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Questions tagged [conjunctions]

Conjunctions are words used to connect clauses or sentences or to coordinate words in the same clause, such as "and," "but," and "if."

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Conjunction Problems on since

1)Since i was unwell ,so i did not come. 2)Since i was unwell ,i did not come. My book said sentence 1 is not correct as we don't use so with since. Is it correct?
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Meaning of “as” in this sentence [closed]

everyone, I'm reading an English novel and I found the next sentence: The person I'd once been vanished as I wrapped myself in white when the dust rose into clouds. I don't really understand ...
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Difference between and/or after “you can use”

The differences between the usage of "and" and "or" can sometimes be subtle. According to One or more of A, B, C, [and, or, and/or] D? One or more of A, B, C and D "means that of the sets a, b, c ...
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Connectors and Coordinating Conjunctions. Connector FOR

After FOR (as Coordinating Conjunction) could be a -ING verb ? I know after FOR can be a clause with Subject, verb and complements for example: I asked him to stop, FOR I had something important to ...
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How can I describe a conjunction that ends a sentence (so, and, or, but …)?

Recently I (American English speaker / academic / raised in Appalachian and Southern dialect household) noticed myself falling into a conversational pattern with coworkers where I would end a spoken ...
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60 views

Difference between “taking into account” and “considering” when used as conjunctions of contrast

How do I explain the difference between "taking into account" and "considering" to ESL students and can they be used interchangeably in the following sentences? "Taking into account that my sales are ...
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Need a word that combines the elements ''related to this' and 'following from this.'

I'm looking for a word/phrase that has a meaning which roughly contains the elements of being 'related to the previous points' and 'following from the previous points, but not in a causative way'. ...
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301 views

The word ”time” as a conjunction

In "Time travel” James Gleick discusses the OED definition of the noun ”time” (p248). He notes, in parentheses, that it can also function as an interjection and an obscure conjunction. Sadly, the ...
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Subordinating conjunctions “who” & “when” as subject clause?

I understand who and when can be used to introduce adjective clause for sure like the following sentences. The time when it is good for us to meet has not been decided. The person who is ...
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Adjective and conjunction which has higher priority?

I have a question about priority. For example: "elder brother and sister" means: "elder (brother and sister)" or "(elder brother) and sister"? Another example: "old men and women" means: "old (...
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The Educator for football technology or The educator of football technology [closed]

Please, could you explain that sentence, and also articles "the educator" or "educator" what is correct?
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Coordinating conjunction at beginning of sentence

Reading Wallace Shawn’s new book NIGHT THOUGHTS and he uses this construction all the time. And I knew my childhood memories affected it. But that theory wouldn’t work. How do you show that first ...
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Whereas + present participle

Is it grammatically correct to use whereas + a present participle? For example: I am disinclined to recognize my weak mathematical skills, whereas willing to admit my lack of English skills. This ...
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Can “why” be a conjunction?

I was reading an article about the use of "why" as an adverb. I thought about what other function the word can have and came to the reasoning that it can be a conjunction joining clauses. I looked up ...
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1answer
110 views

If X or [if] Y - Should I extend conditional after “or”?

I have a message to write where the recipient may encounter two problems. It is currently written like this: "If you are having problem X or if you are having problem Y please contact Z." I'm not ...
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1answer
119 views

What's the meaning of the sentence “or so he would have us believe”? [closed]

He wrote: 'Pytheas tells us that Thule is one day's sail from the congealed sea... and this Pytheas saw with his own eyes - or so he would have us believe. Mainly the mood or the conjunction ...
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1answer
48 views

Verb agreement with a phrase set off by “but”

A coworker is writing a sentence like Sally, but especially Joe, enjoys questions about grammar and usage. He thinks it should be Sally, but especially Joe, enjoy questions about grammar and ...
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Does a relative pronoun really combine the function of a pronoun with that of a conjunction?

Oxford Living Dictionaries defines 'relative pronoun' as follows: (Originally) a pronoun which refers to an antecedent, as a demonstrative or personal pronoun; (now) specifically a pronoun which ...
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Is it grammatically acceptable to start each options by 'or'?

I've been using this wording and was wondering if it is grammatically acceptable: "I wanted, or an apple, or an orange, or even a pineapple, but not a cake!" I was under the feeling that it showed ...
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Conjunction - “or” - meaning. Is it eliminate the previous/afterwards alternative

In programming and logic, for example, the "or" is meaning something that may or may not be added to the previous or afterwards: A or B (A only; B only; A and B). However, in real live conversations ...
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List: Joining three compound items, two with a common element

Which one is the most proper way to structure a list comprising "metabolic diseases," "microvascular complications," and "macrovascular complications" in the following example: High blood glucose ...
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1answer
335 views

'although' meaning 'but'

Most dictionaries I know of say that 'although' has two related but different usages. For example, Oxford Living Dictionaries define it as follows: 1 In spite of the fact that; even though. ‘...
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57 views

Using the conjunction “as” to express similarity

Is the following sentence gramatically corrent? He has shown sufficient technical aptitude, as has he high motivation to complete the project earlier. In this sentence what meant is that the ...
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1answer
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Of (verb), of (verb), and of (verb)?

Which is correct? Example 1: We want to emphasize the importance of running, swimming, and dancing. Example 2: We want to emphasize the importance of running, of swimming, and of dancing.
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1answer
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Can a conjuction prevent run-on sentences without punctuation?

