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Questions tagged [direct-objects]

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Subject + verb + personal object+ bare infinitive; such as "I demanded her pay her taxes" Can we follow this same formula for all subjunctive verbs? [migrated]

My main question was prompted when I realized that there were other cases where subjunctive can be used with other verbs, such as with like, ask, etc. So my question here is whether we can use the ...
PROCESIONES CELESTES's user avatar
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0 answers
43 views

"by validating" - missing direct object?

According to several dictionaries I have, "validate" is a transitive verb. But both Grammarly and ChatGPT judge the following (imperative) sentence as correct: Ensure feature quality by ...
Jirka-x1's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
675 views

Does using a preposition phrase instead of a direct object change the transitivity of a verb?

A textbook I'm using to refresh some basic grammar states that indirect objects can be identified by it's answering of questions such as 'to whom', 'to what' etc. (fair enough) and they always come ...
Jos's user avatar
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-1 votes
1 answer
40 views

Can any noun type be used as a direct object? [closed]

Can a noun of any type be used as a direct object?
FAQ's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
60 views

Order: "Yours and Derricks" or "Derrick and yours"? [duplicate]

I am thanking 2 people for their help. Do I say Yours and Dericks support or Derrick and your support Which is correct?
Karen Brown's user avatar
2 votes
4 answers
165 views

"and has as one of its Healthy People 2020 goals to “create social and physical environments that promote good health for all.”"

I would like to ask you about the bold-faced part in the following sentence: (1) The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention defines social determinants of health as “conditions in the places ...
yasukotta's user avatar
5 votes
3 answers
204 views

Can two verbs have the same direct object?

I’ll do whatever it takes to get the job. Is whatever a direct object for do and takes?
John's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
200 views

Is “senior year” a direct object or something else in “I played my senior year”? What about “perfect game” in “I threw a perfect game”?

In the sentence “I played my senior year” (Referring to baseball) would senior year be an adverbial phrase or a direct object? Would the same apply to “I threw a perfect game”? In the second example ...
James's user avatar
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1 answer
140 views

Why can the adverb "otherwise" be used followed by a verb as an object in the sentence "But the research suggests otherwise"?

In the sentence But the research suggests otherwise, we know "suggest" is a transitive verb, so my question is, what "otherwise" is then? I guess it's an adverb here, but we must ...
jamespe's user avatar
  • 13
0 votes
1 answer
50 views

Where to put the direct object

Is it grammatically acceptable to use the words in the order they are put in the sentence: People shouldn’t take at face value every bit of information they might find in blogs.
Appolinaria's user avatar
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2 answers
125 views

Is this infinitive a noun or an adverb?

In the following sentences... Watch me whip. You make me feel special. The word "whip" and the phrase "feel special" are infinitives without "to." However, I'm not ...
Heather Leland's user avatar
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1 answer
117 views

Is a verb transitive when used only with an indirect object? [closed]

I am learning about indirect objects and transitivity in French, but I believe that my question is also valid in English. Therefore, I'd like to sort this out in English. If a verb is used only with ...
user2153235's user avatar
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0 answers
59 views

Are Complements of Objects Considered 'Predicative' and 'Locative'?

Subjects can take two types of complements: predicative (adjectives and nominals) and locative. Is this the same for objects? Examples: He painted the town red. I kept the money out of sight. ...
MJ Ada's user avatar
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0 votes
4 answers
1k views

In the sentence "The cat likes to eat fish," is the object "likes to eat fish" or just "fish"?

In the sentence "The cat likes to eat fish," is the object "likes to eat fish" or just "fish"? I can see an argument for both, because the sentence "I like it" ...
warasdf's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
490 views

Does "to help" only have indirect object without having a direct object?

there. I stumbled upon this sentence: The charity gave them money to help them purchase a house. While trying to analyse it, I met some problems related to the verb "to help". My first ...
Maria Lima's user avatar
6 votes
3 answers
747 views

'She' as sentence object [duplicate]

In the following sentence from Lolita, Humbert Humbert, in describing with maximum condescension the character of his new wife, states: 'I had always been aware of the possessive streak in her, but I ...
x30's user avatar
  • 77
1 vote
2 answers
177 views

Use of pronoun for objects in the preceding sentence [duplicate]

I am having some doubts regarding the use of pronouns.  Please have a look at the following sentences. I picked a pen from the dustbin yesterday.  It writes very smoothly. I picked a pen from the ...
M. Noraiz's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
526 views

Semantic roles of 'direct object'

What are the primary semantic roles of 'direct object'? In particular, I was wondering what the semantic roles of 'direct object' are in such sentences as: They crossed the river. He promised her ...
Eric's user avatar
  • 706
2 votes
2 answers
445 views

What is the direct object of "I imagined" in the context "as I imagined would be the case"? (i.e. I imagined what?)

