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Questions tagged [phrases]

This tag is for questions about phrases in the linguistic sense. In linguistics a “phrase” is a group of words that make a unit of syntax with a single grammatical function. Use [phrase-requests] if you are searching for a phrase.

0
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1answer
10 views

‘then/now we’re talking’

I chance upon the hearing of a certain phrase which is concluded by the words ‘now were talking’ or ‘then we’re talking’ but I am confused by what they are referring to because weren’t we talking the ...
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0answers
25 views

None of God's promises ever fail [on hold]

BLUEGLAZE~ Of course, I still need your hep~ Could you help me with this question: None of God's promises ever fail. Abraham had a son at 100 years old. None of God's promises have ever failed. ...
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1answer
21 views

Most common answers for “thank you! (e g for your help) [on hold]

What are the most common answers in AmE when a person says “thank you”? Thank you;)
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2answers
38 views

The meaning of “thanks chat”

In this video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JALiA9y-L90&feature=youtu.be&t=585, it seems that he said "nice thanks chat". In this context, the word "chat" means "audience"? Did he thanked ...
3
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1answer
34 views

Prepositional verb structure - “[rely] [on John]” or “[rely on] [John]”

It is difficult to determine the correct consituent structure of prepositional verbs, such as rely on someone. Either on someone forms a constituent to the exclusion of rely, as in (1), or rely on ...
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2answers
17 views

Synonymous to “Have had enough of ~”

When you're tired of situation, you can use the pattern "have had enough of ~". For instance, Peter has had enough of the quarrel between his mother and wife. What patterns can I also add after the ...
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0answers
11 views

Type of usage with determiners/phrases

The bride looked radiant, a fairy tale princess. The bride looked radiant — fairy tale princess. She'd known him all her life, a great friend. She'd known him all her life — great friend. On these ...
0
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1answer
12 views

Type of usage in these examples? Clauses/fragments

Peter senses his father's danger and tries to reach him, but is forced to watch helplessley as his father is driven away. Her father struggles with complex emotions about the child he raised as his ...
0
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1answer
53 views

What does it mean to say “goodnight” instead of “goodbye”? [on hold]

For example: in Helena by My Chemical Romance, he says goodnight to his grandma instead of saying goodbye to her. Is this only something you say to someone who's died? Is it just easier to say ...
1
vote
1answer
23 views

What's the correct phrase to use? In our app or on our app

This new service will be available in our app. This new service will be available on our app. What's correct? Second one feels wrong but interested to know what's right here.
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0answers
21 views

does “You will burn eternities over” make sense?

As an ironic idiom from the idea of 'burning for all eternity' does the above phrase make sense? I know eternity should not be plural in the abstract notion, but does"burning eternities over" properly ...
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2answers
36 views

“at this stage” Vs. “in this stage”

Going through a document for proof reading, I came across the phrase "In this stage, the model is put into operation" and was kind of confused. Mostly I had heard "At this stage ...", i.e. "at" ...
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1answer
28 views

Is the phrase 'outlet into' correct?

From a post on Instagram: Going to yoga gives me a necessary outlet into self care. (...) Dictionaries unanimously agree that the preposition that goes after the noun outlet is for: outlet noun ...
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3answers
57 views

Some polite/alternative way of saying “due to the lack of”? [on hold]

I have been writing my SOP for grad school and I'm looking for polite ways of saying "due to the lack of". Currently, I have this sentence: I analyse and solve system defects that occur in lieu of ...
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0answers
10 views

transferable skills gained from parallel occupation?

Activities or occupation in other business sectors in the past at the same time.
0
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1answer
38 views

Using the Latin phrase 'ante Christum natum' in an English sentence

The phrase ante Christum natum translates to 'before the birth of Christ,' and Wikipedia says it is the (likely outdated) Latin equivalent to BC, in the same way post Christum natum is the equivalent ...
1
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1answer
24 views

I'm looking for a word that describes that horrible feeling you get when you see something disgusting and painful happen?

