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“The grocery store where I always shop went out of business.”

This source - https://www.masterclass.com/articles/subordinate-clause-explained - identifies "where I always shop" as an example of a subordinate adverbial clause, but I don't understand how it can be adverbial if it modifies a noun (the grocery store). Isn't it an adjective clause? If it is an adverbial clause, could someone please explain how it's modifying the verb?

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    I think you're right and this is a mistake at the site.
    – Barmar
    Aug 12, 2022 at 0:47
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    Upon linking to your source, it appears your source erred by saying "adverbial" instead of "adjectival" in its explanation of the third example, which this is in reference to, thus negating the basis for this question. Aug 12, 2022 at 3:11
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    Yes, and further, the classification of finite subordinate clauses is based on their internal form rather than spurious analogies with the parts of speech. Thus a so-called 'adjective clause' is in fact a relative clause.
    – BillJ
    Aug 12, 2022 at 16:56
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    There's no doubt that the subordinate relative clause "where I always shop went out of business" modifies the nominal "grocery store". Your reference to 'adverbial' probably stems from the fact that the relative word "where" functions as an adjunct (adverbial) of place in the relative clause.
    – BillJ
    Sep 4, 2022 at 7:28
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    Incidentally, I would ignore the resource you cited. For example, the clauses it calls 'adjective clauses' are best called 'relative clauses'. The classification of subordinate clauses is based on their internal form or head word, not on spurious analogies with the parts of speech.
    – BillJ
    Sep 4, 2022 at 7:46

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In traditional terminology, yes, this is an adjectival clause, for precisely the reason you state: "it modifies a noun (the grocery store)."

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