Questions tagged [complements]

For questions about the use of, or meaning of, complements.

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103 views

Structure and usage of the construction - BE of

I have seen various sentences like this: The availability of two reasonably complete mammalian genomes is of great help to gene finders. - The New York Times I do my utmost to dress the actors very ...
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41 views

Noun adjuncts or complements? [duplicate]

I asked a question regarding PP complements the other day and I believe I now have a better handle on that. But I am still scratching my head over this paragraph from CGEL: Within the category of ...
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108 views

Multi-layer prepositional phrase

I am having trouble picturing the structure of this preposition phrase from the point of view of generative syntax (PP) My attempt to run it down goes like this: from (preposition) + the point of ...
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44 views

How can I tell if a prepositional phrase is a complement to a noun or a modifier? And how are these two different?

In the NP "mines in wartime", "in wartime" modifies the head "mines". that nice tall man from Canada whom you met "from Canada" modifies "man". But ...
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104 views

Grammar rule: ONE sentence; ONE subject, ONE predicate. Is it?

I just watched a video on grammar (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Drv6jD8xWdw) that states that English sentences can only have one subject. At first, I thought it was obvious, but then I thought of ...
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44 views

Preparatory it; not possible for complements

I was reading Practical English Usage, by Michael Swan and got into something that has got me deeply confused. It basically says that preparatory it can be used as a preparatory subject or object, but ...
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1answer
64 views

predicative complement vs predicative adjunct

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Page 250) has this passage: Here, Od is Direct Object, and Oi is Indirect Object. It seems that CGEL is saying that almost raw in [i-ii] and fiendishly ...
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35 views

What are the subjects, objects, complements and gerunds in this sentence?

As with most great avant artists, it’s easier to describe how Arca makes you feel than what it is, exactly, she makes. Just wanted clarification on a few things. What is the first part of the ...
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66 views

Was this subject complement diagrammed correctly?

The sentence is the following. I'm focusing on the part in bold: Feeding the goats is messy and time consuming. It's in this book. The author provides the following diagram: And I think it should ...
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1answer
30 views

What are the objects and indirect objects in this sentence (if any)

The storage making your home work harder. It's from a furniture advertisement, and I was just wondering how to dissect the complements here. Is it that storage is the subject, making is the verb, ...
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3answers
88 views

That-clause in “it seems that”

Is the that-clause in the following sentence a predicative complement or a displaced subject with it being the dummy subject? It seemed that he was correct. My understanding is that if the that-...
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53 views

What is the nature of That-complementizer here?

It was in 1945 that World World 2 ended. I think that is a complementizer, but I'm not sure of the nature of this complement. By nature I mean the part of speech of the complement clause and to what ...
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41 views

Which of the following sentences uses a subject complement? [closed]

What about C, isn't a bit anxious about the test tomorrow also a subject complement following the linking verb am?
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73 views

Adjective placed before a noun but adjectival complement after it

Page 14 of Practical English Usage reads In some cases an adjective can be put before a noun and its complement after it. This happens with different, similar, the same, next, last, first, second etc;...
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40 views

Can a Noun or Noun phrase ever be Secondary Predicate complement or adjunct?

1 She drank the coffee [hot] - adjective The winter froze the Lake [solid]-adjective Sam painted the wall [green] - adjective The boy delivered the package [wet] - adjective She sells them [new] - ...
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118 views

Is it possible to have a “noun or noun phrase” as object/subject complement in “Depictive or Resultative” construction?

A sentence containing ditransitive verb can have two objects. In the ditransitive verbs a subcategory, as it is described in some of the articles, usually called "Attributive ditransitive verbs&...
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33 views

Analyzing the verb “to head”

This is both a usage question and a grammatical analysis question. I am familiar with complex transitive verbs, such as "to place", where one has to have at least one complement, besides the ...
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1answer
134 views

Grammar of sentence “He helps people find happiness”? Object Complement or Indirect object?

He helps people find happiness. Is this an example of an Indirect Object (People) or an Object Complement (find happiness)?
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1answer
65 views

Temporal Participial Phrases

He lay staring into the sky. He came running towards me. He arrived finding nobody there. I have read this by John Lawler but am struggling to put these into one of the five categories he mentioned. ...
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2answers
126 views

Omitting “by” preposition and the resulted phrase

Consider the following examples: I paid for it by using my credit card. I was in contact with my friends by sending letters. I learned how to dance by watching online videos if I remove the ...
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43 views

Grammar analysis: why is “Fufu” in the following sentence object complement rather than direct object

I called my pug Fufu: subject...object...object complement(Introducing English Grammar, p.93) Yet if I say: I give my pug some water. then pug would be indirect object and some water would be ...
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1answer
42 views

What kind of complementation for “be regarded”?

I'm trying to find where the passive form "be regarded" belongs in terms of transitivity. In the sentence: Only a minority of countries would be regarded as part of the third world. Is the verb would ...
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1answer
195 views

Is an object of a verb a complement of a verb or of a verb phrase (a predicate)?

a. I love you. Here, you is the object of the verb love. It's also a complement, because it completes the meaning of the sentence. Per Wikipedia, complement is defined as: In grammar, a ...
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1answer
274 views

Singular or plural of 'type' [duplicate]

I have the following two sentences: In Germany, the most common type are air-water heat pumps, followed by brine-water heat pumps. In this thesis three type(s) of optimization approaches are ...
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2answers
107 views

Is 'the course' a complement or an adjunct in 'Stay the course'?

Stay the course is a fixed expression, but I'd like to know how to analyze the course. At first blush, it seems to be complement of the verb stay. But then, you have a similar-looking example stay ...
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111 views

Is the relative clause always an adjunct/modifier of the antecedent?

