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Questions tagged [complements]

For questions about the use of, or meaning of, complements.

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A question about the sense of verbs [migrated]

Can we say, "He comes/goes" instead of "He comes here/goes there." if the listener knows where that person comes/goes?
Salim uddin's user avatar
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"I want someone to do something." — Where are arguments here?

In an ongoing attempt to find the examples where complements and arguments don't coincide with each other, I came across these two answers of the user "BillJ". from BillJ's answer on english....
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Is it true that every argument is a complement but not every complement is an argument?

The textbook "The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language", page 226: Argumenthood In the simplest cases the propositional meaning of a clause (ignoring the component contributed by the ...
Loviii's user avatar
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7 votes
2 answers
266 views

A question about syntactic function of the clause

Given: He told me the secret how he had done well in the exam. In this sentence, the ditransitive verb tell here has the following core arguments, with each of these noun phrases performing a ...
Salim uddin's user avatar
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2 answers
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Can we transform verbs from one form to another?

The complex transitive form "verb + direct object + to+ v¹": It takes two hours to get to the airport. Now can we use the simple form "verb + Direct object". For example, It ...
Salim uddin's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
237 views

Can a catenative complement be a predicative complement?

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Page 251) has this section in Chapter 4 The clause: complements: 5 Predicatives and related elementsA predicative complement is oriented towards a ...
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1 answer
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Resultative Complement in English?

I suspect there might be something missing between ‘experience’ and ‘a much’ in the sentence. She has emerged from the experience a much stronger person. Is that grammatically correct? I don’t have ...
tasira's user avatar
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1 answer
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Do we need to hyphenate the compund noun if it is given as an object complement? [duplicate]

I have a question about hyphenating compound nouns when they function as object complements. For instance, should entertainment oriented be hyphenated in below sentence? Much of the radio programming ...
Mohamed Iliyas's user avatar
1 vote
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141 views

Can verbs of perception have an adjective in the objective complement position?

I know as below. [verbs of perception + object + bare infinitive / present participle / past participle] But I found this sentence. The note was heard loud. Then can verbs of perception have an ...
Eunjin Park's user avatar
15 votes
7 answers
3k views

Is "I gave a hundred dollars to my father, and she did so to her father" grammatical?

Is the following sentence grammatically correct? I gave a hundred dollars to my father, and she did so to her father. To me it sounds perfectly fine. According to the unscientific method of asking ...
alphabet's user avatar
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5 answers
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What is the syntactic role of "to do something" in these sentences?

Take these sentences: I felt he was mean to do that. We'd be stupid to do something like that. I feel like the "to do that" part in them functions differently syntactically than in ...
desmo's user avatar
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Be ambigious about "which" relative pronoun

I have seen an example referring to "on a par with something" at Cambridge Dictionary: "At this rate, they'll have 600,000 visitors to the exhibition, which will put it on a par with ...
noname18's user avatar
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3 answers
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"It is comfortable to sit on this chair." is not grammatical, but why are similar constructs grammatical or used... ? - 'preparatory it' complements

According to Practical English Usage, 4th ed., Michael Swan (2017), section 'preparatory it', preparatory it is not used with complements. He gives these two examples (section 7 in the screenshot): ...
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Complementation according to Quirk et al.: syntactic concept vs. semantic concept

According to the definition of "complementation" in "The Oxford Dictionary of English Grammar", for most linguists complementation is a syntactic concept. However, the definition ...
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What's the difference between complementary infinitives and infinitives as object? [duplicate]

Example: I forgot to lock the door. Is "to lock" here a complementary infinitive or just an object?
Marj's user avatar
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2 answers
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To dance oneself

LCD Soundsystem sings about Danc(ing) Yrself clean, Sesame Street's muppets sing about Danc(ing) myself to sleep, Alice Cooper about Danc(ing) yourself to death and on its website the British Royal ...
Contactomorph's user avatar
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1 answer
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How can I best describe the content of the object complement in the sentences below? [duplicate]

I came here after reading that perception verbs should be followed by either a base infinitive or a present participle as in the following examples: I saw the car crash into the barrier. I saw the ...
Damian Eastwood's user avatar
1 vote
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As if as though

I am having a problem identifing which gramatical function as if (as though, like) has As far as I know After linking verbs, we have noun/ noun phrase/ noun clause and adjective/ adjective phrase ...
Htlioliat31's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
332 views

Is 'there' a locative complement in this example?

