Questions tagged [relative-clauses]

Relative clauses are clauses starting with the relative pronouns who*, that, which, whose, where, when. They are most often used to define or identify the noun that precedes them.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
-2
votes
0answers
30 views

Which of the following three sentences is correct…? [closed]

I just want to purchase the products which I earlier told you we usually purchase from Flipkart. I just want to purchase the products which I earlier told you which we usually purchase from Flipkart. ...
0
votes
0answers
39 views

When a noun followed by a restrictive clause is preceded by “whichever” or “whatever”, it is incorrect to introduce the clause with *that*

When a noun followed by a restrictive clause is preceded by whichever or whatever, it is incorrect to introduce the clause with that in formal writing: Whatever book you want to look at will be sent ...
0
votes
1answer
53 views

Which possessive pronouns should I use in “I'm not a person who…”?

Consider this sentence, please: I'm not a person who screams out my achievements from the rooftops. Why do we use "my" instead of "his/her" in the sentence above, when "I&...
0
votes
1answer
26 views

Question on the comma placement in specific sentence

A comma before that seems to be very uncommon 1,2. But I am quite unsure about the following sentence: For each state and word, we calculate its orbit, that is, the set [... a mathematical formula ...
1
vote
1answer
66 views

How to know if a past participle form used in a sentence is the adjective for the next word or not?

I've read this sentence in a book: Like most languages, C# lets you define local variables, which are named elements inside a method that each hold a piece of information. I can see this sentence in ...
0
votes
1answer
21 views

What is the subject of the relative pronoun of that?

'Featuring floral patterns, religious symbols, and messages of hope, the painted henna crowns are amazing substitutes for the hats and wigs that the cancer patients would otherwise use to cover their ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

Small particles in plastics can leak into the oil, which further reduces its quality

'Plastic containers usually do not provide adequate protection from light, heat, or moisture; additionally, small particles in plastics can leak into the oil, which further reduces its quality.' What ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

…how it reacts, adding to the difficulty

'Also, the wind can significantly alter the direction of the ship and how it reacts, adding to the difficulty of anchoring the ship.' What does "it" refer to in 'how it reacts,...? What is ...
1
vote
1answer
63 views

Is a non-restrictive relative clause a subordinate clause?

a. The mayor, who lives in this house, has not been seen for days. This is a non-restrictive relative clause, since it provides supplementary information about the mayor, but is not essential to the ...
0
votes
2answers
181 views

You'll know afterwards, when I get mad. [Analysis of 'when']

American sitcom That '70s Show has these lines (YouTube): Eric: So, uh, for future reference, do I have to ask you, uh, before I go out with my friends? Donna: No. Uh yes. Sometimes. Eric: So, uh, ...
2
votes
2answers
120 views

keep it inside your body, where it belongs [antecedent of 'where']

Bolt, a Disney animation, has these lines: Bolt : What is this red liquid coming from my paw? Mittens : It's called blood, hero! Bolt : Do I need it? Mittens : Yes, so if you want to keep it ...
0
votes
2answers
33 views

Relative pronoun where vs which usage

The ABC hotel, ______(a relative adverb/pronoun) Felix had suggested to me, was really a nice place to stay. I wonder if both "where" and "which" are correct here. In my opinion, ...
3
votes
3answers
119 views

those who(m) he thought were guilty

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Page 466) says: a. those whom he thought were guilty b. those who he thought were guilty Here who(m) is subject of the content clause functioning as ...
0
votes
0answers
14 views

infinitival relative clause

I'd like to know whether an infinitival relative clause such as "with which to V" needs an expicitly identified antecedent for the semantic subject of "to V." If not, could you ...
0
votes
2answers
41 views

How can “that” refer to a word when there are some other words between them

For example, The translator has to use expressions in the target text (that are different from those in the source text). I hope "that" can refer to expressions, but I feel it will refer ...
0
votes
2answers
33 views

For then - does it exist? [closed]

Example: The result is trivial if g = 0, for then any basis serves as a set of z's. Does the phrase exist, or should be there them instead?
0
votes
2answers
46 views

Why can the relative pronoun be omitted?

