Questions tagged [infinitives]

Questions about verbs in their basic (unmarked) forms, such as “be”, “do”, “have”, or “sit”, sometimes introduced by the particle “to” and other times used by itself.

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1answer
27 views

Helping [to] + infinitive verb?

What would be correct? And why? I'm helping maintain the library. I'm helping to maintain the library. I'm helping maintaining the library. I'm helping in maintaining the library. (ok this one sounds ...
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18 views

to-infinitive as a direct object(noun phrase)? (as in 'I promised to buy her a pizza tomorrow') [duplicate]

I think this 'to' is some kind of connecting word. I think it connects a verb and what the verb intends. I think in this usage, the originally transitive verb becomes an intransitive verb needing a ...
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1answer
48 views

to infinitive as direct object?! (as in : I promised to get there in time.)

I'm a passionate Korean English-learner, and I would like to ask you a question about grammar. It was 3 years ago when I first started to study the to-infinitive as studying grammar with Grammar In ...
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30 views

Which one best fits and grammatically correct sentence? And usage

Here is the tense I got stuck by while chatting with my friend. But you are the one who promised to accomplish this task by 25 February. I am talking about the future action which still ...
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0answers
44 views

Why “to” is here in this sentence? “please to ring the bell” [duplicate]

Among songs from Wee Sing for Baby, there is a song “To Babyland” The lyrics begin as: How many miles to Babyland? Anyone can tell: Up one flight, to the right. Please to ring the bell” I am ...
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9 views

to have been vs having been

I regret to have been late vs I regret having been late What is the difference in meaning of these two sentences?
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2answers
111 views

Need help breaking down this sentence: “I took action to make my plan come to fruition.”

So far I have "to make my plan come to fruition" as a subordinate clause, but I'm having trouble defining its components. Is "come to fruition" modifying "plan"? How is the infinitive functioning here?...
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1answer
117 views

Verb + object + infinitive. What is the logic behind choosing between to-infinitive or bare infinitive?

For example, why I saw him eat/eating pasta. but I asked him to eat pasta. or She asked him to leave her. but She saw him leave her. I saw some articles about the topic that told you ...
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2answers
59 views

Bare Infinitive as Subject [duplicate]

I would like to know whether or not a verb in its bare infinitive form can be used as the subject of a sentence. In other words, is it grammatically correct to say: Do what her/his mother asks is ...
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38 views

Is 'to' a part of infinitive when using 'to + verb' and 'to' has the same meaning as 'in order to'

Please, take a look at the examples below. I started to cry. I opened my eyes to see them. ('to' = 'in order to') In the first example the 'to cry' part is sure an infinitive. It corresponds to ...
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2answers
86 views

Is the second “to” needed here? “I am going to listen and (to) read” [duplicate]

Which one is correct? Can I use both? "I am going to listen and read." "I am going to listen and to read."
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2answers
101 views

“I saw you doing something” [duplicate]

Apologize that I know there are many similar questions but I am still not satisfied with them so asking a new question here. For example, there is a sentence like "I saw you doing something". Non-...
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1answer
57 views

'To solve' versus 'To solving'

Trying to understand what seems to be a very subtle difference in written and spoken English. Recently, I've seen articles that use 'to + gerund' and 'to + infinitive' in the exact same situations, ...
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1answer
64 views

Baldur's Gate: EE What does this sentence mean? [closed]

I'm playing a PC game 'Baldur's Gate:EE' and I can't understand this sentence. It is from a character in the game. "I bet those rank-ridin' bandits are hired by the Amnian. It'd be like those ...
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2answers
66 views

What are the correct words I have to insert here? (Verb patterns) [closed]

I have to complete this sentence with verb patterns. I think that my answer is correct but the checker does not think the same. Your hair needs -------------- . It looks a right mess! (CUT) I ...
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23 views

Do you dare to defy social customs or Do you dare defy social customs [duplicate]

