Questions tagged [direct-objects]

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2answers
103 views

“Get on”: is it transitive, intransitive or both?

I'm new here (in the sense of asking a question, but I often use the site for reference.) I have a question regarding the phrasal verb "get on", or more specifically when used with "with", eg. "get ...
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23 views

Can prepositions and verbs have an indirect object(s) or is the object of a verb(s) or preposition(s) always direct? [closed]

This is something I have always wondered, but I have been struggling with the subject-object thing for too long a time now, I can still very much in English learner.
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51 views

the adverb “all” as a direct object

merriam-webster.com: 1. I forgot all about paying the bill. collinsdictionary.com: 2. He loves animals and he knows all about them. As written in the dictionaries, "all" is an adverb ...
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1answer
39 views

On the optionally of “each other”/ “one another”

It seems that with some verbs "each other" is optional but not with others. Is there a general sense of when it is optional? Is there a terminology or concept behind this I can google for further ...
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2answers
122 views

Who vs. whom when the he/him test is unclear

I'm not sure whether the following sentence requires who/whom: Does anyone know who/whom I can speak with about that? If a similar sentence began with who/whom, it would be "whom." Whom can I speak ...
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2answers
93 views

Does a transitive verb always require a direct object?

If a verb is only listed in the dictionary as a transitive verb, can it be correctly used without a direct object, i.e. as an intransitive verb? We can use the verb "force" as an example, which is ...
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1answer
376 views

Complex object grammar and other things [closed]

I've seen a number of different phrases in different books describing the action of closing a door, and I'm not quite sure that I fully understand the grammar behind them. For example: (1) [He] ...
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3answers
100 views

In the sentence “Go help yourself”, is 'yourself' both the direct object and the subject?

In the sentence "Go help yourself", is 'yourself' both the direct object and the subject? Can a subject and direct object be the exact same word in a sentence? If not, what is 'yourself' here?
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3answers
61 views

Misunderstanding the use of me/him/her/them/us

I'm aware that when the pronoun is also the object of a sentence we use these: me instead of I, them instead of they and so on. But when I say: He is a teacher, and her? Why do I say her instead ...
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2answers
31 views

parenthetical sentence with coordinate clause sharing the same direct object

Is this grammatical in English? An Italian wizard named Mirkius has found, and managed to control, a ferocious creature named Onestus
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2answers
118 views

Which pronoun should be used after the word ‘like’? [closed]

For example, which of the following is considered correct?: Don't be like him Don't be like he is There are other examples I can't think of right now where people use him instead of ...
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3answers
94 views

Direct and Indirect objects in “I take my kids to school”

In the sentence I take my kids to school. I would be the subject and the verb would be take. Now, as the verb take is acted upon the kids, I thought my kids was the direct object and the school ...
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2answers
73 views

Transitive verbs without direct objects

My linguistics teacher said the sentence "She put the book on the table." is wrong without 'on the table' part. I disagree with him. Isn't in a sense transitive verbs also intransitive when you speak ...
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1answer
204 views

Indirect object pronoun before direct object

I have seen a few people say that indirect objects that are in the form of a pronoun should be placed before the direct object in a sentence. Why is that? I didn’t know it mattered. For example: “I ...
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1answer
67 views

Does 'neighbour', as a verb, take a direct object?

I heard, today, on an American documentary, the word 'neighbour' used as a verb, something I had not come across before. The OED tells me that the verb is obsolete or rare, but seems to have come back ...
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1answer
730 views

What distinguishes a predicative complement from an object?

Asked this on ELL but with no answer: What makes be an intransitive verb? How do we know that the analysis of It is me as transitive by tradtional grammars is incorrect? Take for example: 1. I gave ...
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1answer
362 views

Which is the direct object and which is the object complement in this sentence? [duplicate]

I was reading a book on English grammar and it stated that the object complement may also be an adjective. In the sentence "Roger called George heartless", Roger was the subject, called was the verb, ...
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2answers
140 views

Terminology: Definition of the term “direct object”

In Michael Swan's "Practical English Usage", he states in section 16.1: Many verbs besides auxiliaries can be followed by forms of other verbs (or by structures including other verbs). This can ...
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3answers
5k views

“I remember the advice he gave to me” Why add preposition to?

While I was reading a book, I stumbled upon a sentence "I remember the advice he gave to me". From my understanding, give can be used in two ways. First. Give + IO + DO. For example, "He gave me an ...
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1answer
91 views

Can an entire phrase consisting of a noun and a prepositional phrase modifying the noun be considered the direct object?

I have two questions related to the following sentence: I saw pictures of animals. My first question is, what is the direct object of the sentence? (a) The direct object is pictures. (b) The ...
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2answers
300 views

Does being in the accusative case guarantee the existence of a direct object?

I want to clear this matter up once and for all. Even though I have already asked a few questions on the site related to the nominative case and the accusative case, I still get confused by one ...
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1answer
246 views

Possible semantic roles for direct object

What are all possible semantic roles of direct object in English? also is there any dictionary which tells us about semantic role of direct object for transitive verbs?
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1answer
952 views

I don't care what they say

I don't care about what they say. In the sentence above, they phrase what they say, is presumably the complement of the preposition about, and the preposition phrase about what they say is ...
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1answer
2k views

What is the meaning of *them* in this sentence? I mean what does them refer to in this sentence? [duplicate]

Do you remember the first time you talked about our future together and I said: “I’ll think about it later”? I lied. I lied that I can be with you forever and never leave. Do you remember our ...
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1answer
1k views

Which one is the direct object and indirect object?