[1] He was the only one there. In this sentence, 'the only one there' is an example of a predicative complement (subject complement), a predicative nominal. However, inside this noun phrase, we have ...
MJ Ada's user avatar
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1 answer
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To help and gerund clauses

I've reached an impasse with my girlfriend (both non-native speakers) about this sentence she used: Maybe we didn't have enough of it for it to become routine again and help measuring time To me, ...
Radu's user avatar
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1 answer
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How to analyze e.g., "The man had trouble finding shoes to fit"

In a sentence like "The man had trouble finding shoes to fit," how might "had trouble finding shoes to fit" be analyzed? Is this like a direct object ("trouble") and ...
MYin's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
96 views

What is the constituent type of 'laugh' in 'I saw her laugh'?

Could someone explain to me the constituent type of “laugh” as in “I saw her laugh”? Best with an X-bar graph. I know it's a lot of trouble. You don't have to draw the whole thing, a simplified ...
Jenny's user avatar
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0 answers
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Does the sentence "I need you to make these calls for me" contain an object complement?

I'm currently working on my paper and predicative constructions confuse me so much. The book I use tells that object complements can follow the verbs of wish & intention, but there was no word ...
Sasha Smetana's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
103 views

Indirect complement or extraposed subject?

Is the content clause ('that she saw him commit the crime') in the following sentence an extraposed subject or an indirect complement* licensed by 'so'? It just so happens that she saw him commit the ...
Eric's user avatar
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agreement of the subject complement with the subject [duplicate]

A colleague of mine asked me, "Can we say 'My favorite food is hamburgers.'" I said of course it is correct. But she said a native speaker says it is wrong. It should be "My favorite ...
Louis Liu's user avatar
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On the arguments of 'put'

I have noticed that the verb 'put' usually takes a direct object and a (typically) prepositional, non-core complement, as in: He put the book on the shelf Sometimes, the prepositional complement is ...
Eric's user avatar
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What is the difference between a predicate nominative/predicate adjectives and a subject complement?

For example, the sentence "John was a policeman" or "Ben was angry." Both describe the subject, so I'd call them subject complements. But they could also be a predicate nominative ...
warasdf's user avatar
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2 answers
134 views

Omissibility of "to be" before Noun or Adjective [duplicate]

I have heard that cognitive verbs such as 'think, believe, consider, suppose, understand, imagine...etc.' should use 'to be + noun' or 'to be + adjective' in the object complement. She believed him ...
hero yoo's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
157 views

Structure and usage of the construction - BE of

I have seen various sentences like this: The availability of two reasonably complete mammalian genomes is of great help to gene finders. - The New York Times I do my utmost to dress the actors very ...
Man_From_India's user avatar
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Noun adjuncts or complements? [duplicate]

I asked a question regarding PP complements the other day and I believe I now have a better handle on that. But I am still scratching my head over this paragraph from CGEL: Within the category of ...
Eddie Kal's user avatar
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Multi-layer prepositional phrase

I am having trouble picturing the structure of this preposition phrase from the point of view of generative syntax (PP) My attempt to run it down goes like this: from (preposition) + the point of ...
Eddie Kal's user avatar
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1 vote
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How can I tell if a prepositional phrase is a complement to a noun or a modifier? And how are these two different?

In the NP "mines in wartime", "in wartime" modifies the head "mines". that nice tall man from Canada whom you met "from Canada" modifies "man". But ...
Eddie Kal's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
737 views

Grammar rule: ONE sentence; ONE subject, ONE predicate. Is it?