The first two sentences mean the same thing, and so do the last two. (1) She's obviously the person to finish the job. (1') She's obviously the person who should finish the job. (2) She was the first ...
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1answer
33 views

noun as object complement, which is in S + V + O + N

Considering noun object-complements, can we use prepositions in front of them at will? (S + V + O + Noun OC) e.g. He elected me president./He elected me as president He considers them hypocrites./He ...
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1answer
66 views

Is this sentence missing a noun?

I know in some cases a prepositional phrase can be a complement to another prepositional phrase, but this sentence just sounds like it is missing a noun. So I made myself this little promise that I ...
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464 views

Appositive or Complement?

The way (that) he eats amuses me. I found the way (that) leads out of here. I love ice-cream in the same way (that) I love my mom. 1) The part of speech of the word that is conjunction in ...
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4answers
324 views

Is 'to resign' an object or subject complement in 'The teacher wishes to resign'?

The teacher (S) wishes (V) to resign It is no doubt that 'to resign' is a complement of something, but is it a complement of the noun The teacher or the verb wishes? Subject complement [analysis 1]:...
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191 views

complement vs adjunct/modifier

In the following noun phrase, is the prepositional phrase from Lloyds complement or adjunct/modifier? even all the preposterous salary from Lloyds that Bill gets The Cambridge Grammar of The ...
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1answer
67 views

The way which you should hold them

The Cambridge Grammar of the english Language, page 224, reads Complements are most often NPs, and conversely NPs are usually complements. Some NPs can occur with adjunct function, but they tend ...
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50 views

How to determine if a complement is a predicative complement or a locative complement?

(1) She is out and will be back in soon. (2) She is out and will be conscious soon. Is out a locative complement in (1) but a predicative complement in (2)? If so, is the distinction between the two ...
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343 views

participles as object complements

Can participles or participial phrases serve as object complements in traditional grammar? And are direct objects viewed as a type of complement in traditional grammar? I'd appreciate reference to ...
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1answer
47 views

Structure after All/What with predicative complement

Possibly didn’t make the subject clear enough. I don’t know if that can be changed? To me, structures of this type should follow what you normally use after the main verb. For instance: All I want ...
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119 views

What is the grammatical topic of this shortening technique?

Extracted from an English cloze test: .....these virtual selves exist in the same online spaces that many people use every day. And this is a new and unfamiliar phenomenon that some people might ...
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1answer
194 views

Object or complement with “have”

Take the following sentence: "He has blue eyes" Does "blue eyes" act as an object or a complemet? Would the answer be different in a sentence such as:
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3answers
109 views

Is 'to smoke' a complement or adjunct in this sentence?

I hope you are all well. He stopped to smoke. Is to smoke a complement of stop or is it an infinitive-of-purpose adjunct?
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1answer
143 views

Can 'smart home' and similar phrases be adjectives if followed by a noun, or do they become complements? [closed]

I'm having some confusion here as I've been tasked with checking that some texts fit a style guide for work, and it requires that two adjectives directly preceding a noun be hyphenated, e.g. 'well-...
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1answer
51 views

How to understand the “of somebody” part

It is recounted of Thomas Carlyle that when he heard of the illness of his friend, Henry Taylor, he went off immediately to visit him, carrying with him in his pocket what remained of a bottle of ...
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105 views

“They reported being told to…” Trying to explain

I have never really thought about this one before, but out of curiosity, is it grammatical to have "being" after the verb "report"? Here is an example: "They reported being told to stay behind the ...
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53 views

Why aren't degree modifiers complements?

As far as I've been able to figure out, in the CaGEL* framework, complements are items that are licensed by some other element (generally the head), so that if an item has to be licensed, it is per ...
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63 views

Function of PPs with predicative complements

According to CaGEL* (e.g. p.636 ff), prepositions can take predicative complements, as in [1] She worked as a waitress [2] He passed for dead [3] I took you for granted [4] They left him for ...
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299 views

What is the nature of, and syntactic distinction between, modifier and complement?

I am struggling to understand the syntactic relevance of the distinction between complement and modifier in theories such as the one presented in the Cambridge Grammar of the English Language by ...
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1answer
111 views

CaGEL equivalent to obligatory adverbial?

When I learnt grammar in school, I was taught that there are optional and obligatory adverbials. Trying to understand grammar in the form presented by Huddleston and Pullum (e.g. the Cambridge Grammar ...
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666 views

How is transitivity defined in CGEL?

This ques­tion is specif­i­cally for those who are fa­mil­iar with the 2002 edi­tion of The Cam­bridge Gram­mar of the English Lan­guage by Hud­dle­ston and Pul­lum. The book has this pas­sage at ...
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243 views

Are these 'that'-clauses complements or adjuncts?

(1) It's a plan [that is being touted as the most modest proposal considered yet in Congress]. Here, the that-clause is a relative clause that modifies the antecedent 'plan', so I believe it's not a ...
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1answer
153 views

Determining licensing in CaGel by means of substitution test

I read a comment on licensing in another post, which made me revisit this concept. Unfortunately I haven't got access to CaGEL – only to its "little brother", Huddleston and Pullum's A Student's ...
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187 views

Indirect complement or postmodifier in NP

In the sentence [1] He is the most talented artist (that) I know what is (that) I know in terms of function – an indirect complement, licensed by most, or simply a common postmodifier? Why? ...
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441 views

“Far from happy” Preposition followed by an adjective?

It occurs me that in such sentences as He is far from happy. However, just as the critics are not of one mind in their criticism, so they are far from united on what to do. the preposition from is ...