I'm confused whether dare should be used with to or not . The sentence-"He dare to disobey the laws" can also be written as "He dare disobey the laws", if I'm not wrong. Yet in some Grammar books it ...
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0answers
45 views

nouns and prepositions inside infinitives

Two phrases from English-Russian dictionary of mechanical engineering and automation: to face harden to through harden That is we have the noun "face" and the preposition "through" inside the ...
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2answers
31 views

Which is correct: “to scrape” or “to scraped”? [closed]

When playing he tripped which caused him to _____ the skin away from his knee. scrape or scraped, I am confusing about tense.
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2answers
84 views

What's the meaning of “to” in “Love you to”? [closed]

There's a Beatles song called "Love You To" (not To Love You nor Love You Too). I've never understood this grammar construction and I don't understand what the title actually means. Is it just a ...
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1answer
32 views

Start statement with infinitive

Is it possible to use infinitive and start statement with it to express conditional statement? For example: To go out with you today, I need to finish my job. If it isn't correct way, could you ...
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0answers
32 views

To use 'to' or not to use 'to' between the verb 'is' and another verb [duplicate]

'What reading does is encourage comprehension and our ability to focus.' As far as I'm concerned there's nothing wrong with this sentence. However, I'm aware that one could add 'to' before encourage. ...
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1answer
56 views

Ing form as infinitive at the beginning of a sentence

Is it possible to use the ing form as infinitive at the beginning of a sentence? E.g. learning extracurricular Software to improve personal training. This is a sentence I put in brackets in my ...
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2answers
51 views

I couldn't decide which one to use, and where to use: simple tense vs. perfect tense

The two questions in my grammar book: 1)"Many people claim ------ sundaes and many towns around the world pretend ---- birthplaces of ice creams. A) to have invented / to be B) to ...
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1answer
49 views

Future Active Infinitive

I am a Latin student, and often find myself having to complete verb synopses. In these, I write all the possible forms and modifications a verb could possibly take, along with the English translation....
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1answer
57 views

A Inquiry About Infinitive-To and Its Role As A Subordinator or An Auxiliary

If you're interested in grammar, as I am, I am sure you have delved into a thought process about infinitive to, and like me, you have probably questioned what it is, or what it could be defined as. My ...
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1answer
22 views

Use of the infinitive, always use 'to'?

Which is the correct use: Thanks for the opportunity of being here? or Thanks for the opportunity to be here? The idea was to use the verb in infinitive.
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2answers
112 views

Infinitives used as imperatives?

There is a passage in The Moonstone (by Wilkie Collins, 1874) which is full of infinitive forms of verbs. ("To xxx"). What I find hard to explain is that despite the infinitives, this passage clearly ...
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2answers
339 views

the first trial <stemming/to stem> from… vs. the first person to climb

Here are excerpts from different American news articles: a. Mr. Manafort’s case is separate from the investigation into Russia’s interference in the 2016 election and any ties to the Trump campaign,...
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29 views

Interrogatives followed by an infinitive

I know these sentences work: We don't know where to put the sofa. (where we should put the sofa) No one could tell me how to start the engine. (how I should start the engine) The rules didn't ...
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161 views

“hard to distinguish” or “hard to be distinguished”?

Here is a phrase (slightly modified from the original) that I'd like to discuss. A) targeting small structures that are hard to distinguish I have no doubt that this will convey what it means, but ...
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3answers
121 views

“To be reviewed and approved”

Does the phrase "to be reviewed and approved by [someone]" indicate that the actor must take the specified actions (i.e., review and approve)?
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1answer
454 views

“No one is born hating…” vs. “No one is born to hate…”

“No one is born hating another person because of the color of his skin, or his background, or his religion. People must learn to hate, and if they can learn to hate, they can be taught to love, ...
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2answers
48 views

What is the correct way to use to-infitives?

This topic often confuses me. Sometimes I am not even able to understand the meaning of a sentence. For instance, the sentence: "White to move". You can hear it in chess, it means that the player ...
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1answer
46 views

Can an adverb clause modify an infinitive?

