Questions tagged [nonfinite-clause-complementation]

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Should this verb be in the third-person singular form, the infinitive form, or the present participle form? [duplicate]

Watching a game review, I've noticed a phrase whose meaning confused me. The reason why I got confused is that the author used a base form of the verb "to explore" in pair with the singular ...
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Can prepositions be 'subordinators'?

"For her to lose the election would make me very happy." What I think is that here "For her to lose the election" is an infinitival non-finite subordinate clause & "for&...
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Non-finite clause vs phrase

We know that a clause is a sentence which is a part of a sentence. So, a clause is itself a sentence having a subject and a predicate, but a phrase is just a group of words. To tell you the truth,I ...
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See somebody do/doing something [duplicate]

Consider these two variations: Every morning, tourists can see soldiers raise the national flag in the square. Every morning, tourists can see soldiers raising the national flag in the square. What ...
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When do present participles shift from being "gerunds" or "verbal nouns" to become non-finite clauses?

Note: This is not a question about what is the difference between a gerund, verb and participle, interesting as that polemic may be. It is about non-finite clauses, which does bear upon these ...
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1 vote
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What does 'fungus-growing' mean?

Renowned Swiss entomologist Martin Luscher described the mounds of this fungus-growing species as being as much as 16 feet tall, 16 feet in diameter at their base, and with a cement-like wall of ...
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1 answer
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The gerund and its complementation

In what cases does the gerund stemming from a transitive verb take the direct object of that verb and when is a prepositional complement used? For example: Brown's deft painting of his daughter is ...
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Can we have non-finite clauses with overt subject without "for"?

I read the following in a comment to an answer to another post of mine: "What’s the difference between expect for things to improve and expect things to improve? Is that for part of expect for, or is ...
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How is "swimming" being used grammatically in "I saw them swimming in the lake"?

Consider this sentence: I saw them swimming in the lake. How is "swimming" used in the sentence? Is it a gerund or verb or anything else and how is it connected to the sentence? I am mostly aware ...
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2 votes
2 answers
276 views

Grammatical term for a noun coming after an infinitive?

I didn't come to offer help. As far as I can tell, this is how I would analyze this sentence from a grammatical perspective. I = pronoun didn't = aux. verb with "not" for negation. come = zero ...
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1 vote
2 answers
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(Noun) being (noun) verb ... AND With (noun) being (noun), ...?

First time poster here. Please forgive me for violating any rules if I have. I might also be asking a stupid question. So... I have heard 'being' used in different situations and naturely pick up ...
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2 votes
2 answers
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Terminology: Definition of the term "direct object"

In Michael Swan's "Practical English Usage", he states in section 16.1: Many verbs besides auxiliaries can be followed by forms of other verbs (or by structures including other verbs). This ...
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4 votes
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"I have you returning the car."

Context: Top Notch 2 Conversation: Agent: I have you returning the car on August 14th here at the airport. Renter: Yes. That's correct. I am puzzled by this sentence in a conversation between a ...
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3 votes
5 answers
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"I hate Jill singing those songs." = "I hate Jill when she is singing those songs."?

Can the sentence I hate Jill singing those songs. mean I hate Jill when she is singing those songs. Or does it mean something else?
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1 answer
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What tense is used for "go" in "you see it go away"? [duplicate]

I understand it's not the present tense, else it would be "goes". Is the sentence grammatically correct? If so, does it mean "you are seeing that it is going away"?
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'watch her run' vs 'watch her running' [duplicate]

QUESTION 1 I'm trying to figure out the seemingly subtle difference(s) between a sentence modified by a bare infinitive and one modified by a participle phrase. What do you get out of these: I ...
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7 votes
1 answer
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Non-finite clause complementation of complex transitive verbs

This question has been bothering me for a while. It came up when I was reading Chapter 16 of "A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language." How to explain the grammatical structure of the ...
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6 votes
2 answers
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"Heard me [infinitive]" vs. "heard me [present participle]"

"Heard me [infinitive]" vs. "heard me [present participle]" At that time, you wouldn't have heard me talk about it. At that time, you wouldn't have heard me talking about it. At ...
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4 votes
3 answers
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Correct usage of "see" vs. "watch"

I have seen them grow up. I have watched them grow up. Though the intended meaning is conveyed in both sentences, I want to know which in this case is a better fit, see or watch.
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