I understand that run-on sentences join independent clauses without a word to connect them or a punctuation mark to separate them, but can a connecting word suffice to prevent a sentence from running ...
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Grammar: “I'll try AND help them”

There are tens of questions here on EL&U about the grammaticality of the try and do something construction and its merits compared with the unremarkable try to do something collocation. However, ...
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Can we use "Since…, thus… as a grammatically valid sentence?

I am wondering if below sentence (and in general, all similar sentences) is grammatically correct and semantically meaningful: Since I have graduated from school, thus I should find a job.
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Would there be an invisible and unneccesary preposition after the word conjuntion “and” if earlier in the sentence there is already a preposition?

I am trying to combine these two sentences in order to make it more concise. The program provides training on reviewing data schematics; it also provides training on interpreting data charts. I ...
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“All but” idiom or excluding “but” in this context?

I'm having a bit of trouble with this section of a biology paper: "LSU was amplified in these species using F63.2 and Mollusc28R2, which amplified all but ~400 bases at the 3' end of the gene." Does ...
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1answer
52 views

Question on prepositions and comparisons

I ran into a grammar book that claims this sentence as incorrect: Every year, more tourists travel to Disney World than the Louvre They are saying it needs to be "...to the Louvre". Other sources ...
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Why is this sentence incorrect? Why is this other sentence correct?

The answer to this GMAT question was not what I expected it to be. Link to the forum page here. Up until now, I was certain about two fundamental truths about grammar. It is always possible to ...
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What distinguishes the two meanings of the word “though” as a conjunction

The dictionary provides two meanings for the word "though" when used as a conjunction: to introduce a sentence that makes what you just said surprising, as in "He is a Marxist, though he has read ...
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The use of whatever and whichever [closed]

Which of the following sentences is correct: Whichever decision you take I will agree with you. Whatever decision you take I will agree with you.
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What exactly falls under the label of “complement”?

There seems to be a lot of contradicting beliefs out there regarding complements and what they cover -- or maybe I am just confusing myself. However, I cannot seem to find an answer that I understand. ...
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Differentiating between the use of “or” in questions

In a question such as "Does this word mean plenty or too much?" where the two words conjugated by "or" are similar in meaning could be asked in a way that a yes or no answer is expected instead of x ...
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1answer
260 views

Given that: a preposition or conjunction

The Oxford Living Dictionaries defines given that as a conjunction. when you consider something However the dictionary defines the preposition given in the following way: taking into ...
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1answer
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'As' always to describe something happening at the same time?

I heard the conjunction 'As' even when used to describe the reason for something implies it is happening at the same time. So, I'm wondering if the following sentence is a little strange to hear for ...
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How do complements, relative pronouns, and conjunctions correlate?

I have searched the site a lot and still have yet to find an answer that helps me understand how complements, relative pronouns, and conjunctions correlate. I have seen a few articles that talk ...
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Comma placement conjunctions

Please Help! My question was not answered on ELL, and I'm studying for the ACT. I don't understand the answer to this question. Scientists did not find it problematic to explain the physical world ...
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2answers
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“and/or” in an extended list

I'm having a problem with "and/or" as I write technical descriptions for audience segments. Audience segments are people who have been put in a group based on similar interests, attributes or ...
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Do you put a comma around “as well”

Would I write, "He, as well, no longer held the need to impress her" or "He as well no longer held the need to impress her"? Which is grammatically correct?
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CMS: The Curious Case of “Because of”

The phrase "because of" is commonly thought of as a preposition; by itself, "because" is also considered by some to be a subordinating conjunction. The Chicago Manual of Style doesn't capitalize any ...
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Can I have “and” in more than one clause in a sentence?

I've read on this site you can have more than one "and" in a sentence, but all the examples used "and" continuously. At school today, we had sums and writing and play and dinner and a story and a ...
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Correct usage of Neither, nor, not, [closed]

A• Secession is the solution, neither election nor restructuring. B• Secession is the solution, not election nor restructuring. Please, which of the above is correct?
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63 views

What are these phrases called?

Tragic yet beautiful; Pretty yet ugly; Cold yet sweating; Hot yet shivering; Scary yet funny; Serious yet funny; What are these called? phrases with the word yet
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609 views

How do you differentiate between “in order to”, “so as to”, “so that” and “to”?

When we use the phrases so as to, in order to, and so that, we simply mean with the aim or purpose of doing something. The first two phrases are always followed by an infinitive to. Will I not be ...
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1answer
1k views

“Whether or not…” vs. “whether… or not”

I'm confused with the placement of 'or not' with 'whether' in a sentence. E.g. I'm not sure whether I should go or not. I'm not sure whether or not I should go. Whether you stay or ...
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How to reconstruct a sentence to avoid words like but, yet, still, although and though?

I often find difficult to avoid those words. It'd be fine in articles, essays, etc if it was only because of the repetitiveness, there are three words or more for it, but in longer texts, like novels, ...
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What part of speech is “rather than” in the sentence, “Consider swimming rather than hiking.” [closed]

What part of speech is rather than in the sentence Consider swimming rather than hiking. Is it an adverbial phrase, or is than a comparative conjunction and rather an adverb?
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Ensure and Imply: To use “that” or not? [duplicate]

Is it necessary to use "that" when using the verbs "ensure" and "imply"? For example, I wrote "Theorem 1 implies there is a number j such that..." and "We impose a CFL condition to ensure the ...