Stack Exchange Network

Stack Exchange network consists of 175 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.

Visit Stack Exchange

Questions tagged [nonfinite-clause-complementation]

1
vote
0answers
50 views

Can we have non-finite clauses with overt subject without “for”?

I read the following in a comment to an answer to another post of mine: "What’s the difference between expect for things to improve and expect things to improve? Is that for part of expect for, or is ...
-1
votes
1answer
58 views

How is “swimming” being used grammatically in “I saw them swimming in the lake”?

Consider this sentence: I saw them swimming in the lake. How is "swimming" used in the sentence? Is it a gerund or verb or anything else and how is it connected to the sentence? I am mostly aware ...
2
votes
2answers
126 views

Grammatical term for a noun coming after an infinitive?

I didn't come to offer help. As far as I can tell, this is how I would analyze this sentence from a grammatical perspective. I = pronoun didn't = aux. verb with "not" for negation. come = zero ...
1
vote
2answers
103 views

(Noun) being (noun) verb … AND With (noun) being (noun), …?

First time poster here. Please forgive me for violating any rules if I have. I might also be asking a stupid question. So... I have heard 'being' used in different situations and naturely pick up ...
2
votes
2answers
132 views

Terminology: Definition of the term “direct object”

In Michael Swan's "Practical English Usage", he states in section 16.1: Many verbs besides auxiliaries can be followed by forms of other verbs (or by structures including other verbs). This can ...
4
votes
1answer
213 views

“I have you returning the car.”

Context: Top Notch 2 Conversation: Agent: I have you returning the car on August 14th here at the airport. Renter: Yes. That's correct. I am puzzled by this sentence in a conversation ...
3
votes
5answers
181 views

“I hate Jill singing those songs.” = “I hate Jill when she is singing those songs.”?

Can the sentence I hate Jill singing those songs. mean I hate Jill when she is singing those songs. Or does it mean something else?
1
vote
1answer
77 views

What tense is used for “go” in “you see it go away”? [duplicate]

I understand it's not the present tense, else it would be "goes". Is the sentence grammatically correct? If so, does it mean "you are seeing that it is going away"?
1
vote
0answers
47 views

'watch her run' vs 'watch her running' [duplicate]

QUESTION 1 I'm trying to figure out the seemingly subtle difference(s) between a sentence modified by a bare infinitive and one modified by a participle phrase. What do you get out of these: I ...
6
votes
1answer
4k views

Non-finite clause complementation of complex transitive verbs

This question has been bothering me for a while. It came up when I was reading Chapter 16 of "A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language." How to explain the grammatical structure of the ...
5
votes
2answers
2k views

“Heard me [infinitive]” vs. “heard me [present participle]”

"Heard me [infinitive]" vs. "heard me [present participle]" At that time, you wouldn't have heard me talk about it. At that time, you wouldn't have heard me talking about it. At ...
4
votes
3answers
2k views

Correct usage of “see” vs. “watch”

I have seen them grow up. I have watched them grow up. Though the intended meaning is conveyed in both sentences, I want to know which in this case is a better fit, see or watch.