Look at the sentence: —> That’s the actor who was a pilot in Star Wars. The relative pronoun is the subject so we cannot omit it. I know that we can omit the relative pronoun if it’s the object. My ...
1
vote
0answers
22 views

Economy of words is part of the English language way (which) is saying things

"Economy of words is part of the English language way is saying things! Passive voice and complex sentences are out!" When analyzing the sentence above, I found it has one subject, but has ...
1
vote
2answers
33 views

of which confusion

I have serious problem with understanding stucture of the following "of which" sentences, especially the "of which's". Could anyone help me by rephrasing them in an explanatory way?...
0
votes
1answer
39 views

Relative clause and Participle

Father bought a car which is BMW. Is it right to say: —> Father bought a BMW car The apples that are lying on the table are bad. Are these correct grammatically: —> the apples lying on the table ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

Are these examples correct?

I know that a noun phrase is a group of words headed by a noun. The following examples have relative clauses: I like movies that talk about real stories. I like cats that have black eyes . I like ...
0
votes
0answers
52 views

At angles you’d have to be careful walking (at)

A car review article titled "Escape the City and the Roads with the 2020 Subaru Outback" has this paragraph: X-Mode also enables the Hill Descent Control. After a quick coffee break 800 ...
1
vote
2answers
148 views

She invited me to go with them, which I'd quite like to (do)

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language , in Chapter 17 Deixis and anaphora, says (Page 1526): Is [iv] well-formed? How about adding do after to as follows? She invited me to go with them, ...
0
votes
2answers
57 views

“The place I was born” vs. “The place I was born in”

This is the place where I was born. [1] I can omit where & keep the antecedent place : This is the place I was born. [1a] I can omit the antecedent place and keep the relative word where : ...
1
vote
0answers
52 views

Relative pronoun vs. relative adverb [duplicate]

[1] "That picture was taken in the park where I used to play." (Here, 'where' is an relative adverb. [2] "I remember the day when we first met." (Here, 'when' is an relative adverb.) ...
0
votes
0answers
29 views

Passive causative in relative clauses

Causative is used to say that you arrange for someone else to do a job for you. For example, "John has the car repaired". This is different from "John has repaired the car" because the latter sentence ...
0
votes
0answers
51 views

which is correct?: [whom vs. who] he claimed gave him bad directions

I came across an article titled: “Man admits murdering 2 whom he claimed gave him bad directions” (https://www.google.co.kr/amp/s/www.deseret.com/platform/amp/2011/8/16/20386522/man-admits-...
0
votes
0answers
23 views

Relative adverb or relative pronoun?

"Can you provide me more information why this conclusion is valid?" "I have no idea why he called." (1) Are these why-clauses relative clauses? (2) Is "why" a relative ...
0
votes
0answers
42 views

Non-restrictive vs Sentential Relative Clause

I love my father, who is a teacher. "Who is a teacher" is a non-defining or non-restrictive relative clause. He failed the test, which shocked everyone. "Which shocked everyone" is ...
0
votes
0answers
30 views

How : neither a relative pronoun nor a relative adverb

Relative pronoun : who, whom, whose, which, that Relative adverb : when, where, why Is "how" neither a relative pronoun nor a relative adverb? Is 'how' only a subordinating conjunction in a ...
0
votes
0answers
25 views

that as conjunction

According to https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/that, the article introduces that as a form of conjunction. However, it seems to me that the following two sentences do not have same structures. For ...
0
votes
3answers
74 views

Why is 'which' the correct relative pronoun in this sentence, and not 'when'..?

At ten to nine, which is just before the exam begins, please make sure you assemble outside the hall. This sentence is giving me a headache. The relative pronoun refers to the time ten to nine so why ...
0
votes
1answer
28 views

Can a dependent clause be connected to another dependent clause to form a meaningful sentence?

I encountered with a sentence: Because even tiny islets can be the basis for claims to the fisheries and oil fields of large sea areas under provisions of the new maritime code, which is ...
0
votes
0answers
49 views

Are Relative pronouns or Relative adverbs Subordinating Conjunctions?

