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Conjunctions are words used to connect clauses or sentences or to coordinate words in the same clause, such as "and," "but," and "if."

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Can a conjuction prevent run-on sentences without punctuation?

I understand that run-on sentences join independent clauses without a word to connect them or a punctuation mark to separate them, but can a connecting word suffice to prevent a sentence from running ...
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Grammar: “I'll try AND help them”

There are tens of questions here on EL&U about the grammaticality of the try and do something construction and its merits compared with the unremarkable try to do something collocation. However, ...
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Can we use "Since…, thus… as a grammatically valid sentence?

I am wondering if below sentence (and in general, all similar sentences) is grammatically correct and semantically meaningful: Since I have graduated from school, thus I should find a job.
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14 views

Would there be an invisible and unneccesary preposition after the word conjuntion “and” if earlier in the sentence there is already a preposition?

I am trying to combine these two sentences in order to make it more concise. The program provides training on reviewing data schematics; it also provides training on interpreting data charts. I ...
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30 views

“All but” idiom or excluding “but” in this context?

I'm having a bit of trouble with this section of a biology paper: "LSU was amplified in these species using F63.2 and Mollusc28R2, which amplified all but ~400 bases at the 3' end of the gene." Does ...
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1answer
45 views

Question on prepositions and comparisons

I ran into a grammar book that claims this sentence as incorrect: Every year, more tourists travel to Disney World than the Louvre They are saying it needs to be "...to the Louvre". Other sources ...
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4answers
175 views

Why is this sentence incorrect? Why is this other sentence correct?

The answer to this GMAT question was not what I expected it to be. Link to the forum page here. Up until now, I was certain about two fundamental truths about grammar. It is always possible to ...
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0answers
12 views

Can a non-restrictive modifier start with a conjunction?

For example: A similar car, only bigger and blue, drove past John. or Jane enjoyed a light, but tasty, brunch with her mother. Are these sentences grammatically correct? or should the commas ...
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21 views

preposition + either… or

I came upon the following sentence: This game is suitable for either children or adults. So, Does this mean that the game is suitable for both children and adults, or only for one of the group? And ...
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80 views

What distinguishes the two meanings of the word “though” as a conjunction

The dictionary provides two meanings for the word "though" when used as a conjunction: to introduce a sentence that makes what you just said surprising, as in "He is a Marxist, though he has read ...
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1answer
44 views

The use of whatever and whichever [closed]

Which of the following sentences is correct: Whichever decision you take I will agree with you. Whatever decision you take I will agree with you.
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2answers
111 views

What exactly falls under the label of “complement”?

There seems to be a lot of contradicting beliefs out there regarding complements and what they cover -- or maybe I am just confusing myself. However, I cannot seem to find an answer that I understand. ...
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40 views

Differentiating between the use of “or” in questions

In a question such as "Does this word mean plenty or too much?" where the two words conjugated by "or" are similar in meaning could be asked in a way that a yes or no answer is expected instead of x ...
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1answer
56 views

Given that: a preposition or conjunction

The Oxford Living Dictionaries defines given that as a conjunction. when you consider something However the dictionary defines the preposition given in the following way: taking into ...
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1answer
30 views

'As' always to describe something happening at the same time?

I heard the conjunction 'As' even when used to describe the reason for something implies it is happening at the same time. So, I'm wondering if the following sentence is a little strange to hear for ...
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0answers
43 views

How do complements, relative pronouns, and conjunctions correlate?

I have searched the site a lot and still have yet to find an answer that helps me understand how complements, relative pronouns, and conjunctions correlate. I have seen a few articles that talk ...
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1answer
36 views

Comma placement conjunctions

Please Help! My question was not answered on ELL, and I'm studying for the ACT. I don't understand the answer to this question. Scientists did not find it problematic to explain the physical world ...
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2answers
37 views

“and/or” in an extended list

I'm having a problem with "and/or" as I write technical descriptions for audience segments. Audience segments are people who have been put in a group based on similar interests, attributes or ...
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1answer
84 views

Do you put a comma around “as well”

Would I write, "He, as well, no longer held the need to impress her" or "He as well no longer held the need to impress her"? Which is grammatically correct?
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CMS: The Curious Case of “Because of”

The phrase "because of" is commonly thought of as a preposition; by itself, "because" is also considered by some to be a subordinating conjunction. The Chicago Manual of Style doesn't capitalize any ...
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2answers
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Can I have “and” in more than one clause in a sentence?

I've read on this site you can have more than one "and" in a sentence, but all the examples used "and" continuously. At school today, we had sums and writing and play and dinner and a story and a ...
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2answers
70 views

Correct usage of Neither, nor, not, [closed]

A• Secession is the solution, neither election nor restructuring. B• Secession is the solution, not election nor restructuring. Please, which of the above is correct?
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2answers
44 views

What are these phrases called?

Tragic yet beautiful; Pretty yet ugly; Cold yet sweating; Hot yet shivering; Scary yet funny; Serious yet funny; What are these called? phrases with the word yet
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1answer
203 views

How do you differentiate between “in order to”, “so as to”, “so that” and “to”?

When we use the phrases so as to, in order to, and so that, we simply mean with the aim or purpose of doing something. The first two phrases are always followed by an infinitive to. Will I not be ...
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1answer
315 views

“Whether or not…” vs. “whether… or not”

I'm confused with the placement of 'or not' with 'whether' in a sentence. E.g. I'm not sure whether I should go or not. I'm not sure whether or not I should go. Whether you stay or ...
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2answers
72 views

How to reconstruct a sentence to avoid words like but, yet, still, although and though?