In my previous question Is the phrase “as I imagined would be the case” grammatically correct and why?, someone referenced this other question: Where is the subject in "as was traditional for ...
Pablo Messina's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
141 views

In the sentence "I must decide which English course to take," is "which English course to take" a noun clause?

I am hesitating to call it a noun clause because there is no conjugated verb (only the verbal "to take"). I am thinking that "which English course to take" is actually an ...
Bridget F's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
420 views

Passive Voice with intransitive verbs?

With a sentence like, "He sat on the couch," is sat still being used as an intransitive verb since, in general, prepositional phrases cannot act as direct objects? To me, the prepositional ...
Eric1982's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
286 views

Does a direct object always follow the transitive verb?

I am confused as to whether direct objects always follow the transitive verb. When I searched for an explanation online, it always says that direct objects always come after the transitive verb. I can'...
nobodybutstillconfused's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
21 views

Checklists for instruction - direct or second person?

For instruction within a professional org, we utilize checklists for the specific parties to self-assess their "products". Because there is some unfamiliarity with the subject matter, we ...
Jason's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
57 views

Is the object necessary in “It teaches (all) to think”? [closed]

What are the differences between: It teaches to think. It teaches all to think. I have found in a book that the 1st sentence isn’t correct. Is that right?
Mathematician's user avatar
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0 answers
26 views

"this drug induces sleeping" or "this drug induces sleep"?

I seem to have heard both structures before, but I don’t understand which it would be. In other languages the second verb would be in the infinitive, but I have heard things like "Josh hates ...
Will's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
55 views

How do I understand the syntax of “He puts to good use things other people have thrown away”?

He puts to good use things other people have thrown away. I have only seen “put something to good use”,but I haven’t ever seen this pattern that is used here, which is more complicated. Is “he put to ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
66 views

Object vs adverbial

In the sentence: "The teachers in our school are nice." Is "in our school" an adverbial or part of the subject "The teachers in our school"? Wondering because it would ...
Google User's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
72 views

Interjecting adverbs between indirect and direct objects in ditransitive verb phrases?

I'm currently writing a paper about a syntactic issue in English and I was curious how these sounded to everyone. Sam put carefully the coffee on the desk. Sam put the coffee carefully on the desk. ...
Jordan M.'s user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
99 views

Is this a direct object or prepositional phrase?

Sorry if my question is not suitable for this forum. Although a native speaker, I am unfamiliar with grammatical rules in English (which consequently leads to a lack of comprehension in foreign ...
MuchAppreciated25's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
46 views

Finding the direct object

In the following sentence, I'm trying to figure out which is the direct object: On a trip like this, one must be careful about gas consumption. I know that the subject is one and the verb is be ...
bugsyb's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
801 views

"I have a friend VISITING me." Participle vs entire Direct Object Clause

"I have a friend visiting me." Which part of speech is "visiting" specifically? Even if "a friend visiting me" is an entire direct object clause, what is the breakdown: Is "visiting" a participle? ...
UncleRukhus's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
33 views

"The direction traveled"

I have always found use of the phrase "the direction traveled" a bit odd, though not as striking as "travel a direction". People travel a distance and travel in a direction, but do ...
Eddie Kal's user avatar
  • 1,172
2 votes
2 answers
1k views

"Get on": is it transitive, intransitive or both?