I just watched a video on grammar (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Drv6jD8xWdw) that states that English sentences can only have one subject. At first, I thought it was obvious, but then I thought of ...
Pablo GM's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
258 views

Preparatory it; not possible for complements

I was reading Practical English Usage, by Michael Swan and got into something that has got me deeply confused. It basically says that preparatory it can be used as a preparatory subject or object, but ...
Pablo GM's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
433 views

predicative complement vs predicative adjunct

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Page 250) has this passage: Here, Od is Direct Object, and Oi is Indirect Object. It seems that CGEL is saying that almost raw in [i-ii] and fiendishly ...
JK2's user avatar
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What are the subjects, objects, complements and gerunds in this sentence?

As with most great avant artists, it’s easier to describe how Arca makes you feel than what it is, exactly, she makes. Just wanted clarification on a few things. What is the first part of the ...
x30's user avatar
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2 answers
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Was this subject complement diagrammed correctly?

The sentence is the following. I'm focusing on the part in bold: Feeding the goats is messy and time consuming. It's in this book. The author provides the following diagram: And I think it should ...
mjfneto's user avatar
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1 answer
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What are the objects and indirect objects in this sentence (if any)

The storage making your home work harder. It's from a furniture advertisement, and I was just wondering how to dissect the complements here. Is it that storage is the subject, making is the verb, ...
x30's user avatar
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0 votes
3 answers
313 views

That-clause in "it seems that"

Is the that-clause in the following sentence a predicative complement or a displaced subject with it being the dummy subject? It seemed that he was correct. My understanding is that if the that-...
Gestaltfilter's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
72 views

What is the nature of That-complementizer here?

It was in 1945 that World World 2 ended. I think that is a complementizer, but I'm not sure of the nature of this complement. By nature I mean the part of speech of the complement clause and to what ...
Joe's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
117 views

Which of the following sentences uses a subject complement? [closed]

What about C, isn't a bit anxious about the test tomorrow also a subject complement following the linking verb am?
jxhyc's user avatar
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0 answers
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Adjective placed before a noun but adjectival complement after it

Page 14 of Practical English Usage reads In some cases an adjective can be put before a noun and its complement after it. This happens with different, similar, the same, next, last, first, second etc;...
GJC's user avatar
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Can a Noun or Noun phrase ever be Secondary Predicate complement or adjunct?

1 She drank the coffee [hot] - adjective The winter froze the Lake [solid]-adjective Sam painted the wall [green] - adjective The boy delivered the package [wet] - adjective She sells them [new] - ...
New Moon's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
227 views

Is it possible to have a "noun or noun phrase" as object/subject complement in "Depictive or Resultative" construction?

A sentence containing ditransitive verb can have two objects. In the ditransitive verbs a subcategory, as it is described in some of the articles, usually called "Attributive ditransitive verbs&...
New Moon's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
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Analyzing the verb “to head”

This is both a usage question and a grammatical analysis question. I am familiar with complex transitive verbs, such as "to place", where one has to have at least one complement, besides the ...
pablodf76's user avatar
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1 answer
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Grammar of sentence "He helps people find happiness"? Object Complement or Indirect object?

He helps people find happiness. Is this an example of an Indirect Object (People) or an Object Complement (find happiness)?
Siddharth's user avatar
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1 answer
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Temporal Participial Phrases

He lay staring into the sky. He came running towards me. He arrived finding nobody there. I have read this by John Lawler but am struggling to put these into one of the five categories he mentioned. ...
Joe's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
448 views

Omitting "by" preposition and the resulted phrase

Consider the following examples: I paid for it by using my credit card. I was in contact with my friends by sending letters. I learned how to dance by watching online videos if I remove the ...
Ramin's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
101 views

Why is "Fufu" in the following sentence object complement rather than direct object? 'I called my pug "Fufu" .'

I called my pug Fufu: subject...object...object complement(Introducing English Grammar, p.93) Yet if I say: I give my pug some water. then pug would be indirect object and some water would be ...
jxhyc's user avatar
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1 answer
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What kind of complementation for "be regarded"?

I'm trying to find where the passive form "be regarded" belongs in terms of transitivity. In the sentence: Only a minority of countries would be regarded as part of the third world. Is the verb would ...
Nel's user avatar
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