I often find difficult to avoid those words. It'd be fine in articles, essays, etc if it was only because of the repetitiveness, there are three words or more for it, but in longer texts, like novels, ...
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166 views

What part of speech is “rather than” in the sentence, “Consider swimming rather than hiking.” [closed]

What part of speech is rather than in the sentence Consider swimming rather than hiking. Is it an adverbial phrase, or is than a comparative conjunction and rather an adverb?
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11 views

Ensure and Imply: To use “that” or not? [duplicate]

Is it necessary to use "that" when using the verbs "ensure" and "imply"? For example, I wrote "Theorem 1 implies there is a number j such that..." and "We impose a CFL condition to ensure the ...
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3answers
65 views

Is it correct to join a verb and an adjective by a conjunction?

Consider the following sentence: Did it make you laugh or make you silent? Would it be correct to rephrase this as Did it make you laugh or silent? If you replace "silent" by "cry", then the ...
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1answer
60 views

Why is a comma used in the sentence “Jack has been studying zebras since 1972, when he started the famous Animal Center”?

Why is there a comma in this sentence? Jack has been studying zebras since 1972, when he started the famous Animal Center. Isn’t the first clause independent, and isn’t when a subordinating ...
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0answers
67 views

Why isn’t this instance of “so” preceded by a comma even though it’s beginning a new independent clause?

William Strunk writes in the 1914 edition of his Elements of Style: Place a comma before and or but introducing an independent clause. ... Two-part sentences of which the second member ...
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1answer
35 views

try and stop a loser or a winner [duplicate]

The following paragraph is an excerpt from an article in the New York Times entitled “Is North Korea a Nuclear Threat or Not? The President Now Says It Is” published on 22 June 2018: “They [Trump’s ...
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1answer
66 views

“I spilled water on the table and [the] floor”

Compare the sentences: I spilled water on the floor. I spilled water on the table and floor. I spilled water on the table and the chair. Is the missing the before floor in the second ...
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48 views

Is it possible to combine two independent clauses without a conjunction or semicolon?

I was looking at an ACT packet and came across this sentence which according to the official ACT answer key was correct grammar: Both the beam and the planking appeared to be well preserved, ...
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21 views

…also has been suffering or …has also been suffering [duplicate]

He has a history of diabetes. He also has been suffering from hypertension. He has a history of diabetes. He has also been suffering from hypertension. Which one is correct?
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34 views

Sentence correctness with multiple verbs phrases and a single subject

I wrote the following in my work: I enjoy stalking and stealing from people. I am not a native English speaker, and have always been nervous when writing sentences with verb phrases packed into one ...
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2answers
118 views

That these skills are transferable (which/that/and) makes them especially beneficial [closed]

Why would "which","that", and "and" be omitted in the following sentence: That these skills are transferable across professions (which/that/and) makes them especially beneficial to twenty-first ...
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238 views

the usage of not only.. but also

Not only such institutes provide physical support but elderly also get emotional support from their fellows and caretakers. This is a sentence I wrote for my IELTS essay. My teacher said that this ...
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24 views

Is this sentence using “when” as a conjunction correctly applied?

“Some choose to be involved just so that they will project an image of piety and philanthropy when under all of that facade lies a selfish ulterior motive.”
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32 views

Conjunction and preposition

Never before in the history The question I have is about the function of the word "before". Is it acting as a conjunction or a preposition? If it is functioning as a preposition, then another ...
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529 views

can “and therefore” be acceptable in the following sentence?

In my view, children and adults cannot be seen as identical in the eyes of the law, and therefore age must be taken into account when punishing offenders. As and is a coordinator and therefore is a ...
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2answers
298 views

What parts of speech are GIVEN and THAT in the phrase “Given that…”

I'd like to know which parts of speech given and that are in the following sentence: Given that the dress is small, I couldn't wear it. In the answers here, one poster said given that is a ...
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1answer
104 views

Commas and Coordinating Conjunctions Before Dependent Clauses

"For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbors, and laugh at them in our turn?" -- Jane Austen Many famous authors and writers use coordinating conjunctions and commas in this way. Are ...
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3answers
521 views

Nevertheless after comma is good style?

I have a question similar to this one, but it is actually the opposite. I have been using always "nevertheless" after full stop, and today I felt to use it after comma. However, it looks really ...
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1answer
37 views

'the eigenvalues of A are either 0 or 1 or both'. Does that mean Both 0 and 1 are possible?

I was asked the following question in a National level exam whose answer will be 'the eigenvalues of A are either 0 or 1 or both'. But one option which reads the eigenvalues of A are either 0 or 1 ...
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0answers
34 views

Can “but” be short for “all but”? [closed]

I'm confused by "but" in a sentence "His (Sraffa's) reputation as a major economic theorist rests on but three works". My understanding is that but is short for "all but" since Sraffa is not a ...
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0answers
33 views

Commas with coordinating conjunctions and dependent clauses

We've received a warning about my neighbour, and he will be evicted if he doesn't turn his music down, or if my neighbour does not pay his rent on time. Can the comma and the coordinating ...
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coordinating conjunctions with commas between multiple dependent clauses (rules/ usage)

Joining multiple clauses in a single sentence using comma? Was a question on the other site, but he's chaining multiple dependent clauses with 'which'. But in contrast with that question: using ...
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82 views

Meaning of “Teaming”

What is the meaning of "teaming" in the following sentence: It was the school holidays, and the place was teaming with people, families, youth groups, holiday clubs. (from here) According to ...
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What conjunction is used with “comparative analysis”?

It is certain that after the phrase comparative analysis the preposition of follows and that after the first element compared the conjuction and is usually used. But can the conjunction and be ...