Extremely specific, I know. Hopefully, that makes it easier to answer. It's just like the title says. You know when you're watching a program and something horrible happens in it along the lines of ...
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0answers
14 views

Meaning and how to use [closed]

1) intend 2) magnificent beast 3) spare minute 4) cosmic sign 5) consequence 6) stand for 7) reputation 8) fundraiser 9) compact 10) persona
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0answers
20 views

meaning of “original importance” [on hold]

how do you understand the meaning of "original importance" in the following: "the critical focus of classical comedy on the aesthetic and ethical values of music in contemporary tragedy is a clear ...
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2answers
28 views

Did I draw this phrase diagram correctly?

Hello beautiful people, I am writing an exam on English grammar soon and one part is requiring you to draw a phrase diagram separating the noun phrases, verb phrases, etc.. Now I took a sentence ...
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2answers
18 views

Word that means political aspect of a topic

word or phrase to replace "politicallity" - which isn't a word. i'm doing a presentation and need a word to title the slide. the slide is covering political aspects of a subject.
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0answers
13 views

Head vs go home distribution frequency or any other possibility's [on hold]

I was wondering the frequency ratio of the verb phrases 'head home' and 'go home' in all of their forms. Or you can add another phrase that means a similar thing as well if you have one. You are ...
0
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1answer
16 views

Correct usage/distinction in these examples [on hold]

The score has a real unique sound with interesting vocals; the score is also well produced and professional. Our law firm is one of the Internet's most prolific copyright experts: firms that catch ...
0
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1answer
56 views

What does “bar the question” mean?

I was asked what I was working on last night and I only have one thing to work on so the answer was pretty obvious but before I could respond he said, "bar the question?", which apparently means ...
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0answers
16 views

about the words that are phrase or clause

You shall join the rebel group 'as soon as possible'. In the above sentence ''as soon as possible'' is a adverb phrase or noun phrase or adjective phrase
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0answers
15 views

“as great as has” [migrated]

Which sentence is more correct and why? Einstein is as great a scientest as HAS ever lived. Or, Einstein is as great a scientist as ever lived.
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0answers
44 views

What is word or phrase for opposite of lame duck when employee are still in office but not slated to continue, who do more than they had ever done

What is opposite of lame duck when employee are still in office but not slated to continue and start to work harder to bring about change i.e. if the employee is on verge of retirement or termination ...
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1answer
22 views

What is the meaning of “get down on to”?

How would you understand this:"I got down on to a low speed, for it was painful to travel against it." Context (From "the Horror of Heights" Short story by Arthur Conan Doyle: "Just as I reached the ...
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0answers
31 views

Is there any difference between “get ill” and “get sick”?

I wonder if there is any difference between “get sick” and “get ill”. Will it be OK if I say, for example, “if you drink this water, you’ll get ill”? Or maybe it’s better to say either “get sick” or “...
2
votes
1answer
81 views

Why do we say “traffic jam”?

A thought occurred to me during a tedious journey yesterday, when travelling why do we use the word jam when describing being …caught in a traffic jam? It is just a queue, in this case, it ...
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0answers
28 views

The meaning of “cut off from the water” in this context

I was wondering what is meant by "cut off from the water" in the following context. On just such a sweltering day, the emperor's army trapped Hussein's little band within smelling distance of the ...
0
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3answers
71 views

What is a better way of saying modest budget?

I am trying to come up with a word or words to describe someone's financial situation that is not too low or too high. In other words, they can afford nice things (not low end), but they don't have ...
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0answers
18 views

a sentence that can be read at any point and make sense

Is there a such thing as a 'circular sentence', the idea that at any point a sentence can be read and make sense. I'm not talking about moving the words around - for example - there are none there ...
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1answer
25 views

Is it correct to say 'and as well' instead of 'as well as'?

