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Questions tagged [infinitives]

Questions about verbs in their basic (unmarked) forms, such as “be”, “do”, “have”, or “sit”, sometimes introduced by the particle “to” and other times used by itself.

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Is the infinitive form of verb a true verb?

My question is just as mentioned in the title of this post: Would you call an infinitive verb a true verb? I can't find any direct mention of it anywhere on the web. The CMoS (2010) catalogs ...
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2answers
57 views

“He is said to have known peo­ple” vs “He is said to know peo­ple”? [on hold]

I came aross a ques­tion like this: As a pub­lic re­la­tions of­fi­cer, he is said ________ some very in­flu­en­tial peo­ple. to know to have known There are two avail­able an­swers ...
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1answer
36 views

Identifying parts of sentences with infinitive phrases

To help others is important. In this sentence, 'To help' is the infinitive (being used as noun subject) and 'is' is the verb. What is the object ? 'Others' ? And is 'To help others' an infinitive ...
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0answers
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Reading a sentence [migrated]

The accountant made the writer to sign on the check. They always make us laugh. In these two sentences .. why is to sign used in first sentence instead of only SIGN? In second sentence why is ...
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1answer
28 views

“For + subj. + to” infinitive to indicate purpose

I would like more information about this type of construction. Good examples escape me at the moment, but it would be something along the lines of: These conditions need to be satisfied for this ...
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1answer
35 views

“doomed to” + noun or infinitive?

I know the phrase "doomed to failure" exists. I also found someone here who suggests that both, "doomed to failure" and "doomed to fail" can be used for a specific situation: "I'm doomed to failure"...
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29 views

Parallelism of split infinitives

I was wondering about parallelism of split infinitive in this sentence: As the human capacity to speak developed, so did our ability to not only trick prey but to lie to other humans. What I can’t ...
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1answer
27 views

Passive or Active (Infinitive construction)

The task is to open the brackets: I don't want these rumours (to spread) around. As far as I can see, both "to spread" and "to be spread" are possible. What sounds more natural to you? Does "around" ...
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1answer
49 views

“To start” or “to starting” [duplicate]

While I was attempting online ISL test, where I got the following MCQ: Chen's looking forward ______ his job next week. a) to starting b) to start c) starting d) in starting ...
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0answers
103 views

Did prescriptivists make up pied-piping in relative infinitive constructions?

A quick Internet search suggests that pied-piping in relative clauses was a natural feature of English even though it is loved by prescriptivists; it existed in older stages of the language, and it ...
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1answer
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Can I say that the 'to-infinitive which is part of predicative is an object?

The infinitive as object as in "He asked me to come in." & the to-infinitive as part of predicative as in 'The house of Jane was not easy to find' both act as noun. Both of these 'to come & to ...
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1answer
22 views

to display/show vs to be displayed/shown

The user can choose which elements to display/show The user can choose which elements to be displayed/shown Which sentence is more correct? Is there any difference when using show or display.
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2answers
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Is the sentence “We see this problem be unsolvable.” grammatically correct? [closed]

This is supposed to be the correct answer to one of the exercises from a B2 textbook written by a non-native author. It struck me as odd, but my teacher (also a non-native speaker) told me that such ...
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1answer
233 views

“Regarded as” vs “regarded to be”

I have come across this sentence: Kashmir is regarded to be the heaven on earth. Is there a difference between that and Kashmir is regarded as the heaven on earth.
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1answer
41 views

Gerund or infinitive and WHY

WHY is this sentence incorrect? "All that they can do is preparing as much as they can." I know it should be "All they can do is (to) prepare as much as they can." But, for the life of me I can't ...
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1answer
46 views

' I went to place that I wanted to go to'

' I went to place that I wanted to go to' I've just read the sentence above from some test papers, and it looked really awkward. I've already heard "I went to the place where I wanted to go" sounds ...
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1answer
49 views

stated rule on use of infinitives in a sequence?

Is there a stated rule on use of infinitives in a sequence? Or is it a question of style? For example, It is vital for a viewer of this movie to listen for its main character's underlying position,...
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1answer
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“not be permitted access” vs. “not be permitted to access”

I was wondering is it right to say something this way: You will not be "permitted access" to the work you produce. Isn't it better to say it this way? You will not be permitted to access to the ...
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0answers
46 views

Can you use a 'to' infinitive instead of using 'by ~ing'?

To identify human genes and understand their roles allows researchers to discover the cause of various diseases. To contain the meaning of 'by ~ing' or 'while ~ing', can you use 'to infinite' like in ...
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0answers
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Infinitive verb as the main verb

I have seen this usage on Twitter and wonder what it exactly means. Is it just an informative exception or a common usage? Thresa May to take her Brexit roadshow to the north-east (https://i.stack....
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2answers
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Things that go “hand-in-hand” to make me resign

Looking for a formal sentence to explain the reasons for leaving my previous job, and for some reasons i insist on using the phrase "hand-in-hand" in the sentence. Is it formal and grammatically ...
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3answers
10k views

What is the purpose of (-s) in “Don't hurts us”?

Shouldn't verbs after "to do" always be infinitive? If so, then what's the purpose of adding the suffix "-s" ? Image from Middle Earth- Shadow of Mordor || Gollum says: Don't hurts us!
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omission of infinitive marker: i.e., He'll come, if he wants (to)

To me, these He'll come, if he wants He'll come, if he's able He'll come, if I allow him are simply variants of He'll come, if he wants to He'll come, if he's able to He'll ...
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1answer
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How to use 'fly'?

