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Questions tagged [infinitives]

Questions about verbs in their basic (unmarked) forms, such as “be”, “do”, “have”, or “sit”, sometimes introduced by the particle “to” and other times used by itself.

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Is it correct to use a full infinitive (to do) instead of a bare [migrated]

Is it correct to use a full infinitive (to do) instead of a bare infinitive (do)? I am an esl Chinese resident. And I read a comment, of which the commentator thinks I am benighted. (But I admit it's ...
fafafafa's user avatar
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42 views

Choosing between infinitive and conjugated form

I am confused whether the following phrase is correct: We demand the equation have at least one root... It sounds a bit strange to me, but I have a feeling that the bare infinitive 'have' should be ...
Michael Freimann's user avatar
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1 answer
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Confused about the rules for verb + infinitive

I'm doing a worksheet in which rules for verbs + infinitive or gerund have to be completed. And there is one rule I'm really not clear about. It says: "An infinitive is often used to answer the ...
Rosie's user avatar
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-1 votes
2 answers
75 views

Can we transform verbs from one form to another?

The complex transitive form "verb + direct object + to+ v¹": It takes two hours to get to the airport. Now can we use the simple form "verb + Direct object". For example, It ...
Salim uddin's user avatar
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1 answer
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What is the right negative form of infinitive? [duplicate]

I know the right negative form of infinitive is "not to do",but can "to not do" style be used?
森野久徳's user avatar
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1 answer
44 views

". . . he can't bear her to look sad."

(From A Terrible Kindness by Jo Browning Wroe, Part I Aberfan, chapter 12 September 1957) (The boy chorister saying goodbye to his mum) 'I'm so proud of you,' Evelyn (his mum) is saying, the tide in ...
philphil's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
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Use of past infinitive

I found an article with these sentences: I want to have finished the job, before I go home. You need to have passed the test, or else you won't be admitted. Uh! You're supposed to have painted it ...
Jess3032's user avatar
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0 answers
62 views

Infinitive phrases modifying adjectives [duplicate]

I'm having a hard time trying to figure out how these infinitive phrases function (if they are infinitive phrases at all) in the following examples. I have learnt that they can act as nouns, ...
fonema Jimena's user avatar
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1 answer
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What is the part of speech of "to talk" in this sentence?

I was trying to understand how to translate this sentence into another language, and I realized I do not fully understand it in English! The sentence is: We chose to meet up to talk about the plans. ...
sudo rm -rf slash's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
77 views

Difference between noun+to do+preposition VS noun+for doing (+preposition)

Through English grammar books, I understand that a proper preposition is always necessary when the verb in a to-infinitive before a noun is an intransitive verb, such as: There is no place to play in....
tasira's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
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Two Infinitives in a Row, but Dropping “To”?

Was just thinking about English vs. Spanish and thought about the following sentence: “We can try to run” In Spanish, I believe this translates as: “Podemos intentar correr” In Spanish, intentar and ...
Sabrina's user avatar
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1 answer
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Why is it "I began to look around" and not "looked" [duplicate]

I'm trying to help a German friend with their English, why is it "I began to look around" and not "I began to looked around" And I'm unsure how to explain it to her simply. Thank ...
Tim's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
167 views

The function of "to start the year"

Tech shares wobble to start the year FXS What is the function of "to-infinitive" here? I would like to know the grammar. I don't think the to-infinitive means the purpose since we wouldn’t ...
Mango Gummy's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
99 views

Can I omit "to" in infinitives as object?

I was reading a book, and then the following sentence appeared: "Our wisest move at this point is retreat" But this is not the only case where I've seen this, there are also sentences that ...
The_Soul_Eater's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
103 views

Does "happy" function as a predicate adjective in "He seems to be happy"?

He seems happy. He seems to be happy. In the first sentence, "happy" is the predicate adjective. What is going on in the second sentence? Does the infinitive with "happy" still ...
cookie234's user avatar
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What's the difference between a gerund acting as a noun, and an infinitive acting as a noun, as well? [duplicate]

I asked this question at the end of class, and the teacher told me: "They do not have the same meaning. A gerund represents any instance of an action, while an infinitive represents the concept ...
Stim Roe's user avatar
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1 answer
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Is the sentence "What I need to do is sweeping them off" grammatically correct?

