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Questions tagged [complements]

The tag has no usage guidance, but it has a tag wiki.

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1answer
18 views

“They reported being told to…” Trying to explain

I have never really thought about this one before, but out of curiosity, is it grammatical to have "being" after the verb "report"? Here is an example: "They reported being told to stay behind the ...
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0answers
45 views

Why aren't degree modifiers complements?

As far as I've been able to figure out, in the CaGEL* framework, complements are items that are licensed by some other element (generally the head), so that if an item has to be licensed, it is per ...
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0answers
29 views

Function of PPs with predicative complements

According to CaGEL* (e.g. p.636 ff), prepositions can take predicative complements, as in [1] She worked as a waitress [2] He passed for dead [3] I took you for granted [4] They left him for ...
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2answers
116 views

What is the nature of, and syntactic distinction between, modifier and complement?

I am struggling to understand the syntactic relevance of the distinction between complement and modifier in theories such as the one presented in the Cambridge Grammar of the English Language by ...
2
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1answer
46 views

CaGEL equivalent to obligatory adverbial?

When I learnt grammar in school, I was taught that there are optional and obligatory adverbials. Trying to understand grammar in the form presented by Huddleston and Pullum (e.g. the Cambridge Grammar ...
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0answers
140 views

How tran­si­tiv­ity is de­fined in CGEL

This ques­tion is specif­i­cally for those who are fa­mil­iar with the 2002 edi­tion of The Cam­bridge Gram­mar of the English Lan­guage by Hud­dle­ston and Pul­lum. The book has this pas­sage at ...
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1answer
75 views

Are these 'that'-clauses complements or adjuncts?

(1) It's a plan [that is being touted as the most modest proposal considered yet in Congress]. Here, the that-clause is a relative clause that modifies the antecedent 'plan', so I believe it's not a ...
5
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1answer
121 views

Determining licensing in CaGel by means of substitution test

I read a comment on licensing in another post, which made me revisit this concept. Unfortunately I haven't got access to CaGEL – only to its "little brother", Huddleston and Pullum's A Student's ...
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2answers
87 views

Indirect complement or postmodifier in NP

In the sentence [1] He is the most talented artist (that) I know what is (that) I know in terms of function – an indirect complement, licensed by most, or simply a common postmodifier? Why? ...
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1answer
61 views

“Far from happy” Preposition followed by an adjective?

It occurs me that in such sentences as He is far from happy. However, just as the critics are not of one mind in their criticism, so they are far from united on what to do. the preposition ...
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3answers
161 views

What exactly falls under the label of “complement”?

There seems to be a lot of contradicting beliefs out there regarding complements and what they cover -- or maybe I am just confusing myself. However, I cannot seem to find an answer that I understand. ...
2
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1answer
69 views

The exit to or exit from a place?

New York Times article about restuarant employees blocking patrons from leaving the building: One of the arresting officers, Anthony Sengco, wrote in his criminal complaint that he observed Dr. ...
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0answers
57 views

How do complements, relative pronouns, and conjunctions correlate?

I have searched the site a lot and still have yet to find an answer that helps me understand how complements, relative pronouns, and conjunctions correlate. I have seen a few articles that talk ...
2
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1answer
72 views

I am confused with usage about 'the' and object complement

Is the sentence as below correct in grammar? And is it clear enough? Please copy & paste keyword, mykeyword, into the search box of Google Play Store app or website to locate this pure app ...
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2answers
401 views

How to tell if something is a core complement or a non-core complement?

CaGEL on page 216 cite the following: "Kim gave the key to Pat" An NP indirectly related to the verb through the preposition is referred as an oblique. The phrase "to Pat" is a non-core ...
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1answer
382 views

What distinguishes a predicative complement from an object?

Asked this on ELL but with no answer: What makes be an intransitive verb? How do we know that the analysis of It is me as transitive by tradtional grammars is incorrect? Take for example: 1. I gave ...
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2answers
347 views

Similar adjectives to “worth”

This laptop is worth $140. Here worth does not need a following preposition. However, when I say, for example: I am curious about his motivation behind his decision. The word curious is an ...
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3answers
2k views

Is “I am who(m) God made me” grammatical?