Everyone is looking at us. In the above sentence, "to look" is the verb, "everyone" the subject. Is "us" a direct object or indirect object? How do you find the DO and IO?
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446 views

Diagramming a Sentence with a Causative Verb

For a Reed–Kellogg sentence diagram, how would you diagram a sentence with a causative verb like "made"? For example: The hot weather made her want to swim. I understand that "weather" is the ...
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2answers
528 views

what is the direct object & the indirect object in the sentence in my post

I am trying to learn about direct and indirect objects. My question is sadly very simple but I'm unsure. In the sentence below what is the direct object & what is the indirect object? She should ...
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1answer
204 views

What type of object is 'whom' in this sentence?

In the sentence Whom is she calling? what type of object is whom? Is whom an indirect object because she is doing the calling to a person referred to as whom?
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2answers
524 views

Since the rules do not forbid “I brought him him”, can I therefore say it that way?

I’ve searched about direct and indirect objects, and all explanations have led me to think that I could say this: ?I brought him him. Is that allowed? I think it should be, since the rules governing ...
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0answers
41 views

Direct object's placement [duplicate]

According to Longman's English grammar's book: We can use two objects after verbs like give and buy. Instead of: Give the book to me, we can say: Give me the book. lnstead of: Buy the book for ...
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1k views

Direct and indirect object with “give” and “buy”

I have been studying Longman's English grammar book, and something is really confusing me: We can put it and them after the verb: Give it to me. Buy them for me. Do it for me. With e.g. give and buy, ...
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3answers
249 views

Repeating the object in a list of transitive verbs

You have received this proposal. Please decide whether you would like to accept it or reject it. Is it correct to repeat the object it in this sentence or should I skip it until the last verb? For ...
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2answers
925 views

Position of direct object and prepositional phrase

I send something to someone. /I send to someone something. I made a cake for my mother. /I made for my mother a cake. I know with certainty that in these pair of sentences the first ones are ...
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1answer
110 views

Can we put prepositional phrases between transitive verbs and their direct object?

Can we write like this: You should not keep in a doghouse a dog that is used to a steam - heated apartment? The original sentence is: You should not keep a dog that is used to a steam - heated ...
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1answer
3k views

Can a prepositional phrase act as an indirect object?

For example, in the sentence: I baked a cake for my mom. Direct object (DO): cake Indirect object (IO): for my mom Some webpages say IO can only come before DO While others explain that a ...
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1answer
620 views

Reflexive pronoun: direct object or predicate noun?

In the sentence: He considered himself wise. I would parse this as He - subject considered - transitive verb himself - direct object wise = object complement adjective My kids ask me ...
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1answer
411 views

Is it possible for a sentence to have a direct object and predicate adjective?

In school, I was taught that action verbs have direct objects and linking verbs have predicate adjectives or nominatives; however, some verbs seem to use both simultaneously. For example, in "I made ...
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2answers
706 views

Indirect objects that answer the question “by whom”

Here is a sentence from Chapter Seventeen of Huckleberry Finn. The sentence appears in a grammar worksheet: When I got to the three log doorsteps I heard them unlocking and unbarring and ...
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2answers
1k views

“The mixture was added water”: Is “add” a double-object verb?

The mixture was added water. This sentence, written by a non-native speaker, seems somehow odd to me, but I cannot say that I find it at all ambiguous. This example sentence is written by a speaker ...
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6answers
20k views

Indirect object? Direct object? In active voice? In passive voice?

The following sentence has an active voice verb and an indirect object (IO) me and a direct object (DO) book: "Jeff gave me a book." As I understand, a passive voice verb comprises (1) a form of the ...
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0answers
210 views

“They survived the journey” is journey a direct object?

In the sentence: "There was no guarantee that the travelers would survive the journey." Would "the journey" be considered a direct object, or what would it be? In this sentence nothing seems to ...
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1answer
151 views

They also serve who only stand and wait. What is the function of “who only…wait”?

Is the part "who only ...wait" a noun clause acting as direct object? I am confused because the verb "serve" is shown to be an intransitive verb in the book in this particular example.
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3answers
1k views

What is the real difference between direct objects and prepositional phrases?

I'm a fairly new ESL teacher. One of my students asked me recently why "...to comply with the rules of grammar" needs a preposition (with), whereas "...to follow the rules of grammar" doesn't. After ...
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4answers
1k views

What is the direct object in the sentence “He causes you difficulty”?

I'm confused because if I said "he cause you to go home", the "you" would be the direct object, correct? But if I said "cause you difficulty", I would think that the direct object would be 'difficulty"...
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2answers
988 views

Direct object before indirect object

In this article on the changes in English grammar the author says: How untrammelled the English passive is, may be seen in the fact that, not content with a construction like “A book was given him,”...
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1answer
191 views

Use 'conform' verbally in a sentence taking a direct object

Give me an example of a sentence using the verb 'conform' + direct object. I'm aware that this is usually used in a prepositional phrase however I'm wondering how it might be used without it. So give ...
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1answer
664 views

If the direct object is also doing an action can it be a subject?

For example in a simple sentence such as: Jim saw another man eat a cow. I know that "Jim" is the subject, and "another man" is the direct object. But then is "another man" a subject as well ...
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4answers
598 views

How can I diagram the direct object placement in “… the watch that my uncle had given me.”

Please consider: "... the watch that my uncle had given me." "my uncle" is the subject. "had given" is the main verb (past perfect). so... "me" is an indirect object? or should it really be "had ...
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2answers
403 views

How do I differentiate between direct and indirect object with an object of a preposition present?

I am working on the following sentence: They will look toward me, whom they pierced. I am aware that a basic rule to identifying an indirect object is to ask, "to whom?" However, in this case, I am ...
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1answer
1k views

In what case can the object be placed at the beginning of a sentence?

Every word I say is true; this I promise you. I think the pronoun 'this' is the direct object of the verb 'promise' and 'this' should be be placed after 'you', but it is placed at the beginning of ...