I think "What I need to do is sweeping them off" should be What I need to do is (to) sweep them off" Can "sweeping" be allowed to be used? or grammatically wrong and never be ...
HanJe Bae's user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
112 views

Is this awkward reuse of a verb between subjects correct?

From a Library of Congress article about Freud: ...patients tended to perform for the camera and doctors to record the most photogenic. This sentence seems to reuse the verb tended between the ...
japreiss's user avatar
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-2 votes
5 answers
250 views

Can you tell me the difference between the bare infinitive and the base form of a verb?

I heard my teacher stating that the base form of a verb is not an infinitive itself, but it is used to construct one of the two forms of infinitives. Edit note This question has been linked to a ...
Stim Roe's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
209 views

What is the difference between a bare infinitive and an infinitive?

One teacher told me that the bare infinitive cannot be used as the direct object of a modal verb because it is not a noun. But, aren't infinitives with or without "to" infinitives?
Stim Roe's user avatar
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1 answer
187 views

succeed + gerund or infinitive

The below question was asked in national English exam in Turkey: Choose the best word or expression to fill the spaces in the passage. As Henry Hill, the actor Ray Liotta gives a complex portrayal of ...
ofenerci's user avatar
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1 answer
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cause + noun + to infinitive

Once you’re on your journey, certain wheels cause friction to control movement toward either side of the track, resulting in a loss of energy. Does "to control" specify the verb "cause&...
HanJe Bae's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
125 views

"glad to V" vs. "glad (that) S V"

As an EFL teacher, I am currently teaching a unit on infinitives and one of the expressions covered in the textbook is "feeling adj. + inf" as in "I was glad to hear the news." In ...
JParker's user avatar
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6 votes
3 answers
437 views

Infinitives modifying nouns [closed]

Wikipedia lists one use of to-infinitive verb forms as being a 'modifier of certain nouns and adjectives': the reason to laugh the effort to expand anxious to get a ticket Some other examples: Don'...
Quppa's user avatar
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0 answers
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Elliptical "try and pull" instead of to-infinitive "try to pull"? [duplicate]

Why does she try and pull the stunt? This is probably an elliptic sentence - Why does she try the stunt and why does she pull the stunt (off)? - but it still seems like very bad style to me. Why ...
DumbQuestionButAnswerAnywayPle's user avatar
1 vote
5 answers
72 views

What is the syntactic role of "to do something" in these sentences?

Take these sentences: I felt he was mean to do that. We'd be stupid to do something like that. I feel like the "to do that" part in them functions differently syntactically than in ...
desmo's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
55 views

What's the correct answer to the question? changing or to change?

The following is a question from an English test. Which form is correct, changing or to change? Agriculture gave people their first experience of the power of technology _______ (change) lives.
徐道邻's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
55 views

Infinitives of purpose with the past perfect [closed]

In the sentence: "There were people everywhere. They thronged the streets, choking the alleys. They had come in their thousands to see the light show" I would group the infinitive of ...
Ecstatic blender boogie's user avatar
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2 answers
56 views

Adverb Nowhere/Anywhere/Somewhere

I understand that anywhere is an adverb in this sentence: We couldn't go anywhere nice to eat. However, I am a little confused about how nice to eat is explained. nice and to eat both modify the ...
user480565's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
26 views

In a sentence such as 'she said I should say hello to the baby' - is 'to' functioning as a preposition? [closed]

In the following sentence, does the 'to' function as a preposition? She said I should say hello to the baby. If it is a preposition, could it function as an oblique? Or is it just acting as an ...
user avatar
1 vote
4 answers
278 views

Does imperative 'do' (in 'do'-support) share the same form with infinitive 'do'?

Without do-support, all imperative verbs are in the same form as infinitive verbs. (1) Shut up. [imperative] (2) I want you to shut up. [infinitive] I can't think of any exceptions. But, with do-...
JK2's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
310 views

Does 'as' take bare infinitive?