Because I often see as well as or and in sentences, is the following sentence correct? It is suitable for you and as well for me. Thanks!
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3answers
49 views

What is a choice that is heavily favorable on one side?

A choice that is so favorable on one side that it somewhat forces you to pick the favorable one. Example: "If you choose option A everyone will die or choose B to save everyone (with a small ...
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0answers
29 views

Terms/phrases such as “if not” “just” and “but” used to replace longer thoughts; do they have a name?

Example. // Equivalent grammatical meaning. (Equivalent connotation) Running is bizarre, if not pointless. // Running is bizarre and nearly pointless. (If running is not pointless, at the very least ...
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1answer
34 views

Linked phrases?

I am wondering if there is a literary term for the following types of sentences: "When the going gets tough, the tough get going." "Money doesn't make you, you make money." In these phases, the ...
0
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1answer
23 views

An alternative, more concise phrase for “due to even something as insignificant as”

I'm looking to improve on the wording of the following phrase shown in bold. While it conveys the correct meaning, "due to even something as insignificant as" seems unnecessarily wordy so I was hoping ...
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0answers
15 views

Word/Phrase for organizational system in which management's responsibilities is made to be performed by staff (which is above their responsibilities)

Word or a phrase for a organizational system in which decision making/responsibilities of management are regularly made/performed by rank and file staff (which is above their responsibilities). The ...
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0answers
19 views

To start guiltily

I have been reading The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy and came across this sentence which sounded odd to me. Sometimes he would get seized with oddly distracted moods and stare into the sky as ...
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3answers
48 views

Why isn't the definite article used before “closest” in “Who are you closest to”?

Why is there no definite article before "closest" in the question "Who are you closest to in your family?" My only assumption is that "to be close to someone" is a set phrase and it is used without an ...
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3answers
461 views

Is 'dumb butler' used as a phrase?

I’m Turkish and there is a name for the thing you put your coat on or scarf when you enter a house or office, dilsiz uşak. The thing is translated word for word as ‘dumb butler’. I looked it up in ...
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1answer
42 views

Does this sentence sound weird in English? [closed]

"Neptune’s natural light coming in through the top windows washed the station in baby blue hues." I am alluding to the "washed with light" part. Does it sound like a legitimate literary expression or ...
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0answers
19 views

The difference between the gerund and the participls [migrated]

"They prefer buying organic food " in this phrase " buying " us a verb or a noun ...?
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3answers
115 views

'Thus it was… redeemed and wed?' What does that mean in 2018? [closed]

Here are two paragraphs from Clive Barker's Weaveworld. I am really having trouble digesting two phrases. True joy is a profound remembering; and true grief the same. Thus it was, when the ...
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1answer
35 views

What does “I don't mind doing something for you?”

I asked my teacher to write some recommendation letter for me and he said that "I don’t mind writing a recommendation for you". I think it means that "I will do that for you" but how good it is? ...
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0answers
18 views

Does “Ain't on that sh*t/crap” or “Ain't about that sh*t/crap” make sense?

My mind is a little bit fuzzy about this phrase. I could have sworn I've heard it being used in situations when someone quits something bad, similarly to the phrase "Ain't about that life". E.g., if ...
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0answers
46 views

Is there a name for this grammatical structure where a verb is followed by a direction?

In English there are lots of phrases where a verb is followed by a direction and it takes on a whole new meaning. Examples: get up, get off, get down, take in, take out, take off, etc. This is ...
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0answers
21 views

sportsman whose game has failed him

I'd like to ask about the sentence below, from Conan Doyle's Bruce Partington Plans. "The London criminal is certainly a dull fellow," said he in the querulous voice of the sportsman whose game has ...
1
vote
1answer
44 views

“The bigger they are.” by itself

I am wondering if the sentence below is correct to use in (informal) speaking. "I don't like to be famous, the bigger you are." I have purposefully omitted the second part of the phrase to seem ...