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Questions tagged [grammatical-roles]

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973 views

What is the gram­mat­i­cal term for “‑ed” words like these?

In English we say things like: a cal­i­brated de­vice a dis­trib­uted prod­uct a founded com­pany a de­stroyed house Those ‑ed words there all sig­nify that some verb (here re­spec­tively cal­i­...
0
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0answers
22 views

Is it “No band practice” or “No band practise” in British English? [duplicate]

I understand that one is a noun and one is a verb. But is it correct to say "There is no band practice today" or "There is no band practise today" UPDATE: I am not asking for the correct spelling of ...
2
votes
1answer
79 views

What's the FUNCTIONAL difference between a supplement and an adjunct/modifier?

I'm trying to understand the difference between supplements and adjuncts/modifiers. In my search for enlightenment, I've come across a number of entries and posts, of which I think this one summarises ...
0
votes
1answer
34 views

What is the role of “one” in this sentence?

I can't understand what is the role of word "one" in this sentence: A hillside in the morning so radiant with light one has the feeling he has been looking at Van Gogh's drawings. Source: The ...
1
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2answers
45 views

Does a ver­bal noun turn back into a verb when mod­ified by an ad­verb? [duplicate]

Here singing is a noun: I like singing. But what about here? I like singing loudly. Loudly is still an ad­verb, right? But singing is still be­hav­ing like a noun, right? So which is it, a noun ...
-1
votes
1answer
40 views

What is a phrase like “in my house” called?

What is the grammatical name and function of the clause in bold: They were in my house when the thieves broke in.
2
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0answers
57 views

Difference between supplemental NP and absolute clause?

What is the difference between a supplemental noun phrase and a absolute clause? In these examples and in general. Is it just the non-finite nature of the second example? Are they not serving a ...
1
vote
2answers
79 views

Where is the subject in a sentence that starts with a prepositional phrase

Where is the subject in a sentence that starts with a prepositional phrase. For example the preposition phrase beginning with after below: After breakfast the boys wandered out to the garden. Is ...
2
votes
2answers
100 views

“To hunt is my favorite pastime.” What part of speech is “to hunt” in this sentence?

The function of infinitives seems to be up for grabs at the last post I commented at. I either need to be schooled or my interlocutors do. May your answers bring some clarity. These are your choices....
0
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2answers
47 views

Is “the better” a noun phrase in this sentence? How to parse this sentence?

A sentence from this site reads ungrammatical. On the sweet side, don’t pass up the walnut coffee cake, which is served warm, the better to soak up the bourbon-caramel glaze. Is the better a noun ...
2
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2answers
123 views

Grammatical term for a noun coming after an infinitive?

I didn't come to offer help. As far as I can tell, this is how I would analyze this sentence from a grammatical perspective. I = pronoun didn't = aux. verb with "not" for negation. come = zero ...
0
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2answers
52 views

“To agree with someone”: is that prepositional phrase an adverbial or a nominal one?

In this sentence: I agree with you. What is the function of the prepositional phrase ”with you” there? Is it an adverb or noun? If it is an adverb, then what type of adverb is this?
0
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0answers
19 views

What is the words for the relationship between pounds and pence, or dollars and cents? [duplicate]

A pound is a higher denomination than pence. I'm looking for the word that describes the relationship between a small denomination and a large one, or potentially between denominations in any ...
1
vote
2answers
52 views

What is the correct part of speech when someone calls you by your name?

If someone uses your name in all correspondence with you, and this is not necessary, then what part of the English language is the name? For example: What is your point Jay?
3
votes
3answers
151 views

“She wanted out of this dump.” What is the grammatical function of “out of this dump”?

I came across a line in a movie. She wanted out of this dump. She wanted to start a new life. It seems the sentence is missing to get/be/go. Is the sentence grammatical as it currently stands? ...
5
votes
3answers
205 views

Can a noun be an adverb? [duplicate]

This question, which I first posed on the ELL site a few weeks ago, remains effectively unanswered. Although there an answer did finally get posted, it seemed to be more of a parody of an answer than ...
1
vote
1answer
69 views

What grammatical term describes "ashamed?

In the below sentence, which term identifies "ashamed"? "Upwards of two years ago, this labouring man had a child sent home to him by the mother, which his relations seem to be so much ashamed that ...
10
votes
2answers
384 views

The grammaticality and function of “people ages 20 to 30” (as opposed to “people aged 20 to 30”)

I have seen/heard constructions similar to "people ages 20 to 30" many times. However, several discussions, including questions on ELU, suggest the aforementioned construction is ungrammatical/typo: ...
1
vote
1answer
42 views

English Poetry Question [closed]

Is talking a gerund in this sentence? We hear people talking of your son’s birth. I just need to know for my English poetry assignment.
0
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0answers
47 views

How do I decide which to choose syntax tree to parse a sentence?

For example, I have a sentence like: The dog is running to the tree. I need to parse this tree to components and I want to use syntax tree models (tense phrase, noun phrase, etc.). Which one is ...
0
votes
1answer
79 views

Gerund, participle, or present continuous verb

In the following sentence, I did quite well in the examination, without having to burn the midnight oil. What is "having" -- a gerund, a participle, or just a present continuous verb? I tried Wren &...
1
vote
1answer
63 views

Can a noun be both a subject and an object at the same time?

John Knight, who/whom I spoke to yesterday, seemed to be rather irritable. In this sentence, John Knight is an object because I (the subject) am speaking to him; however, he is also a subject since ...
2
votes
1answer
150 views

Does 'whilst' contain an invisible verb within it?

This question prompted me to consider the difference between 'while' and 'whilst'. I have already scanned the previous questions (here and here ) about this but there is still something not reported (...
0
votes
1answer
113 views

What is the syntactic function of “called a typedef” in the sentence “C provides a facility called a typedef” [duplicate]

What is the syntactic function of the non-finite clause "called a typedef" in the sentence "C provides a facility called a typedef."?
0
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2answers
246 views

What’s the grammatical classification of “where” when used in questions like “Where have you been all day?”

Consider the following sentence: Where have you been all day? What category does where belong to in that sentence? Is it a determiner or a preposition? Is it something else?
1
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2answers
361 views

What are the parts of speech and grammatical roles in the sentence “I don’t know very much”? [closed]

In the sentence: I don't know very much. What parts of speech do the words know very much play? I is clearly the subject, and don’t is a verb/adverb contraction. Is know an adverb to do? Very ...
6
votes
1answer
12k views

Should I modify a gerund using an adjective or an adverb?

I know that a gerund is a noun, so it should be modified by an adjective. However, it is also a verb form. Can I modify it by using an adverb?