Here a sentence from my grammar book. "It is as difficult to swim as drive. I know when 'than' is used in a sentence, then it takes bare infinitive. Like.. "She is better able to speak than(...
Ansh's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
226 views

Passive of verb "let" : with or without "to"

Page 64 of the fourth edition of Practical English Usage reads Verbs which can be followed, in active structures, by object + infinitive without to, use to-infinitives in passive structures. Compare:...
GJC's user avatar
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0 votes
3 answers
110 views

If "to X" signifies an infinitive, what form is the phrase "to be able to X", and can it be split?

"To slowly walk" is a split infinitive which is sometimes frowned upon, in which case "slowly to walk" or "to walk slowly" is often preferred. "To be able to walk&...
TylerDurden's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
2k views

May I start a sentence with a verb "develop" or do I need to use "to"? [closed]

I need to explain to a client what we will do in each phase of a project. In the last phase of the project we will develop a roadmap. My doubt is the following: May I start a sentence with "...
Marcos Vinicius Nunes's user avatar
-1 votes
2 answers
39 views

Is the structure "Who wants this ball to bang on their head?" acceptable?

I am proofreading an English book written by a non-native speaker. A structure the author uses is the following Who wants this ball bang on their head? The meaning intended to be conveyed is: Who ...
V.Lydia's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
28 views

Girls who I've made [to] love me [duplicate]

Is that "to" mandatory and needed, or is it wrong and unneeded? I give my friend great advice, saying to them how they shouldn't treat girls by telling my story, "All the girls who I'...
user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
83 views

With adjective uses of the to-infinitive like 'a place to live in', is the preposition 'in' necessary?

a house to live in a place to live in Does the second example essentially need the preposition 'in'? In the first example, the noun 'house' is a specific place, so I've known to use to-infinitive it ...
Eunjin Park's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
101 views

What's the difference between complementary infinitives and infinitives as object? [duplicate]

Example: I forgot to lock the door. Is "to lock" here a complementary infinitive or just an object?
Marj's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
42 views

to-infinitival subordinate clause [closed]

saw a sentence in the class's slide: "Missy began to think when will he arrive." I think "to think when will he arrive" and "when will he arrive" are two subordinate ...
Tsuki's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
138 views

Infinitive phrase

'Captain John is a person to admire'. Can you give the way to figure out that whether it is adjectival or adverbial?
user465073's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
183 views

In the sentence "He doesn't like people telling him what to do" why is there a Gerund after people and not an infinitve?

Forgive me if this has already been answered. I've searched similar questions and only saw this The object of "I don't like people telling me what to do"? which doesn't answer my ...
Emmet's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
1k views

so adjective as to-infinitive

I searched everywhere for an explanation about this construct but couldn't find. The construct is: "so adjective as to-infinitive". For example: "the kid was so brave as to amaze all ...
Tamir's user avatar
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4 votes
3 answers
433 views

When do we need to use "to" here?

I would like to know when we use "to" before the second verb (in this case communicate) in the following sentence. Sir Percy Grigg, a high Treasury official who knew both well, described ...
Alexander's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
408 views

Infinitive as direct object [duplicate]

Merriam's dictionary defines "eat" as an intransitive verb and provides the following definition followed by an example: "to bear the expense of : take a loss on" the team was ...
Eric1982's user avatar
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3 votes
3 answers
194 views

Why do we say "he made me eat it" but "he allowed me TO eat it"?

Why does the choice of the first verb "made" vs. "allowed" change the tense of the second verb "eat" vs "to eat"? Using the opposite tense in either case sounds ...
AutomatedMike's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
125 views

Is this infinitive a noun or an adverb?

In the following sentences... Watch me whip. You make me feel special. The word "whip" and the phrase "feel special" are infinitives without "to." However, I'm not ...
Heather Leland's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
37 views

Where should I position the correlating conjunction relative to the infinitive? [duplicate]

I am proofreading the following sentence: They inspired her to produce not only her zine and blog but to create a whole new scene in New Orleans. I am thinking it should rather be written as follows:...
Phil's user avatar
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1 answer
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Query regarding the function of an infinitive

What function does the infinitive serve in the following sentence? It is too early to talk about that thing.
equinox's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
182 views

Why does one use infinitive in "He be saying nonsense."? [duplicate]

I hear some people using infinitive form especially with the verb "to be" in songs or regular conversations. I don't know exactly it mean means grammatically. Can anyone help? For example: ...
CHOSM's user avatar
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