The title is pretty self explanatory, in the sentence: It is difficult to travel through the huge expanse of parched sands in the Sahara Desert, where oases are plentiful but distant from each other....
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1answer
51 views

“How to we categorize appropriation”

I cannot grasp the sentence structure of this: What incites my curiosity even further is how to we categorize appropriation in the case when Japanese people say that there is nothing offensive ...
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0answers
28 views

Are two (or more) to-infinitives treated as singular?

A friend said to me that two (or more) to-infinitives are treated as singular (whereas gerunds can be treated as plural depending on the situation). Is it true? Or, in this example sentence, which ...
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1answer
68 views

Where should “efficiently” go? “…to use ___ the money we collected ___.”

I need to answer a business-related e-mail. Which one is correct grammatically? We request your approval to use efficiently the money we collected. We request your approval to use the money we ...
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1answer
84 views

Hello, which one is correct grammatically? [closed]

Please share your offers with me to evaluate. Please share your offers to evaluate with me. Please share with me to evaluate your offers.
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1answer
48 views

Infinitive problem

1)He gave me a pen to write with. 2)He gave me money to spend. Why spend is not taking preposition as it is done in first example. Kindly help me.
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1answer
117 views

Is the infinitive form of verb a true verb?

My question is just as mentioned in the title of this post: Would you call an infinitive verb a true verb? I can't find any direct mention of it anywhere on the web. The CMoS (2010) catalogs ...
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2answers
285 views

“He is said to have known peo­ple” vs “He is said to know peo­ple”? [closed]

I came aross a ques­tion like this: As a pub­lic re­la­tions of­fi­cer, he is said ________ some very in­flu­en­tial peo­ple. to know to have known There are two avail­able an­swers ...
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1answer
58 views

Identifying parts of sentences with infinitive phrases

To help others is important. In this sentence, 'To help' is the infinitive (being used as noun subject) and 'is' is the verb. What is the object ? 'Others' ? And is 'To help others' an infinitive ...
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1answer
304 views

“For + subj. + to” infinitive to indicate purpose

I would like more information about this type of construction. Good examples escape me at the moment, but it would be something along the lines of: These conditions need to be satisfied for this ...
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1answer
150 views

“doomed to” + noun or infinitive?

I know the phrase "doomed to failure" exists. I also found someone here who suggests that both, "doomed to failure" and "doomed to fail" can be used for a specific situation: "I'm doomed to failure"...
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1answer
53 views

Passive or Active (Infinitive construction)

The task is to open the brackets: I don't want these rumours (to spread) around. As far as I can see, both "to spread" and "to be spread" are possible. What sounds more natural to you? Does "around" ...
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1answer
2k views

“To start” or “to starting” [duplicate]

While I was attempting online ISL test, where I got the following MCQ: Chen's looking forward ______ his job next week. a) to starting b) to start c) starting d) in starting ...
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1answer
352 views

Did prescriptivists make up pied-piping in relative infinitive constructions?

A quick Internet search suggests that pied-piping in relative clauses was a natural feature of English even though it is loved by prescriptivists; it existed in older stages of the language, and it ...
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1answer
38 views

Can I say that the 'to-infinitive which is part of predicative is an object?

The infinitive as object as in "He asked me to come in." & the to-infinitive as part of predicative as in 'The house of Jane was not easy to find' both act as noun. Both of these 'to come & to ...
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1answer
368 views

to display/show vs to be displayed/shown

The user can choose which elements to display/show The user can choose which elements to be displayed/shown Which sentence is more correct? Is there any difference when using show or display.
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2answers
53 views

Is the sentence “We see this problem be unsolvable.” grammatically correct? [closed]

This is supposed to be the correct answer to one of the exercises from a B2 textbook written by a non-native author. It struck me as odd, but my teacher (also a non-native speaker) told me that such ...

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