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Questions tagged [phrases]

This tag is for questions about phrases in the linguistic sense. In linguistics a “phrase” is a group of words that make a unit of syntax with a single grammatical function. Use [phrase-requests] if you are searching for a phrase.

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Is 'Ears like a Shite Hawk' an expression for someone with good hearing? [closed]

I'm sure someone used to use this expression for someone with good hearing.
Alister Baldwin's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
15 views

Welcome as short version of "you are welcome" [migrated]

Is it possible to say welcome instead of you are welcome? What would be the short response to a thank you, especially in written communication?
Saim Doruklu's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
80 views

Stop blowing your load in the Golden Arches

While doing some research I came across the following phrase: “Young men do not need to proactively freeze their sperm,” says David Ryley, a reproductive endocrinologist at Boston IVF. “If men want ...
Prometheus's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
4 views

Can I download / buy Cambridge English Corpus / Cambridge Learner Corpus? Where to download these corpus? [migrated]

I seen https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cambridge_English_Corpus . Can I download / buy Cambridge English Corpus / Cambridge Learner Corpus? Where to download these corpus?
Vy Do's user avatar
  • 371
3 votes
1 answer
108 views

Specific term for a "Synonym Phrase"?

Is there a specific term for a pair of phrases where each word technically has the same or similar meaning, but when taken together, has a completely different meaning or implication? I used Synonym ...
Chromane's user avatar
  • 1,645
5 votes
3 answers
1k views

Why is "second" an adverb in "came a close second"?

Consider the following example sentence excerpted from Oxford Learner's Dictionaries: One of the smaller parties came a close second (= nearly won). Much to my surprise, the example sentence is ...
xmllmx's user avatar
  • 2,770
1 vote
1 answer
72 views

Why do phrases "By fair means or foul" and "By hook or by crook" have such different use of preposition 'By'?

Both idioms have pretty much the same meaning. Both are centuries old idioms. However, one uses preposition 'by' twice while the other doesn't. Why? Can someone please explain what am I missing here?
EMS's user avatar
  • 329
1 vote
1 answer
58 views

What is "with the larger group being the first to flee" called? [duplicate]

I've been reading about the lore of Red Dead Redemption 2, I came across a certain phrase that I wonder about its name and what is the kind of function it serves. I have seen it elsewhere many times, ...
Shady Badr's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
105 views

Why does the phrase "as a mapping out of a..." work?

"This deck of cards can be viewed as a mapping out of a spiritual journey, one that parallels the journey of faith and discovery found in Anderson's book." I am specifically wondering about ...
Riley 's user avatar
  • 111
-1 votes
2 answers
75 views

Can we transform verbs from one form to another?

The complex transitive form "verb + direct object + to+ v¹": It takes two hours to get to the airport. Now can we use the simple form "verb + Direct object". For example, It ...
Salim uddin's user avatar
6 votes
3 answers
884 views

Is "go through the effort" a new variant of "go to the effort" or is it a long-standing, maybe regional, variant?

I'm 99% sure I've always used and read and heard "go to the effort" but I've started noticing in the past year or so that people younger than me, at least on YouTube are saying "go ...
hippietrail's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
38 views

Looking for a word that is grouping a bunch of supportive phrases [duplicate]

What would the word be for a list of phrases you would say to someone if they posted that something negative happened to them? People reply things like sorry to hear that hope you're ok but you're ...
Jake's user avatar
  • 11
0 votes
1 answer
40 views

Mid-sentence phrase where you need 1 of 2 things but could also have both as well

I have been losing sleep over this, I have used this string of words before but can not think of it the best way I can describe it is in the title I believe it uses a combination of “if, and, or” and ...
Airic's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
2 answers
65 views

On-demand treatment or Required treament?

I'm struggling to name a department in my hospital in English. This department provides paid treament services. I mean that we serve the needs of our patients. Should I use "Department of On-...
Dr Binh's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
52 views

How to use " I have got to hand it to you " [closed]

I just want to know how to use this idiom as I came across it yesterday.
Henya's user avatar
  • 11
0 votes
1 answer
57 views

"A good thing about still living in the house we grew up in"

(From A Terrible Kindness by Jo Browning Wroe, Part II Cambridge Choir, chapter 16) (A letter from Uncle Robert) . . . We might pop up to Cambridge for evensong every now and then, though I'm not ...
philphil's user avatar
  • 361
0 votes
3 answers
174 views

What does phrase "he got hammered" mean? When is it appropriate to use?