I'm new here (in the sense of asking a question, but I often use the site for reference.) I have a question regarding the phrasal verb "get on", or more specifically when used with "with", eg. "get ...
Alex Bennett's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
34 views

Can prepositions and verbs have an indirect object(s) or is the object of a verb(s) or preposition(s) always direct? [closed]

This is something I have always wondered, but I have been struggling with the subject-object thing for too long a time now, I can still very much in English learner.
OneWhoBelievesInPeace's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
61 views

the adverb "all" as a direct object

merriam-webster.com: 1. I forgot all about paying the bill. collinsdictionary.com: 2. He loves animals and he knows all about them. As written in the dictionaries, "all" is an adverb ...
Loviii's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
69 views

On the optionally of "each other"/ "one another"

It seems that with some verbs "each other" is optional but not with others. Is there a general sense of when it is optional? Is there a terminology or concept behind this I can google for further ...
Frank Schwieterman's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
2k views

Who vs. whom when the he/him test is unclear

I'm not sure whether the following sentence requires who/whom: Does anyone know who/whom I can speak with about that? If a similar sentence began with who/whom, it would be "whom." Whom can I speak ...
user27343's user avatar
  • 192
1 vote
2 answers
2k views

Does a transitive verb always require a direct object?

If a verb is only listed in the dictionary as a transitive verb, can it be correctly used without a direct object, i.e. as an intransitive verb? We can use the verb "force" as an example, which is ...
thinkpad22 's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
1k views

Complex object grammar and other things [closed]

I've seen a number of different phrases in different books describing the action of closing a door, and I'm not quite sure that I fully understand the grammar behind them. For example: (1) [He] ...
Maria's user avatar
  • 23
0 votes
3 answers
302 views

In the sentence "Go help yourself", is 'yourself' both the direct object and the subject?

In the sentence "Go help yourself", is 'yourself' both the direct object and the subject? Can a subject and direct object be the exact same word in a sentence? If not, what is 'yourself' here?
Jak's user avatar
  • 1
1 vote
3 answers
149 views

Misunderstanding the use of me/him/her/them/us

I'm aware that when the pronoun is also the object of a sentence we use these: me instead of I, them instead of they and so on. But when I say: He is a teacher, and her? Why do I say her instead ...
Andrea Mora's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
64 views

parenthetical sentence with coordinate clause sharing the same direct object

Is this grammatical in English? An Italian wizard named Mirkius has found, and managed to control, a ferocious creature named Onestus
elio sottoscritti's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
1k views

Which pronoun should be used after the word ‘like’? [closed]

For example, which of the following is considered correct?: Don't be like him Don't be like he is There are other examples I can't think of right now where people use him instead of ...
Patty DeVore's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
486 views

Direct and Indirect objects in "I take my kids to school"

In the sentence I take my kids to school. I would be the subject and the verb would be take. Now, as the verb take is acted upon the kids, I thought my kids was the direct object and the school ...
vik1245's user avatar
  • 141
-2 votes
2 answers
221 views

Transitive verbs without direct objects [closed]

My linguistics teacher said the sentence "She put the book on the table." is wrong without 'on the table' part. I disagree with him. Isn't in a sense transitive verbs also intransitive when you speak ...
Boketto Caustic's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
349 views

Indirect object pronoun before direct object

I have seen a few people say that indirect objects that are in the form of a pronoun should be placed before the direct object in a sentence. Why is that? I didn’t know it mattered. For example: “I ...
AJK432's user avatar
  • 420
1 vote
1 answer
202 views

Does 'neighbour', as a verb, take a direct object?

I heard, today, on an American documentary, the word 'neighbour' used as a verb, something I had not come across before. The OED tells me that the verb is obsolete or rare, but seems to have come back ...
Nigel J's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
1k views

What distinguishes a predicative complement from an object?

Asked this on ELL but with no answer: What makes be an intransitive verb? How do we know that the analysis of It is me as transitive by tradtional grammars is incorrect? Take for example: I gave an [...
Joe's user avatar
  • 41
0 votes
1 answer
577 views

Which is the direct object and which is the object complement in this sentence? [duplicate]

I was reading a book on English grammar and it stated that the object complement may also be an adjective. In the sentence "Roger called George heartless", Roger was the subject, called was the verb, ...
Eric Zhang's user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
322 views

Is the sentence, ' I want to learn skateboard.' , grammtically right?

Is the sentence, ' I want to learn skateboard.' , grammtically acceptable ? Instead of 'learn to skateboard or learn skateboarding', is ' learn skateboard ' right expression?
user290461's user avatar