There is your sky Break your cage You meant for fly Not for staying in a range "You meant for flying" Or "You meant for fly" Which one is correct?
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1answer
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Infinitive and present perfect together?

I am not sure if the following sentence is correct Nonetheless, I consider that living with and have trained my own dogs have helped me to gain hands-on experience Can somebody please help me? ...
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3answers
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Is is possible to say “Admit to something being something else”?

I was wondering if anyone could help me figure out whether the sentence below is grammatically correct or not. (is it okay to say admit to something being something else?) "The Prime Minister admits ...
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1answer
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Can “to do something” refer to a noun with wh question? [closed]

Let's think of a normal sentence such as "I found a book with 500 pages." Everyone knows that we can't make its question form like "Which book did you find with 500 pages?" because the connection ...
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0answers
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adjective+for someone to do something

I know that we can normally use the combination "adjective+to do smt". He is close-minded to talk to. That topic is very hard to argue on. How about adding "for" to those sentences? He is close-...
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Why was the word “find” used when the word “was” was used? Can I also say “to find”? [duplicate]

The first thing we did was find smart investors four our hedge funds
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1answer
37 views

help someone (to) do with DIFFERENT MEANINGS

I have gone through (almost?) all the posts pertaining "help somebody (to) do" to find the two forms (with "to" or without) are the same in meaning. It came to my attention that bare infinitives in "...
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30 views

“To travel is to live” is this sentence correct?

I got a bottle as a present and it is written "To travel is to live" I supposed that should be written something different but I don't know how to say this in English, somebody tried to say that when ...
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1answer
54 views

Unknown Grammar (or passive continuous infinitive) [duplicate]

Here is a sentence I have trouble parsing: A member of staff objects to their image being used in a particular way. I cannot find a grammar reference according to such sentence. Is it passive ...
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0answers
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Comparing infinitives and nouns

I'm wondering whether it's grammatically correct to compare an infinitive with a noun using 'than'. For example: "Does he like to play in band better than gym?" she asked? I don't hear much usage of ...
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37 views

Structure with to+infinitive or participle

What's the difference in meaning between these two phrases? It was the beginning of an artistic career devoted to the oneness of art and life. It was the beginning of an artistic career to devote to ...
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0answers
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infinitive functions : adverb or direct object?

we were given the following questions by our teacher and the answers didn't make sense. hope you guys can explain. They needed to have a degree in engineering, physics and mathematics. - adverb was ...
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Is “You were going to <noun> and <verb>.” grammatical?

In the song "An English Teacher" from the musical "Bye, Bye Birdie," Rosie sings to Albert You were going to NYU / and become an English teacher. I would parse this as You were (going to NYU) and (...
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1answer
41 views

Help straighten OR help straightening

Like it will help straighten your hair OR it will help straightening your hair Which is correct? Thanks,
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1k views

Make somebody to do something

I know this verb does not take "to" after the direct object. Although, I spot T.L. Short in his "Peirce's Theory of Signs" always inserting "to" in this construction. What happens? Is it some formal-...
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1answer
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“The soil is too arid to plant seeds.” Is “to plant seeds” correct here?

I feel something's wrong with the part "to plant seeds", whose logical subject should be a person. I wonder if the sentence is right or how to correct it the other way around.
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3answers
209 views

base verb or V-ing?

Can anyone tell me why a V-ing is used after the infinitive 'to'? There are four stages on the road to becoming a scientist, and I remember them all. (to become?) There are now a number of routes ...
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2answers
4k views

I would prefer + (to infinitive) + rather than + (bare infinitive) or (to infinitive)?

I've found this during my studies: I would prefer to die in a car crash rather than to die in my sleep. Is this correct? Shouldn't it be: I would prefer to die in a car crash rather than die in ...
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Parsing a sentence with a causative verb

I am an ESL teacher trying to help a student prepare for a test that will have a lot of sentence parsing. We are both stumped by the second verb in causative sentences. For example: She asked the ...
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1answer
58 views

What is the infinitive form of a possessive adjective?

I want to create flashcards (French <-> English) about idioms like "to put all your eggs in one basket". Those idioms have to be written in the infinitive form but I don't know what do to with ...
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What is the difference between “It's sad to see you leave.” and “It's sad seeing you leaving.”?

"It's sad to see you leave." "It's sad seeing you leaving." I know the first one has a infinitive, and the second one a gerund. But I'm not sure about the difference of the meaning. or these two ...
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56 views

Infinitive as an adjective

Please tell me what sentence is right: 1) There was so much to read; 2) There was so much to be read. Thank you
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3answers
856 views

Difference between “help + [infinitive]” with and without “to”

Englishgrammar.org has an article discussing cases where an infinitive does not use the word "to." One case is with many causative verbs like "make" and "let." I want the water to run *I want ...
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Regarding whether to add a preposition in infinitive phrase served as attributive [duplicate]

The two sentences I encountered when I read grammar book are as follows: I had no place to live in. A good place to eat is the Sichuan restaurant around the corner. Regarding the 1st sentence, the ...
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Is there an understood infinitive?

In the sentence, "Let me go to the store for you", it is obviously an understood "you" and "let" is the verb, right? Well, then what part of speech would be "go"? I am thinking an infinitive with an ...
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2answers
597 views

Uses of to-infinitive in passive sentences

First, I would like you to look at these two sentences: 'I used scissors to cut it.' 'I wore glasses to read a book.' And I am going to form passive sentences from the two. 'Scissors were ...
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Difference between infinitival clause acting as a noun and the adverbial version

Consider the clause Sally picked apples to sell As I understand it, "to sell" is an infinitival clause that modifies the noun, so that "apples to sell" can be considered the object? If this is the ...