This comes from the movie "Moneyball". General Manager is trying to sell baseball player Venafro to another baseball team Steve: "Is (baseball player) Venafro hurt?" Billy: "...
4orneMore's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
51 views

"something qua something" vs "something simpliciter"

I am wondering if there is a difference between the phrases. I have recently come across a text that uses the phrases "ideology, simpliciter" and "ideology qua ideology" near each ...
user501724's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
60 views

What's it called when person A's shoulders are in person B's shoulders in a reassuring way, and B's hands are on top of person A's hands?

What's it called when person A's shoulders are in person B's shoulders in a reassuring way, and B's hands are on top of person A's hands? If there's not a word please help me describe it in a clear ...
lila.popelier's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
44 views

"Being in advantage", as used in the video gaming world of fighting games

In fighting games such as Street Fighter, it is common to say that you're "in advantage" to say that you're "in an advantageous state" as opposed to your opponent. Is it ...
Stefan Schouten's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
62 views

Infinitive phrases modifying adjectives [duplicate]

I'm having a hard time trying to figure out how these infinitive phrases function (if they are infinitive phrases at all) in the following examples. I have learnt that they can act as nouns, ...
fonema Jimena's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
169 views

Look forward very much to

One example of Cambridge grammar confuses me. I look forward very much to hearing from you soon. Is the sentence correct? Why does it put "very much" together with verb phrase "look ...
Kebab King's user avatar
6 votes
2 answers
1k views

"And I'll tell you for why". Why the "for"? [duplicate]

English is my second language, so maybe I'm just missing something simple. I've come across the phrase "and I'll tell you for why" a couple of times and I'm wondering why you'd say that ...
Hans Kilian's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
63 views

Is there premodification in this noun phrase "too many victims"

I have to analyze the noun phrase "too many victims" but I somehow can't figure out whether "too many" is a determiner or premodification. Given the fact too is an adverb and many ...
Alex's user avatar
  • 13
0 votes
1 answer
40 views

The semicolon (;) put before "one of which"? [duplicate]

Today I took an English Writing class, and my professor assigned sentence correcting practice exercises. Five components of defective parts have been identified, one of which is severely damaged. My ...
User's user avatar
  • 1
-1 votes
1 answer
51 views

Crust and crumb [closed]

" Crust and crumb " is the title of an 1895 picture " toy " book in the Montgomery Ward catalog. The title feels like an idiom. I welcome input.
Kathleen Tirpak's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
79 views

What part of speech is the word "having" in this context?

What part of speech is the word "having" in the following? Having signed the contract, we went for a party.
Reem Abodeeb's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
67 views

Let's assume X+into is a phrasal verb meaning A. X is also used with into again but with a different meaning (B) Can we count it as a phrasal verb?

Let's assume that we have 2 words: X and into. In dictionary the phrase X+into is accepted as a phrasal verb when it means A. We can also use X with the word into again, but then it literally means ...
Melis's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
2 answers
61 views

How do you interpret 'high risk eggs' in this context? [closed]

I was watching a documentary about border control at an airport. One woman was carrying prohibited foods. The relevant part of the original sentence is as follows: This woman ... has been caught with ...
SuperDuperMario's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
600 views

Put oneself together vs. pull oneself together

I'm reading a book about makeup, aesthetics, the concept of beauty, etc. One of the author's interviewees said, That notion of beauty as a strength and putting yourself together well as a self- ...
Olivia Lo's user avatar
  • 589
2 votes
3 answers
209 views

Phrase for a person in town known for being insane?

This is my first post, forgive me if it is unorthodox. So, I’m looking to title a video, and this is bothering me: I could’ve sworn there was a phrase to describe a local crazy person in a town or ...
Randy's user avatar
  • 21
3 votes
1 answer
63 views

Some phrases follow a two person pattern - what are these kinds of phrases called?

In English we have some composite phrases that are meant to be said by two people. Person A says the first part and person B finishes with the appropriate response. An example would be the classic ...
WhiskeyHammer's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
127 views

Phrase that is more business-appropriate than "got screwed"? [closed]

What is a more business-appropriate phrase that has the same meaning as "got screwed" (the non-sexual meaning). In all the examples below, the people "getting screwed" were ...
End Antisemitic Hate's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
103 views

What is a band box? [closed]

She looks like she just stepped out of a band box. In this sentence, what does "stepped out of a band box" mean?
Elizabeth's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
3k views

What is the origin of “give it the beans!”?