SAH asked an interesting question about case, I am [who/whom] G-d made me, but one issue that came up in the comments repeatedly is that many people said that they find the example sentence ...
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1answer
205 views

Which is the direct object and which is the object complement in this sentence? [duplicate]

I was reading a book on English grammar and it stated that the object complement may also be an adjective. In the sentence "Roger called George heartless", Roger was the subject, called was the verb, ...
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0answers
157 views

Is there such a thing as the “indirect complement” of a noun?

CaGEL* explains the concept of "indirect complements" on page 443 as follows: If it's the complement of a noun, be it direct or indirect, it's part of a noun phrase (NP) headed by the noun, right? So,...
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1answer
170 views

Is the definite/indefinite article a complement or a modifier of a noun?

The definite/indefinite article -- the/a(n) -- always comes before a noun and can never be used without a noun. Is the definite/indefinite article a complement or a modifier of a noun?
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0answers
91 views

syntactic analysis of a phrase with FROM…TO

In the sentence Everything we do, from eating and ice cream to crossing the Atlantic and from baking a loaf to writing a novel, involves the use of coal, directly or indirectly. I can't come ...
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0answers
299 views

“the fact that…” grammatical construction

In the following sentence: The issue is the fact that it is red. What type of grammatical form is "that it is red"? I think that it is some kind of noun clause that functions as an objective ...
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0answers
47 views

Why is this clause not a subject complement?

I'm following Greenbaum and Nelson's Introduction to Grammar. 'For all its weaknesses the labyrinthine committee structure provides a useful function in disseminating information' is presented ...
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0answers
23 views

lead to vs relocate

I read "lead many companies to relocate in rural areas (1)" This is typo ? We can make a complete sentence " The government leads many companies to relocate in rural areas " I have a doubt that " ...
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0answers
51 views

What is the function of these prepositional phrases coming after V + DO with the verbs “clear” and “nudge”?

I would like to know what structural elements (form) would you consider to describe the function of the prepositional phrases in these sentences: Chris Christie’s announcement Tuesday cleared the ...
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161 views

Confused “Complements and adjuncts” in these sentences “Did I hear this correct?” & “Am I reading this right?”

Source Complements and adjuncts are different. A complement is necessary in order to complete the meaning. An adjunct is not necessary, and adds extra information. Compare He put the cake ...
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1answer
91 views

What is the function of “for more productivity” on this sentence?

rapid population increases drive the search for more productivity. What is the function of "for more productivity"? is it a complement or an adverbial? Thank you!
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3answers
890 views

Can prepositional phrases be subject complements?

I’m an ESL teacher without much formal training (at this stage). I have however Googled grammar questions many times and been redirected here, so this time I'm actually posting. I’m trying to explain ...
0
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1answer
30 views

Mckee believed WAS the Mary Rose Vs Mackee believed TO BE the Mary Rose [duplicate]

In 1967 , Edgerton's side-scan sonar systems revealed a large , unusually shaped object , which Mckee believed WAS the Mary Rose. Shouldn't this be "Mackee believed TO BE the Mary Rose"? Can ...
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0answers
224 views

'for <noun> of' vs 'to + infinitive' as a complement phrase (of undergo)

I'm confused whether there's any semantic difference between the use of 'to + infinitive' vs 'for (the) noun of' as a complement phrase. E.g., "The patients underwent CT to evaluate their lungs." ...
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1answer
95 views

not followed by to or ing

Take a look at this sentences: 1 I usually try not BE so rude. 2 I usually try not TO be so rude. 3 I usually try not BEING so rude . 4 All I need is TAKE a rest . 5 All I need is TO take a ...
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1answer
327 views

Is this an adverbial complement? “They led me _to believe that there was no danger_.”