"It is a song that my mother taught me." This sentence consists of : (1) a main clause : "It is a song". (2) a subordinate/dependent clause : "that my mother taught me". (3) A relative pronoun or a ...
0
votes
0answers
22 views

more than one relative pronoun or determiner in a relative clause?

Girlfriends, many of whom nag whose boyfriend too much, are also kind to their boyfriend. Can more that one relative pronoun or determiner be used in one relative clause like above?
0
votes
1answer
92 views

Don't be trapped by dogma, which is living with the results of other people's thinking

From a speech by Steve Jobs: a. Don't be trapped by dogma, which is living with the results of other people's thinking. If the sentence is to work syntactically, dogma has to be the antecedent of ...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

Do we need to explicitly mention the antecedent in an attributive clause inside another one, both describing the same antecedent?

A sudden question popped up in my head just now: which of these two sentences are correct, or are they both wrong? I write books that nobody reads or even knows that they exist. I write books that ...
0
votes
1answer
58 views

Have you been influenced all you can ever be influenced? [How are the preceding and the following clauses connected?]

How would you rephrase 'all you can ever be influenced'? (In) all (that) or (in) all (where)? To me this 'all' seems like a relative adverb but no old school grammar book has 'all' explained as a ...
2
votes
0answers
33 views

Why is “were” used in the highlighted relative clause?

Thank you for taking interest in this question. I have attached below the context of the clause in question to help your understanding. A full version of the question would be: Why were, instead of ...
0
votes
0answers
109 views

fused relative word (whatever, whoever) + the hell/on earth

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language has presented five reasons for classifying ungoverned open exhaustive conditionals not as fused relatives but as open interrogatives, and the fourth ...
0
votes
0answers
42 views

Can the word “that” be substituted for in which?

Have you filled out the details in the paper that the date wasn't mentioned. Is this a correct sentence? Here I used "that" because I read in a grammar book "that" is sometimes used as an adverbial ...
1
vote
2answers
49 views

Confusion in identifying defining and non-defining relative clauses

I was watching a video on relative clauses and there was two sentences that confused me. "I saw a car which was white" The speaker said this sentence is definite clause. "She went into the ...
0
votes
2answers
54 views

Is the following sentence definite or indefinite relative clause?

"I met my uncle who had just arrived" Is the sentence a definite or indefinite relative clause? And why?
3
votes
3answers
83 views

proper usage of “used to” when designating a change in name

I'm currently entrenched in a grammar dispute with one of my coworkers. We are trying to determine which usage of "used to" properly describes the change we made in a naming convention used at work. ...
1
vote
2answers
131 views

Identifying the antecedent of an integrated(restrictive) relative clause

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language has this (Page 1061): In [11], CGEL doesn't analyze the determiner no as part of the antecedent of the relative clause. Let's compare [11] with [11a] and ...
2
votes
0answers
26 views

Can we use 'what' as a relative pronoun in formal english?

Is the following sentence grammatically correct? A stone what rolls gathers no moss.
2
votes
0answers
40 views

Is the relative clause always an adjunct/modifier of the antecedent?

The first two sentences mean the same thing, and so do the last two. (1) She's obviously the person to finish the job. (1') She's obviously the person who should finish the job. (2) She was the first ...
1
vote
2answers
186 views

I've found <somewhere/some place/a place> where

a. I’ve found somewhere where they apologise to you if you bump them with your backpack on a crowded tube. (From this Guardian news article) Is it just me or is the repetition of where bothering ...
1
vote
0answers
32 views

can we use “which” after troops?

which of the following is correct? Rome was threatened by Hunnish troops who showed their superiority ...... Rome was threatened by Huniish troops which showed their superiority ..... Is troops a ...
0
votes
1answer
41 views

Two times 'that' in a relative clause

I would like to ask, whether I should use two time 'that' in a relative clause. Here is my sentence: "Especially modulating heat pumps that can not only be switched on and off but that can ...

1
2 3 4 5
10