There’s a phrase, possibly specific to British English, to “Give it [some/the] beans!” when referring to a task that somebody should put more effort into. It’s similar to “Give it some welly!”. What I ...
deeBo's user avatar
  • 121
1 vote
3 answers
104 views

How to understand this phrase: a native son of Negro descent?

I came across this phrase in a paper on African American literature, and it made me wonder whether the phrase "a native son of Negro descent" could be used to describe a child who has an ...
Yuhang Ma's user avatar
22 votes
6 answers
4k views

Throttle is to slow down, but full throttle is max speed?

According to Merriam-Webster, to throttle means to regulate the speed via a constricting valve, especially to speed down. For example, "to regulate and especially to reduce the speed of (...
Juan Perez's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
64 views

Why is it "have a care", and not "have care"?

I was reading The Lord of the Rings (or actually I was listening to Andy Serkis' reading of it), wherein Frodo once says to Gollum as a warning, "have a care". I instantly perceived it to be ...
Shathur's user avatar
  • 643
4 votes
2 answers
583 views

'My bad' vs 'My bag'

Over the years I've noticed a non-insignificant amount of people use the term 'My bag' to admit guilt when getting something wrong (i.e. 'Mea culpa'). For example: Happy Birthday! My birthday's not ...
Daniel's user avatar
  • 41
2 votes
0 answers
110 views

Why are "all together" and "altogether" exact homophones in American English?

This question was inspired by the interesting discussion here: Why isn't the T in "relative" flapped? It seems like the adverb already and the two-word phrase all ready should be ...
Quack E. Duck's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
147 views

"Ay me" origins and usage?

I have been recently reading Romeo and Juliet, and towards the beginning of the balcony scene, Juliet says Ay me. What does this phrase mean and when was it first created/used?
Enderman's user avatar
  • 103
0 votes
2 answers
546 views

"Don't start blowing up my line"

In Le Sserafim's Perfect Night there's a line: "Don't start blowing up my line". Tonight I don't care what's wrong or right Don't start blowing up my line I'd care at 11:59 But nothing ...
Huy nguyen kim nhat's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
174 views

'Go on a binge' in British English?

If said without any accompanying information, is 'go on a binge' primarily understood by Brits as meaning a 'drinking binge'?
Swenglish's user avatar
  • 107
0 votes
0 answers
51 views

how to properly use expression '3000 strong' army?

i recall reading some phrase to express when one wants to assess the size of a group or army: "he has 3000-strong army", not in a sense "strong army" but to estimate the size of ...
ERJAN's user avatar
  • 376
1 vote
3 answers
522 views

"Out of sight" to refer to something that is very good — could it be based on German?

There is a word in German, ausgezeichnet which vaguely sounds like the English phrase "out of sight" but that is usually translated as "excellent". I could see some non-German ...
releseabe's user avatar
  • 603
1 vote
1 answer
60 views

Prepositional phrases next to adjectives

-The boy akin to an impassioned bard recited his stories -The girl similar to him stood still. These adjectives (italicized) and others similar are always placed next to a prepositional phrase (bolded)...
anu's user avatar
  • 15
2 votes
0 answers
127 views

Which work of Shakespeare "oftentimes better than a master of one" appears in if it it accredited to him? [duplicate]

A jack of all trades is a master of none, but oftentimes better than a master of one is apparently accredited to William Shakespeare. Just to clarify - I mean the FULL quote, not just 'Jack of all ...
Ziarek's user avatar
  • 131
0 votes
1 answer
71 views

"my stomach told me" VS "my guts told me"

I'm an English learner and I came across this sentence: My stomach told me that this was unprecedented. Does this expression mean that I had a feeling or my instincts told me that something that had ...
Ali.twoforkstower's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
51 views

Is "no good" or "it is no good" gramatically correct English? [duplicate]

I recently came across some discussion on the fact that "no bueno" is not gramatically correct Spanish, and generally not a phrase Spanish-speakers use, unless they find it funny. Of course, ...
D.R's user avatar
  • 113
0 votes
2 answers
55 views

Is this use of "complete with" idiomatic? [closed]

"I’ve seen a Japanese brass band competition complete with the equipment in Youtube and the performance was simply great". Is the use of "complete with" correct there? Based on ...
Joseph Virgil Edang's user avatar

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