I'm a novice who realised the existence of this site today. The following picture is from Idiomatic and Syntactic English Dictionary by A.S. Hornby: Pattern 10 Verbs marked P 10 may be ...
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2answers
663 views

Participial Phrases As Objective Complement

Can a participial phrase be used as an objective complement? If so, is there a way to tell when the participial phrase is or is not used as an objective complement? How would this sentence be ...
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0answers
36 views

consider, assess, evaluate, judge, deem – link to complement [duplicate]

Could someone please comment as to the correctness of the ways of linking these verbs to complements, or even comment on general good usage? Word range can be expanded! We assessed the risk as/...
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3answers
548 views

Does “Predicate” includes object, complement and modifiers?

I'm currently studying the "Sentence Structure" for the English language. I've found varied information in this regard. Some sources says that the sentence consist of five components: Subject + ...
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0answers
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Is “with Trevor” in “dined with Trevor” adjunct or complement?

We dined with Trevor the following Monday. I'm doing a test to figure out whether the constituent "with Trevor" is an adjunct or complement to the verb "dine". It is called the "did so" test as some ...
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2answers
56 views

'I suppose the country can only properly be given to a child – as from birth it was given to me.' Does this sentence make sense?

In The Firstborn, British author Laurie LEE, famous for his autobiographical novel Cider with Rosie, wrote – about his newborn daughter Jessy: I suppose the country can only properly be given to a ...
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1answer
349 views

What is the grammar structure? “I am not going to stand here watching you do it”?

Is this sentence correct? I am not going to stand here watching you do it. I saw it in an article. If it is - and I think it is - why is "watching" a gerund? What is the grammar structure? Is it a ...
2
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1answer
143 views

Use of “confess” when followed by interrogative clause (e.g. I confessed to my parents what I ate last night)

I am not a native speaker, but just wondering if you can use a non-why question as the embedding clause of confess. a. I confessed to my wife why I started smoking again. (Pretty sure this one ...
2
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1answer
78 views

'Out to get me.'

"He was out to get me." 'Out' is not a verb, so 'He was out' looks like subject/linking verb/PA, except that quite plainly 'out to get me' carries the full meaning, because 'He was out' on its own ...
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1answer
2k views

make it after 3 o'clock

I heard someone say "make it (the meeting) after 3 o'clock." To me, it sounded pretty idiomatic, but I was unsure as to the grammar of it. "After three o'clock" is a prepositional phrase, then how ...
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1answer
623 views

Discontinuous noun phrase and apposition involving object complements

I was wondering whether these uses of discontinuity are valid. Here are two uses I would like to question: The use of discontinuous noun phrase: [1a] He made the system useless that could have ...
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1answer
294 views

Subject or subject complement

In the sentence "What is it that makes us happy?", is 'what' the subject or the subject complement? Does 'that' refer back to 'it' or to 'What'?
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1answer
6k views

The difference between 'wish I will be' and 'wish to be'

For example: I wish I will be an Engineer. I wish to be an Engineer. is there any difference between the two sentences?
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6answers
669 views

In structures such as 'football manager', is 'football' a modifier or a complement of the head noun?

I thought I'd post this as it illustrates a problem often encountered on ELU. In structures such as 'football manager', is 'football' a modifier or a complement of the head noun? I've seen both ...
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1answer
311 views

Important to learn is this stuff

This song is fun to sing. This pizza is too hot to eat. Is the infinitive there considered a complement of the predicate adjective?
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3answers
702 views

Verb-Subject Order

Is it optional to front the verb in sentences like the one below when an adverbial precedes? In the film, appear two more girls who think that Dallas is quite rude. I have already checked the ...
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1answer
420 views

Gerund phrase…is it really?

Object of Preposition Some people consider my interest in gardening an obsession. (The gerund phrase is “gardening an obsession.”) As I was searching around for the correct use of gerund ...
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2answers
689 views

Why can an adjective be placed after “eat” as in “garlic can be eaten raw”?

Edit note: This question with some good answers does not explain (or ask) why it is an adjective that's used as opposed to an adverb in this type of construction: Is this an objective complement or ...