I know the subject can be omitted in untensed clauses. But I've encountered with the following: You spent more money than was intended to be spent. Here, 'than' seems to be functioning like a ...
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17 views

“Fail though I did”

I have found the following sentence : Fail though I did, I would not abandon my goal. The adverbial clause "Fail though I did" (instead of, "Even though I failed") seems quite stylistic. But what'...
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2answers
49 views

Comma before “which” in the following sentence? [duplicate]

I can't seem to determine whether or not the second half of the sentence below is restrictive or non-restrictive and thus, whether or not a comma is needed? While it doesn't seem necessary, it does ...
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33 views

The present perfect in the main clause and in the subordinate clause

Share your view on this issue. I was exposed to the following concept: 1 He has had a bike in the last two months. (is wrong) Instead, it should be 1a He had a bike in the last two months. (is ...
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71 views

Is there any 'for + NP + to-infinitive' where the NP is not the semantic subject of the infinitive?

In (a), for example, you is the semantic subject of apologize: a. I've been waiting for you to apologize. Is there any for + NP + to-infinitive where the NP is not the semantic subject of the ...
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Raised object vs. Subordinate subject (I didn't want Kim mistreating my cat)

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Page 1204) says: A crucial difference between gerund-participials and to-infinitivals is that a non-genitive NP can function as subject of the former ...
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The Chauvet cave is unique because its preservation is unprecedented ? despite containing the oldest paintings ever discovered. Comma?

The Chauvet cave is unique because its preservation is unprecedented ? despite containing the oldest paintings ever discovered. Do I need a comma here?
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1answer
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Is my StackExchange-Description written correctly? [closed]

This is my profile-description of the StackExchange-Site: "Dösbaddel" is a (North-)German word for "Dummkopf" which probably means "fool" in English. Is it written properly or do I need to insert ...
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2answers
721 views

Transformation of sentence beginning with As soon as into sentence beginning with Hardly…when

Consider this sentence: As soon as we reached the station, the train left. Now if I transform this into a sentence beginning with Hardly, then which of the following sentences is correct and why? ...
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60 views

noun clause or adjective clause?

I think these clauses are both noun clauses but I'm not sure . I have doubts that the first one might be an adjective clause. I don't agree with the idea that money makes happiness. (I think its a ...
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1answer
33 views

subordinate clause

I'm looking for a grammatical explanation for this clause Men tend to talk about fewer subjects, the most popular being work, and sport. In other words, we could say "..., among which, work and ...
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74 views

Adverbial clause or adjectival clause?

(When they are used properly), pyrethroids have been found to pose very little risk on human. What is the grammatical name and function of the expression in the bracket?
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Need help breaking down this sentence: “I took action to make my plan come to fruition.”

So far I have "to make my plan come to fruition" as a subordinate clause, but I'm having trouble defining its components. Is "come to fruition" modifying "plan"? How is the infinitive functioning here?...
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1answer
50 views

Comma before a subordinate clause

I was reading a book and stumbled on this sentence: It was closed, but the salesman said he would wait, if we hurried. I'm confused about the use of the comma preceding if we hurried. Why not ...
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1answer
78 views

Is “He was arrested because he murdered his neighbour.” a simplification of “He was arrested because he had murdered his neighbour.”?

I am familiar with tense simplification in subordinate clauses: He went out after he put on his coat. instead of had put, because the conjunction after makes it clear that the action of putting on ...
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2answers
61 views

The referent of relative pronouns [grammar]

"The boss expressed his displeasure about the absence of the staff at the meeting yesterday , which had caused the delay of projects approval." Is the sentence grammatically correct ? if so , the "...
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Subordinating Clause

Given: Building these houses entails a lot of work. Does 'these houses entails a lot of work' form a subordinating clause to the verb 'building'? If so what kind of subordinating clause is it?
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784 views

How did “to wish that” come to hate the present tense in the subordinate clauses it governs, and why is it alone in this?

Inspired by this earlier question, I've realized that we have no canonical question addressing the stranglely one-of-a-kind special grammatical rules demanded by the verb wish of its subordinate ...
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22 views

Is this a dependant clause?

I was wondering if the following was a dependent clause: There weren’t enough beds, so I had to sleep on the floor.
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1answer
58 views

Using “for” in clauses

Is there any problem with this sentence? If any, how can I make it correct? "Social Security Institution is in charge of, authorized and responsible for the collection of the Fund premiums, and the ...
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Replacing a comma with a subordinate clause

Can I add more information to this sentence To achieve efficiency and tangible results, motivation of the workers is important as it can help them improve their performance and happiness. and ...
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246 views

Why does “that” sound odd to me after “said” in these sentences with “as” and “like”?

You said that he would come to the party. He came to the party, as you said that he would. He came to the party, just as you said that he would. He came to the party, just like you said that he would. ...
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3answers
46 views

Should I use a comma before “who” in this sentence, or can it be written without that comma?

Which of the following is correctly written as far as its comma (or lack of comma) is concerned? People who love their jobs can easily excel in their fields of work than those, who put salary on the ...
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104 views

Sentences starting with “Which”: Fragment or complete sentence?

I read an article in a newspaper and was wondering if what I read was a sentence fragment. The sentence/fragment in question is: Which is why we believe the proposed amendments should be passed. ...
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2answers
200 views

Type of subordinate clause in 'I am happy that you are here'

In the sentence 'I am happy that you are here', 'that you are here' acts as a subordinate clause. However, I am unsure what type of subordinate clause it is: i.e. I'm not sure if it's an adverbial, ...
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1answer
56 views

Using ‘used to’ in subordinate clauses

Is it correct to use the modal verb ‘used to’ in subordinate clauses? For example, could I say, ‘When we used to go to New Delhi, my father and I would shop for music CDs’? Or must I reserve it only ...
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88 views

Use of present tense in a subordinate clause within a sentence that uses future tense

Is the use of tenses correct in the following sentence ? "One of the key components will be the XXX that replaces the existing YYY." In particular, the use of the present tense in the subordinate ...
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2answers
41 views

Using a comma before a subordinate clause

It is very common that we don't insert a comma before a subordinate clause at end position as follows: The President was opening a new university when a bomb went off. However, I came across ...
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1answer
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Understanding 5 consecutive “that”s in this sentence

(This sentence was told as an entertainment by my English teacher 8 years ago.) She presented us with the following sentence: She said that that that that that he said was wrong. I had a bit of ...
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2answers
68 views

Noun clause as object

I know I can use a subordinate clause as an object of a sentence. I don't know who is that person. Can I put this object at the beginning of that sentence who is that person, I don't know.
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41 views

Word or phrase for a commonly-used clause at the beginning of a sentence, such as “It's almost as if”

I've been seeing a lot of tweets/comments/posts with the following structure: "It's almost as if [obvious observation]". Ignoring how terrible this trend is, what is an appropriate word or phrase for ...

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